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Full text of "The Tribune almanac and political register for.."

UNIVERSITY 
OF PITTSBURGH 



Dar.Rm, 

AY67 
N5T8 

1875-79 



LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Pittsburgh Library System 



http://www.archive.org/details/tribunealmanacpo18751879newy 




LPAJfj 



*** -*y 

CONTENTS. 

[for Alphabetical Lnt>ex, see next page of this cover. J 

Astronomical data, Calendar, &c 

Trade and Commerce, 

The Transportation Question, 

Markets for and Prices of Wheat 

Abstract of Public Laws passed at the First Session of the Forty- 
Third Congress 

Appropriations made by the Forty-Third Congress at its First 
Session 

Record of the Votes of Senators and Representatives en the Cur- 
rency Question 

Monthly Range of the Gold Premium for Thirteen years, 

The Amendments to the Constitution of the State of New York. . 

The Rejected New Constitution for Ohio, 3 1 

Public Debt of the United States on December i, 1S74 32—33 

Record of Events, 34— 3 8 

Obituary Record, 38-40 

Presidents and Vice-Presidents of the United States from 1789 to 

1874 

New York State Government, Sheriffs and County Clerks 

United States Government— The Cabinet, Judiciary, and Ministers 

to Foreign Countries 

Forty-Third Congress— Senate and House of Representatives.... 

Forty-Fourth Congress, as far as chosen December :5th, 1874 

Law relating to the Election of Representatives in Congress in 1876 

and following years 

• Election Returns 49-94 

Vote for President, 1852 to i&fi ._ 95 

States of tbWJnion, Population, ©^presentation in Congress, Time 

of HoldmgjJElectiong^over^ore, &c^ 
Advertisers' JDireptbry.g^:.^. .. 





■C 




r. Clevel 



^;4«J«6^r->0 



AND POHTTCAL REGISTER 

FOR 

f 



TRIBUNE 




1875. 



"ty tftjL^* Kiiii^L^ m. 




ASSOCIATION. 
YORK. 



r* "''" 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Astronomical, 

PAGE 

Calendar 3-8 

Church Days 2 

Conj unction of Planets, 4c . 2 

Cycles of Time 2 

Eclipses 1 

Evening Stars 1 

Jewish Calendar 1 

Morning Stars 1 

Places of the Planets 1 

Planets Brightest 1 

Political, Financial 
and Statistical. 

Alabama Claims, act to pro- 
vide for adjudication of 23 

Amendments to the Constitu- 
of New York 29, 30, 31 

Apportionment of Congress- 
men 96 

Appropriations made by the 
XLIIId Congress at its first 
session 24 

Bank Notes, act for Redemp- 
tion of in greenbacks. ...20, 21 

Bank Reserves, act for Re- 
lease of 20, 21 

Bankrupt Act, Amendments 
to 22 

Calamities and Disasters, 
1874.. 37,38 

Canada, Foreign Commerce 
of 13 

County Clerks, (State of New 
York) 41 

Currency, the Dawes Compro- 
mise — Inflation Act 20, 21 

Currency — the Record of Con- 
gress on Inflation, 25, 26, 27,28 

Custom-House Officers, act to 
Regulate Salaries of 23 

Erie Canal, capacity and 
business of 13, 14 

Erie Canal, opening and clos- 
ing of, for 28 years 14 

Erie Railroad, ton3 moved by,i4 

Exports and Imports 9-13 

Financial Measures, record 
of the votes of Senators and 
Representatives on, 25, 26, 
27, 28 

Gold and Silver, balances ex- 
ported and imported from 
the United States and Great 
Britain for 20 years 9 

Gold Premium, range of for 
thirteen years 28 

Governors of the States and 
Territories 96 

Great Britain, Foreign Com- 
merce Of 9, II, 12 

Great Britain, Wheat imports 

of 15, 17 

Mai ine Schools, act to Encour- 
age 19 



Ministers of the United 
States to foreign countries, 42 

Moieties, act to Repeal 22 

New York, Amendments to 
Constitution of 29, 30, 31 

New York Canals, Statistics 

o f 13, 14 

New York State and County, 
Officers of 41 

New York Central Railroad, 
tons moved by 14 

Obituary Record, 1874, 38, 39, 40 

Ohio, Constitution proposed 
for 31 

Pennsylvania Railroad, tons 
moved by 14 

Political Record. . . 36, 37 

Presidents and Vice * Presi- 
dents from 1789 to 1874 40 

Prices of Wheat in Great Brit- 
ain for 20 years 16, 18 

Public Buildings, Appropri- 
ations for 24 

Public Buildings^ postpone- 
ment of expenditures for, 23 

Public Debt, Statement of on 
December 1, 1874 32, 33 

Record of Congress on the 
Currency 25, 26,27,28 

Record of Events, 1874, 34, 

35, 36- 37, 3 8 , 39, 40. 
Representatives XLIIId Con- 
gress 44, 45, 46 

Representatives elected to 

XLIVth Congress 47, 48 

Representatives, election of 

in 1876 and subsequently.. 48 
Salary Grab, act to Repeal.. .19 
Senators of the United States, 

names of 43, 46 

Sheriffs, (State of New York) . . 41 
Specie, movement of in the 
Foreign Commerce of the 
United States and Great 

Britain 9 

States, areas of 96 

" Capitals of 96 

" Governors of, their sal- 
aries and expiration of 
their terms of office . . 96 
" Legislatures of, times 

of assembling 96 

" Population of 96 

" Representation of in 

Congress 96 

" times of holding elec- 
tions in 96 

Trade and commerce 9-13 

" balance of 9 

" foreign, of Canada 13 

" " Great Brit- 
ain 9, 11, 12 

" foreign, of the United 

States 9, 10, 12 

Transportation statistics. . 13, 14 



Tree planting on Wes 
prairies, act to encouraj 
United States, executive 
" judicial offi 

of 

f or eign c 
merce of..c 
ministers ol 
for'gn count: T 
wheat exp 

of. 

Welland canal, capacity i; 

business of |, 

Wheat, statistics of, 15, 16, fj 

Election Return 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado , 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa ; 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan : 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri i 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

'■ Newark 

New York by counties 

" by towns and co 
ties 

" on cons, ame 
ments *, 

" Assemblymen..* 

" Congressmen... 

City 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

k ' constitution 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania • 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia - 

Wisconsin 

Vote for President, 1852-1I 



h 



n 



ggUNE^LM ANAC EOE 1875, 

- Astronomical Department. 

U~d a D d arranged ^res^Jor^ Wo^SAM^ H. WKIGHT, A. M„ M. P.. 



i=^n=iiS^=^=^5^i^^iSss' A — ■»>—-'- 



Invis- 



'here will be two Eclipses this year : 
A Total Eclipse of the Sun, April 6 
3 in the United States. 

I An Annular Eclipse of the Sun. Sept. 29. 
lible east of the Mississippi river as ? Partial 
[ipse, the Sun rising Eclipsed. A so in Africa 
1 Southwestern Europe. The Eclipse will be 



annular or ring-like from Sodus Point, on the 
south shore of Lake Ontario, Lyons, Oswego, 
Syracuse, Utica, Saratoga, and Northern Massa- 
chusetts, to the ocean. Aloni? the central line 
the size of the Eclipse will be irt digitB. 

For the time of ending and size, see the fol- 
lowing table : 



PLACES. 



rtland, Me. 

ebec 

intreal .... 

ston 

aany 

rtford 

Dvidence . . . 

w York 

Chester 

ronto 

ffalo 

taca 



Eclipse 
ends. 

H. M. 

7 36 
7 33 



24 



Size. 
Digits 



ioy 2 



10% 

10% 



10% 

10% 



PUCES. 



Syracuse 

Philadelphia . 
Pittsburgh . . 

Detroit 

Washington . . 

Baltimore 

Richmond — 

Chicago 

Madison, Wis. 
Indianapolis.. 
Charleston — 
Savannah 



Eclipse 
ends. 



H. M. 

7 9 
13 



6 

6 
7 
7 

I 

6 
6 
64S 
6 43 



13 



Size. 



Digits. 
11* 
10% 



gVz 
32-5 



7M 



PLACES. 



Frankfort. Ky. 
Springfield, 111. 

Raleigh 

St. Louis 

Nashville 

Montgomery 
Tallahasse.... 
Jackson, Miss 
Little Rock.., 
New Orleans. 



Morning Stars. 

Venus until September 23. 
Mars until February 26. 
Jupiter until January 20. 
Saturn from February 5 to May 16. 



Evening Stars. 

Venus after September 23. 

Mars after February 26. 

Jupiter from January 20 to November 4. 

Saturn until February 5, and after May 16. 








PLACES OF THE 


PIjA 


kNE^ 


rs. 










TIME. 


? 
6 

71 

m 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


,'st Sunday — 
cond " — 
lird " .... 
rarth " — 
fth " .... 


m 

V3 
Si 


t 
\5 


t 

m 

\3 


\3 


t 

w 

22 


f 

t 

m 
10 


8 
" HI 

M 

>3 


n 

HL 

V3 

a 


si 
t 

\9 


w 

t 

SI 


*6 

\3 


* 



PLANETS BRIfiHTKST. 

lugust'15. Mars, June 20. thb FOlJR SEASO NS. 

Winter begins, 1874, December 21, 6 14 eve., and lasts 

Spring " 1875, March 20, 7 13 eve., ^ 

Summer " 1875, June 21, 3 39 eve., u 

wffiT « SI', Kmber 22', o I mo!' Tropical year/ 



. 92 20 

• ?3 14 
. 89 18 
365 5 



59 



54 



JEWISH CALENDAR, 1874. 



MONTH. 



;Sebat 

5 Adar 

7Nisan 

3Ijar 

9 Sivan 

Tammuz 



BEGINS. 


DATS. 

30 
29 
3° 
29 
3° 
29 


January 19 — 
February 18... 

April 18 



11 Ab.. 
12EIUI 

1 Tisri 

2 Heshran 



BEG:rs. 



July 15 

August ;j 

September 12, 
October 12. 



3 Cisleu November 10. 

4Thebet iDecember 9. 



DATS. 



3 o 
29 
30 

20 
29 
29 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



CHURCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME. 



Septaageeima Sunday.. .Jan. 24 

Sexagesima " " 31 

Quinquageeima " Feb. 7 

A8h Wednesday," " 10 

Suadragesima " " 14 
id-Lent Mar. 7 

Palm Sunday " 21 

Good Friday " 26 



Easter Sunday Mar. 28 

Low Sunday Apr. 4 

Rogation" May 2 

Ascension Day " 6 

WhitSunday " 16 

Trinity " " 23 

Corpus Christi " 27 

Advent Sunday Nov. 28 



Dominical Letter 

Epact 

Golden Number 

Solar Cycle 

Roman Indiction 

Julian Period 65 

Dionysian Period 

Jewish Lunar Cycle 



The year 187=; is the third year after Bissextile, and until July 4th, is the ninety-ninth year of tl 
Independence of the United States. 

CONJUNCTION OF PLANETS, AND OTHER PHENOMENA. 



Month 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Aspect. 



inril 



May, 



June 



O near $ 
© near 9 
© near h 
9 brightest 
H d Sun 
© near u 
© near $ 
$ 8 Sun 
© near 9 

7 near Sun 
© near ^ 

8 gr. elon.E. 
71 stationary 

9 gr. elon. W. 
© near 21 
$ u Sun 
© near & 
© near ? 
© near ^ 
© near u 
9 near > 
© near $ 
8 gr. elon. W 
© near ? 
© near 9 
if 6 Sun 
© near 2£ 
© near 5 
© near > 
© near $ 

7 D Sun 
© near u 
$ stationary 
© near $ 

© near ^ 
© near 9 
^ stationary 

8 gr. elon. E. 
© near it 

11 stationary 
© near $ 
t 8 Sun 
© near ^ 



Wash'n time 



H. M. 

6 14 e. 
3 45 e. 
10 18 m. 



3 26 e. 

4 47 e. 
i 30 e. 

5 8 m. 
8 18 m. 
4 39 e. 
04 m. 

8 13 e. 
70 m. 
330 m. 

1 55 m. 

9 50 m. 
4 29 m. 
942 e. 
327 e. 
542 m. 
20 m. 

2 10 e. 

28 11 54 e. 
2 6 32 m. 
2 7 19 e. 

17 o 9 m. 
so 5 36 m. 
25 3i8e. 

29 7 15 e. 
2 7 30 e. 

16 9 23 e. 

17 5 10 m 

18 1 



o m. 
2 51 m. 
4 20 m. 
458 e. 

o m. 

1 26 e. 
8 13 m. 
8 o e. 

18 10 18 e. 
20 3 21 m. 
23 9 32 m. 



Distance apart. 
Deg. M . 

$ 2 32 N. 
9 8 39 N . 
2 3 55 ^ • 



n 2 32 n. 

$ 4 6N. 
$ 180 o E . 

? 9 5 N . 



348N. 
18 9 E. 

46 49 TV. 

253 N. 

90 o W. 

452N. 
7 21 N. 
341 N". 
255N. 

1 16 N. 
5 2 N. 

27 50 "W. 

3 33N- 
356N. 

236 N. 
424N. 
3 20 N . 
038S. 
00 o W. 

2 16 N. 

2 ; 3 N. 

3 o N. 

4 12 S. 



Month 



Aspect. 



j Wash'n time Distance apart. 



July. 



Aug. 



Sept 



Oct.. 



e 24 11 E. 

U 2 10 N. 

S o 57 N. 

> 2 41 N. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



O neav $ 
Sun apogee 
© near i± 
U Sun 
© near $ 
9. near s 
© near ^ 
$ stationary. 

8 gr. eion. W 
© near 9 

© near 11 

9 near e 
© near $ 
7 8 Suu 
© near *» 
9 near £ 
© near 9; 
© near % 
© near $ 
© near > 
© near 9 
© near ir 

5 gr. elon. E. 
© near $ 
© near > 
<$ d Sun 
9 near 11 
9 near 5 
2: near 9 
© near 11 
© near 9 
U 6 Sun 
© near $ 
© near > 
*> d Sun 
S gr. elon. "W. 
5 near 7 
© near if. 
© near 9 
© near > 
© near $ 
© near 2£ 
® near 9 
© near 7 



D. H. M. 

i io 39 m. 
3 o 19 m. 
10 4 44 e. 

15 1 35 e - 

15 3 8 e. 
20 1 2 e. 

20 1 23 e. 
25 8 o m 
27 6 55 e. 
31 4 42 m 

7 23 m 

10 438 c 

12 2 47 m 

i| 83c 

16 5 1 e. 
18 8 43 e. 
30 439 m 

3 11 30 e. 
9 6 33 m, 

12 10 18 e. 

29 o 28 e. 

1 6 17 e. 

6 11 56 m 

7 9 49 e - 
10 5 43 m. 
23 7 6 m. 
25 4 18 m. 
25 7 ic e. 

745 m- 

1 17 e. 

29 11 18 e. 

4 5 22 e. 

5 6 2 e. 

6 2 31 e. 
12 74 m. 
15 30 m. 

21 10 45 e. 

' 743 m- 
8 34 m. 
04 m. 
4 3C 
1 12 m. 
4 49 e. 



20 



Deg.M. 

9 5 21 S. 

U 4 21 N. 

U 90 o E. 

$ o 2 S. 

» 3 40 s. 

!? 2 30 N . 



31 10 26 m. 



19 42 TV. 
435 8. 
2 45 ^ , - 
016N. 
028N. 
180 o E. 
231N. 
o 23 S. 
2 8S. 
312N. 
133N. 
2 41 N. 
124N. 

25 25 £• 

2 23 N. 
2 -7 N. 
90 o E. 
o 22 S. 
238S. 

2 52 B. 
4 2 N. 

3 52 N - 

237N. 

2 42 N. 
90 o E. 
19 17 W- 

13 S. 

4 26 N. 
4 8 N. 
2 25 N. 

1 58 N. 
4 54N. 

2 62 N. 

2 "3N. 



Explanation of tlie above Table. 



In the table above it is to be understood that 
the word " near " and the character 4 (conjunc- 
tion) are synonymous, and; mean that the two 
bodies are nearest each other at the time ex- 
pressed, and that they are then on a line run- 
ningfrom the North Pole through both bodies, 
andnave the same right ascension. Gr. elon. 
means greatest elongation or greatest apparent 
angular distance from the Sun. Stationary 
means that the planet is then without apparent 
motion east or west with respect to the Stars, 
and is about to move in a direction contrary to 



that it last had. The character 8 indicates that 
the planet is opposite the Sun, or 180 deg., or 
a half circle, east of it, and rises when the Sun 
sets, and sets when he rises. When a planet is a 
quarter of a circle, or 90 deg. from the Sun, east 
or west, it is known by a • 

Flanetarv Characters. — ? Mercury, 9 
Venus, $ Mars, v. Jupiter, ? Saturn, Jfl. Uranus, 
ftj Nertune, © Moon. 

The above table enables us to And the planets 
throughout the year. 









, . 


















- , - 














JANUARY AND FEBRUARY, 1875. 






MOON'S CHA 
January. 


NGES— MERIDIAN OF 


NEW YORK. 

February. 












Ttl 


1 day, oh. 12m. aftern. 
1 day> 4I1. 26m. aftern. 


First Quarter. .13th day, oh. 24m. morn. 




'irst Quarter.. i4t 




ull... 


21st day, oh. 45m. attern. 


Full 20th day, 3I1. 5m. morn. 




,ast Quarter.. 29th day, jh. 38m. morn. 


Last Quarter.. 28th day, 4I1. 55m. morn. 




Note.— To ascertain time of Moon's changes for the meridian of Boston, add 12 minutes ; for 




7ashington, subtract 12 ; for Charleston, S. C, subtract 24 ; for Chicago, subtract 54, and generally 




mr minutes for each degree of w^sfc longitude. 






d l M 




Boston, N. i^n- 


K. York City, 


Washin n, 


Charleston, ST. 








gland, X. Y. 


J'hilii., Conn., 


Mtl., Va„l 


Carol'a, 'I'en- 






§11 




St:ite, Mich., 


N.J.,Penn'a, 


Ky., Mo.,| 


ne»see, <tieo'ii, 






1 £ 




Wis., Iowa «fe 


Oliio, Ind. «fe. 


auit Cali- 


Ala., Miss. tSz, 






Vl I'M 




Oregon. 


Illinois. 


furuia. 


lionisiaim. 




O 

>> 

eS 




Moon 1 Moon 
south 'place 


Sun Sun | >. on 


H. W. 


Sua |Sun # 


Moon 


H. W. | 


Sun 


Su 1 1 TVT on: 


!-im| >un 


Moon h w. 






rise 


set. 1 rises. 


Bost. 


rise. | fet." 


rises 


N.Y. 


rise 


set I ris-s. 1 


rise. | set. 


rises. iCh'ln 









Q 


H.M. 


H M. H. M. 


H. M. 


H.M |H.M. 


H. M. 


H M. | 


H.M 


H M. H. M. | 


H.M H.M. 


V. M.!H. M. 




AN. 


i|F 


T*3-*' 7 


7 30 4 38 


1 41 


6 41 


72i 444 


1 39 


3 27 


719 449 I 36' 


7~ 4 5 4 


I 29, 2 41 




x8 


7 55 ^ 19 


7 33 4 39 


2 44 

3 48 


7 33 724 4 45 


2 41 


4 18 I7 19 450 2 37, 


7 4 5 5 


2 26 3 33 






?'s 


8 40 TIL 1 


7 30 4 40 


8 25 7 24 4 46 3 43 


5 15 J7I9 4 51 3 38; 7 45 6 

6 2 719 4 52 4 41: J7 4 5 7 


3 24 4 2S 

4 2 ^ 5 J 2 






4 iM 


9 28 ni 13 


7 3° 4 4i 


4 53 


9 10 7 24 4 47 4 47 






5 


T 


10 20 n[ 25 


7 3° 4 42 


6 10 8 7 24 448 s S3 


6 54 ,7 19 4 53 5 46 17 45 8 


5 26! 6 8 




6 


W 


II 14, t 8 


7 3° 4 43 


6 S9 


10 59 724 4 49 6 S2 


7 42 7 19 4 54 6 45; 


7 45 8 


6.23 6 59 






7 


T 


e. 10: t 21 


7 30 4 44 sets. 


11 46 724 4 so sets. 


8 29 7 19 4 5s sets.' 


7 4 5 9 s ?ts.| 7 46 






8 


F 


1 5 V3 4 


7 So 4 45 


I 43 


mo. IJ724 451 5 48 


9 2o,j 7 19 456, 5 54-1 


7 4 510 


6 12, 8 33 






9 S 


1 58 ^3 i7' 


1730446 


6 45 


33 7 24 4 52 


6 50 


10 4:7 19 4 57 


SS 


7 4'5 11 


7 II 9 18 

8 5 10 3 






10S 


2 48 rfW 1 


,729 447 


-7 40 


1 18! 7 24 453 


7 49 


104s 7 19 458 


7 53 


7 4'5 12 






11 


M 


3 36 .w 14: 


7 29 4 48 


9 2 


2 3:723454 


9 10 


II 26 718459 


9 13 


7 4l 5 12 


9 20 10 46 






12 


T 


4 23 ^ 28 


729 449 


10 18 


2 46 723 455 


10 19 


mo. H7 18 5 


10 20 


7 45 13 


10 23: 11 29 






13 


W 


5 "i* r * 


7 28 4 so 


11 30 


3 29*723 45° 


11 30 


15:17185 1 


11 29 


7 4|5 14 


11 28 mo. 






14 


T 


5 58! X 26 


7 28 4 si 


mo. 


4 18 7 22 4 57 


mo. 


1 57 175 2 


mo. 


7 4 5 T 5 


mo. j 18 






15 


F 


5 48 


¥ 10 


727 


4 53 


44 


5" 
6 10 


7 22 458 


42 


1 57 7 x 7,5 3 


40 


7 3|5 16 


» 34 1 11 






16 


S 


7 42 

8 41 


T 24 


7 27 


454 


1 59 


722:459 


1 55 


2 53 7 ^5 4 


1 52 


7 3 5 17 


1 4i 


2 10 






3 


S 


8 8, 


7 26 


4 55 


3 15 


& 26! 


7 2i|5 


3 10 


427 16 5 5 


3 5 


7 3 5 18 


2 51 


3 17 






M 


9 43 


8 23 


7 26 


456 


4 34 


721:5 1 


4 28 


5 11 7 l6 5 6 


4 22 


7 2?5 19 


4 I 


4 26 






19 


T 


10 46 


n 7 


7 2S 


4 58 


5 53 


9 3i! 


7205 3 


5 46 

6 51 


6 18 ! 7 15 5 7 

7 18 7 14 5 8 


5 39, 

6 44 


7 21520 


s 18 


5 31 






20 


W 


11 47 


n 21 


724 


4 59 


6 58 


io33i 


7IQ 5 4 


7 2521 


6 22 


6 33 






21 


T 


mo. 


23 5 


723 


5 


rise. 


11 27I 


7 i8[5 5 


rise. 


8 10 7 14! 5 9 


rise.l 


7 1 5 22 


rise. 


727 
8 14 






22 


F 


1 30 


S3 19 


7 22 


5 1 


6 7 


C. I 4 | 


7185 6 


6 12 


9 0. 


7 I3!5I« 


6 16; 


7 ii5 2 3 


6 30 






23 


S 


ft 2 


7 22 


5 3 


7 17 


I 10! 


7 17 


5 8 


7 20 


9 54! 


7 "IS 12 


7 23: 

8 26 


7 0524 


7 33 


9 10 






24 


s 


2 23 


ft i=; 


7 21 


5 4 


8 22 


1 39 


7i6 


5 9 


8 za 


10 23 


7 I2 l5i3 


7 0525 


831 


9 39 






3 


M 


3 6 SI 27 


7 20 


5 5 


9 27 


2 19! 


7 15 


510 


9 27 


11 i, 


7111514 


9 28 


7 0526 


9 29 10 19 
10 24 10 50 






T 


3 48|TlJi 9 


7 20 


5 & 


10 28 


2 56. 


7 15 


5 II 


10 27 


11 40 


7 10515 


10 27: 


6 59 527 






27 


W 


4 28 


TTU2I 


7 19 


5 7 


11 29 


3 34; 


7i4|5 I 2 


11 27 


e. 20' 


7 10:5 16 


11 25 


6S9 5 28 


11 19 


11 34 

e. 16 






28 


T 


5 8 


=s= 3 


718 


5 9 


mo. 


4 I6 1 


7 i3| 5 T 3 


mo. 


1 3' 


7 gj 5 17 


mo." 


6 s8l s 29 


mo. 






29 


F 


5 49 

6 33 


53 


7 17 


510 


30 


5 


7 12:5 15 


27 


1 47i 


7 8:519 


24 


& 58 530 


14 


1 






30 


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7 16 


5ii 


1 34 


5 52 


7i2 


516 


1 30 


238, 


7 8 s 20 


1 26 


6 57 5 3i 


1 12 


1 32 






3 1 


s 


7 19 


TU 9 


7 15 


5 13 


2 38 


47 


7 11 


5 17 


2 32 


3 33 


7 7i5 2i 


2 27 

1 


656 5 32 


2 10 


2 47 




EB. 


1 


M 


8 9 


Ttl 21 


7 14 


5 14 


3 46 


7 49 1 

8 50 


7 10 5 18 


3 40 


4 34J 


7 6,5 22 


3 33 


6 56j5 32 


3 13 


3 49 




2 


T 


3 


t 3 


7 13 


5 i5 


4 48 


7 9|5 19 


4 4i 


5 35; 


7 5,5 23 


4 34 


655533 


4 12 


4 50 






3 


W 


9 58 


* 16 


7ii 


516 


s 46 


9 47| 


7 7|5 20 


5 39 


33; 


7 4 


5 24 


5 3i 


6 5415 34 


5 9 


5 47 






4 


T 


10 54 

11 48 


t 29 


7 10 


518 


33 


10 41J 


7 6 5 22 


6 27 


I I4 
8 11 


7 3 


5 25 


6 20 


6 53i 5 35 


5 59 


6 41 








F 


V3 13 


7 § 


5i9 


7 10 


11 28; 


7 5 5 23 


7 4 


7 2 


5 26 


6 58 


652 530 


6 41 


7 28 






6 


S 


e. 41 


V3 26 


7 8 


5 20 


sets. 


mo. 


7 4|5 24 


sets. 


8 57 


7 1 


5 27 


sets. 


651 537 


sets. 


8 15 






I 


s 


1 31 


^ 10 


I I 


5 22 


2 5 


I5 1 


7 3 5 25 


8 19 


941 7 0528 


1 9 


6 50 S38 


7 16 

8 23 


8 55 






M 


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7 6 


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8 19 


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7 2:526 


10 22. 6 59 5 29 


8 20 


6 49 5 39 


9 37 






9 


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3 7 


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7 5 


525 


9 32 


1 37 


7 i|5 28 


9 3i 


n 2M658J531 


9 30 


648:540 


9 28 


10 20 






10 


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3 55 


* 23 


7 4 


526 


10 4s 


2 20 


7 0,529 


10 42 


11 37 6 57:5 32 


10 40 


6 47I5 4I 


10 34 


11 2 






11 


T 


4 45 


T 7 


7 2 


527 


11 58 


3 2 


6 59i5 30 


11 55 


mo. 1 6 56; 5 33 


11 51I 


646(5 42 


11 40 


11 51 






12 


F 


5 38 


T 21 


7 1 


529 


mo. 


3 5i ! 


658; 5 31 


mo. 


37, 


6 55 5 34 


mo. | 


6 46; 5 43 


mo. 


mo. 






I3 i£ 


6 35 


» 5 


7 


5 30 


1 15 


4 47 


6 57! 5 32 


1 11 


1 3* 


6 54:535 


1 5 


6 45;5 44 


50 


47 






14 & 


7 34 
835 


8 19 


]6 s8 


5 3i 


2 31 


I 5 * 

8 18, 


6 56 ; 5 33 


2 2S 


2 40 


6 53 5 36 


2 19 


6 44!5 45 


2 


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5 33 


3 45 


5415 34 


3 38 


3 5i| 


652 5 38 


3 30 


643 546 


3 9 






16 


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■£ 55 


534 


448 


6 53,5 36 


4 4i 


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650 539 


4 33 642 546 


4 11 


4 18 






3 


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10 33 O 


254 


5 35 
5 36 


5 4° 


9 24 


6 51 5 37 


5 34 


6 10' 


6 49 5 4o 


5 27 641 547 

6 8*640548 


5 6| s 24 






T 


II 26 S3 13 


52 


6 19 


10 21 


650 538 


6 14 


7 7,1648541 


5 52 6 21 






19 


F 


mo. 27 


,651 


5 38 


6 52 


11 9 


649 540 


648 


7 5i i j6 47 ! ^42 


6 43: 639 549 


6 30 


7 9 






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648 541 


rise. 


8 34 !6 40 5 43 


rise . i 


6 38 5 so 


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21 


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59 & 23 


'648 


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7 11 


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6 46,5 43 


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9 14 :6 44 5 45 


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645 5 44 


8 14 


9 50 '643 540 


6 36 5 5i 


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23 


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2 22 TTJ2 17 


f45 


5 43 


I 40 


6 43 5 45 


9 15 


10 22 ,641 547 


9 13 


635 5 S2 


9 8 


9 49 






24 


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3 3l29 


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5 45 


10 17 


2 l6 


6 42 5 47 


10 15 10 sS p4o 548 


10 12 


6 34 5 53 


10 3 10 16 






25 


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11 21 


2 52 


6 40 5 48 


11 17 11 36 ,638 549 


11 13 1 


632 5 54 


11 010 52 






26 


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5*7, 

548 


mo. 


3 32 


6 38 5 49 


mo. 


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mo. | 


6 3i j 5 54- 


11 58 11 32 






27 a 

28 s 


5 11 ""I 5 


638 


24 


4 19 


6 37: 5 5o 


19 


1 6 ;6 35 551 


14! 


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5 o.m 171 037 


5 491 1 301 5 13 035 551 


1 24 


1 59' 634 5 52 


I 17, 6 29 5 56 


59l 1 13 





MOON'S CHANGES— MERIDIAN OF NEW YORK. 



March. 

New 7th day, 3& . 

First Quarter. .14th day, 8h. 
Full 21st day, 6h. 



24m. aftern. 
9m. morn. 
56m. aftern. 



Last Quarter. .29th day, nh. 29m. aftern. 



Boston, S. En- 
gland, ST. "!. 
Slsite, Mich., 
Wi«., Iowa «fc 
Oregon. 

Ann Run i \ 1 , 



April. 

New 6th day, ih . 

First Quarter.. 12th day, 4h. 

Full 20th day, izh. 

Last Quarter.. 28th day, 2h. 



40m. morn. 
37m. aftern. 
34m. morn. 
21m. aftern. 





d 


^ 




a 


s 




c 

a 


Si 




V* 


V* 












>, 


►> 




01 


09 




a 


Q 


If AD 


1 


M 


MAK. 


2 


T 




3 


VV 




4 


T 




J 


If 

S 




I 


s 




Q 


T 




10 


vv 




II 


T 




12 


I?" 




13 


S 




M 


H 




15 


M 




16 


T 




3 


w 




T 




IQ 


V 




20 


hi 




21 


S 




22 


M 




2H 


T 




24 


vv 




3 


T 




F 




27 


S 




28 


H 




2Q 


U 




v> 


1' 




3i 


vv 


APE'L 


1 
2 


T 
F 




3 


s 




4 


s 
Iff 

T 




§ 


VV 




T 




Q 


F 




10 


S 




11 


s 




12 


M 




iq 


T 




M 


w 




15 


T 




16 


1? 




17 


s 




ib 


s 




lu 


M 




30 


'J' 




21 


w 




22 


T 




23 


F 




24 S i 




»5 


s 




20 


M 




2 


T 




VV 




2Q 


T 




30 


F ■ 



Moon Moon 
south place. 



Sun Sun Moon 
,rise. I set. riies. 

H.M. H M. H. M. 



H. W. 

Boat. 

H. M. 




K. Tfork City, Waahln'n, 
I'hila., Conn., Md., Va., 
M. J., Pena'a, K-y., Mo., 
Ohio, Ind. «ic 1 and Cali- 
Illluols. I fornia. 

Sun Sun Moon h. w. Sun Sun M<.on 
rise. set. rises. N. Y. rise. set. rist- s. , 

H.M. H.M. H. M. H. M.I H.M H.M. H. M. 



Charleston, \. 
C'arol'a, Ten- 
nessee, Geo'a, 
Ala., Miss. «fe 
Louisiana. 



5 5i| 2 34 

5 5 2 i 3 33 

5 53 4 25 

5 54 5 4 

5 55 5 40 

5 5° ° 9 
5 e,7 sets. 

5 58 7 22 

5 59! 8 27 



6 10 
611 
6 12 



9 46| 
2I11 3 

3 mo. i 

4 21 

5 1 38, 

6 2 44 

3 37 

4 21 

4 551 

5 24 
5 47 



6 13 rise 
6 14 7 4 
6 15 8 6 
6 17 911 
6 18 10 13 
6 ig'n 17 
6 20 mo. 
6 21 I 22 
6 22 1 22 
623 
6 24 



2 15 

3 1 



6 16! 

7 20 
825 
9 22 

10 12 

11 5 
11 45 
mo. 

26 
1 10 

1 55 

2 42; 

3 35 

4 38' 

5 49 

6 52 

8 11 

9 9 
9 55 

10 43 

11 21 

11 55 

e. 27; 

1 2 

1 38 

2 19, 

3 n 

3 48 

4 43 

I 47 

5 54 



8 15 \3 15 

9 6 \3 29 

9 5 6 ^ v 13 
10 45 X? 27 

,11 35 >^ 12 

e. 26 >£ 27 

1 191 T 12 

2 17 C P 27 

3 18 8 12 

4 21 8 26 

5 23 n 10 

6 23 n 24 

7i8© 7 
8 8O20 

8 54 ^ 3 

9 37 V. ib 

10 18 ' a 28 

10 58 TTJJ 10 

11 38 TTJi 22 

mo. =i= 4 

19 =2= 16 
1 U28 

1 48 i'l. 9 

2 37 ill 21 

3 28 f 3 

4 21 t 15 

* l i * 28 

o 6 \3 11 

6 56 \3 24 

7 45 ■»? 7 



5 43 626 
5 42 6 28 
5 40 6 29 
5 38 6 30 
5 b^ 6 31 
5 34 6 32 
5 32 6 33 
531634 
5 29 6 35 
5 27 6 30 
526,637 
5 24 6 38 
5 23 6 40 
521 641 
5 19 642 
5 18 6 43 
5 16 6 44 
5 J 4 645 
5 13 6 47 
5 11 648 
5 10 6 49 
5 8650 
5 6651 
5 5652 
3 6 53 
26 ^4 



6 35 5 53 
6 34 5 53 
6 32 5 54 
6 30 5 55 
6 29 5 56 
6 27 5 57 
6 25 5 58 
6 24 5 59 
6 22 6 o 
6 20 6 1 
6 19 6 2 
61763 
61664 
6 14 6 5 
6 12 6 7 
611 6 8 
6969 
6 7 6 10 
6 6 6 11 
6 4 6 12 
6 2 6 13 
6 1 6 14 

5 59 6 15 
5 58 6 10 
5 56 617 
5 54 f 18 
5 « 6 19 

5 51 620 
5 49 6 21 
5 47 6 22 
5 46 623 



7 

7 47 



2 27 

3 26 
418 

4 <;8; 

6 5 . 
sets. 8 28 

7 22! 9 13 

8 26: 9 56 

9 43 10 36 
10 58 11 24 
mo. mo. 

21 



15 

1 31 

2 37 

3 32 

4 I5| 

4 50 

5 20 

5 46 
rise. 

10 8 10 22 

11 11 11 1 
mo. 11 45 

15 e - 34 

1 15 1 30 
282 33 

2 55 3 39 



1 25 

2 35 

3 47 

4 55 

I 54 
6 44 

n- 

838 
9 14 
9 



ai 



4 59 6 58 
4 58 6 58 
4 56 6 59 



3 35 

4 8 
4 34 9 43 

4 58 10 32 

5 21 11 18 
sets. 11 59 

8 39 mo. 

10 1 ! 45 

11 22 1 35 
mo. 1 2 29 

35! 3 28 

1 34 4 32 

2 221 5 42 

2 59 46 

3 29 7 48 

3 51 841 

4 I3l 9 25 
4 32 10 6 
4 5° 10 45 

rise. 11 21 

8 2 11 55 

9 6 e. 30 

10 10 1 10 

11 13- 1 53 
mo. 2 38 

9 3 28 
57 4 22 

1 33 5 19, 
266 21 

2 33 7 20 



5 45 6 24 3 30 
5 44 6 20. 4 3 
5 42 627! 4 31 
540 628 4 57 
538 629 5 21 
5 36 6 30 sets. 
5 34 6 31 ! 8 36 
5 33 632 9 56 
5 31 6 33 11 16 
5 29 634 mo. 
5 28 6 35 28 
5 26 6 36 
525 6 37i 2 15 
5 24 6 38 2 54 
5 22 6 39 3 25 
521 640 3 49 
5 19 641 4 12 
5 i7 642 4 32 
5 16 644 4 5i 
5 14 6 45 rise. 
5 13 646 7 58 
511 647 9 1 
5 10 6 48 10 3 
5 9 649 11 o 

7 6 50 mo. 

6 6 51 

5 6 52 

36 53 

2654 

0655 



4 40 

5 38 
b 31 

VI 
844; 

9 4i 

10 20 

11 12 
mo. 1 

13 
27I 1 19 

2 28 

3 32 

4 33 

5 26 

6 11 
6 52 1 
Z 2 9 



838 

91 l 
9 56 

10 37 

11 20 
e. 13 

1 9 

2 5 

3 7 

4 5 : 



50 

1 27 

2 1 
2 30 



6 33 5 53 
6 31 5 54 
6 30 5 55 
6 28 5 56 
6 2? 5 57 
6 26 5 58 
6 24 j 59 
6 23 6 o 
6 21 6 1 
6 19 6 
6186 
6166 
6156 
6 13 6 
6 12 6 
6 10 6 
696, 
7 6 10 
5 6 11 
3 6 12 
2 6 13 
1 6 14 
o 6 15 
5 58 6 16 
5 56 6 17 
5 55 6 18 
5 54 6 19 
5 53 6 20 
5 51 6 20 
5 49 6 21 
5 47 622 



5 46 6 23 
5 45 624 
5 43 6 25 
5 4i 626 
5 40 6 27 
5 38 6 28 
5 36 6 29 
5 35 6 30 
5 33 6 31 
5 3i 6 32 
5 3o 6 33 
528634 
5 27 6 35 
5 2b 6 3b 
5 24 6 37 
5 23 6 38 
5 22 6 39 
5 20 6 40 
5 19 641 
5 17 642 
5 16 6 43 
5 14 6 44 
5 13 645 
5 12 646 
5 10 6 46 

5 9647 
5 8648 
5 6 649 
5565° 
5 3 651 




3 24 

3 59 

4 28 

4 55 

sets. 

831 

9 50 

11 9 

mo. 1 

20 

1 20 

2 9 

2 48 

3 21 
346 

4 10 
4 32 

rise. 

HI 
9 57 

10 59 

11 55 
mo. 

43 
1 21 

1 56 

2 26 



5406 

546 6 

;5 45 f 

5 44 6 
,5 42 6 
541 6 

:5 38 6 
5 37 6 
5 35 6 
534f 
5 33 6 
5 32 6 

5 31 f 
530 6 
5 29 6 
5 28 6 
5 27 6 
525 f 
524 6 
523 6 
5 22 6 
5 21 6 
5 20 6 

5 19 f 

5 186 
5166 
5 156 
5 146 



3 55 

4 53 

5 43 

6 32 
718 



20 3 8 

21 3 45; 
21 4 19 

22 , 4 50; 
23 5 21 . 

23 sets.] 7 59 

24 8 I9 ( 8 45 

25 9 341 9 35 

25 10 48 10 29 

26 11 58 11 28 

27 mo. 'mo 



5« 



1 49 1 42 

2 32 2 46 

3 8 348 

3 38 4 4i 

4 6 K 2 k 
4 32 6 6 

32 4*56 6 45 

33 rise. 7 21 

34 7 40 

35 8 39 

35 9 37 

36 10 37 

37 11 32 10 3 : 

37 mo. 11 28 

38 22 

39 1 3 

39 I 4i 

40 2 15 



8 30 

9 10 
9 53 



io 



£ 



MAY AND JUNE, 1875. 




MOON'S CHA 

May. 


NGES— MERIDIAN OF 


NEW YORK. 








June. 








First Quarter. .12th day, 2k. 41m. morn. 


First Quarter. . 10th day , 2h. 59m. aftern. 


Full.. 






LastQ 


uarter..28th day, ih. 34m. morn. Last Quarter.. 26th. day, gh. 31m. morn. 




fi 






Host 011 , X. En- 


|Jf. Tort City, 


'Washin'n, 


Charleston, X. 




*a 


M 


, 


gland, N. TT. 


l'hila., Conn., 


Bid., Va., 


Carol'a, Ten- 




O 


CP 




State, Mich., 


N. «J., Penn'a, 


Ky., Mo., 


nessee, Geo'a, 
Ala., Miss. <tfc 




S 


£ 




Wis., Iowa «fe 


Ohio, Intl. «fc 


and Cali- 




O 
c8 


tf-i 
O 
!>> 
c3 




Oregon. 


Illinois. 


fornia. 


Iiouisiana. 




Moon 
south 


Moon 
place. 

" 


Sun 


Sun 


.VJoon 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sunl Sun I Moon 


Run Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 




rise. 


set. 


rises. 


Bost. 


rise. 


set. 


rises. 


N.Y.I 


rise. set. rises. 


rise. 


set. 


rises. 


Ch'ln 




Q 


Q 


H.M. 


H M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 1 


H.M H.M. H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


MAY. 


I 


s~ 


"8li 


W2.T. 


4 55 


7~o 


2 59 


8 16 


4 59 


656 


2 56 


5 0! 


5 2 6 52 


2 54 


513 641 


2 48 


4 16 


2 


s 


9 21 


X 5 


4 53 


7 1 


3 21 


9 S 


457 & 57 


3 20 


5 54 15 i&53 


3 20! 


[5 12 642 


3 17 


5 9 




3 


M 


10 10 


3€ 20; 


4 52 


7 2 


3 44 


958 


456 658 


3 44 


644:15 054 


3 45! 


:5ii,6 43 


3 48 


5 58 




4 


T 


n 2 


T 5 


450 


7 3 


48 


1049 


;4 54' 6 59 


4 10 


7 33ii4e;8 655! 4 13 1 


15 10 644 


4 20 


6 49 




5 


W 


11 58 


T 20 


4 49 


7 4 


sets. 


II 36 


4 53 


7 


sets. 


8 i8 | '4 i-7,6 56 sets.; 


5.10645 


sets. 


7 36 

8 27 




6 


T 


e. 59 


8 6 


4 48 


7 1 


8 52 


mo. '452 


7 1 


847 


9 14 4 56 '6 57 8 40 


5 9,645 


8 22 




8 


F 


2 3 


8 21 


4 47 


7 6 


10 14 


2 7 4 51 


7 2 


10 7 


10 9 ! 455 658: 9 59 


5 8,646 


9 38 


9 23 




S 


3 9 


n 5,. 


446 


7 7 


11 23 


1 23 J450 


7 3 


11 16 


11 3'4 54 6 59." 8; 


5 7 


047 


10 46 


10 20 




9 


S 


4 13 


n 20 


4 45 


7 8 


mo. 


2 20 1449 


7 4 


mo. 


mo. 4 53 7 on 55j 


5 6 


6 47JII 34 


11 20 




10 


31 


5 11 


4 


4 44 


7 9 


9 


3 20 1448 


7 1 


2 


5l|4 52j7 1 mo. j 


5 5 


6 48 mo. 


mo. 




11 


T 


6 4 


17 


4 43 


7 10 


57 


4 19 


14 47 


7 6 


5 ? 


1 &!i4 5 i7 2 4°i 


5 5 


649 


20 


19 




12 


W 


6 52 


a 


442 


711 


1 30 


5 17 


!4 4° 


7 Z 


1 26 


2 3, 4507 3 1 21 


5 4 


649 


1 8 


1 17 




13 


T 


I 3 £ 


a i3 ! 


441 


712 


1 58 


6 17 


|4 45 


7 8 


1 5 i 


3 3! 4 49 7 4 1 52' 


5 3 


6 50 


1 42 


VI 




14 


F 


8 18 


SI 251 


440 


7*3 


2 17 


7 \ 


4 44 


7 9 


2 16 


3 53;,4 48 7 5 2 14 1 


5 2 


6 51 


2 9 




15 


S 


8 58 


tie 7, 


4 39 


7M 


2 38 


7 58 


'4 43 


7 10 


238 


4 43 14 47 7 6: 2 37 


5 2 


651 


2 36 


3 58 




16 


s 


9 37 


mi 19; 


4 38 


71 l 


2 58 


845 


!4 42 


711 


2 58 


5 30:14467 7! 2 59 


5 1 


6 52 


3 2 


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2 


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10 18 


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437 


716 


3 24 


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711 


3 2=; 


6 11:4467 7 : 3 27 


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436 


7 X 7 


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20 


T 


mo. 


Til 6 


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719 


rise. 


11 26 


440 


7*4 


rise. 


8 9J444 7 10 rise. 


4 ^9 


655 rise. 


7 26 
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21 


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9 


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458 


6 55 8 32 




22 


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432 


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457 


6 57 no 19 


9 34 




24 


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432 


723 


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2 20 


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4 57 


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25 


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724 


mo. 


3 § 


430 


719 


mo. 


II 53.I44I7I4 n 56 


4 56 


6 58.11 40 


11 8 




26 


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4 5i 


Y3 20' 


430 


725 


6 


3 56 


4 35 


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1 


e. 441:440 7 15 mo. 1 


456 


6 58 mo. 


11 56 




2 z 


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5 39 


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429 


726 


35 


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28 


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727 


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231:1439716 551 


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29 


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4 55 


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30 


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427 


7 28 


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4 54 


7 1 


1 45 


3 37 




31 


M 


8 48 


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426 


729 


2 7 


8 33 


4 32 


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518 


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JUNE. 


1 


T 


941 


V 14! 


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7 30 


2 36 


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6 11 


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2 


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1038 


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425 


7 3i 


3 7 


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7 25 


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7 12 4 37-1 7 19 


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7 2 3 30 


6 26 




3 


T 


11 41 


8 I4| 


425 


7 32 


sets. 


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sets. 


8 4 |4 36720 sets. 


4 53; 


7 3 sets. 


7 21 




4 


F 


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8 29 


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mo. 430 


726 


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727 


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7 


M 


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728 


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4 52, 


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8 


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mo. 435 723:11 5i; 


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w 


5 33 


a 9! 


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mo. 


3 52| 428 


729 


mo. 


38 434723 mo. i 


4 52 


7 mo. 


mo". 




10 


T 


6 16 


SI 22 


4 22 


7 36 


23 


4 42 j I4 28 


7 30 


20 


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18 


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43 


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T02i6 


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13 


s 


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7 38 


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7 8j 428,731 


1 22 


3 53' 434725 


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3 8 




14 


M 


859 


=2= 10 


4 22 


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7 57IJ4 28 732 

8 46 1428 732 


1 43 


4 43i ! 4 347 26 


4 521 


7 8 1 55 


3 57 




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4 22 


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5 3 1 ; i 4 34 726 


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16 


w 


10 30 


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2 27 


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l l 


T 


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7 39 


3 ° 


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3 6 


7 4:434 727 


3 12, 


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6 18 




18 


F 


mo. 


TT127, 


4 22 


7 39 


rise. 


11 5 428 7 33 


rise. 


7 48 ,434 7 27 nse.i 


4527 9 rise. 


7 § 




19 


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850 


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843 


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e- 33| 428,734 


9 28 


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21 


M 


1 % 


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10 310 3|!435 728i 9 57! 


4 53 71°! 9 40 


9 17 




22 


T 


2 48 


V3 17! 


4 23 


7 39 


10 38 


2 3 


4 297 34 


1034 10 45;:4 35 728 1030; 


453 710,10 16 


10 3 




23 


W 


3 37 


^y 


4 23 


740 


11 I 


2 47| 


4 29 7 34 


11 11 29^435 728 10 57 j 


4 53 7 io| 10 47 


10 47 




24 


T 


423 


<&? 13 


4 23 7 40 


11 26 


3 29 


4 29: 7 34 


11 24 


e - IS' 435 728 II 22; 


4 53 7 io, 11 17 


11 29 




25 


F 


5 9 


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4 23 7 40 


11 48 


4 i7i |4 29 735 


11 47 


1 4 '4 35 7 29 11 47, 


4 53 711 11 46 


e. 17 




26 


S 


5 54 


K 10 


4 23 7 40 


mo. 


5 7I429.735 


mo. 


1 53 4 35 729^0. | 


453 711 mo. 


1 I 




27 


s 


6 40 


¥*g 


4 24 7 40 


9 


6 6 430 735 


10 


2 32,436 729 11 


4 54 7" 


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8 6; 1430735 


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3 2 




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8 23 


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1 1 


1 5 


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9 22 


8 8 


425 7 40 1 38 


9 10 14317351 1 43 5 56 '437 7 29 : 1 49 '4 55 7 11 2 5 


5 10 



JULY AND AUGUST, 1875. 


MOON'S CHANGES— MERIDIAN OF NEW 


YORK. 


July. 




August. 








First Quarter. . 3d day, loh. 33m. aftern. 


First Quarter. .10th day, 5b.. 44m. morn. 






Last Quarter.. 23d day, 8h. 42m. aftern. 


Last Quarter. .25th day, 3I1. 43m. aftern. 






A\ :\ 


Boston, X. En-; X. York City, Washln'n, Charleston, X. 




w -* 




gland, X. Y. IMilla.,Conn., ; Md., Va., Carol'a, Ten. 
Si:iie, Mich.,: X. «J., Penn'a, li Ky., Mo., nemce, Geo'a, 
WU.,Iowa<&< Ohio, Iud. «fel| and Call- Ala., Miss. «fc 




6 \3\ 






— > 






1 1 






OrcKOn. 1 Illinois. |j fbmla. Louisiana. 


Sun Sun Moon H. w. Sun 


Sun Moon h. w. Sun Sun Moon Sun Sun 


Moon H. w. 




>>' *J» moon .moon r | 1<s 
~ q south place. H M 


• et. ri»'». Boat. rise. set. rises. If. Y. rise set. rises, rise- set. 


rises. Cb'ln 




■ M. H. K. H. M. H M. H.M. II. M. M. M . H.M II M H. M. H.M. H.M. 


H. M. H. M. 


JULY. 


I IT 1 10 26 8 23 4 25 


7 40I 2 22 10 14 4~3~i 7 34 1 2 28I 7 4 37 7 29 2 35 4 55 7 II 


2 56 6 14 


2 F : 11 32 n 7 4 26 


740I 3 18 11 15 432 7 34 1 3 25 7 57 4 37 7 29 3 33 4 55 7 " 
7 40 sets. mo. 4 33 7 34 sets.] 8 55 4 38 7 29 sets. 4 56 7 n 


3 54 7 15 1 
8Ct8. 8 10 




1 s c 37 n 22 427 




4 ■ 1 39 a> 7 4 27 

5 M 2 34 .3 21 4 28 


7 39J 9 23J 10:433 733I 9 18 9 47 4 38 7 28 9 12 4 56 7 11 
7 39 1 9 5° 1 1 U 34 7 33 1 9 52' IO 34 4 39 7 28' 9 48 4 57 7 n 


8 56 9 1 




9 36 9 50 ' 




6 T 321 >' 4 p; 


7 30 10 23 1 50 435 733 10 20 11 16 4 40 7 28 10 17 4 57 7 11 


10 9 10 34 I 




7 \V 4 10 s{' 17 4 29 

8 T 4 52 TTH 4 30 


7 39 I0 40 
7 38" 5 


2 34 4 3=; 7 33 10 45 mo - 4 4© 7 28 10 43 4 58 7 11 


10 39 11 17 




3 17 436 7 32 11 5 


2 441 7 27 11 5 4 58 7 10 


11 5 11 58 




9 F 5 33 TTQ 12 4 31 


738 11 23 


3 58 437 7 32 11 25 


45 442 727 11 26 459 7 10 


11 30 mo. 




10 S 6 IJ TTJJ 2j 432 

i! S 6 53 ^ 6 433 


738 11 44 4 42 437 7 32 H 47 


1 29 442 727 11 49 5 7 10 

2 16 4 43 7 26 mo. 5 7 10 


11 57I 42 




7 37 mo. 5 3° 438 7 31 
7 37 4 6 20 439 731 


mo. 


mo. | 1 30 




ia M 7 39 === 18 433 


8 


3 6 444 7261 12 3 1 7 9 


23 2 20 




13 T 8 23 TTl 434 7361 28714440730 


33 


3 56 4 4 s ; 7 25I 38 5 1 7 9 


53 3 14 
1 28 4 5 




14 \\ 9 14 TTL I 2 4 3-7 3° 58 8 5 4 41 7 30 1 a 4 52 4 45 7 25 I 10 b 2 7 




15 T 10 6 TTJ, 24, 4 36 7 35 I 31 9 2 4 42 7 29! 1 38 5 47 4 46 7 24! 1 45 -,3782 b 5 2 1 

16 F 10 59 / 6 4 37 7 34 2 18 9 5; 4 43 7 291 2 23 641 4 47 7 24 2 c 3 5 37 g 2 55 5 55 

17 S n 52 t 18 437 734! 3 14 10 46 441 7281 3 21 7 30 448 723 3 28 ;, 4 7 8, 3 50 6 46 [ 
188 mo. ^ 1 438 733 rise, n 30 44c; 728 rise. 8 22 449 7 23 rise, c; 4 7 7 rise. 730 










19 M 4» >3 M 4 39 7 32I 8 42 e. 14 4 46 7 27I 8 37 9 4 50 7 22, 8 32 5 5 U 7 8 18 814 

20 T 1 34 V3 27 4 4° 7 32 9 8 58 446 7 26| 9 5 1 9 44' 450 721 1 9 \ 5 57 6 8 51 8 58 

21 W 2 22 xc 10 441 731 9 30 1 40 4 47 7 26J 9 28 10 22 4?i 721; 9» 5 67 6 9 19 9 40 | 








22 T 3 7 fl* 23 4 42 7 30I 9 53 


2 2° 4 48 7 25' 9 52 1 1 2 4 52 7 20 9 5 2 <; 77 5 9 49 10 20 




»3 f 3 53H 7 443 7 29 10 13 
24;S !. 4 38 x 20 444 728 10 35 


3 4 49 7 24 10 14 11 45 4 53 7 19 10 13 5 77 5 10 17 11 
3 44 450 723 10 37 C. 30 4 53 7 18 10 40 5 87 4 10 47 11 44 1 






3ft 1*1 T 4 445727," 2 

26 M 6 16 f 19 4^726 11 33 


4 3? 451 722 11 5 


1 22 43.J 717 11 9 5 87 3 11 20 e. 35 




§ 32 4 52 721 11 38 


2 18 455 7 17 " 44 5 9 7 3 " 59, 1 32 




27IT ' : I " 3 3 4 47 7 25 mo. 


6 39 4 52 7 20 mo. 


3 25 4 56 7 16 mo. 5 10 7 2 mo. 2 39 

4 36 4 56 7 15I 27 5 II 7 1 46 3 51 : 




28 £ 8 11 ,-5 17 4 48 7 24I 14 7 5i 4 S3 7 19I 2° 

29 T 9 15 H 2 4 49 7 23 1 4 9 J4M718 Ml 

30 F 10 20 n 16 4 50 7 22 2 6 10 8 4 14 7 18 2 13 




5 48 4 57 7 14 * *7 5 11 7 1 40 5 2 

6 54 4 58 7 14I 2 21 5 12 7 0' 2 43 8 8 I 

7 50 4 59 7 13 3 32 5 13 6 59 3 52 7 7 

1 






SI S 11 22 © 1 4 5i 7 21, 3 18 11 7 4 55 7 »7 3 25 


AUG. 


III 1 

1 8 e. 20 15 4 52 7 20 sets. 11 56 4^7 16 sets. 


8 39 5 7 12 sets. 5 14 6 58 sets. 7 56 


2 M 1 13 29 4 53 7 l0 8 22 mo. 4 57 7 15 

3 T 2 1 ft. u 4547 18 8 471 39 4 58 7 14 

4 W 2 4<; 25 4 55 7 16 9 8! 1 21 4 50 7 12 


8 20 9 25 5 I 7 n 16 5 14 6 57 8 5 8 39 




8 45 10 7 5 17 10; 8 43 5 15 656! 8 37: 9 21 




9 7 I0 42 ,5 2 7 9 9 7 5 i° 6 55 9 5 10 1 




5 T 3 27 Tiff 8 4 "56 7 15I 9 27 2 05 7 iij 9 28 11 19 5 37 8 9 28 5 16 6 54 1 9 31 10 37 1 
t F 4 9 Tij 20 4 57 7 14 9 44; 2 37 5 1 7 10 9 46 mo. 5 47 7 9 48 5 17 6 53! 9 55 " 16 | 






7 8 ![ 4 50 =£= 2 4 58 7 13 10 7 3 16 5 27 9 10 10 

8 8 5 33 =2= 14 4 59 7 11 10 30. 3 56 5 37 7 10 34 
M 6 19 =2- 26 5 7 10 10 57: 4 42 5 4 7 6 11 3 

10 T 7 6 m, 8, 5 1 7 9 11 28 5 35 5 5 7 3 11 35 

11 ^ 717111,205278 mo. 1 6 31 5 6 7 4 mo. 

12 T 8 "50 t 2 5 3 7 7; i° 7 35' 5 7 7 3 l8 

13 F 9 43 t M 5 4 7 5 x 2 8 35 5 8 7 1 1 
1 1 S 10 36 * 27 5 5 7 4 1 59 9 32 5 9 7 2 6 
it; 8 11 27 v} 10 5 67 2 3 11 10 24 5 10 6 58 3 17 


15 57 6 10 13 3 18 6 52 10 24 1 1 56 
42 5 67 4 10 39 5 18 6 51 10 50 mo. 






1295773 11 95 19 65011 26 42 • 

2 21 5 87 2 n 42 5 20 649 mo. I 1 35 1 






3 17 5 9 7 mo. 5 21 648 


2 2 31 




4 20 5 10 6 5oi 26 5 21 6 47 

5 23 5 11 6 58J 1 17 5 22 640 


48 3 35 




1 39 4 35 




6 18 5126 57 2 13 5 23 6 45 2 44 5 32 1 

7 20 5 13 6 55! 3 23 3 23 6 44 3 41 6 24 j 






16 M mo. v3 23 5 7 7 rise. 11 10 5 n 6 56 rise. ; 752 5 14 6 53 rise. 5 24 643 rise. 7 10 1 

17 T 17 JT 5 8 6 50 7 35 " 53 5 ".6 5-? 7 331 8 36 5 15 6 521 7 30 5 25 6 42! 7 22' 7 53 | 






18 W 1 4320 5 96^7 


7 57 e. 32 513652 7 56 9 19 5 16 650 7 55 525 641 7 51: 8 32 

8 18 112 5 14 6 51 8 18 9 58 5 17 6 40 8 19 3 26 6 40 8 19 9 12 | 




19 T 1 w >f 3 5 10 6 55 




20F 23-5^17 511654 


8 40 1 52 5156 491 8 42 10 36 5 18 648 


8 44 5 27 6 39 8 49 9 52 

9 22 527 638 9 32 10 33 




21 ft 3 23 T 1 5 12 652 


9 16 2 33 5 16 647 9 19 11 25 5 19 646 




22 8 4 13 t 15 5 14 6 51 9 36J 3 20 [5 17J6 46 9 40 ev. s 5 20 6 45 


9 45 5 28 637 9 59 11 20 1 




23 M 5 7 T 29 515 650 10 11 4 13 518 645 10 17 

24 T 6 4 8 14 5 10 648 10 17! 5 17 5 19 6 44 n 4 

25 W 7 6 « 28 5 17 647 11 55 6 31 520 642 mo. 


1 5 21 6 44 10 23 3 29 6 36 10 42, e. 13 [ 




2 3 521 642 11 11 529 635 n 32 


1 *? 




317 522 641 mo. 5 30 6 34 mo. 


2 31 




26 T 8 9 n 12 5 18 6 45 mo. 1 7 49 521641 2 434 523640 10 5 31 6 33 ; 32 

27 F 9 10 rt 26 5 19 6 44. 1 1 1 8 58 5 22 6 ™ 1 8 5 43 5 24 6 38 1 14 5 31 6 32 1 36 

28 8 10 9 © 10 5 20 6 42; 2 18 9 57 3 23 6 38 2 24 6 43 5 2-; 6 37 2 30 5 32 6 31 2 48 


4 58 






5 57 




29 8 11 3 O 24 521 640 3 32 10 50 <; 24,6 37 3 37 7 34 526 636 3 41 533629 3 56 

30 M 11 52 p 7 5 22 639 sets. 11 30 5 25 636 sets. 8 12 5 27 63* sets. 5 33 6 28 sets. 


50 




7 %o 


1 31 1 e. 38 ft 20 523637 7 11 mo. 5 26 635 7 10, 8 56 528 633 7 9 534 626 7 5' 8 11 



SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER, 1875. 


MOON'S CHANGES— MERIDIAN OF 


NEW YORK. 


September. 






October. 


First Quarter, .,7th day, 4I1. 42m. aftern. 


First Quarter. . 7th day, nh. i*8m. morn. 




Full 14th day, 6h. 1 8m. aftern. 


Last Quarter.. 22d day, 2a. 5m. morn. 


Last Quarter.. 2 1 st day, 9I1. 16m. morn. 


New 29th day, 7I1. 59m. morn. 


New 29th day, oh. 16m. morn 




f& 






Boston, X. En- |iJV. "York City, 


j Washin'n, 


Charleston, X. 




a 







gland, X. Y. 


1'h.ila., Conn., 


Md., Va., 


Carol'a, Ten. 




S 




State, Mich., 


X. J ., Penu'a, 


Ky., Mo., 


nessee, Geo'a, 




8 


► 




Wis., Iowa «fc 


Ohio, Ind. <fc 


and Cali- 


Ala., Miss. <£s 







O 




Oregon. 


Illinois. 


fornia. 


ILionisfana. 


Moon 
south 


Moon 
place. 


Sun 


Sun 


.vmon 


|H. W. 


Sun | Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun M.jon 


.Sun 


bUE 


Moon 


H. W. 




as 

PS 


Q 


rise. 
H.M. 


set. 

H M. 


sets. 

H. M. 


Bost. 

H. M. 


rise. set. 

H M. H.M 


sets. 

H. M. 


N. Y. 

M. M. 


rise 

H.M 


set 

H.M 


sets. 

H. M. 


rise. 

H.M. 


set 

H.M 


sets. 

H. M 


Ch'ln 
a. m. 


SEPT. 


I 


W 


1 21 


m 3 


5 24 


6.35 


7 30 


II 


5 27 633 


7 30 


9 33 


5 29 


63I 


7 30 


5 35 625 


7 31 


~847 


2 


T 


2 3 


TI]J 16 


5 26 , b 33 


7 50 


47 


5 28 6 31 


7 5 1 


10 9 


5 30 


6 20 


7 53 


5 35 6 24 


7 57 
823 


9 23 




3 


F 


2 44 


TIE 28 


527,632 


2 9 


1 23 


5 29 6 30 


8. 12 


10 41 


5 31 


628 


2 15 


5 36 6 22 


9 59 




4 


S 


3 27 


=2= io! 


528,630 


831 


1 59 


5 30 6 28 


8 35 


11 19 


5 32 6 26 


8 39 


5 37 621 


851 


10 37 




5 


s 


4 I2 


=!!= 22 


5 29 6 28 


8 57 


2 37 


5 31 6 26 


9 2 


mo. 


5 33 624 


9 » 


5 37 6 2C 


9 24 


11 19 




6 


M 


4 59 


m 4 1 
TTL 16 


5 30 , 6 26 


9 28 


3 19 


5 32 624 


9 34 


4 


5 34 623 


9 4i 


53 ? : ^§ 


10 


mo. 




7 


T 


548 
40 


531I625 


10 3 


4 5 


5 33 6 22 


10 10 


5 2 


535 621:10 18 


5 38: 6 18 


10 49 


5 




8 


W 


Til 28 


532)623 


10 51 


VI 


534 621 


10 59 


1 46 


535 6 2o'n 6 


5 39 616 


11 29 


59 




9 


T 


m 


t 10! 


5 33 6 21 


11 47 


5 35 6 19 


11 54 


248 


5 36 6 18 mo. 


5 40:6 15 


mo. 


2 2 




10 


F 


/ 22 


5 35|6i9 


mo. 


7 5 


5 36 6 17 


mo. 


3 50 


5 37 


6l6 


1 


540,614 


24 


W 




11 


S 


9 17 


V3 5 1 


536,617 


54 


8 8 


5 37 6 16 


1 1 


4 52 


5 38 


6l5 


1 8 


541 612 


1 27 




12 


S 


10 7 


V3i8| 


5 37,6 15 


2 2 


5 


5 38 6 14 


2 7 


5 50 


5 39 


6l3 


2 13 


5 42 6 11 


2 29 


5 5 




13 


M 


10 56 


Off 1 


5381614 


4 26 


9 56 


5 39! 6 13 


3 17 


6 42 


5 40 


6 12 


3 -'2 


542,6 9 


3 34 


I 53 
6 43 




14 


T 


11 43 


«rid 


5 39j6 12 


10 43 


5 4o,6n 


4 29 


VI 


5 4i 


6 10 


4 32 


5 43 6 8 


4 39 




s 


W 


mo. 


^29' 


5 40 6 10 


rise. 


11 23 


54i,6 9 


rise. 


5 4i 


6 9 rise. 


5 43,6 7 


rise. 


V\ 




T 


3 2 


X 13; 


54i6 8 


6 45 


e. 3 


5 42;6 7 


6 46 


8 48 1 


542 


% 7 


6 47 


5 44 6 6 


651 




3 


F 


1 18 


>€ 27 


|5 42 


6 b 


7 9 


4 t 
1 26 


5 43 6 5 


7 11 


9 30! 


5 43 


I 5 


7 14 


5 45,6 5 


7 23 


844 




S 


2 8 


V 12: 


5 43 


6 5 


7 37 


5 44 4 


8 18 

9 1 


10 11 


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\ 4 


8 24 

9 3; 


5 45[6 4 


It 

9 28 


9 26 




19 

20 


s 

M 


3 1 

3 59 


T 26 1 

8 lo| 


5 44 

5 45 


6 3 
6 1 


§ I3 
854 

9 48 


2 x i 

3 6 


544,6 2 
5 45 6 


10 56 

11 5i 


5 44j 

5 45! 


6 2 

6 


5 40,6 3 
5 47 6 1 


10 14 

11 6 




21 


T 


5 


8 25, 


546 


6 


4 6 


5 46' 5 59 


9 55 


e. 53 


5 46| 


5 59 


10 3| 


5 47,6 


10 25 


e. 6 




22 


W 


6 2 


n 9; 


5 4 l 5 5 l 

5 48 5 56 


10 41 


% I5 


5 47^5 57 


10 48 


2 1 


5 47 


5 57 


10 55 


548550 


11 17 


I 15 




23 


T 


V* 


n 23! 


mo. 


6 29 


5 48,5 56 


mo. 


3 15 


5 48 


5 56 mo. 


5 48 5 57 


mo. 


2 29 




24 


F 


O 8; 


5 50 5 55 


5 


7 4i 


549 554 


11 


4 26 


5 495 54 


18 


5 49[ 5 55 


37 


3 41 




25 


S 


857 


O20 


5 5115 53 


1 19 


8 44 

9 36 


5 505 53 


1 24 


5 29 


5 50,5 53 


1 29 


5 50,5 54 


1 45 


4 44 

5 36 

6 21 




26 


s 


9 47 


ft 4! 
ft 16; 


5 52 5 51 


2 30 


55i:55i 


2 34 


6 22 


55i|55i 


2 37 


5 50, 5 53 


2 49 




3 


M 


10 33 


5 53 5 49 


3 39 


10 21 


5 5215 49 


3 42 


7 17 


5 52; 5 49 


3 44 


5 51 


5 51 


3 5i 




T 


11 16 


SI 29: 


5 54 5 47 


4 46 


11 1 


5 53 5 48 


4 47 


7 44 
§18 


5 5315 48 


4 48 


5 52 


5 50 


4 52 


7 1 




29 


W 


11 58 


TTRI2| 


555J546 


sets. 


11 36 


5 54| 5 46 


sets. 


5 54! 5 46 sets. 


5 52 


5 48 


sets. 


P9 6 




30 


T 


e. 39 


Try 24. 


5 50; 5 44 


6 13 


mo. 


5 55'5 45 


615 


8 57 


5 55] 5 45 


b 17 


5 53 5 47 


6 24 


OCT. 


1 


F 


1 22 


=& 6, 


5 57 5 42 


6 34 





5 56|5 43 


638 


9 32 


5 56j5 43 


6 41 


5 54 5 45 


6 52 


8 48 


2 


S 


2 6 


=s= i8 : 


558 540 


6 58 


48 


5 57i5 4i 


7 3 


10 12 1 


5 57| 5 41 


7 8 


5'55|5 43 


7 22 


9 26 




3 


S 


2 52 


TTL 


5 59 i 5 39 


7 27 


1 26 5 58 5 40 


7 33 


10471 


5 58: 5 40 


7 39 


5 55 5 42 


7 57 

8 35 


10 1; 




4 


M 


3 40 


TTL 12! 


6 15 37 


8 


256 o;538 


8 6 


11 32 


5 59 5 38 


8 14 


5 565 41 


10 48 






T 


4 3i 


TTl 24' 

* 6; 


6 2536 


8 53 


2 48j|6 1 537 


9 


mo. 


6 01537 


9 8 


5 57 5 40 


9 30 


11 37 







W 


5 23 


6 3 5 34 


9 45 


3 37116 2 535 


9 52 


13 


6 ij5 35io oj 


5 57:5 39 


10 22 


mo. 


* 


I 


T 


6 15 


# l8. 


6 4 5 32 


10 35 


4 32 6 3J533 


10 42 


1 19 


6 2534m 49 


5 ?8 5 37 


11 10 


32 




F 


7 6 


\3 


6 5 5 31 


mo. 


5 3i if 4|5 32 
31 6 5530 


mo. 


2 17 


6 3 5 32 mo. | 


5 59[5 36 


mo. 


1 3i 




9 


S 


7 56 
844 


\3 13 


6 6|5 29 


6 


11 


3 17 


6 4:531 


171 


5 59 5 35 


35 


2 31 




10 


S 


\3 26: 


6 8:527 


53 


7 341,6 6:528 


5? 


4 19 


6 5529 


1 2 


6 534 


1 ib 


3 34 




11 


M 


9 32 


Off 9 |6 915 26 


2 3 


8 30 |6 7 527 


2 6 


n 


6 6528 


2 9 


6 15 33 


2 19 


4 30 




12 


T 


10 18 


^23|6 10: 5 24 


3 15 


9 20 6 8525 


3 17 


6 7526 


3 19 


6 1,5 31 


3 24 


5 20 

6 6 




13 


W 


11 6 


^ 7.|6ll;522 


4 26 


10 o||6 9I524 


4 26 


6 52 


6 8525 


4 26 


6 2530 


4 27 




14 


T 


11 56 


5€ 22 6 i2|52i 


rise. 


10 55' |6 10 5 22 


rise. 


m 


6 95 23 rise. 


6 3,529 


rise. 


6 55 




15F 


mo. 


T 6 6 J3 1 5 19 


5 38 


11 34' 611 


521 


14 


8 16,16 10,522 5 45 


6 3528 


§ 55 


7 34 

8 20 




i5S 


50 


T 2i|6 14 ; i; 17 


6 9 


e. 20 ;6 12 


519 


9 6: 


b 11 5 20 


b 19 


6 4 5 26 


6 35 




18 M 


1 47 


8 6 j6 155 15 


6 50 


1 9! |6 13 5i7 


6 57 

7 48 


9 55 1 


6 12 5 19 


7 i « 1 525 
7 561,6 6524 

8 59 1? 7 523 


7 23 


9 9 




2 49 


8 2i'|6i 7| 5i4 


7 41 


2 41,614516 


1046; 


6 13 5 18 


8 18 


10 4 




j«t 


3 54 


n 5 618 512 


844 


3 1 |6 155 14 


851 


11 46 


6 14 5 16 


9 21 


11 1 




20 w 


458 


n 20 ,6 19 5 11 


9 54 


4 4 ! ,6i6 513 


10 1 


e. 41] 


6 15 5 15 10 81, b 85 22 


10 28 


e. 4 




21 T 


5 58 


3 


6205 9 


11 10 


5 11! 6 17 


512 


11 15 


1 57l 


6 10 5 14 11 21 1 6 8 5 21 


11 37 


1 11 




22|F 


6 54 


© 17 


6215 8 


mo. 


6 I9';6i8 


5" 


mo. 


3 5! 617 5 13 mo. ||6 9 510 


mo. 


2 19 




23 s 


7 40 


ft 


6225 6 


7 


7 15 ,6 19 


5 9 


11 


4 5! [618511 


i6j6 10 5 19 


28 


3 15 




2 <?r 


831 


ft 13 


6235 5 


1 30 


8 12 6 20 


5 8 


1 33 


4 t;8 j6 i9>5 10 


1 36 1 6 1 1 5 18 


1 44 


4 12 




25!M 


91 i 

9 50 


ft 26 [6 255 3 


2 36 


9 2 6 21 


5 6 


2 38 


5 47 '620 5 9 


2 39' 612 5 17 


2 44 


5 2 




26 T 


TTJJ 8 626 5 2 


3 4i 


9 45 6 22 5 51 


3 41 


6 31! 621 5 8 


3 42, j6 13 5 16 


3 42 


5 45 




27W 

2&T 


I0 37i 


TTIJ.2I [6 27 5 O 


4 45, 10 25 02315 31 


4 44 


7 1 1 ! 6 22 5 6 


4 43 [6 14 5 15 


4 39 


6 25 




11 19I 


=a= 3 6 28 4 59 


5 49 11 4 624 5 2 


5 46 


7 47, 623 5 5 


5 44 615 5 14 


5 36 


7 4 




29 P 


e. 2 


=s= is 6 29 4 S7 sets. 11 41 6255 sets. 


8 20 6 24 5 3 sets, 6 16 5 13 sets. 


7 4i 
S 1 ^ 




30 s 


47! 


=t 27 ,6 30 4 55 5 28 mo. ; 6 26 4 59I 1; 34 


9 3 6 25 5 2 5 39 6 16 5 121 5 56 
9 45! ,6 26 '5 1, 610,617511)630 




31.SII 1 35I 


TTl 9 632454! 5 57i 15.62814581 5 3 


8 59 J 



NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 1875. 


MOON'S CHANGES— MERIDIAN OF 


NEW YORK. 


November. 






December. 


First Quarter. . 6th day, 4I1. 56m. morn. 


First Quarter.. 5th day, oh. om. aftern. 


Full 13th day, 4a. 33m. morn. 


Full... 12th day, % 2h. 48m. aftern. 

Last Quarter.. 19th day, ioh. om. morn, j 


Last Quarter. .19th day, yh. 53m. aftern. 


New . . 


27t 


1 day, 6h. 59m. altern. 










J(J 


. 


Boston, \. En- 


N. York City, nWashln'n, 


Charleitton, ~S. 




— 1 







Klaud, N. Y. 
Slate, Mich., 


Phlla., Conn., Md., Va., 


Carol'a, Ten- 







s 




! N.J.,Penn'a, Ky„Mo„ 


1 ne»see, Geo'a, 
Ala., Miss. <fc 




js 


£ 




Wis., low a A 


Ohio, Ind. «fc 


1 and Call- 




v- <— 




Oregon. 


Illinois. 


1 fomia. 


i Louisiana. 


i , 




Moon 


Sun Sun Moon 


H. W. 

Boat. 


J Sun Sun 1 Moon 
rise. tet. set*. 


H. W. 

!N.Y. 


[San 
rise 


Sun 
set. 


Moon 
Bets. 


Sun trun 
rise. ! Bet. 


Moon 
Bets. 


H. W. 

Ch'ln 




rise, j Bet. sets. 




Q 


Q "~ ul " 


P luCa H.M. H M. 11. M. H. M. 


H.M. H.M. H. M. 


H. M. H.M 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. H.M. 


H. M. 


H. M. [ 


NOV. 


1 


M 


2 24 

3 10 


TIL 20 633454! 640J 59 
t 2 634453 7 281 1 40 
t 14 636 4 51 8 24 1 2 27 
t 26 637 4 v> 9 28 3 14 


630 457I 6 56 


10 24 6 27 

11 10 6 28 


5 


jTl 


6 18 5 10 


n 


9 40 1 


2 


T 


631 4 56; 7 35 


4 5? 
4 58 


Z 4 2 
, 838 


619 5 9 


10 27 I 




3 


w 


4 58* 


632 454 8 31 


1 1 59 6 29 


6 20 5 £ 


8 59 


II 14 1 




4 


T 


6 34 4 53' 9 34 


mo. 1 6 30 4 57 


9 4i 


62157 


9 59 


mo. 




5 


!•" 


IS 


\3 9 638 449 10 35; 4 4 
V3 21 639 448 n 44 1 4 58 


635 4 52! 10 40 


51 6 31 4 56 


10 45 


6 22 5 7 1 1 1 


4 




6S 


636 451 11 47 


1 45 6 32 4 5s 


11 51 


6 23 5 6 mo. 


• • 58 




7 s 
8M 


1" 


i& 4 641 4 47 mo. 5 54 

«r 17 642 445 53 6 49 


6 37 4 50, mo. 


2 40 6 33 4 54 


mo. 


6 24 5 5 3 


1 54 




6 38 4 49 


55 


3 35 6 3S 4 53 

4 30 6 36 4 52 


58 


6 25 5 4 1 5 
6 26 5 3 2 7 


2 49 




9>T 


8 53 


X 1 6 4 3 4 44 : 2 2! 7 45 


6 40 4 48 


2 3 


2 4! 


3 45 




10 W 


9 41 


K 15 6 44 4 43 3 I3i 8 40 

T 646 442 4 27I 9 30 


641 447 


3 13 


6 16 6 39 


4 5i 


3 12 


6 27 5 2 3 J2 
6 28 5 21 4 17 


4 40 




11 T | 10 33 


6 42 4 47 


4 25 


450 


4 23 


ir,\ 




12 F 1 11 29 


T 15 647 441 1 5 45 10 21 


6 43 4 45 


5 42 


7 17 640 


4 4? 


538 


6 29 5 1 5 28 
6 30 5 rise. 




13 S mo. 


8 648 440 rise. |n 12 


644 444 rise. 


I 54 §41 

8 48 6 42 


4 48 rise . 


I'll 




14 s 30 


8 15 6 49 4 39 5 30 e. 3 
n 6 51 4 39 6 29 1 
n 15 652 438 7 39 1 58 


646 443 


5 37 


4 47 


5 44 
644 


631 5 0] 6 5 
6 32 4 59! 7 8 
6 32 4 c,8j 8 14 
6 33 4 581 9 26 




15 M 1 1 3 6 


646 4 43 


636 


9 46 6 43 


446 


9 




16 T jl 2 43 


648 4 42 


7 46 


10 40 6 44 


4 45 


7 53 


9 58 




17W11 3 48III 29 653437! » 5& 

18 T ' 4 47iO 13 654 436 10 12 

19 F : 5 41 JO 27 656 43=; 11 21 

20 S • 29 10 6 n7 4 34 mo. 

21 8 7 M ft 23 658 4 341 30 


2 56 


649 441 


9 ? 


11 40 6 45 


4 44 


9 8 


10 56 




3 53 


6 50 440 10 16 


e. 39 6 46 4 44 


10 21 


6 34 4 57 10 35 


11 53 




4 52 


651 439 11 25 


1 31 6 47 4 43 

2 33 6 48 4 42 


11 28 


635 4 56 11 38 e. v | 




it 


6 53 4 39 mo. 
8 54 4 38; 32 


mo. 


6 36 4 56 mo. 


1 48 




3 28 649 442 


33 


6 36 4 55 


39 


2 42 1 




22 M 7 5° Tlfl 5 6 59 4 33I 1 35j 7 34 

23 T || 8 36:TIJi 18 7 4 32 2 36 8 19 


6 55 4 38 I 35 


4 19 6 50 4 41 


1 36 


637 
638 


4 55 


1 37 


3 34 




656437 2 36 


5 3 651 441 


2 35 

3 36 


4 55 


2 32 


4 19 




24IW 917=^ 7 2 4 32 3 4° 9 5 


6 57 4 36| 3 38 
6 58 4 36 4 41 


5 50 652441 
6 3=; 6 53 4 40 


6 39 


454 


3 29 


5 5 




2JiT 10 0=2= 12 7 34 31 1 4 44! 9 49 


4 37 


6 40 


454 


4 27 


5 49 

6 31 




26 F 1044=2=24 7 4 4 3M 549:1031 


6 59 4 35 5 44 


7 16 6 54 3 40 


5 40 


6 40 


4 54 5 25 




27 s 


11 31 Til 6 7 5 4 30 sets. 11 14 
c. 2o|ni 17 7 6430 4 37 11 50 


7 4 35 sets. 


7 56 6 ^ 4 40 sets. 


6 41 


4 ^4 sets. 


7 14 




28 8 


,7 2 4 35 1 4 44 


8 39 6 s6 4 40 


4 5 i 


6 42 


454 


V 2 o 


7 56 

8 37 




*w 


1 11 nj, 29 7 7 4 30 5 23 mo. 


7 3 4 34 5 30 


9 23 6 58 4 40 


6 30 


643 


4 54 




30 T 


2 2 


t 11 7 0429 


6 16 


37 


7 4 4 34 6 23 


10 B 659439 


644 


454 


6 52 


9 22 


DEC. 


1 w 

2 I 


2 54 

3 43 


t 27 7 10 4 28 
\3 5 7 11 4 28 


U\ 


1 22 

2 7 


7 5 4 34 7 28 
7 6 4 34 8 30 


10 44 7 4 39 

11 35 7 1 4 39 


lit 


644 
6 45 


4 54 

4 54 


in 


10 7 
10 51 




3 F 


4 30 ¥3 17 7 12 4 28 9 321 2 m 


7 7 4 34 9 36 
7 8 4 33 10 41 


mo. 7 2 4 39 


9 40 6 46 4 54 9 53 


11 36 




<§ 


■ 5 16.W 7 13 4 28 10 38 3 36 


22 7 3 4 39 


10 44 647 


4 54 io 53 


mo. 




5 B 


6 sX? 13 7 14 4 28 11 45 4 24 


7 9 4 33 11 47 


1 11 7 4 4 38 


1 1 48 647 


4 54 11 53 


24 




6 II 


6 44 W 26 71U 28 mo. 5 13 

7 29 K 9 17 16428 53 6 6 

8 17 X 23 '7 17 428: 2 371 

9 9 T 8 7184281 3 161 7 57 
10 7 T 23 7 19 4 28! 4 33 8 57 


7 10 4 33 mo. 


1 59 7 5 4 38 mo. 6 48 


4 54 mo. 


1 13 




l\L 


7 H 4 33 53 


2 52 7 6 4 38 


54 649 


4 H 


.8 


2 6 




8 \Y 


7 12 433 2 2 


3 46 7 7 4 38 

4 43 7 8 4 38 


2 1 6 50 


4 54 


3 1 




9 £ 


7 13 4 33 3 13 


3 11 6 50 


4 54 


3 2 


3 57 




10 F 


■7 14 4 33! 4 29 


5 42 7 9 4 38 

6 42 7 10 4 38 


4 25 6 51 


4 54 


4 12 


4 H. 




11 S 


11 11 8 8 7204 28 1 5 55 9 ^6 


7 15 4 33 5 49 
7 16 4 33 rise. 


5 43 6 52 


4 55 5 20 
4 55 rise. 




12S 


mo. » 23 7 21 4 28 rise. 1 10 56 


7 39 7 11 4 3» 
838 7ii 4 38 


rise. 6 ^3 




13'M 


19 H 8 7 22 4 28 


6 32 e. 60 


7 16 433 5 22 
7 17 4 33 639 
7 18 4 34 7 57 


5 30 654 


4 551 5 52 


7 55 




14 T 


1 27 n 24 723 4 28 

2 31 <3 8 7 24 4 29 


9 37 7 12 438 


6 45 6 55 4 55! j 2 
8 2 6 56 4 56 8 18 


9 10 




[G W 


7 5? 1 47 


10 31 7. 13 4 39 


9 47 




16 T 


3 30 O 22 7 25 4 29 9 6! 2 40 

4 22 ft 6 7 26 4 29 10 18 3 20 

5 10 ft 19 7 26 4 29 11 241 4 10 


7 18 4 34| 9 10 


11 22 7 13 4 39 


9 14 6 56 4 56 9 25 


10 40 




17'F 
18 S 


7 19 4 34 10 20 


e. 14 7 14 4 40 


10 22 6 57 4 t;6 10 29 


11 29 




7 10 4 34 11 25 


1 5 7 14 4 40 


11 26 6 57 4 ^6 11 29 


e. 18 ' 




19 s 


5 53 Try 2 '726 4 30 mo. 5 6 

6 35^ 15 7 27 4 3o| 29 5 54 


7 20 4 35 mo. 1 


1 52 715 4 41 


mo. 6 58 4 \7 mo. j 


1 6 




20 M 


720 4 3j 29 2 40 7 15 441 

721 436 1 31 3 30 7 15 4 42 


28 6 ^8 4 57 27 
1 29 6 59 4 ^,8, 1 23 


1 54 




21 T 7 10 "1Z 27 727 431 1 32 6 44 

22 W 758 — 9 7 28 4 31 2 36 7 36 

23 T 8 42 =2= 21 728432 3 40 8 27 


2 44 

3 38 




7214 36 2 33 4 21 7 16 4 42 


2 30 6 59 4 58 2 21 




7 22 4 37 3 38 


512 7 16 4 43 
6 2 7 16 4 43 


3 32 7 4 c, 9 3 19 


4 27 




24 F I 9 28 ni 3 728432I 4 45 9 16 


7 2: 4 371 4 40, 
722 438 5 42 
7 23 4 38 1 6 46 


4 34 7 4 59 4 18 

5 36 7 05 0; 5 16 
38 7 15 1 1 6 17 


11 




2s S 10 16 nt 14 7 29 4 33! 5 49 10 4 

26 S 11 7 .nj, 26 7 29 4 33 6 e;3 10 54 

27 M 11 58 t 8 7 29 4 34 sets. 11 36 

28 T e. v> t 20 7 29 4 34 5 12 mo. 


6 50 7 17 4 44 




7 39 7 17 4 44 

8 18 717 445 

9 6 7 18 44^ 


6 ca 

7 38 

8 20 




7 23-439 sets. 


sets. 7 1 5 1 sets. 




7 23 4 39 5 18 


5 25 7 1 5 2 546 
8 30 7 25 3 6 47 




29 W 1 40 Y3 2 7 30 4 351 8 i8| 20 7 23 4 40, 6 24 

30 T 1 1 2 28 Y3 14 7 30 4 30 7 22 1 1 2 7 24 4 41 1 7 26 


9 48 7 18 4 46 


9 2 




10 28 7 18 4 47 


7 3i 7 25 4 7 45 


9 44 




31 F H 3 14 \3 27 7 30 4 37I 8 31I 1 44 724 442 834 11 9 719448 8 38. 7 35 5 8 48 


10 25 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



TRADE AND COMMERCE, 



The folio-wing: tables of the foreign commerce 
of the United States, Great Britain and the Do- 
minion of Canada, will be found interesting and 
instructive, as illustrating the transition from a 
period of great activity in trade to one of great 
depression. In order to enable the reader to 
make a full comparison, we have given the sta- 
tistics of five consecutive years for the United 
States and Givat Britain and three for Canada. 
It will be found, in the case of the United States, 
that the imports of sugar, molasses, tea and cof- 
fee show a great deal of steadiness, while those 
of iron, steel and lead, and cotton, woolen, silk 
and linen goods have heavily declined. Of these 
facts the table of quantities affords a better 
measure than that of values. 

In examining the exports of the United States, 
the great fall in the valu3 per cwt. of cotton and 
provisions, comparing 1869-70 with 1873-4, is to 
be noticed, otherstrikingfeatmvsarethe enor- 
mous quantities of breadstuff's and provisions 
exported in the last three years, the increase 
ranging from two to fivefold in four years. In 
the case of some of these articles, the capacity of 



No. 1.— Value op the Total Imports ants 
Exports op Meechaitdise into and from 
the United States for Twenty Tears. 



Tutal 
Year. Impels. 



1855.. 
1856.. 
1857.. 
1858.. 

i860!! 
1861.. 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1864.. 
1865.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873- 
1874- 



257,723,148 
310,432,310 
348,428,342 
263,338,654 

331,333,341 
353,616,119 
289,310,542 
189,356,677 
243,335,815 
316,447,283 
238,745,58o 
434,812,066 
395,763,100 
357,436,440 
417,506,379 
435,958,408 
520,223,684 
626,595,077 
642,136,210 
567,406,342 



T^tal 
Ex 'orts. 



218,909,503 
281,219423 
293,823,760 
272,011,274 
292,901,051 
333,576,057 

219,553,833 
190,670,501 

203,964,997 
158,887,988 
162,013,500 
348,859,522 
297,303,653 
281,952,899 
286,117,697 
392,771,768 
44^,820,178 
444,177,586 
522,479,317 
586,402,089 



Domestic 
txpo^ta. 



192,751 135 
: 66,438,051 
278,906,713 

251,351,033 
278,392,080 
316,242,423 
204,899,616 
179,644,024 
186,003,912 
143,504,027 

I32,473>969 
337,5i8,i02 
282,584,321 
269,389,900 
275,166,697 
376,616,473 
428,398,908 
428,487,131 

505,033,439 
569,1; 52, 170 



Foreign 
Expons. 



26,158,368 
I 4,78l,372 

14,917,047 
20,660,241 

14,509,971 

17,333,634 
14,654,217 
11,026,477 
17,960,535 
15,383,961 
29,559,531 
11,341,420 
14,719,332' 
12,562,999 

10,951,000 

16.155,295 

14,421,270 

15,690,455 
17,446,483 

16,849,619 



No. 3.— Table showing for the United 
States the Balance op Merchandise 
Imported and Exported, and of the 
Specie Movement for Twenty Years. 





Merchan- 


Merchan 


Specie, Ex- Specie, 




d ee, Exces« 


dise, Excess 


cess cf j Excess of 


Year. 


oflmported. 


of Exported. 


Exported. I Imported. 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




38,813,645 





52,587,531 







29,212,887 





41,537,053 





1857 


54,604,582 





56,675 123 





1858 





8,672,620 


33,358,651 





I859 


38,432,290 





56,453,622 





i860 


20,040,062 





57,996,104 





1861 


69,75.6,709 








16,548,531 







1,313,824 


19,972,588 





1863 


39,370,818 





56,571,956 





1864 


157,559,295 





92,280,929 







76,732.082 





57.833,154 







85.952,544 





75,343,979 







98,459,447 


• 


38,797,097 







75,483,541 
131,388,682 





79,595,734 










37,330,504 
31,736,486 







43,186,640 










77,403,5o6 





77,171,964 







182,417,401 
119,656,288 





66,133,845 





1873: 





63,127,637 





1874 





X 8,9S 5,747 


38,175,499 






the foreign markets to absorb our productions 
appears to have been reached, and no further 
increase is to be expected, at least until trade in 
Great Britain becomes more active. Bacon, 
hams, beef and lard are examples of the oroducts 
to which we refer. On the other 1 and," there is 
reason to expecS an increase in the exports of 
coal, leather, manufactures of iron and steet and 
cotton goods. '1 he nation is under a necessity 
to export, both in payment for its imports and 
for the settlement of its large debts to 1 oreigL ers. 
If cotton, breadstuii'8, provisions, petroieum, to- 
bacco and the available coin and bullion prove 
inadequate for such payments, other articles 
will be taken— namely, manufactures. 

The imports of Great Britain arc rateAat their 
value, exclusive cf duty , in th 3 ports where they 
are entered, including freights and profits of the 
importer. They are chiefly raw materials aud ar- 
ticles of food. The exports, on the contrary, are 
largely made up of manufactured goods. The 
values of the foreign trade of Great Britain are 
uniformly given in pounds sterling, the value of 
which is $4 86 and 65-iooths cents in our gold coin. 



No. 2.— Value of the Total Imports and 
Exports of Merchandise into and from 
the United Kingdom for Twenty Years. 



Year. 



854. 

855. 
856. 

§57. 



860.. 
861., 
862.. 
863.. 



867.. 



870.. 
871.. 
872.. 
873- 



Total 
Im orts. 



£ 

152,389,053 
143,542,850 
172,544,154 

187,844,441 
164,583,832 

179,182,355 
210,530,873 
217,485,024 
225,716,976 
248,919,020 
274,952,172 
271,072,285 
295,290,274 
275,183,137 
294,693,608 
295,460,214 

303,257,493 
331,015,480 
354,693,624 
2.71,287,372 



T< ui 

Exports. 



£ 

115,821,092 
116,691,300 
139,220,353 
146,174,301 
139,782,779 
155,692,975 
164,521,351 
159,632,498 
166,168,134 
196,902,409 
212,619,614 
218,831,576 
238,905,682 
225,802,529 
227,778,454 
237,015,052 
244,080,577 
283,574,700 
314,588,834 
310,994,765 



Briusk 
Pr. due-. 



£ 

97,184,726 
95,688,085 
115,826,948 
122,066,107 
116,608,756 
130,411,529 
135,891,227 
125,102,814 
123,992,264 
146,602,342 
160,449,053 

i65,83=;,725 
188,917,536 
180,961 ,923 
179,677,812 

189,953,957 
199,586,822 
223,066,162 
256,257,347 
255,164,603 



Foreign A 
C .1 i.ial. 



£ 

18,636,366 
21,003,215 
23,393,405 
24,108,194 
23,174,023 
25,281,446 
28,630,124 
34,529,684 
42,175,870 
50,300,067 
52,170,561 
52,995,851 
49,988,146 
44,840,606 
48,100,642 
47,061,095 

44,493,755 
60,508,538 
58,331,487 
55,830,162 



No. 4.— Table showing for the Unite p 
Kingdom the Balance of Merchandise 
Imported, and op the Specie Movement 
foe Twenty Years. 



Year. 



1854. 
1855, 
1856 
1857 
1858. 
1859 
i860 
18& 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
187 1 
1872 
1873 



Merchan- 
dise, Excess 
oflmported. 



£ 

36,567,961 
26,851,550 
33,323,801 
41,670,140 
24,801,053 
23,489,380 
46,009,522 
57,852,526 
59,548,842 
52,016 611 
62,332,558 
52,240,709 
56,384,592 
49,380,608 
66,915,154 
58,445,162 
59,176,916 
47,440,780 
40,104,790 
60,292,607 



spec e, Ex- 
cess of 
Exp'Tted. 



2,556,572 
2,064,603 



727,849 



Specie, Ex- 
cess of 
Imported. 



9,864,314 
I,38i,353 



2,330,285 
3,486,754 
4,595,976 
6.369,687 

12,648,528 
9,496,530 
4,632,581 
4,123,463 

10 535,978 
4,380,156 

4,555.439 



Average 
Bank 
Rate. 



3i 

2| 

4i 

5i 

2i 
ii 

n 

4f 
7 

2} 

2i 

3i 

3i 

H 
4| 
4f 



10 THE TRIBU*T1 ALMANAC FOR 1875. 

No. 5.— Foreign Trade of the United States for Five Tears. 

Table I.— IMPORTS.— Quantities of thb Leading Abticles.— (Tears end June 30). 

Articles. 1869-70. 1870-1. 1871-8. 1878-8. 1878-4. 

Coal tons. 420,683 443»955 490,631 416,015 498,03! 

India-rubberandguttapercha,crude,cwts. 85,929 98,499 105,388 129,79,1 126,70! 

Pig iron tons. 153,283 178,139 247,529 215,490 Q2,0 4* 

Bar iron tons. 70.612 90,810 105,160 74.H4 34,3°9 

Rails (Iron and steel) tons. 279,770 458,056 531,537 357.631 148,910 

Scrap iron tons. 148,186 155,805 230,763 204,078 CI >357 

Tin plates tons. 67,381 79,900 87,733 85,931 7^589- 

Lead, pigs, bars and old tons. 39,518 43,141 37.324 31,862 1 9-4 2 S 

Leather, tanned, of all kinds cwts. 87,130 79,263 101,153 92,390 83,05! 

Gloves of kid and leather doz. pairs. M'.995 604,031 746,904 ^55,919 -24,454 

Sugar, uurelined cwts. 10,358,682 10,617,464 13,011,561 12,983,253 i4,2i6,6B§ 

Molasses galls. 56,347,223 44,401,359 45,214.403 43-533.909 47.075,797'] 

Tea cwts. 423,293 458,615 569,741 578,707 498,3181 

Coffee cwts. 2,100,429 2,839,305 2,667,910 2.618,699 2,636,3511 

Wine^n casks galls. 9,048,013 9,553,156 9,484,117 9,836,442 7,839,9381 

Wool, raw and fleece cwts. 439,555 607,661 1,091,576 763,318 383,47$! 

(a) Cotton goods thousand yds. 65,472 71,300 84,762 68,194 ~*i,oa§i] 

(b) Woolen goods thousand yds. 61,362 75,362 72,080 65,121 7 2 ,354: 

Table II.— IMPORTS.— Values in Gold of the Leading Classes of Abttcles. 

Total value of merchandise $435,958,408 $520,223,684 $626,595,077 $642,136,210 $567406,348^ 

Coin and bullion 20,363,079 21,270,024 13,743,689 21,480,937 28,4i4,oo$(l 

Coal 1,110,316 1,151,760 1,291,200 1,539,603 1,968,2MB 

Coffee 24,233,766 30,992,869 37,942,225 44,108,878 i5,o4o,g6« 

Cotton, all manufactures of 23,380,053 29,876,640 35,307,447 31,201,324 28,183,878. 

Flax, ail manufactures of 16,213,162 18,061,095 21,220,496 20,428,391 17,473,705* 

Iron and steel, and manufactures of — 32,665,327 43,421,971 55,540,188 59,308,412 33.7i3,«5 : 

Lead and manufactures of 3,674,988 3,721,540 3,395,090 3,247,153 2,165,788* 

Hides and skins, other than furs 14,402,339 14,892,987 12,973,904 17,398,611 i6,444,8xA< 

Leather, tanned, of a. 1 kinds 5,728,028 5.994,255 7,642,978 6,766,202 6,138,511V 

Gloves, of kid and leather 3,406,066 3,700,206 4,657,041 3,170,911 3,319,308* 

Silk, all manufactures of 23,904,048 32,341,001 36,448,618 29,890,015 23,997,301' 

Sugar, unrefined 15,662,384 61,249,621 79,129,059 77,912,660 77,440,4591! 

Molasses 12,881,222 10,192,384 10,627,511 9,901,051 10,911,189' 

Tea 13,871,546 17,254,617, 22,943,575 24,466,170 21,212,334' 

Tin and manufactures of and tin plates. 9,651,688 12,757,221 11,809,703 18,356,613 16,145,501. 

Wines, spirits and cordials 7,587,070 8,638,441 8,582,223 9,258,469 8,642,034 

Wool, raw and fleece 0,743,310 9,780,443] 27,206,073 20,433,038 8,247,378 

Wool, all manulactures of 34,490,632 43,839,6401 52,408,471 51 ,075,492 46,882,901 

Table III.— EXPORTS.— Quantities, Pboduce and Manufactures of the U. States. 

Coal tons. 227,918 267,951 400,878 184,633 763,40a' 

Cotton, raw cwts. 8,575,434 13,861,857 8,331,155 10,714,853 12,130,3781 

(c) Leather, tanned cwts. 3,332 16,965 108,054 153,944 !39.5i8 

Wheat bushels. 37,590,139 34,304,906 26,423,080 39,204,285 71,039,9384 

Wheat flour bbls. 3,457,005 3,654,841 2,514,135 2,562,080 4.094,0944 

Indian corn bushels. 1,392,115 9,826,309 34491,610 38,541,930 34,434,600] 

Petroleum, naphtha, mineral oils.. galls. 113,718,203 149,677,585 134.233.397 187,034,113 241.978,0234 

Bacon, hams and beef cwts. 586,661 1,029,700 2,436,213 • 3,812,383 3,423,5081 

Butter and cheese cwts. 440,498 604,151 600,270 757,905 848,027 '< 

Lard cwts. 319,630 714,619 1,782,604 2,058,341 1,829,710! 

Pork cwts. 262,856 350.413 110,442 ^72,745 629,307 

Tallow cwts. 334,045 302,315 679,922 706,880 008,354a 

Leaf tobacco lbs. 185,747,181 215,667,604 234,936,892 213,995,176 318,697,804] 

Table IV.— EXPORTS— Values in CURRENCY of the Leading Classes of Abticles. J 

Gold value of merchandise $376,616,473 $428,398,908 $428,487,131 $505,033439 $569,112470^ 

Coin and bullion 43,881,861 84,403,319 72,798,240 73,905,540 59,699,o86< 

Coal 1.306,318 1,369,236 1,961,606 2,914,075 3,823,758 

Cotton, raw 227,027,624 218,327,109 180,684,195 227,243,009 211,223,580s 

(c) Leather, tanned 106,312 480,143 2,864,800 4,301,174 3,940,426 

Wheat and wheat flour 68,340,822 69,236.608 56,870,744 70,833,918 130,788,553^ 

Indian corn and meal 2,222,111 8,410,827 25,199,364 25,269,521 26.299.350J 

Petroleum, naphtha and minerals oils .. 32.666,311 36,857,380 34,016,660 41,971,190 41,102,07^ 

Bacon, hams and beef 8,062,801 11,912,349 22.997,418 37469,618 36,340,784^ 

Butter and cheese 9,474,183 9,606,080 9,251,730 11,450,929 12,991,3761) 

Lard 5,933.397 10,563,020 20,177,619 21,245,815 19,308,019 



Pork 3> 2 53.'37 4.302,320 4.122,308 5,007,035 5,808,711' 

Tallow 3,814,861 3,021,035 0,073,189 7,068,471 8,131,330: 

Tobacco and manufactures of 21,701,201 21,991,917 26,019,921 25,331.046 32,968,5281 

Wood and manufactures of 13,734.838 12,942,281 11,240,872 19,119,802 21,379,577 

Cotton, all manufactures of 3,780,327 3,558,136 2,304,330 2,947,528 3,091,333s 

Iron and steel and manufactures of 11,002,902 19,601,090 8,747,106 11,119,831 13,180,411' 

Sewing machines and parts of . 2,233,326 1,898,80.} 2,436,085 2,150,720 1,194421 

Agricultural implements 1,068,476 1,070,940 1,547413 2,585,914 3,690,135 

Clocks 584,073 552,1=,^ 679,162 868,888 1,007,507-1 

Table V.— Foreign Goods and Specie RE-EXPORTED from the United States. 

Gold value of merchandise $16,155,260 $14,421,270 $15,690415 $17,446483 $16,849,619- 

Coin and bullion 14,271,864 14,038,629 7,079,294 10,703,028 6,930,719 

(a) Exclusive of hosiery, 6hirts, drawers and manufactures not specified. This item embraces 
only about one-third of the value of the imports of manufactured cotton. (&> This item includes 
less than half the value of manufactures or wool, (c) Exclusive of morocco and other fine, 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T5. 



11 



No. 6.— Foreign Trade of Great Britain and Ireland for Five Years. 

Table I.— IMPORTS and CONSUMPTION of the Principal Articles of Foreign 
and Colonial Merchandise. (Years end December 31.) 



ABTICLES. 

t(a) Coffee. > cwts. 
(a) Tea cwts. 
Sugar .' cwts. 
Tobacco { lbs. 
Wine galls, 
eat cwts. 

Wheat flour cwts. 

Indian corn cwts . 

Butter and cheese cwts. 

Lard cwts. 

Bacon and hams cwts. 

Pork cwts. 

Tallow and 6tearine cwts. 

Petroleum .galls. 

(c) Cotton, raw cwts. 

(e) Wool, sheep's, alp aca, llma.cwts . 

id) Hides cwts. 

(e) Silk, raw . lbs. 

Flax, hemp and jute cwts. 

(e) India rubber cwts. 



1869. 

259,901 
998,995 
12,214,039 
41,719,475 
14,836,797 
37,695,828 

54?i,555 

17,604,113 

2,238,278 

255,964 

74o,i93 

190,874 

1,232,144 

5,402,705 

10,906,886 

2,307,694 

954,120 

5,573,366 

5,094,059 



1870. 

273,480 
1,050,202 
13,870,042 

4i,7i7,7i5 

15,168,321 

30,901,229 

4,803,909 

16,756,783 

2,200,491 

217,696 

567,164 

257,014 

1,530,893 

6,859,385 

11,958,635 

2,350,451 

1,302,232 

6,307,575 
5,886,868 
152,118 



1871. 

276,881 
1,102,943 
14,049,995 

42,775,334 
16,237,756 
39,389,803 

3,977,939 
16,825,023 
2,551,183 

477,568 
1,093,038 

296,144 

1,491.934 
8,980,526 
15,876,248 
2,884,253 
1,447,898 

8,253,335 
7,360,104 
161,085 



18TS. 

282,590 

1,141,003 

14,306,150 

44,004,799 

16,878,219 

42,127,726 

4.388,136 

24,532,670 

2,19^,964 

579,056 

2,001,855 

218,260 

1,328,444 

6,399,710 

12,578,906 

2,735,533 
1,679,108 
7,302,083 
7,232,851 
I57,H4 



136,421 

Table II.— IMPORTS.— Values of the Leading Classes of Articles. 
Aggregate val.. exclusive of specie £295,460,214 £303,257,493 £331,015,480 £354,693,624 

Specie and bullion 20,500,991 

(6) Coffee 4,927,805 

(d) Tea 10,311,465 



29,455,068 

4,942,769 

10,097,619 

15,315,775 17,184,868 

2,265,350 2,169,053 

5,265,600 4,817,294 

19,515,758 16,264,027 

3,792,939 3,383,751 

5,935,665 5,79o,55o 

10,007,060 10,068,208 

930,516 727,192 

2,432,260 1,769,241 

575,825 799,5o8 

2,792,570 3,318,566 

442,858 535,272 

56,846,690 53477,755 

14,696,746 15,812,598 

3,311,000 4,601 ,6^7 

6,812,831 8,204,993 

8,319,048 10,402,705 

1,134,585 1,597,628 

12,884,740 

Table III.— EXPORTS.— Qtjantitces of Leading 

Manufacture. 

Coal, cinders and fuel tons. 10,744,945 11,702,649 

Cotton goods thousand yds. 2,868,630 3,266,998 

Cotton yarn lbs. 168,841,075 186,078,060 

Linen goods thousand yds. 214,793 226,471 

Linen yarn lbs. 34,57°.3i6 37, 2 39,3!4 

Woolen & worsted goods. 1,000 yds. 302,864 292,701 

Woolen and worsted yarn lbs. 37,185,740 35,536,848 

(h) Iron and steel tons. 2,675,331 2,825,575 

Copper, wrought &unwrght cwts. 851,390 767,95° 

Salt tons. 



Sugar. 

(d) Tobacco 

(/) Wine 

Wheat 

Wheat flour 

Indian corn 

Butter and cheese 

Lard 

Bacon and hams 

Pork 

Tallow and stearine 

Petroleum 

(c) Cotton, raw 

(e) Wool, sheep's, alpaca, & llama. 

(d) Hides 

(e) Silk, raw 

Flax, hemp and jute 

(e) Indiarubber 

U) Wood and timber 11,545,918 



38,140,827 

5,394,5n 

11,635,644 

18,186,297 

3,324,906 

7,072,099 

23,318,883 

3,498,008 

6,468,863 

10,280,536 

1,310,012 

2,725,900 

693,096 

3,i34,53i 

604,017 

55,907,070 

17,926,639 

5,035,613 

8,921,589 
11,875,225 

1,684,281 

",785,317 

Articles 

12,747,989 

3,417,406 

193,695,156 

216,338 

36,235,625 

367,869 

43,725.577 
3,169,219 

791,364 
893,201 



OF 



29,608 & 1 2 
5,257,403 

12,933,143 

2I,l87,6ol 
2,706,032 
7,718,848 

26,169,185 
4,087,639 
8,691,192 
9,060,451 
1,308,844 
4,188,981 

447.377 

2,848,164 

433,472 

53,380,670 

18,523,350 

6,701,186 

7,825,180 

11,161,870 

1,762,2^,9 

13440,909 

British 

13,198,494 

3,537,9»5 
212,327,972 

245,019 
31,187,051 

412,541 

39,734,924 

3,382,7:2 

686,757 

753,58i 



18?8. 

288,659 

1,178,767 

15,725,198 

45,944,538 

18,027,308 

43,863,098 

6,214,479 

18,823,431 

2,636,294 

626,090 

2,987,229 

289,695 

1,527,321 

16,661,340 

13,639,252 

2,839,614 

1,621,676 

6,445,213 

8,120.743 

157,430 

71,287,372 
33,599,231 
7,230,351 
",372,595 
20,913,297 

3,902,337 
8,267,326 

28,538,746 
5,849,852 
6,646,991 

11,016,720 

1,388,881 

6,245,230 

644,014 

3,152413 

991,841 

54,704,847 

19,541,678 
6,700,661 
6,758,138 

11,313,011 
1,746,005 

18,134,082 

Home 

12,617,566 

3483,736 

214,778,827 

208,123 
28,734,212 

345,887 

34,744,507 

2,957,813 

699,397 

840,939 



764,707 
Table IV.— DOMESTIC EXPORTS.— Values of the Leading Classes of Articles. 

£199,586,822 £223,066,162 £256,257,347 £255,164,603 



33,760,671 

1,853,733 

6,246,133 

72,821,411 

9,721,945 
33,283,112 
26,124,134 
4,006,385 
5,966,041 
2,9.2,634 



57,347 
55,861 



Aggregate val., exclusive of specie £189,953,957 

Specie and bullion 16,377,528 18,919,690 

Beer and ale 1,892,716 1,881,673 

Coal, cinders and fuel 5,165,668 5,638,371 

(i) Cotton manufactures 67,116,954 71,416,345 

(i) Linen manufactures 9,132.229 9485,837 

h) Woolen and worsted mfs 28,207,528 26,659,202 

(h) Iron and steel 22,342,080 24.038,090 

Hardwares and cutlery 3,736,602 3,812,385 

Machinery and mill work 5,118,922 5> 2 93,273 

Copper, wrought and unwrought. 2,,ZZ >S2> 1 2,819,853 

Table V.— Re-exports of Foreign and Colonial Merchandise. 

Aggregate value £47,061,095 £44493,755 £60,508,538 £58,331487 

(a) Quantities entered for home consumption only, (b) Value of total imported, of which 
about 5-6 is re-exported, (c) Quantity and value of total imported, of which from 1-5 to 1-6 is re- 
exported, (d) Quantity and value cf total imported, of which 1-4 is re-exported, (e) Quantity 
and value of total imported, cf which 2-5 is re-exported. (/) Value of total imported, of which 
1-8 is re-exported, (g) Value of total imported, of which 1-10 is re-exported, (h) Including tin 
plates and excluding hardware and cutlery and machinery , the \alue or which is separately stated. 
(0 Including yarn. U) Exclusive of mahogany. j, 



30,335 

2,085,430 

10 442,321 

80,164,155 

10,356,761 

38493,411 

35,996,167 

5,089,481 

8,201,112 

5,231 ,302 



,899,285 

2,422,020 
13,188,511 
77,363,612 

9,285^083 
30?743,37i 
37,731,239 

4,938,537 
10,019,929 

31287,473 

£55,830,162 



12 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



No. 7.— Total Value of the Imports of 
Foreign Merchandise and of the Ex- 
ports of the Produce and Manufac- 
tures of the United States to each 
Country in the Year ended June 30, 1873. 
The exports, with the exception of those sent 
from the Pacific ports, are given at their de- 
clared value in paper money. 

CountTit.*. Import!. Exports. 
Great Britain & Ireland. .$237,298,208 $312,347,848 

Germany bi, 401,766 60,124,410 

Spanish West Indies 8n,o=;6,756 17,031,100 

British North America 37,649,^32 30,361,368 

France 33.977.2oo 33,220,620 

Brazil 30.340.376 7,090,987 

China, incldg.IIong Kong 27,191,7^9 »*547»»5 

Belgium ^711.077 15,280,437 

British India 16,855,747 16=1,270 

Italy 7.974.482 7,241,097 

Spain 4,962,431 10,056,724 

Russia 2,212,293 11,764,256 

Holland 2,943,077 10,842,840 

New Granada 6,148,840 5,106,703 

British W. Land Honduras 3,643,169 j^.t^s 

Argentine Republic 7,587,843 2,985,661 

Japan 7,903,794 1,167,972 

Mexico 4,276,165 3,941,019 

Dutch East Indies 7,556,954 255,134 

Venezuela 5,512,910 1,^26,342 

British Australasia 3,142,418 3>9 I 7,477 

Philippine Islands 6,171,635 17,570 

British possess, in Africa.. 3,994,828 1,798,928 

Uruguay 1 3,57i,37 6 1,836,421 

Sweden and Norway 2,598,052 2,542,330 

Havti 1,049,598 3,?pS,j^7 

British Guiana 3,21^,273 1,638,115 

Peru 1,186,161 2,671 53 1 

Chili 1,070,007 2,273,957 

Central American States. . 1,974,968 899,570 

Gibraltar 13,345 2,430,938 

Austria 781,402 1,608,612 

French W.I. and Guiana. 1,194,740 1,134,795 

Turkeyin Eu'pa & in Asia 870,700 1,316,656 

Dutchw. Land Guiana... 1,182,994 954,852 

Sandwich Islands 1,275,061 631,163 

Portugal 579,075 1,180,187 

Danish West Indies 444>7'9 1,022,126 

Denmark 8,s82 1,281,380 

San Domingo 409,850 602,373 

African terr. not named. . . 703,267 221,437 

French possess, ndt named 274,0^5 246,646 

Egypt and Turkish Africa 263,318 225,406 

Greece 413,604 5'>379 

British possess, not named 219,819 132,294 

Azores, Mad. &C.Verd Isl. 12=1,877 178,030 

Miquelon and St. Pierre... 13,282 204,447 

Liberia 104,335 98,655 

Algeria and French Africa 57,9=i6 133,847 

Spanish possess, not named 36,765 92,389 

Sth. Am. States not named 79,634 23,850 

All other countries 106,195 36,200 

Total '.$642,136,210 $575,227,017 

No. 8.— Imports and Exports of Specie and 
Bullion to and from the United States, 
in the Year ended June 30, 1873. 

(This table includes the] foreign 6pecie and 
bullion re-exported.) 

Countries. Imports. Exports. 

Great Britain & Ireland.. $498,570 $58,351,025 

Mexico 12,154,060 105,262 

British North America 6,159,538 4,007,443 

Japan 1,349,580 6,890,871 

China, incldg. Hong Kong 181 7,154049 

Germany 96,198 1,942,049 

Peru 20,090 1,549,099 

Venezuela 35,616 1,510,404 

Hayti 91.899 798,033 

Spanish West Indies 398,901 349,169 

New Granada 262,124 241,913 

France 324 431,050 

Central American States.. 6,354 385,739. 

San Domingo 109,078 145,749 



British W.I. and Honduras $159,132 $38,163 

Danish West indies 20,139 137.470 

All other countries 118,75 3 -10.578 

Total $21 ,480,937 $84,608,59 

No. 9.— Total Value of the Imposts oa 
Foreign and Colonial Merchandism 
and of the exports of produce and* 
Manufactures of the United KixgdoJ 

to each Country in the Year 1873. 

Countrits. Impots. Exp't1t.\ 

United States £71,471493 £33,574,6' 

France 43,339,234 17.291^ 

British India 29,890,802 21,354, 

Germany 19,926.451 27,270,^ 

Australia 17,262,706 17,610,1 

Russia 21,189.331 8,997,2 

Holland .- 13,272,444 16,745/ 

china, incldg.IIong Kong 13,303,917 8,294,6 

Eevpt I 4, l 55«9i3 6,222,oiS[ 

British North America... 11,727.851 8,6i9,7« 

Belgium 13,07^,186 7,2oa,94B 

Spain and Canary islands 11,404,129 3,921 jB 

B'-azil 7,399.974 7,544,SB 

1 urkey 6,068,925 7,733^B 

Italy 3,831,091 7,144,195 

Sweden 7,739,744 3,i5°,3a| 

British West Indies 6,680,016 3.481.597' 

British South Africa 4,120,915 4,33^,4612 

Portugal, Azores & Mad. 4,661,094 3,433,05 

Chili 4,76.4,195 3,165,1c 

Spanish We6t Indies 5,109,259 

Peru 1;, 219,572 

Argentine Republic 2,604,043 

Denmark 3,=7i -i39- 

Stral ts Settlements 3,464,279 

Ceylon 4,331.006 

Norway 2,947,033 

New Granada 1,077,233 

West Africa (Foreign)... 1,963,507 

Ur . :guay 1 .270,723 

Gi eece 1 ,736,643 

Austrian Territories 809,433 

Japan 561,390 

Wallachiaand Moldavia. 1,024,334 

Mauritius 1,273,910 

Philippine Islands 1,420,009 

Central America 1,363,999 

Mexico 499,532 

Malta 301,668 

Gibraltar 92,905 

Morocco 970,206 

Channel Islands ^51,009 

Dutch East Indies 436,163 

West Africa (Uritish) 473,405 

Haytl 339,002 

Bolivia 771,843 

Dutch AVcst Indies 233,659 

Venezuela 97.772 

Algeria 438,7«4 

Ecuador 318,161 

Danish West Indies 10454 

Tripoli and Tunis 150,527 

Aden 25,876 

Whale Fisheries, Northn. 145,598 

Islands in the Pacific 47,492 

hast Africa 09,214 

French West Indies 17,684 

Siam 31,496 

Persia 10,991 

Native Ter. in Indian Seas 56,506 

Falkland Islands 28,703 

French possess, in India. 32,663 

Madagascar 2,037 

St. Helena 1,611 

C.( hiua,Cambo.ja,'fonqn. 17,000 

Bourbon (Reunion) 13,100 

Patagonia 9,325 

Ascension 3 

Arabia (Muscat) 

Heligoland 

Total £371,287,372 £255,164,603 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



18 



No. 10. — Foreign Trade of the Dominion of Canada. 

fThe Dominion of Canada consists of the six Provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick. 
bva Scotia, British Columbia and Manitoba. The British North American Provinces, outside of 
e Dominion, are Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island. The population of the four princi- 
1 Provinces of the Dominion was 3,090,561 in 1861, and 3,485,761 in 1871.] 



Table I.— Value of Goods Entered fob Consumption". 

.Countries. 1870-71. 1871-73 

,168,170 



reat Britain $49,168,170 $61,900,702 

mted States 29,022,387 34,217.969 

•ance . * 1,265,183 1,809,244 

rmany ......; 570,332 -936,757 

ain • 430,364 429,951 

Hand 173,210 193,658 

lgium ;.. 171,584 204,344 

iflsh North American Provinces. 1,93743* 1,968,587 

itish West Indies 839,523 1,128,236 

anlsh " 2,018,930 1,276,739 

ench " 25,922 35,906 

her " i°,745 6,934 

uth America 79,207 81,176 

ina and Japan 442,4or 386,612 

her countries : 499.755 345,o6 i 

Total 4 Provinces $86,661,145 $104,921,876 

:anitoba 286,337 1,020,172 

ritish Columbia 1,767,068 

Grand total $86,947,482 $107,709,116 $127,514,594 

It appears, from the foregoing statement, that 54 per cent, of the aggregate importations into 
le Dominion during the last fiscal year were from Great Britain, and 37 per cent, from the United 
tates of America ; the import trade with both these countries amounting together to upwards 
* 91 per cent, of the whole importations. 



1873-78. 

$68,522,776 

47,735,678 

2,023,288 

1,099,925 

477,886 

216,628 

346,702 

1,808,997 

964,005 

1,143,241 

43,412 

24,274 

416,199 

1,663,390 

1,028,193 



Table II.— Value of Exports. 

Countries. 1870-71. 1871-72. 

reat Eritain $24,173,224 $25,637,996 

nited States 30,975,642 31 ,896,816 

ranee 76,376 102,242 

ermany 16,235 36,232 

pain 1 17,079 25,084 

olland 6,835 0,376 

lelgium 57,467 60,777 

(ritish North American Provinces 1439,704 1,726,175 

iritish West Indies 2,104.062 2,319,702 

panish " » 1,498,854" 1,632,681 

Tench " 194,596 273,547 

)ther " ■ ^ 79,884 100,222 

outh America 720,681 671 ,031 

)ther countries 380,758 521,953 

Total .- $61 ,841 ,397 $65,010,834^ 

Sstimate d.amount short returned at Inland Ports 2448,668 2,887,056 

Total the produce of Canada $64,290,065 $67,897,890 

loods not the produce of Canada exported to Great 

Britain, United States and other countries 9,853,03 3 1 2,744,125 

Total 4 Provinces $74,143,098 $80,642,015 

Ldd Manitoba (to Gt. Britain and United States only).. 30,520 85,541 

Jritish Columbia 1,912,107 

$82,639,663 



THE TRANSPORTATION QUESTION; 
Statistics of* the Business of the Canals and Trunk. Railroads. 



1872-78. 

$31,486,571 
40,554,655 
31,907 
76,553 
2c,o8o 
13,142 
17,754 
2,283,638 

1,939,733 
1,614,312 

299,060 

91,630 

1,259,266 

690,711 



80,384,012 
9,405,910 



$89,789,922 



Grand total $74,173,618 

Of the goods, not the produce of Canada, exported in 1872-3, $7,257,277 went to Great Britain, 
and $1,517,871 to the United States. 



From the Western Lake ports to the entrance 
pf the Erie Canal at Buffalo, and to that of the 
Canadian Welland Canal at Port Colborne, the 
distances are about equal. Of the 500 miles of 
water navigation between Buffalo and N. York, 
345 are by the Erie Canal. Of the 375 miles of 
navigation between Port Colborne and Mont- 
real, but 71 miles are canal navigation. The 
Erie Canal locks are no ft. long, 18 ft. wide, and 
7 ft. deep. The present locks on the Welland 
Canal are 150 ft. long, 26)^ ft. wide, and 10^ ft. 
deep. The locks of the enlarged Welland Canal 
will be 270 ft. long, 45 ft. wide and 12 ft. deep. 
The Erie Canal is navigable for boats 102 ft. long 
and 17.% ft. wide, drawing 7 ft. of water, and car- 



rying 200 to 225 tons of cargo. The Welland 
Canal is navigable for vessels 142% ft. long and 
26 ft. wide, drawing qK ft. of water, and carry- 
ing 310 to 400 tons or cargo. The enlarged Wel- 
land Canal, which will probably be completed 
within three years, will accommodate vessels 
carrying from 1200 to 1500 tons of cargo. 

It thus appears that "the great struggle with 
the Welland Canal for the carriage of grain 
from the West to the seaboard, for shipment to 
Europe, is yet to come off. Meanwhile, the rail- 
roads, by their complete organization of through 
freight lines for the carriage of flour and gram, 
without transhipment from the West to every 
village and town in the East which can be 



14 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



reached by the locomotive, have rapidly in- 
creased their grain carrying business, while that 
of tbe canal, tnongh stimulated by low tolls and 
an unusual demand for export to foreign coun- 
tries, appears to have attained its maximum. 
Unless, indeed, BOme means be found of increas- 
ing the canacity or efficiency of the canals, 
grain will be crowded off by the coal, lumber 
and other bulky freight, for the transportation 
of which railroad competition is not so keen. 
Table L— Tons of Freigh t of all kinds moved on 
New York Canals and the New Fork Central, 
Erie and Pennsylvania Jtailroads. 



Year. 



1862.... 
1863.... 
1864.... 
1865.... 
1866.... 
1867.... 
1868.... 
1869 ... 

1870 

1871.... 
1872 

1873.... 



n. y. 

Canals. 



5.598,785 
5»557,692 
4,852,941 
4,729,654 
£,775,220 
5,6*8,325 
6,442,225 
5,859,080 
6,173,769 
6,467,888 
6,673,370 
6,364,782 



Central 
Rail oad. 



1,387,433 
1,449,604 
i,557, J 48 
1,275,299 
1,602,197 
1,667,926 
1,846,509 
2,281,885 
4,122,000 
.',532,056 
4,393,905 
5,522,724 



Er.e 
Railroad. 



1,632,9*5 
1,815,096 
j 2,. 70,798 
2,234,350 
3,242,792 
3,484,546 
3,908,243 
4,312,209 
4,852,5c; 
4,8x4,208 
5,564,274 
6,312,702 



Pennsyl a 
Railroad. 



1,989,126 
2,256,347 
2,559,884 
2,555,705 
3,186,359 
3,709,224 
4,427,884 
4,992,025 
£,427400 
6,575,843 
7,844,778 
9,211,231 



Note.— In the above and following statistics of 
the New York Canals, 2,000 lbs. are cailed a ton. 
Table II. — Tons of Agricultural Products 
moved on the New York Canals and Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, and of Vegetable food on the 
Neio York Central and Erie Railroads and 
Welland Canal. 





New York 


Welland 


Y'ar 


Canals. 


I anal. 


1861 


2,144,373 


586,583 


1862 


2,491,036 
2,236,075 


721,149 
558,489 


1863 


1864 


1,572,836 


♦144,561 


1865 


1,606,091 
1,786,000 


350,608 


i86j 


439,487 


1867 
1868 


1,438,517 


341,075 


1,442,147 


495,«73 


1869 


1,314,071 


503,869 


1870 
1871 


i'Jo3J86$ 


590,749 
668,076 


1872 


1,683,962 


539,917 


1873 


1,750,418 


581 .309 



Central I Erie Pennsyl. 
Railro d. Railroxd. Railroad. 



447,563 
469,885 
405,380 
461,511 
349- I0 3 
453,663 

» 

764,831 

1,297,481 

1,459,919 
1,158,894 
1,452,962 



220,000 
225,045 
280,229 
338.646 
344.827 
353.194 
410,823 
584,870 
483,105 
873,423 
851,579 
M34,5>7 
1,119,734 



* Half year onlv. The years i85i-3 for the 
"Welland Canal, ehd with December 31 ; from 
1865 to 1871 with June 30, and 1872 and 1873 with 
Dec. 31. 

Table III.— Tons of Lumber, Coal, Manufac- 
tures, Merchandise and Miscellaneous Articles, 
moved on the New York Canals. 



Lumb»r. 



1,052,392 
1,560,674 
1,628,688 
1,478,921 
1,467,315 
',/69,994 
1,744,252 
1,958,309 
1,885,930 
1,916,511 
1.941,297 
1,950,798 
1,582,072 



Coal. 



542,150 

636,720 

732,057 

855,063 

720,683 

1,136,613 

1,282,594 

1,611,689 

1,324,408 

1,458,185 

1,194,037 
1,162,590 
1,625,859 



Year. 

i86r. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 

!§»•__ 

Note.— The principal article embraced under I 
the head of manufactures is the Syracuse salt, of 
which 244,222 tons were carried in 1872, and 212,770 
tonsini873. Under the head of merchandise is in- 
cluded railroad iron, of which 161,667 tons were 
carried in 1872, and 53,363 tons in 1873. Under 



Mann- Mer- | MUcel- 
factures. i haniise laneous. 

280,256 
364,887 
319,432 
282,354 
281 ,832 
302,241 
320,8j4 
373,262 
345,239 
342,497 
336,288 

325,564 
267,820 



135,096 
167,927 
172,278 
143.984 
144,968 
179,878 
219,880 
324,064 
268,970 
271,856 
288,428 
298,758 
172,990 



353,368 

468^5^2 

519,783 
^08,765 

682,238 

732,7?4 
753r402 

875,567 
843,970 



965,623 



951,' 
J°5.' 



miscellaneous are classed iron ore, stone, lime 
and clay, which, together, amounted In 1872 to 
675,780 tons, and 415,304 tons in 1873, against 
253,411 tons in 1862. lor agricultural products 
and total tonnage, Bee Tables I and II. 
Table IV.— Average Cargo of Boats, Time nec- 
essary to make a Passage, and Cost of bring- 
ing a Barrel of Flour from Buffalo to Albany, 
Lockages at Alexander' s Lock, and Total Tons 
Delivered at Tide-water from the Erie Canal. 



Year. 



841. 

844. 

848. 
849. 

850. 

851. 
852. 
853. 
854. 
855. 
856. 

858! 

& 

861. 
862. 
863. 
864. 
865. 

866. 
867. 
868. 
869. 
870. 
871. 
872. 
873. 







loll find 


Average 


Days' 


Freight | 


Cargo 


time bet. 


on a 


of Boats. 


Buffalo* 


Barrel of. 




Albany. 


Flour. | 


41 


9 


71C. 


s 


7X 


60 


10M 


1 

56 


g 


%% 


£ 


9 
I* 


58 


84 


49 


94 


52 


Q2 


8K 


g 


1O0 


8K 


100 


8i 


46 


126 


8M 


34 


143 


8X 


31 


I40 


8* 


4 ? 


*57 


8M 


4 S 


167 


8* 


48 


177 


9 


45 


160 


10 
10 


57* 
5i 


170 


JO 


52 


156 


10 


48 


148 


10 


48 


183 


10 


51 


181. 


10 


33 


178 


11 


40 


190 


11 


42 


213 


11 


46* 



1 oils de- 
vered at 
at Alex-: tide-water 
itider'a 
!>>rk. Canal. 



532,520 

799,816 

1,431,252 

1,184,337 
1,266,724 

1,554,675 
[,508,6 
[,644,699 
1,851,438 



30,320 
28,219 
43,957 
34,9iJ 
36,918 

38,444 
40,396 
4i,572 
42,967 
35,?8i 
30,873 
31.223 
22,182 

23,473 
20,274 

32,439 
31,179 
34,977 

30,071 
28,742 

26,037 

20,882 

28,654 

32,107 
24,625 
25,124 

29,725 
28,035 
24,960 



1,508,677 

1.699 

[.43a 

1,702,693 
1,420,715 
1,587,130 
1,117,199 
1,496,687 

1,451,333 

2,276,061 

2,449,609 
2,917,094 
2,647,689 
2,146,634 
2,078,361 
2,523,664 
2,226,112 
2,378,572 
2,257,689 

2,290,698 

2,648,877 

2,670,405 
2.585,355 



During the season of 1874 the Erie canal has 
been navitrated by the Baxter line of steam 
canal boats, making the distance from Buffalo 
to Albany with full cargo in the average time of 
five days. 

Table V.— Dates of the Opening and Closing of 
the Erie Canal for Twenty-eight Years. 



Year. Opened. Closed. 

846 April 16 November 

847 May 1 .November 

848 May 1 December 

849 May 1 .December 

850 April 22 December 

851 April 15 December 

852 April 26 December 

853 April 20 December 

854 April 1 December 

855 April 1 December 

856 April 5 December 

857 April 6 December 

858 April 28 November 

859 April 15 December 

860 Abri) 25 December 

861 May 1 December 

862 May 1 December 

863 May 10 December 

864 April 30 December 

865 May 1 December 

866 May 1 December 

867 May 4 December 

868 April 23 December 

869 May 6 December 

870 May 10 December 

871 April 24 November 

872 May 13 December 

873 May 15 November 

874 May i December 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



15 



MARKETS FOR AND 

The following table6, which have been cOni- 

>iled expressly for this work from the official 

locnments of Great Britain and the United 

States, will be found to contain information 

vhich may be put to profitable use by the intel- 

igent farmer : 

I. 

Our first table Is designed to show t (i.) That 
he quantity of wheat exported from the United 
States to foreign countries is subject to great 
luctuations. Thus we see that it rose from 3 
pillion bushels in 1859 to 37 millions in 1862; 

Tablk I 



PRICES OF WHEAT. 

then fell to below 6 million bushels in i865 
and 1867, and increased again to the enor- 
mous quantity of 71 million bushels in 1874. (2.) 
That the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland is, by comparison with otner countries, 
the only market which can absorb any great 
portion of our surplus wheat. We have count- 
ed the wheat which goes down the St. Lawrence 
as exported to Great Britain, for that is the des- 
tination of all but a small portion of it. After 
Great Britain, Portugal is our steadiest cus- 
tomer. Though the demands of France are in 
the aggregate larger, that nation is a purchaser 
only when ber harvests are below an average. 
The same observation applies to Belgium. 
Bushels of Wheat Exported from the United States to Various Foreign Countries. 
(Years end June 30.) 



fear ended 



859. 



862. 
863. 
864. 
86^. 



870. 
871. 
872. 
873. 
874. 



All 
Countries. 



Bush. 
3,002,016 

4,i55> 1 53 

31,238,057 

37,696,079 

36,160,414 

23,681,712 

9,937,152 

5,579,103 

6,146,411 

15,940,899 

17,557,836 

36,584,115 

34,304,906 

26,423,080 

39,204,285 

71,039,928 



Gt. Brit n 
Direct. 



Bu h. 

1,322,718 

1,934,206 

24,510,961 

22,905,50=; 

27,325»739 

18,078,999 

5,823,255 

1,970,710 

4,685,615 

12,368,446 

13,356,550 

27,787,609 

22,488,021 

19,017,411 

31,790,876 

51,833,278 



Gt.B. via 
C nada. 



B..sh. 
1,352,252 
1,120,975 
4,148,029 



Total, 
Gt. Britain 



Bush. 
2,674,970 
3,0^,181 
3,658,990 



4.53«,47 2 | 27,443,977 
6,5»3,695; 33,903434 



4,116,543 

3,728,929 
1,851,300 
798,550 
3,0^6,271 
3,358,597 
6,232,357 
9,252,149 
3,709,065 
6,306,840 
8,717,903 



22,195,542 

9,552,184 

3,822,016 

5,484,165 
15,424,717 
16,715,147 
34,019,966 
31,740,170 
22,726,476 '1,429, 
38,094,918 I - 



Portu- Aus- 
France. gal. tralia. 

Bush. Bush. Bush. 
5,460 59,952 

28,495! 5,739 909,655 

1,728,190; 25,0891 382,763 

7,655,387 ! 327,070! 444,048 

381,970 563,125 i4'-,323 

292,424! 82,104 188,227 

17,329 90,282 35,072 

83,794' 976,714 



4,800 
83,190 

I20,. r 



41,436 

260,763 

36,839 

I,OI2,637J 701J82 

555,263! 475,856 

426,884 

131,129 



60,551,181 2,223,366 300,301 



287,092 
42,162 

371,721 

78,898 

1,059 

153 
23,042 

37,333 



Bush. 
102,931 
8,052 
160,408 

1,036,735 

622,986 

78,270 



34,726 

5,016 

195,964 

942,399 
1,275,101 

100,054 
3,709,694 



China. 



Bush. 

9,965 
42,398 
32,295 
228,714 
214,078 
9,689 
379,760 

237,339 

29,822 

95,146 

61,805 

1,330 

30 

18 



Year ended 



.1859 
.i860 
.1861 
.1862 
.1863 
.1864 
.1865 
.1866 
.1867 



II. 



.1870 
.1871 
.1872 

.1873 
.1874 



key, Egypt and Austria. (3.) Comparing the 
United States (including our shipments via 
Canada), Russia and Germany, we find that the 



We now direct our attention to the mar- 
set afforded our wheat growers by the United 
kingdom. It is to be observed, (1.) That the 
iggregate British importations have greatly in- 
jreased since the year 1854, with which our 
;able starts. The average quantity of wheat 
leeded from abroad maybe stated at 17 million 
;wts. fifteen years ago, and 34 millions now, 
he annual imports varying at present from 
14 million cwts. to 24 millions. (2.) In ordin- 
ary seasons the three gieat competitors for 
the English market are the United States, 
Russia and Germany, while in years of great 
ibundance France must be added to the list. 
On the other hand, in seasons of scarcity large 
juantities of wheat have been bought of Tur- 

Table II.— Hundred weights (112 lbs.) of Wheat Imported into the United Kingdom from various 
Countries. (Years end December 31.) 



United States ranked first as a source of supply 
in 1856, '60, '61, '62, '63, '64, '69, '70, '71 and '73—10 
years ; second in 1855, '57, '58, '68 and '72—5 years, 
and third in 1854, '59, '65, '66, '67 — 5 years. Russia 
ranked first in 1865, '66, '67, '68 and '72—5 years, 
and second in 1854, '56, '59, '69, '70, '71 and '73 — 7 
years, and third in 1855, '57, '58, '60, '61, '62, '63 and 
'64—8 years. Germany ranked first in 1854, '55, 

'c7 'eg and ' rri e T70QT»a • Du^.Anrl I r* ,Q^a *At 'Ao 



57, 



,9—5 years ; second in 1E 



H,'62, 



63, '64, '65, '66 and '67—8 years, and third in 1856, 
'68, '69, '70, '71, 72 and '73—7 years. Thus Russia 
and the United States are now the great 
rivals, Germany having fallen to a secondary 
rank. 



Year 

ended. 



1854. 

!p: 
III 

i860! 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 



1868. 
J 1869. 

1870. 

Be- 

1873. 



All United 

Countries. States. 



Cwts. 

14,868,650 
11,560,042 
17,648,943 
14,897,814 
18,380,782 

17,337.329 
25,484,151 
29.955,532 
41,033,503 
24,364,171 
23,196,714 
20,962,963 
23,I56,3 2 9 
34,645,569 
32,639,768 
37,695,828 
30,901 ,229 
39,389,803 
42,127,726 
43,863,098 



Cwts. 
1,809,630 
1,078,593 
5,542,983 
2,819,934 

2,576,791 
1 ^9,926 

6,497.335 
10,866,891 
16,140,670 
8,704,401 
7,895,015 
1,177,618 

635.239 
4,188,013 
5,908,149 
13,181,507 
12,371,922 
13,386,122 
8,719,940 
19,796,414 



U.S. via Total. 
Canada U. States. 



Cwts. 

78,650 

63,137 

484,549 

497,445 

436,891 

29,124 

794,829 

2,381,275 

3.732,959 

2,093,997 

1,22^,523 

306,765 

8, 7 S9 

683,127 

557,443 

2,723,053 

2,838,361 

3,278,031 

1,734,982 

3,761,863 



Cwts. 
1,888,280 
1,141,730 
6,027,532 

3,317,379 

3,013,682 

188,050 

7,292,164 

13,248,166 

19,873,629 

10,798,398 

9,120,538 

1,484,383 

644,028 

4,871,140 

6,465,592 

15,904,560 

15,200,283 

16,664,153 

10,454,922 

23.558,277 



Russia. 



Cwts. 

2,196,302 
War. 

3,290,989 
3,060,959 
2,652,940 
3,836,993 
5,638,299 
4,502,998 
5,751,018 
4,534,305 
5,119,234 
8,093,879 

8,937,199 
14,025,236 
10,053,617 

10,269,198 
15,654,000 
17,855,658 
9,595,679 



*Ger- 
many. 



Cwts. 
4,953,651 
4,162,123 
1,871,536 
5,388,188 
3,98^,882 
4,256,248 
6,542,601 
6,270,468 
7,588,239 
5,296,811 
6,363,892 
6,817,292 
6,260,970 
7,103,005 
6,043,362 
6,149,030 
3,348,214 
3,050,108 
3,891,062 
2.155,173 



France. ! 



Cwts . j 

620,005 

"3.356 

43,364 

161,105 
3,545.754 
4,752,245, 
2,394,608! 

783,9!3 
974,285 
I47,48i 
587,105 
2,252,873 
3,473.130! 

597,405 

56,414' 

468,274 

253,6441 

137,641 1 

2,844,811 

1,170,262 



Egypt. 


Turkey. 


fAustria 


Cwts. 


Cwts. 


Cwts. 


1,312,588 


707,607 


316,195 


1,894,7" 
2,316,613 


365,855 


285,051 


645,753 


375,414 


885,023 


70,841 


23,149 


2,013,457 


324,688 


85,371 


1,634,529 


191.291 


61,312 


854,815 


288,596 


317,070 


1,472,514 
3,289,156 


411,277 


378,244 


1,284.439 


785,451 


2,319,590 


282,993 


72,722 


366,868 


355,086 


11,041 


10,063 


386,142 


579,280 


33,831 


387,252 


1,326,529 


M5I.774 


1,904,615 


542,635 


3,219,536 


1,730,492 


1,004,701 


1,004,479 


1,392,497 


1,030,563 


104,950 


357,039 


60,472 


897,116 


827,265 


239> J 47 


2,340,227 


559.008 


5=;,i86 


1,261,230 


295,207 


",530 



Year 
ended. 

.1854 
.1855 
.1858 
a8<;7 
.1858 
.1859 
.i860 
.1861 
.1862 
.1863 
.1864 
.1865 
.1866 
.1867 
.1868 
.1869 
.1870 
.1871 
.1873 
.18-3 



* Exclusive of the Duchies of Schleswig and Holstein, with Lauenburg, from 1854 to I860, inclusive. 
•f Including Veneiia from 1854 to 1860, inclusive. 



16 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T5. 



III. 

"We next present a table of average monthly 
prices of British wheat. We have reduced them 
to dollars and cents, counting the English shil- 
ling as equal to 24 cents in our coin. The En- 
glish averages are obtained by computation 
from all the home-grown wheat sold in 290 mar- 
ket towns down to 1861, and since then in 150 
towns. They are therefore a trustworthy meas- 
ure, not only of the value of wheat in England, 
but, of the changes in its value in the principal 
countries by which the English market is sup- 
plied, since when the price of wheat rises or falls 
in England it rises and falls in New York and 
Odessa. Table III should be carefully compared 
with Tables I, II, IV and V. The relations of 
cause and effect which will be exhibited by such 
a comparison are very instructive and of the 
highest importance. Care, however. mu6t be 
taken not to mistake the cause for the effect, 
or tbe effect for the cause. Some of the more 
important results of these relations of cause 
and effect are aj follows: 

(1.) The wide range of the fluctuations, the 
price in seasons of short supply being some- 
times double that in seasons of great abun- 
dance. For example, in November, 1855, the 
average was $2 42 per bushel ; in March, 1859, 
$1 21 ; in May, 1868, $2 21 ; and in February and 
March, 1870, fi 24. 

(2.) By a singular coincidence the highest and 
lowest yearly averages occur quite regularly 
once in six years. The years of highest prices 
are 1855-6, 1861-2, 1867-8, and 1873-4. The years 
of lowest prices are 18S8-9, 1864-5, and 1869-70. 

(3.) Of the four years of highest prices, two 
(1862 and 1874) are years of very heavy exports 
from the United States, and two (1855-6 and 
1867-8) of only moderately heavy exports. In 
the two latter the year's average price rose to 
$2 22 and $2 05 per bushel respectively: while 
in the two former it rose only to $1 74 and $1 84. 

(4.) The paramount influence of the English 
home-grown wheat over prices appears from a 
comparison of Tables IV and V with Table III. 
Take the first ten years, during which the sales 
of British wheat were returned from 290 mar- 
kets. Of this series 1858-9 and 1863-4 are the 
years of lowest prices.; and the three years, 
1857-8, '58-9 and '59-60, form a series of low-priced 
years. It will be noticed that the supply of 
home-grown English wheat is very great in 
each of those years, and in strong contrast to 
that of the years 1860-1, '61-2 and '62-3 which 
intervene. (See Table IV .) But Table il shows 
that the imports in the same years are only of 
moderate amounts ; while, on the other hand, 
in the years 1861,2 and 3 they were very great, 
and greatest of all in 1861-2, the year of nighest 
price and smallest home supplv. Th.s shows: 
(a), that a full harvest in England depresses 



prices and discourages imports, creating a com- 
petition among the wheat-producing nations in 
a market already well supplied ; (6), that a 
short English harvest, by advancing prices, at- 
tracts wheat from all nations whicn produce a 
surplus, (c.) The tables do not show a single in- 
stance of sufficient competition among the ex- 
porting' nations to make a low pricein England, 
when the English harvest, as indicated by the 
returns of quantities sold, is materially below 
an average, though it Is possible that such 
an event might happen. The reason it does 
not is probably because France and Germany 
are so near to England as to be Bim larly af- 
fected by any influences which cause the En- 
glish crop to fall short of an average. 

(■;.) The highest prices, as we have seen, are 
produced by a short supply of English wheat, . 
combined with only an average surplus for ex- 
portation in the United States. Of such years 
1867-8 is the best example. The next highest 
are in years of deficient English supply ana lull 
harvests in the United States, of which 1862-3 
and 1873-4 are the best examples. Lastly, when 
the English grown supply is large, as it was in 
all the years when the average is below ^1 40 
per bushel, nothing but a failure of both the 
United States and Kussia to produce their usual 
surplus for exportation can, of late years, at all 
events, prevent a low range of prices. In the 
In the year 1855-6 this contingency appears to 
have happened, the 6ales of English wheat be- 
ing very great, and the prices extremely high, 
but the explanation is that no wheat could be 
had from Kussia on account of the war, and 
only a little from the United States, we, too, 
having but little to spare. 

(6.) It is a well-known fact that a small quan- 
tity of wheat in excess of the average supply 
depresses prices in a much greater proportion 
than the ratio of the excess to the average crop. 
The reverse is the case when there is a deficiency. 
This tact is amplv illustrated by our tables. 

(7.) The effect of the expansion or contraction 
of the currency on the price of wheat in the 
United States is exactly measured by its effect 
on the price of gold. The present low price of 
wheat is not in the least the result of any opera- 
tion on the currency. The gold premium was as 
low four years ago, in November and December, 
1870, as it "is now, as maybe seen by consulting 
the table of the monthly prices of gold on an- 
other page of this Almanac. On the other hand, 
it would not be possible to increase the price of 
wheat by expanding the currency a-.d putting 
up the price of gold without putting up the 
prices of other articles in the same proportion, 
with the superadded disadvantage of fluctua- 
tions, which no farmer could foresee, and which 
would be more frequent and violent as the cur- 
rency became less valuable. 



TABLE III.— Average Gazette Prices of British Wheat per Imperial Bushel in each Month 
from September, 1854, to September, 1874. 



Month. 



CO 



$ C 
2 27 
2 3 
2 42 
2 40 
2 30 
2 17 
2 07 
2 06 
2 04 

31 

29 

29 2 18 



CO , ^ 
t~» CO 



I (/ 



I 76 
i 68 

1 61 



1 90 
1 78 



$c. $c. 

1 66 1 28 
1 54 1 25 
1 46 1 
1 44 I 23 
I 36 1 22 
1 36 1 

31 I 24 
34 1 54 

32 1 52 
34 1 36 

33 1 32 



t 



$c. $ 

I 28 I 
I 28 I 
I 30 I 
1 32 I 
I 32 I 
I 31 I 
1 36 I 
I 48 I 

I 57 1 
1 67 1 
1 71 1 
1 78 i 



c. $c. ft 
81 I 65 I 

80 I 70]I 

75 
59 

r 
33 

63 

% 

66! 1 63'! 

52 1 71 1 

53 1 73 1 



1 83 1 
1 84 1 

1 80 1 

i 77 1 

1 74 1 

I 72 1 



C $ 

67 1 
481 
46,1 
39, l 
42 1 
41 1 

36 1 

37 1 

39 1 

40 1 

39 1 
3»i 



September. 1 

October 1 

November.. 2 
December.. 2 
January. ...'2 
February ..2 

March J2 

April |2 

May 2 

June '2 

July 2 

August '2 

The Year.. I2 10 2 22^ 80 1 43 1 31 1 45 1 66 1 74,1 43 1 23 1 20 1 40 1 8i!2 05 1 50 1 38 1 62 1 70I1 72 1 84 



c. $c. 

2=, 1 32 
16 1 26 
16 1 37 

14 1 40 
16 i 37 

15 1 37 
l| 1 36 
18 1 34 
23 1 39 
241 45 



s 



I 20 I 02 
I 30 I 51 



$C.$C. 

1 47 1 88 
« 57 1 99 
1 70J2 08 

I 8l |2 02 
I 84|2 II 
I 82 2 19 

I 79 2 19 

I 85'2 20 
I 94 2 21 
I 90J2 04 

1 95 I 96 

2 03 I 73 



$C. 

I 61 

1 55 
1 5i 
1 55 
1 5i 
1 44 
1 39 

1 3* 
I 38 

1 5° 
158 



$C. 

I 52 
1 42 
1 39 
1 3i 
1 3i 
1 24 



1 34 
1 42 

1 62 



$c. 

I 71 



1 c. 
4a 

41 
50 

57 1 68 

58 1 66 
60 1 67 

1 A 5 
I 63 

I 69 

I 77 

1 75 
74 1 79 



$ C. |C. 

1 75 1 02 
1 76 1 83 
1 70 1 82 
1 701 85 
1 67 1 88 
1 69 1 89 
1 66 1 83 
1 6;i8o 
1 6S 1 86 
1 76:1 83 
1 78 i 82 
1 82 1 73 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



IT 



IV. 

It will be found very instructive to compare 
the preceding tables with those on page 14, 
showing the carrying trade of the New York 
canals. The effect of lowering the tolls on the 
agricultural productions carried has been great- 
ly overrated. The increased movement of 
wheat over the Eri&canal in the years 1871,1872, 
and 1873 was more the effect of the increased 
wants of Great Britain, and the consequent ad- 
vance of 30 or 40 cents a bushel over the avera? e 
price of the years 1863-6 and 1868-70, than of the 
reduction of three cents a bushel in the canal 
tolls from Buffalo to Troy. The high prices of 
1867 and 1868 did not bring a great increase of 
business for the canal, for the excellent reason 
that the Western farmers did not have the 
wheat to send. If the wheat had been in exist- 
ence, $2 30 to $2 80 for a bushel of No. 2 Mil- 
waukee at New York would have brought it 
forward. 

V. 

The exports of wheat and wheat flour from the 
United Kingdom are of insignificant amou t, 
compared with the imports. The following 

TABLE V.— Quantities of British Wheat sold tin 3»0 Market .Toicns of England in each Month 
and Harvest Year from September, 1854, to September, 1864. 



table shows the quantities of wheat and wheat 


flour < 


exported for the last fourteen years : 


TABLE TV.— Quantities of Wheat and 


Wheat 


Flour exported from the United Kingdom. 




<— Home Grown.-, 


FoBEIGN. , 


Year. 


Wheat. 


Flour. 


Wheat. 


Flour. 




Cwts. 


Cwts. 


Cwts. 


Cwts. 


i860 


32,188 


1^,920 


21,645 


8,167 


1861 


1,512,554 


104,314 


1,020,262 


291,509 


1862 


48,195 
167,245 


14,1 tii 


46,332 


33,571 


^ 3 


14,405 
16,635 


10^,742 


29.612 


1864 


^5,402 


37,869 


42,759 


1865 


51,9*25 


-15,684 


27,124 


21,072 


1866 


230,894 


12,697 


46,813 


18,365 
16,861 


1867 


339,335 


15,375 


225,599 


1868 


176,648 


25,202 


291,547 

69,580 

1,093,498 

639,607 


15,085 


1869 


60,^41 


15,080 


8,875 


1870 


923,953 


200,148 


372,187 


1871 


3,293,406 


657,297 


344,954 


1872 


532,977 


37,935 


213,179 


11,119 


1873 


1,128,226 


46,213 


1,027,594 


6i,593 



Months. 



September. 

October 

November . 
December.. 
January — 
February.. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 



1854-5. 
Towns) 



Qrs 

285,545 
590,793 
510,352 
565, 026 

332,483 
365,589 
445,925 
38=^,962 
407,069 
439,252 
378,556 
331,129 



1855-6. 

(290 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

519,395 
594,943 
506,516 
550,055 
390,703 
347,042 
460,223 
399,196 
560, 576 
404,597 
323,517 
292,250 



1856-7. 

Towns ) 

~QrsT 
400,910 
530,695 
528,603 
408,424 
494,790 
410,050 
426,785 

362,343 
572,902 
466,120 
314,410 
396,335 



The Year 5,145,681 5,349,013 5,312,367 5,278,746 5,215,347 5,5^7,989 3,582,81: 

Av. Price $210 $2 22 . $1 80 $1 43 $1 31 $f 45 I $1 66 



1857-8. 

Towns ) 

' Qrs. 

486,884 
577,824 
353,143 
382,354 
492,412 
376,020 
426,422 
330,735 

546,166 
418,117 

357,i '9 



1858-9. 

(290 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

489,729 

57J,744 

426,126 

437,8o8 

530,321 

436,910 

379,046 

546,5102 

391,368 

316,812 

335,876 

353,io5 



1859-60. 

(290 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

425,209 
632.216 
518,109 
632,728 
435,498 
458,990 
59o,348 
402,220 
4i8,33i 
493,834 
250,844 
299,662 



1860-1. 

(290 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

314,51? 
311,656 
314,207 
333,148 
308,673 
262,187 
333,793 
261,405 
289,207 
296,698 
218,036 
339,329 



1861-2. 

(290 
Towns) 



513,625 
55i,794 
540,248 
374,670 
276,532 
319,822 
367,782 
228,211 
317,515 
217,945 
218,127 

232,799 



1862-3. 

(290 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

297,760 
353,ioi 
432,348 
326,143 
391,824 
315,836 

277,993 
320,386 
433,309 
319,434 
217,130 
321,288 



4,159,070 4,006,552 5,131448 
1 74 $1 43 fi 23 



1863-4. 

m (2 9° 
Towns) 

QrsT" 
422,109 
532,926 
448,635 
492,601 
514,727 
398,771 
373,694 
464,945 
370,154 
373,309 
433,804 
305,773 



VI. 



The quantity of wheat grown in the United 
Kingdom is estimated at 14 million quarters, or 
112 million bushels, in average years. The aver- 
age quantity imported may be reckoned at 8 mill- 
ion quarters, or 64 million bushels in the shape 
of grain, and 1% million quarters, or 12 mill- 
ion bushels, in the shape of flour. It is, there- 
fore, apparent that the wheat included in the 

TABLE VI.— Quantities of British Wheat so'd in 150 Market Towns of England in each Month 
and Harvest Year from September, 1864, to September, 1874. 



following tables is in no case one-half of the 
annual growth of the United Kingdom. For the 
period from 1854 to 1864, when the quantities sold 
were returned from 290 towns, we may reckon 
them at one-third the entire produce of the 
United Kingdom, and from 1864 to 1874, when 
they are returned from 150 towns, at from one- 
fourth to one-fifth the total harvest. 



Months. 



September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 
January... 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . , . 

The Year.. 
Average... 



1864-5, 

(iw 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

245,651 

338,741 
264,779 
322,243 
300,817 
297,562 
299,146 
335,428 
327,695 
230,990 

275,503 
201,955 



(150 
Towns) 

Qrs. 

318,895 

304,055 

295,633 

39i,944 

214,715 

260,001 

331,297 
250,160 
250,891 

245,395 
127,838 

191 ,0^9 



1866-7. 

(150 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

325,058 

320,676 

284,531 

332,936 

221,792 

203,902 

280,880 

205,233 

221,069 

197,017 

109,831 

128,249 



1867-8. 

To wns) 
"Qrs/ 

239,727 
349,789 
337,170 
230,014 
193,080 
259,963 
176,768 
173,122 
192,994 
97,184 
106,814 
260,269 



3,440,510 3,181,883:2,831,174 2,616,8943,092,856 
$1 20 I $1 40 I $1 81 I $2 05 $1 50 



1868-9. 

Tow ns) 

""QrsT" 

358,663 
350,377 
267,345 
243,329 
312,654 
254,916 
217452 
204,521 
294,080 
213,005 
204,293 
172,221 



1809-70. 

(150 
Towns) 

"QrsT 

220,167 
308,310 
218,513 

195,974 
241,043 
231,919 
259,539 
308,798 
. 280,739 
230,572 
217,370 
201 ,789 



2j9i4,733 
$1 38 



1870-1. 

(150 
Towns) 

351,231 
424,616 
298,408 
352,631 
267,828 

309,377 
298,965 
371,530 
222,005 
191,126 
158,780 
123,891 



1871-2. 

(150 
Town s) 

QrsT 

371,592 
367,673 
269,354 
322,758 
194.721 
!93,9ii 
245,614 
191,523 
231,783 
268,628 
109,545 
168,955 



3,370,394 2,936,057 
$1 62 I $1 70 



1872-3. 

(150 
Towns) 

"QrsT 
253,592 
264,936 
248,832 
210,068 
166,472 
202,979 
238,127 
159,269 
277,881 
167,467 
101,103 
131,180 



1873-4- 
Towns) 



Qrs. 

232,664 
265,123 
264,925 
234,753 
237,759 
184,187 
160,340 
150,727 
218,894 
129,123 

9 k ,8 r 
126,467 



2,421,906 2,300,833 
$1 72 1 fi 84 



! 38 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



VII. 

The following chart, or diagram, is intended 
to show at one view, most of the separate facts 
presented in the three preceding pages. 

The figures at the extreme right and left mark 
a scale of prices per bushel. 

The columns adjoining them on the inside de- 
note the number of millions of quarters, the 
quarter consisting of eight bushels. 

The line at the top marks the harvest year, 
beginning with September. 

The characters " oooo," by their position with 
reference to the scale of quarters at the sides, de- 
note in millions of quarters the estimated supply 
of British wheat. The estimate is made by mul- 
tiplying the number of millions of quarters sold, 
as shown in Tables V and VI, by three down to 
1864, and in the years since then by four. 

The characters "xxx" denote in the same 
manner the number of millions of quarters of 
foreign wheat imported into Great Britain. 

The heavy black line marks the average price 
per bushel for the year. 

The line at the bottom gives a rough approxi- 
mation of the total 6upply, being the total of 
the estimated English product and the imports. 
It is not, of course, strictly accurate, but it 
illustrates the principle that a comparatively 
Bmall excess or deficiency of supply produces a 
much greater fluctuation in price. 

The dotted lines running straight across the 
diagram are merely for convenience in apply- 
ing the scales at the side. 

The following will further illustrate the use of 
the diagram. Take the year 1864-5, which is the 
seventh ot the blank columns. The line " 0000 " 
is opposite to 14 in the scale of quarters, show- 
ing that the supply of British wheat was, ia 
round numbers t 14 million quarters. The line 
" xxx '• is opposite to 4k in the same scale, show- 
ing that the imports of wheat were 4k million 
quarters. The heavy blackline is opposite $1.20 
in the scale of prices, showing that the average 
price was $1.20 per bushel in gold. Comparing 
the above with the supplies and price of 1867-8, 
Table VII.— Diagram showing (1) the supply of British grown Wheat, (2) the imports of Foreign 
Wheat, and (3) thd Average Prices per Imperial Bushel in the British Market Towns, for the 
Sixteen Yearsfrom 1859 to 1874, inclusive. 



three spaces to the right, we notice a falling off 
to 10k million quarters in the British supply, an 
increase to 8% millions in the imports, and an 
advance in the price to $2.05 per bushel, all which 
is denoted by the changed position of the char- 
acters. 

We may remark, in explanation of the dis- 
crepancy in the total supply, which appears to 
have been one half million quarters greater in 
1867-8, than it was in 1864-5, that the elfect of a 
high price is to bring to the market a larger pro- 
portion of the total yield, wheat being held back 
in the cheap years. It is undoubtedly the fact 
that the 2,616,894 quarters of British wheat sold 
in the dear year, ib67-8, constituted a larger pro- 
portion of the total harvested than did the 
3,440,510 quarters which were sold in the same 
markets in the cheap year, 1864-5. Unfortu- 
nately, there are no means of measuring the op- 
eration of this principle. 

When the plan upon which the diagram is con- 
structed is once understood, it will be found to 
illustrate the principles which we have endeav- 
ored to explain much more clearly than solid col- 
umns of statistics. 

As a general conclusion, it may be considered 
as established that the effect of unrestricted im- 

Eortation, improved means of communication 
y land and sea, and the use of the telegraph, 
has been to give greater steadiness to tue prices 
of wheat in England and throughout the world. 
They neither rise so high, nor sink so low as was 
formerly the case. It is clear, however, that no 
effort of human ingenuity can prevent the price 
of iood from rising when there is a scarcity, and 
falling when there is an abundance, and that, too, 
on a considerable scale. The peculiar situation 
of Great Britain, as the greatest commercial na- 
tion in the world and, at the same time, in no 
slight degree, dependent on other nations for 
bread, causes the price of wheat in all civilized 
nations to turn on the relation of England's to 
the surp us of other countries, and this is par- 
ticularly the case with regard to prices in the 
United States. 



Price 



2.05. 
2.00. 
1.9S. 



1.80. 

1.75- 
1.70. 
1.65. 
1.60. 
1.55- 
1.50. 
1.45. 
1.40. 

1.35- 
1.30. 
1.25. 
1.20. 
1.15. 
1. 10. 
1.05. 
1. 00. 
.95. 

I : 

.80. 



Qrs 

\i5y 2 
16 
Us% 

J 5 

I i4>i 
14 
*3k 
13 

I2>^ 
12 

uk 

II 

IO>< 
10 

9k 



7k 

7 

bU 

6" 

sH 

5 

4k 
4 

3'; 



Total, ) 
Home & > 
Foreign ) 



I 



19K 



3 



0000 



\r\ 


I't 




1 O 



¥ 



•'9 



19% 21 



18k 



i8>* 



17 k 19 



t^ (-. "J 

vo t^ r^ 



r-» t-- 



Qrs 



0000 JawM 0000 



F 



XXX 

0000 



I9K , 20 21;4 20>£ 20 



XXX 

0000 



19 



i6>* 
16 

*SX 

15 

14M 

14 

I3K 

13 

I2>< 
12 

nH 
II 

10k 

10 
9k 

Ik 

8 
7k 

Ik 
6 

5k 
5 

4k 

4 

3k 



Price 



. .2.10 
. .2.05 
. .2. CO 

..1.95 
. .1.90 
..i.]H 

. .I.CO 

..1.75 

. . I . 70 

..1.65 

..1.60 

••1.55 

. . 1 . 50 

..1.45 

..1.40 
••1-35 
..1.30 
..1.25 
. .1.20 
..1. 15 
. .1.10 
..1.05 
.1.00 
.. .95 



( Total, 
<Home& 
( Foreign 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



19 



ABSTRACT OF PUBLIC LAWS, 

iPASSED AT THE FIRST SESSION OF THE FORTY-THIRD CONGRESS, WITH A SUM- 
MARY OF APPROPRIATIONS MADE. 



Chap. 7. — Limits the steam pressure of 
isteamboats used exclusively for towing and carry- 
ing freight on the Mississippi river to 150 lbs., 
in place of 110 lbs., as provided in the act ap- 
proved February 28, 1S71. 

REPEAL OF THE SALARY GEAB. 

Cliap. 1 1 . — An act repealing the in- 
crease of salaries of members of Congress, and 
other officers. — Be tt enacted by the Senate and 
House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, That bo 
much of the act of March third, eighteen hundred 
and seventy -three, entitled, " An act making ap- 
propriations for legislative, executive, and judi- 
cial expenses of the Government for the year 
ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and sev- 
enty-four, 1 ' as provides for the increase of the 
compensation of public officers and employees, 
whether members of Congress, Delegates, or 
others, except the President of the United States 
and the Justices of the Supreme Court, be, and 
the same is hereby, repealed, and the salaries, 
compensation, and allowances of all said persons, 
except as aforesaid, shall be as fixed by the laws 
in force at the time of the passage of said act : 
Provided, That mileage shall not be allowed for 
the first session of the Forty -third Congress ; that 
all moneys appropriated as compensation to the 
members of the Forty-second Congress, in excess 
of the mileage and allowances fixed bylaw at the 
commencement of said Congress, and which shall 
not have been drawn by the members of said Con- 
gress respectively, or which having been drawn, 
have been returned in any form to the United 
States, are hereby covered fnto the Treasury of 
the United States, and are declared to be the 
moneys of the United States absolutely, the same 
as if they had never been appropriated as afore- 
said. 

Approved, January 20, 1874 

(For the text of the Salary Grab, see page 25 of 
the Tribune Almanac for 1874.) 

Chap. 35; — In relation to Engineers in 
the Navy. — Changes the title of first assistant 
engineers to passed assistant engineers, and of 
second assistant engineers to assistant engineers. 
Makes the course of instruction for cadet en- 
gineers at the naval academy four years. 

TREE PLANTING ON WESTERN PRAIRIES. 

Chap. 55. — An act to amend the act en- 
titled "An act to encourage the growth of 
timber on western prairies. 1 '' — Be it enacted 
by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America, in Congress as- 
sembled, That the act entitled " An act to en- 
courage the growth of timber on western prairies," 
approved March third, eighteen hundred and 
seventy-three, be, and the same is hereby, 
amended so as to read as follows : That any per- 
son who is the head of a family or who has ar- 
rived at the age of twenty-one years, and is a 
citizen of the United States, or who shall have 
filed his declaration of intention to become such, 
as required by the naturalization laws of the 
United States, who shall plant, protect, and keep 
in a healthy, growing condition for eight years, 



forty acres of timber, the trees thereon not being 
more than twelve feet apart each way, on any 
quarter-section of any of the public lands of the 
United States, or twenty acres on any legal sub- 
division of eighty acres, or ten acres on any legal 
subdivision of forty acres, or one-fourth part of 
any fractional subdivision of landless than forty 
acres, shall be entitled to a patent for the whole 
of said quarter-section, or of such legal subdivis- 
ion of eighty or forty acres, or fractional su (di- 
vision of less than forty acres, as the case may 
be, at the expiration of said eight years, on mak- 
ing proof of such fact by not less than two credi- 
ble witnesses : Provided, That not more than 
one-quarter of any section shall be thus granted, 
and that no person shall make more than one 
entry under the^provisions of this act, unless 
fractional subdivisions of less than forty acres 
are entered which, in the aggregate, shall not ex- 
ceed one quarter-section. 

Sec. 2. That the person applying for the benefit 
of this act shall, upon application to the register 
of the land-district in which he or 6he is about to 
make such entry, make affidavit before the regis- 
ter, or the receiver, or some officer authorized to 
administer oaths in the district where the land is 
situated, who is required by law to use an official 
seal, that said entry is made for the cultivation of 
timbei, and upon filing said affidavit with said 
register and said receiver, and on payment of ten 
dollars, he or she shall thereupon be permitted to 
enter the quantity of land specified; and the 
party making an entry of a quarter-section under 
the provisions of this act shall be required to 
break ten acres of the land covered thereby the 
first year, ten acres the second year, and twenty 
acres the third year after date of entry, and to 
plant ten acres of timber the second year, ten 
acres the third year, and twenty acres the fourth 
year after date of entry. A party making an 
entry of eighty acres shall break and plant at the 
times hereinbefore prescribed, one-half of the 
quantity required of a party who enters a quarter- 
section, and a party entering forty acres shall 
break and plant, a# the times hereinbefore pre- 
scribed, one-quarter of the quantity required of 
a party who enters a quarter-section, or a pro- 
portionate quantity for any smaller fractional 
subdivision : Provided, however, That no final 
certificate shall be given or patent issued for the 
land so entered until the expiration of eight years 
from the date of such entry; and, if at the ex- 
piration of such time, or at any time within five 
years thereafter, the person making such entry, 
or if he or she be dead, his or her heirs or 
legal representatives shall prove, by two credible 
witnesses, that he, or she, or they have planted, 
and, for not less than eight years, have cultivated 
and protected such quantity and character of 
timber as aforesaid, they shall receive a patent 
for such quarter-section or legal subdivision of 
eighty or forty acres of land, or lor any fractional 
quantity of less than iorty acres, as herein pro- 
vided. And in case of the death of a person who 
has complied with the provisions of this act for 
the period of three years, his heirs or legal repre- 
sentatives shall have the option to comply with 
the provisions of this act, and receive, at the ex- 



- 



20 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST5. 



piration of eight years, a patent for one hundred 
and sixty acres, or receive without delay a patent 
for forty acres, relinquishing all claim to the re- 
mainder. 

Sec 3. That if at any time after the filing of 
said affidavit, and prior to the issuing of the pat- 
ent for said land, the claimant shall abandon 
the land, or fail to do the breaking and planting 
required by this act, or any part thereof, or shall 
fail to cultivate, protect, and keep in good con- 
dition such timber, then, and in that event, such 
land shall be subject to entry under the home- 
stead laws, or by some other person under the 
provisions of this act : Provided, That the party 
making claim to said land, either as a homestead 
settler or under this act, shall give, at the time 
of filing his application, such notice to the orig- 
inal claimant as shall be prescribed by the rules 
established by the Commissioner of the General 
Land Office, and the rights of the parties shall be 
determined as in other contested cases. 

Skc. 4. That each and every person who, under 
the provisions of the act entitled " An act to se- 
cure homesteads to actual settlers on the public 
domain," approved May twentieth, eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty-two, or any amendment thereto, 
having a homestead on said public domain, who, 
at any time after the end of the third yeur of his 
or her residence thereon, shall, in addition to the 
settlement and improvements now required by 
law, have had under cultivation, for two years, 
one acre of timber, the trees thereon not being 
more than twelve feet apart each way, and in a 
good thrifty condition, for each and every sixteen 
acres of said homestead, shall, upon due proof of 
such fact by two credible witnesses, receive his 
or her patent for said homestead. 

Sec. 5. That no land acquired UDder the pro- 
visions of this act shall in any event become lia- 
ble to the satisfaction of any debt or debts con- 
tracted prior to the issuing of certificate therefor. 

Sec. 6. That the Commissioner of the General 
Land Office is hereby required to prepare and 
issue such rules and regulations, consistent with 
this act, as shall be necessary and proper to 
carry its provisions into effect; and that the reg- 
isters and the receivers of the several land offices 
shall each be entitled to receive two dollars at 
the time of entry, and the same sum when the 
claim is finally established and the final certifi- 
cate issued. 

Sec. 7. That the fifth section of the act entitled 
"An act in addition to an act to punish crimes 
against the United States, and for other pur- 
poses," approved March third, eighteen hundred 
and fifty-seven, shall extend,to all oaths, affirma- 
tions, and affidavits required or authorized by 
this act. 

Sec. 8. That parties who have already made 
entries under the act approved March third, 
eighteen hundred and seventy-three, of which 
this is amendatory, shall be permitted to complete 
the same upon full compllanee with the provisions 
of this act. 

Approved, March 13, 1S74. 

(The act hereby amended is given in full in the 
Tribune Almanac for 1874.) 

ENCOURAGEMENT OF PUBLIC MARINE SCHOOLS. 

Chap. 339. — An act to encourage th* 
establishment of public marine 66hool*.-—Be 
it enacted by the SenaU and House of Repre- 



sentatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the 
Navy, to promote nautical education, is hereby 
authorized and empowered to furnish, upon the 
application in writing of the Governor of the 
State, a suitable vessel of the Navy, with all her 
apparel, charts, books, and instruments of navi- 
gation, provided the same can be spared without I 
detriment to the naval service, to be used for the 
benefit of any nautical school, or school or college 
having a nautical branch, established at each or 
any of the ports of New York, Boston, Philadel- - 
phia, Baltimore, Norfolk, and San Francisco, 
upon the condition that there shall be main- 
tained, at such port, a school or branch of a 
school for the instruction of youths in navigation, , 
seamanship, marine enginery and all matters < 
pertaining to the proper construction, equipment i 
and sailing of vessels or any particular branch J 
thereof: And the President of the United States •' 
is hereby authorized, when in his opinion the • 
same can be done without detriment to the pub* • 
lie service, to detail proper officers of the Navy 
aa superintendents of, or instructors in, such 
schools : Provided, That if any such school shall 
be discontinued, or the good of the naval service 
shall require, such vessel shall be immediately 
restored to the Secretary of the Navy, and the 
officers so detailed recalled : Arid provided fur- 
ther. That no person shall be sentenced to, or 
received at, such schools as a punishment or 
commutation of punishment for crime. 
Approved, June 20, 1874. 

THE CURRENCY. 

The following is the Dawes Compromise Bank 
Note Redemption, Inflation, Redistribution bilL 
in full : 

Cbap. 343,-Mti act fining the amount 
of United Slates notes, providing for a re- 
distribution of the national bank currency, 
and for other purposes. — Be it enacted by the 
Senate a?td House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled, That the act entitled "An act to provide a,« 
national currency secured by a pledge of the- 
United States bonds, and to provide for the cir- 
culation and redemption thereof," approved June 
third, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, shall 
hereafter be known as "the national bank act." 

Release of Reserves on Circulation. Reserves 
on Deposits Retained. 
Sec. 2. That section thirty -one of the " the na- 
tional bank act " be so amended that the several 
associations therein provided for shall not here- 
after be required to keep on hand any amount of 
money whatever, by reason of the amount of their 
respective circulations; but the moneys required 
by said rection to be kept at all times on hand 
shall be determined by the amount of deposits in i 
all respects, as provided for in the said section. 

Provisions for Redemption of Bank Notes. 
Ssc. 3. That every association organized, or to 
be organized, under the provisions of the said act, 
and of the several acts amendatory thereof, shall 
at all times keep and have on deposit in the treas- 
ury of the United States, in lawful money of the 
United States, a sum equal to five per centum of 
Its circulation, to be held and used for the re- 
demption of of such circulation ; which sum shall 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



21 



be counted as a part of its lawful reserve, as pro- 
vided in section two of this act ; and when the 
circulating notes of any such associations, as- 
sorted or unassorted, shall be presented for re- 
demption, in sums of one thousand dollars, or any- 
multiple thereof, to the Treasurer of the United 
States, the same shall be redeemed in United 
States notes. All notes so redeemed shall be 
charged by the Treasurer of the United States to 
the respective associations issuing the Fame, and 
he shall notify them severally, on the first day of 
each month, or oftener, at his discretion, of the 
amount of such redemptions ; at d whenever such 
redemptions for any association shall amount to 
the sum of five hundred dollars, such association 
so notified shall forthwith deposit with the Treas- 
urer of the United States a Bum in United States 
notes equal to the amount of its circulating notes 
so redeemed. And all notes of national banks 
worn, defaced, mutilated, or otherwise unfit for 
circulation shall, when received by any assistant 
treasurer, or at any designated depository of the 
United States, be forwarded to the Treasurer of 
the United States for redemption as provided 
herein. And when such redemptions have been 
so reimbursed, the circulating notes so redeemed 
shall be forwarded to the respective associations 
by which they were issued ; but if any of such 
notes are worn, mutilated, defaced, or rendered 
otherwise unfit for use, they 6hall be forwarded 
to the Comptroller of the Currency and destroyed 
and replaced asnowprovidedbylaw: Provided, 
That each of said associations shall reimburse to 
the Treasury the charges for transportation, and 
the costs for assorting such notes ; and the asso- 
ciations hereafter organized shall also severally 
reimburse to the Treasury the cost of engraving 
such plates as Ehall le ordered by each associa- 
tion respectively; and the amount assessed upon 
each association shall be in proportion to the cir- 
culation redeemed, and be charged to the fund 
on deposit with the Treasurer: And provided 
further, That so much of section thirty-two of 
said national bank act requiring or permitting the 
redemption of its circulating notes elsewhere than 
at its own counter, except as provided for in this 
section, s hereby repealed. 

Withdrawal of Circulation. 
Sec. 4. That any association organized under 
this act, or any of the acts of which this is an 
amendment, desiring to withdraw its circulating 
notes, in whole or in part, may, upon the deposit 
of lawful money with the Treasurer of the United 
States in sums of not less than nine thousand 
dollars, take up the bonds which said association 
has on deposit with the Treasurer for the security 
of such circulating notes ; which bonds shall be 
assigned to the bank in the manner specified in 
the nineteenth section of the national bank act ; 
and the outstanding notes of said association, to 
an amount equal to the legal tender notes depos- 
ited, shall be redeemed at the Treasury of the 
United States, and destroyed as now provided by 
law: Provided^ That the amount of the bonds 
on deposit for circulation shall not be reduced 
below fifty thousand dollars. 

Charter Numbers of Associations to be 

Printed on National Bank Notes. 
Seo. 5. That the Comptroller of the Currency 
shall, under such rules and regulations as the 



Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe, cause 
the charter numbers of the association to be 
printed upon all national bank notes which may 
be hereafter issued by him. 

Increase of the Lawful Legal Tender Circu- 
lation. 

Sec. 6. That the amount of United States notes 
outstanding and to be used as a part of the circu- 
lating medium, shall not exceed the sum of three 
hundred and eighty-two million dollars, which 
said sum shall appear in each monthly statement 
of the public debt, and no part thereof shall be 
held or used as a reserve. 

WitJuZrawal of Currency to Secure Equitable 
Distribution. 

Sec. 7. That so much of the act entitled " An 
act to provide for the redemption of of the three 
per centum temporary loan certificates, and for 
an increase of national bank Botes," as provides 
that no circulation shall be withdrawn under the 
provisions of section six of said act, until after 
the fifty-four millions granted in section one of 
said act shall have been taken up, is hereby re- 
pealed; and it shall be the duty of the Comp- 
troller of the Currency, under the direction of the 
Secretary of the Treasury, to proceed forthwith, 
and he is hereby authorized and required, from 
time to time, as applications shall be duly made 
therefor, and until the full amount of fifty-five 
million dollars fchall be withdrawn, to make re- 
quisitions upon each of the national banks de- 
scribed in said section, and in the manner therein 
provided, organized in States having an excess 
of circulation, to withdraw and return so much 
of their circulation as by said act may be appor- 
tioned to be withdrawn from them, or, in lieu 
thereof, to deposit in the Treasury of the United 
States lawful money sufficient to redeem such cir- 
culation, and upon the return of the circulation 
required, or the deposit of lawful money, as herein 
provided, a proportionate amount of the bonds 
held to secure the circulation of such association 
as shall make such return or deposit shall be sur- 
rendered to it. 

Delinquent Banks, LTow Dealt With. 
Sec. 8. That upon the failure of the national 
banks upon which requisition for circulation 
shall be made, or of any of them, to return the 
amount required, or to deposit in the Treasury 
lawful money to redeem the circulation required, 
within thirty days, the Comptroller of the Cur- 
rency shall at once sell, as provided in section 
forty -nine of the national currency act approved 
June third, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, 
bonds held to secure the redemption of the circu- 
lation of the association or associations which 
shall so fail, to an amount sufficient to redeem 
the circulation required of such association or as- 
sociations, and with the proceeds, which shall be 
deposited in the Treasury of the United States, 
so much of the circulation of such association or 
associations shall be redeemed as will equal the 
amount required and not returned, and if there 
be any excess of proceeds over the amount re- 
quired for such redemption, i' shall be returned 
to the association or associations whose bonds 
shall have been sold. And it shall be the duty 
of the Treasurer, assistant treasurers, designated 
depositaries, and national bank depositaries of 



22 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



; the United States, who shall be kept informed by 
the Comptroller of the Currency of 6uch associa- 
tions as shall fail to return circulation as re- 
quired, to assort and return to the Treasury for 
redemption the notes of such associations as shall 

: come into their hands until the amount required 
shall be redeemed, and in like manner to assort 

' and return to the Treasury, for redemption, the 
notes of such national banks as have failed, or 
gone into voluntary liquidation for the purpose 
of winding up their affairs, and of such as shall 
hereafter so fail or go into liquidation. 

Redistribution of Bank Note Circulation. 

Sec. 9. That from and after the passage of this 
act it shall be lawful for the Comptroller of the 
Currency, and he is hereby required, to issue cir- 
culating notes without delay, as applications' 
therefor are made, not to exceed the sum of fifty- 
five million dollars, to associations organized, or 
to be organized, in those States and Territories 
having less than their proportion of circulation, 
under an apportionment made on the basis of 
population and of wealth, as shown by the re- 
turns of the census of eighteen hundred and 
seventy; and every association hereafter organ- 
ized shall be subject to, and be governed by, the 
rules, restrictions, and limitations, and possess 
the rights, privileges, and franchises, now or 
hereafter to be prescribed by law as to national 
banking associations, with the same power to 
amend, alter, and repeal provided by the na. 
tional bank act:" Provided, That the whole 
amount of circulation withdrawn and redeemed 
from banks transacting business shall not exceed 
fifty -five million dollars, and that such circulation 
shall be withdrawn and redeemed as it shall be 
necessary to supply the circulation previously 
issued to the banks in those States having less 
than their apportionment: And provided fur- 
ther, That not more than thirty million dollars 
shall be withdrawn and redeemed as herein 
contemplated during the fiscal year ending 
June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy- 
five. 

Approved, June 20, 1874. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE BANKRUPT ACT. 

Chap. 390. — An act to amend and sup- 
plement art act entitled ''An act to establish a 
uniform system of bankruptcy throughout the 
United States,''' approved March 2, 1867, and 
for other purposes — The court may direct the 
receiver or assignee to take possession of the 
property and carry on the business of the debtor, 
but not for a period exceeding nine months. 
Such order shall not be made, however, until the 
court shall be sati fied that it is approved by a 
majority in value of the creditors. Unless other- 
wise ordered by the court, the assignee shall sell 
the property of the bankrupt at public auction. 
The court may. in its discretion, order any real 
estate of the bankrupt to be sold for one-fourth 
cash at the time of sale, and the residue within 
eighteen months, in such instalments as the 
court may direct, bearing interest at seven per 
cent., and secured by mortgage. Penalties for 
neglect, fraud, &c, on part of assignee are 
prescribed. 

Composition with Creditors. 
In all cases of bankruptcy the creditors may 



resolve that a composition proposed by the 
debtor shall be accepted, provided that the prop- 
osition is agreed to by a majority in number and 
three-fourths in the amount of their claims. 
Creditors whose debts amount to less than $50 
shall not be reckoned in determining the major- 
ity in number. Creditors whose debts are fully 
secured shall not be entitled to vote upon the 
proposition. 

Reduction of Fees. 
The fees, commissions, charges, and allow- 
ances, excepting actual and necessary disburse- 
ments, are reduced to one-half those formerly 
provided. 

(A synopsis of the act, to which the above is an 
amendment, is given in the Tribune Almanac for 
868.) 

MOIETIES REPEALED. 

Chap* 193. — To amend the Customs- 
Revenue laws and repeal Moieties. — Abol- 
ishes moieties to officers of the revenue and in- 
formers, provides for the payment of all fines into 
the Treasury, and appropriates $100,000 to the 
Secretary of the Treasury, out of which to make 
suitable compensation in certain cases. Not to 
exceed $5,000 shall be paid to informers who are 
not officers of the United States. 

Production of Books, Papers, <&c. 

Sec. 5. That all suits and proceedings other 
than criminal arising under any of the revenue 
laws of the United States, the attorney represent- 
ing the Government, whenever, in his belief, any 
business-book, invoice, or paper belonging to or 
under the control of the defendant or claimant, 
will tend to prove any allegation made by the 
United States, may make a written motion, par- 
ticularly describing such book, invoice, or paper, 
and setting forth the allegation which he expects 
to prove ; and thereupon the court in which suit 
or proceeding is pending may, at its discretion, 
issue a notice to the defendant or claimant to 
produce such book, invoice, or paper in court, at 
a day and hour to be specified in said notice, 
which, together with a copy of said motion, shall 
be served formally on the defendant or claimant 
by the United States marshal, by delivering to 
him a certified copy thereof, or otherwise serving 
the same as original notices of .suit in the same 
court are served; and if the defendant or claim- 
ant shall fail or refuse to produce such book, in- 
voice, or paper, in obedience to such notice, the 
allegations stated in the said motion shall be 
taken as confessed, unless his failure or refusal 
to produce the same shall be explained to the 
satisfaction of the court. And if produced, the 
said attorney shall be permitted, under the direc- 
tion of the court, to make examination (at which 
examination the defendant or claimant, or his 
agent, may be present) of such entries in said 
book, invoice, or paper as relate to or tend to 
prove the allegation aforesaid, and may offer the 
same in evidence on behalf of the United States. 
But the owner of said books and papers, his 
agent or attorney, shall have, subject to the order 
of the court, the custody of them, except pending 
their examination in court as aforesaid. 

Penalty for False Invoices. 
Sec. 12. That any owner, importer, consignee, 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



23 



agent, or other person who shall, with intent to 
defraud the revenue, make, or attempt to make, 
any entry of imported merchandise, by means of 
any fraudulent or false invoice, affidavit, letter, 
or paper, or by means of any false statement, 
written or verbal, or who shall be guilty of any 
wilful act or omission, by means whereof the 
United States shall be deprived of the lawful 
duties, or any portion thereof, accruing upon the 
merchandise, or'any portion thereof, embraced or 
referred to in such invoice, affidavit, letter, paper, 
or statement, or affected by such act or omission, 
shall, for each offense, be fined in any sum not 
exceeding five thousand dollars, nor less than 
fifty dollars, or be imprisoned for any time not 
exceeding two years, or both ; and, in addition to 
such fine, such merchandise shall be forfeited; 
which forfeiture shall only apply to the whole of 
the merchandise in the case or package contain- 
ing the particular article or articles of merchan- 
dise to which such fraud or alleged fraud relates ; 
and aDything contained in any act which pro- 
vides for the forfeiture or confiscation of an en- 
tire invoice in consequence of any item or items 
contained in the same being undervalued, be, and 
the same is hereby, repealed. 

The omission to add to market value the cost of 
packing, shipping:, charges for inland transporta- 
tion, &c, without intent to defraud the revenue, 
shall not be a cause of forfeiture ; but where such 
cost, &c, is omitted, the collector or appraiser 
shall add double such cost to the dutiable value 
of the goods. 

Salaries of Custom Rouse Officers. 

Sec. 23. That in lieu of the salaries, moieties, 
and perquisites of whatever name or nature, and 
commissions on disbursements, now paid to and 
received by the collectors, naval officers, and sur- 
veyors connected with the customs service in the 
several collection districts of the United States 
hereinafter named, there shall be paid, fiom and 
after the first day of July, eighteen hundred and 
seventy-four, an annual salary as follows : 

To the collector of the district of New York, 
twelve thousand dollars. 

To the collectors of the districts of Boston and 
Charlestown, Massachusetts; and Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, each eight thousand dollars. 

To the collectors of the districts of San Fran- 
cisco, California; Baltimore, Maryland ; and New 
Orleans, Louisiana, each seven thousand dollars. 

To the collector of the district of Portland and 
Falmouth, Maine, six thousand dollars. 

To the naval officer for the district of New 
York, eight thousand dollars. 

To the naval officers of the districts of Boston 
and Charlestown, Massachusetts ; and San Fran- 
cisco, California; and Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, each five thousand dollars. 

To the surveyor of the port of New York, eight 
thousand dollars. 

To the surveyors of the ports of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts; and San Francisco, California; and 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, each five thousand 
dollars. 

THE ALABAMA CLAIMS. 

Cliap. 459.— Creates a Court of Five 
Commissioners to adjudicate Claims on the 
Alabama Indemnity Fund of $15,500,000 re- 
ceived from Great Britain.— -Sec. 11. That it 



shall be the duty of said court to receive and ex- 
amine all claims admissible under this act that 
may be presented to it, directly resulting from 
damage caused by the so-called insurgent cruisers 
Alabama, Florida, and their tenders, and also all 
claims admissible under this act directly resulting 
from damage caused by the so-called insurgent 
cruiser Shenandoah, after her departure from 
Melbourne on the eighteenth day of February, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-five, and to decide 
upon the amount and validity of such claims, in 
conformity with the provisions hereinafter con- 
tained, and according to the principles of law 
and the merits of the several cases. All claims 
shall be verified by oath of the claimant, and filed 
in said court within six months next after^ the 
organization thereof, as provided in section eight 
of this act ; and no claim shall be received, dock- 
eted, or considered that shall have not been so 
filed ■within the time aforesaid; but every such 
unrepresented claim shall be deemed and held to 
be finally and conclusively waived and barred. 

"What Claims are not to be Allowed. 
Sec. 12. That no claim shail be admissible or 
allowed by said court for any loss or damage for 
or in respect to which the party injured, his as- 
signees or legal representatives, shall have re- 
ceived compensation or indemnity from any in- 
surance company, insurer, or otherwise ; but if 
such compensation or indemnity so received shall 
not have been equal to the loss or damage so 
actually suffered, allowance may be made for the 
difference. And in no case shall any claim be 
admitted or allowed for or in respect to un- 
earned freights, gross freights, prospective profits, 
freights, gains, or advantages, or for wages of of- 
ficers or seamen for a longer time than one year 
next after the breaking up of a voyage by the 
acts aforesaid. And no claim shall be admissible 
or allowed by said court by or in behalf of any 
insurance company or insurer, either in its or his 
own right, or as assignee, or otherwise, in the 
right of a person or party insured as aforesaid, 
unless such claimant shall show, to the satisfac- 
tion of said court, that, during the late rebellion, 
the sum of its or his losses, in respect to its or his 
war risks, exceeded the sum of its or his premi- 
ums or other gains upon or in respect to such war 
risks ; and, in case of any such allowance, the 
same shall not be greater than any such excess 
of loss. And no claim shall be admissible or al- 
lowed by said court arising in favor of any insur- 
ance company not lawfully existing at the time 
of the loss under the laws of some one of the 
United States. And no claim shall be admissible 
or allowed by said court arising in favor of any 
person not entitled, at the time of his loss, to the 
protection of the United States in the premises, 
nor arising in favor of any person who did not at 
all times during the late rebellion bear true alle- 
giance to the United States. 

POSTPONEMENT OP EXPENDITURES FOR PUBLIC 
BUILDINGS. 

Chap* 416.— An act to authorise the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury to suspend work upon 
the public buildings. — Be it enacted by the 
Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled^ That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and 
he is hereby, authorized and directed to defer 



24 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



and upon the final completion of each or any of said ] maining shall be immediately covered Into the 
buildings, and the payment of all outstanding lia- j Treasury. 

bllities therefor, the balance or balances re- The second section of this act relates to the 

selection of sites. 



' 



APPROPRIATIONS MADE BY THE XLIII CONGRESS, I SESSION. 

FOR DEFICIENCIES, &c, 1873-4 : 

By Chap. 3.— Naval Service $4,000,000 

By Chaps. 10, 16, 20, 26, 39, 50, 58, 69, 75 

and 1 36 for sundry purposes 121,461 



70,000 
50,162 

9,247 
322,946 

162,629 



By Chap. 181.— Sioux Indians 

By Chap. 388.— Deficiencies 

State Department 

Independent Treasury 

Mints and Assay Offices 

Territorial Governments 

Treasury Department 

War Department 612^951 

Interior Department, Indians 1 ,837,522 

Public Lands 6,238 

Miscellaneous 202,300 

Post Office Department 221,604 

Judicial 375,821 

Senate 90,600 

House of Heps., Public Grounds, &c. 106,055 



Total Deficiencies, &c, 1873-4 $8,275,375 



339,«35 

3405,404 

27,788,500 



FOR THE YEAR 1874-5. 

By Chap. 74.— Fortlflcations,.&c $904,000 

By Chap. 20=;.— Military Telegraph 100,000 

By Chap. 216.— Naval Service 16,818,946 

By Chap. 217. — Military Academy 

By Chap. 275.— Diplomatic Service . . 
By Chap. 285.— Support of the Army . 
By Chap. 328.— Legislative, Execu- 
tive and Judicial Expenses : 

Pay and Mileage of Senate 400,000 

Pay and Mileage of House 1,665,000 

Salary of President 50,000 

Salary of Vice-President 8,000 

Clerks, &c, of Senate 237,926 

Clerks, &c, of House 347,979 

52,600 
16,417 
60,786 
48,368 
19,800 



Police 

Office of Public Printer 

Library and Botanic Garden 

Public Buildings and Grounds 

Office of President, Salaries 

State Department, Salaries, Postage 

and Publishing the Laws 287,1., 

Treasury Dcpartment-Salaries, &c. . 7,906,742 
Printing Greenbacks, Bonds, &c 2,207,868 



Independent Treasury, Salaries, &c. 
Mints and Assay Offices, Salaries, &c. 

Territorial Governments 

War Department, Salaries. 



478.903 
i.099,345 

257.325 
1,167,1 



Navy Department, Salari s 161,240 

Patent Office, Salaries, &c 672,800 

Pension Office. Salaries, &c m6,5oo 

Interior Department, Salaries, &c. . . 642,=.3o 

Post Office Department, Salaries, &c. 492,992 

Dpt. of Agric'lt'e, Salaries, Seeds.&c. 238,780 

United States Courts, Salaries 432,090 

Judgments of the Court of Claims... 1,000,000 

Department of Justice, Salaries 147,820 

Total by Chap. 328, $20,616,041. 

By Chap. 335.— For Pensions 29,980,000 

By Chap. 389.— For the Indians 5,656,171 

By Chap. 193.— In lieu of Moieties 100,000 

By Chap. 403.— Anacostia river bridge 146,000 
By Chap. 455.— Sundby Civil Expenses : 

Public Printing and Binding 1,676,708 

Life-saving Stations 489,^08 

Revenue Cutter Service 1.152,883 

Marine Hospital Service 100,000 

National Currency, &c 251,500 

Judiciary, Enforcement Act, &c 3,109,291 

Miscellaneous 418,347 



District of Columbia $1,300,000 

Public Lands and Surveying 1,088,880 

Collecting Revenue from Land Sales. 574,040 

Capitol Extension, &c 441,915 

Metropolitan Police 207,530 

Hospital for Insane 203,741 

Deaf and Dumb Institution 77,000 

Columbia Hospital, &c 106,000 

Coast Survey 782,000 

Light Houses 1,765,533 

Building Light Houses, &c 1,185,300 

Armories and Arsenals 640,957 

Signal Office 389,325 

Survey of Northern Lakes 175,000 

Miscellaneous Purposes 679,434 

Building and Grounds at Washington. 317,730 

Navy Yards 1440,740 

Department of Agriculture 68,600 

Public Buildings : 

Boston Post Office 352,027 

Boston Custom House 25,000 

Charleston (S. C./Custom House 100,000 

Chicago Custom House, &c 750,000 

Cincinnati Custom House 600,000 

Columbia (S. C.) Post Office 156,900 

Evansville (Ind.) Post Office, &c 50,000 

Hartford Post Office, <Src 150,000 

Memphi 1 Post Office, &c 50,000 

New Orleans Custom Houl 234,328 

New York Post Office, &c 1,384,208 

Omaha Post Office, &c 65,500 

Portland (Oregon) Cue-som House . . 40,000 

Philadelphia post Office, &c 750,000 

St. Louis Post Offlcej&c 750,000 

Treasury Building, Washington 58,332 

San Franci6co Mint 235,843 

140,000 
75,000 

38,453 

i'O.ooo 

5.934 
20,000 
70,000 

5,000 



Atlanta Court House, &c 

Port Huron Post Office, &c 

Milwaukee Custom House 

New Haven Custom House .... 

Burlington (Vt.) Custom House. . . 

Knoxvllle Custom House 

Grand Rapids Custom House, &c. . 

Albany (N.Y.) Post Office 

Raleign PostOffice.&c 2cw,ooo 

Nashville 225,000 

Furniture and Repairs in general.. . 350,000 
State Department Building, Washgt'n. 775,000 

Heating Apparatus, &c W5,ooo 

Custodians and Janitors 125,000 

Total, Public Buildings, $8,^56,^25 
Sufterers by Southern floods." 400,000 

Total by Chap. 4^, $27,398,147. 

By Chap. 4^6— Post Office Department.' 3^,7^(>,ogi 

By Chaps. 457 and 460.— Rivers and 

• Harbors 5,228,000 

By Chap. 170.— Relief of Sufterers by 

Overflow of Southern Rivers 190,000 

By Chaps. 168, 337, 346 and 411.— For 

sundry purposes 81,300 

For Payment of Claims allowed by 

Commissioners of Claims 663,769 

Relief of Henry S. Welles 193,133 

By other private Acts (estimated) 100,000 



Total 1874-5 $175,465,737 



Recapitulation. 

Deficiencies, &c, 1873-4 $8,275,375 

For the year 1874-5 175^65,737 



Grand Total. $188,741,119 



te* 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



25 



THE CURRENCY QUESTION. 

RECORD OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES, SHOWING HOW 
EACH SENATOR AND REPRESENTATIVE VOTED ON SIX IMPORTANT FINANCIAL 
PROPOSITIONS INVOLVING THE QUESTION OF INFLATION. 
Record of the Senate. 

1.— March 25, 1874, Mr. Schurz moved to 
amend the first section of the Senate Currency 
Bill so as to make the maximum limit of United 
States notes $356,000,000, which was voted down 
by 18 to 40. 

2.— The same day Mr. Wright moved to strike 
out the first section and insert : " That the max- 
imum amount of United States notes is hereby 
fixed at $400,000,000," which was agreed to by 31 
to 26. 

3.— April 2, 1874, the Senate passed its Infla- 
tion Bill, which is given in full under the head 
of 4, in the introduction to the Record of the 
House on Inflation. The vote was 29 to 24, with 
19 absent or not voting. 

4.— April 27, 1874, a vote was taken in the 
Senate on the question, "Shall the (Senate In- 
flation) bill pass notwithstanding the objections 
of the President ?" The vote was, yeas 34, nays 
30— not two thirds. 

5.— June 12, 1874, the Senate, by a vote of 32 
to 23, passed the Maynard-Morton Compromise 
Inflation Bill, which (June 13) was rejected by 
the House. (See 5 of the Record of the House.) 
This so-called "Compromise" released the re- 



serves required to be held by banks against their 
circulation, authorized unlimited expansion of 
bank note circulation, provided for redemp- 
tion of bank notes with greenbacks by the U. ». 
Treasurer, and extended the legal limit of the 
legal tender circulation to $382,000,000. 

6. — June 19, 1874, the Senate passed the Dawes 
Compromise Inflation bill by a vote of 43 to 19, 
which, June 22, was signed by the President and 
became a law. It is given in full on another 
page of this Almanac, under the Abstract of 
the more important Acts passed at the first Ses- 
sion of the XLIIId Congress. 

Explanation. — In the following lists the 
letter Y signifies in every case a vote in favor of 
an increased issue of paper money, or of legal- 
izing the increase of the legal tender circulation 
beyond $356,000,000. The letter N signifies a vote 
against such increase, and the letter A shows 
that the senator or representative was absent 
or did not vote. The names Of Republicans 
are printed in Roman, those of Democrats 
in Italic, and those of Liberal Republicans in 
small caps. An * shows that the individual 
was not a senator or representative at the time 
the vote was taken. 



Name. 



State. 12 3 4 5 6 



Alcorn, James L Miss 

Allison, William B Iowa 

Anthony, Henry B R.I 

Bayard, Thomas F. Del 

Bogy, ±,ewis V. Mo 

Boreman, Arthur I W. Va 

Bout well, GeorgeS Mass 

Brownlow, William G Tenn 

Buckingham, William A... Conn 

Cameron, Simon Pa 

Carpenter, Matthew H Wis 

Chandler, Zachariah Mich 

Clayton, Powell Ark 

Conkling, Roscoe N. V 

Conover, Simon B Fl'a 

Cooper, Henry Tenn 

Cragin, Aaron H N. H 

Davis, Henry G W. Va 

Dennis, George R Md 

Dorsey, Stephen W Ark 

Edmunds, George F Vt 

Fenton, Reuben E N. T 

Ferry, Orris S Conn 

Ferry, Thomas W Mich 

Flanagan, James W Tex 

Frelinghuysen, Fred. T N. J 

Gilbert, Abijah Fla 

Goldthwaite, George Ala 

Gordon, John B Ga 

Eager, John S Cal 

Hamilton, Mobgan C Tex 

Hamilton, William T. Md 

Hamlin, Hannibal Me 

Harvey, James- M Kas 

Hitchcock, Phineas W Neb 

Howe, Timothy O Wis 

Ingalls, John J Kas 



A'A 
T|Y 

N'N 

NiA 



YN 
A A 



X 



N,N 

aIy 

N;N 
YlA 
N.N 
NiN 
N|N 
A'A 
AIY 
A>A 
N>N 
NlA 
YiY 

a!a 

NiN 
A'A 
YiY 
YlA 
NN 
NN 
N'N 
NN 
Y|Y 
YiY 
NN 
YiY 



N ; N 
NiN 
NiN 
NiN 
YY 
YiY 
Y A 

y!y 



Name. 



Slate. 12 3 4 5 6 



Johnston, John W. Va. 

Jones, John P Nev. 

Kelly, James K. Or. 

Lewis, John F Va. 

Logan, John A 111. 

Mc Creery, Thomas C Ky . 

Merrimon, Augustus S. N. C. 

Mitchell, John H Or. 

Morrill, Justin S Vt. 

Morrill, Lot M Me. 

Morton, Oliver P Ind. 

Norwood, Thomas N. Ga. 

Oglesby , Richard 111. 

Patterson, John J S. C. 

Pease, Henry R Miss. 

Pratt, Daniel D Ind. 

Ramsey, Alexander Minn. 

Ransom, Matthew W. N. C . 

Robertson, Thomas J S. C. 

Sargent, Aaron A Cal. 

Saulsbury, Eli Del. 

Schuez, Cabl Mo. 

Scott, John Pa . 

Sherman, John Ohio. 

Spencer, George E Ala . 

Sprague, William R.I. 

Stevenso7i,Joh7i W. Ky . 

Stewart, William M Nev. 

Stockton, John P. N. J. 

Thurman, Allen G Ohio. 

Tipton, Thomas W Neb. 

Wadleigh, Bainbridgc N. H. 

Washburn, William B Mass. 

West, J. Rodman La. 

Windom, William Minn. 

Wright, George G Iowa . '' 



Record of the House. 

' 1.— January 19, 1874, Mr. Wilson, of Indiana, 

moved that the rules be suspended and that the 

following preamble and resolutions be adopted : 

Whereas, by reason of the present monetary 

stringency and the insufficiency in the amount 

I of circulating medium, the industries and com- 

I mercial affairs of the country have been greatly 

i depressed; andwhereas, by reason of said strin- 

fency, the revenues of the Government have 
een largely diminished, in consequence where- 



of Congress has been asked to increase taxation 
to the amount of $42,000,000; and whereas until 
the recent panic the revenues were ample to 
meet the current expenses of the Government : 
Therefore, 

Resolved, That instead of levying additional 
taxes the true policy lies in the enactment of 
such a law or laws as will relieve such strin- 
gency and supply the means necessary to the 
business wants of the country, by increasing the 
circulating medium, thereby reviving business, 



26 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



increasing revenues, and thus avoiding the ne- 
cessity of increasing the present rates of tax- 
ation or duties, or the imposition of additional 
taxes or duties. 

Resolved, That the Committee on Banking 
and Currency be, and is hereby, instructed to 
prepare and report to the House, without delay, 
a bill for the purpose in the first, resolution ex- 
pressed, and that said committee have leave to 
report at any time. 

Mr. Wilson required a two-thirds vote to 
carry his motion, but obtained only 135 to 98, 53 
not voting. 

2.— March 23, 1874, the following bill passed 
the House by a vote of 166 to 77 : 

A Bill to fix the amount of legal tender notes at 
$400,000,000. 

Whereas, The existing uncertainty as to 
whether the amount of legal tender notes now 
authorized by law to be kept in general circula- 
tion, is $356,000,000, or $400,000,000, is calculated 
to derange the business of the country and un- 
settle values ; therefore 

Be it enacted, dec, That the provisions of law 
existing prior to the passage of the act approved 
April 12, 1866, entitled "An act to amend an act 
to provide ways and means to support the 
Government," approved March 3, 1865, be and 
the same are hereby declared to be in force, so 
as to authorize the amount of legal tender notes 
ofthe United States to the amount of $400,000,000, 
to be kept in general circulation, and the total 
amount of United btates notes, issued or to be 
issued, shall never exceed $400,000,000. 

3.— April 14, 1874, the House, by a vote of 129 
to 116, passed the Maynard " free banking " In- 
flation Bill. This bill provided that the national 
banks should not be required to keep a reserve 
for the redemption of their circulating" notes ; 
that there should be no limit to the aggregate 
circulation of the national banks ; that bank 
notes should be" redeemed " at the Treasury in 
legal tenders, out of a five per cent. " redemp- 
tion fund," to be kept and maintained there by 
the banks for that purpose ; that banks should 
keep their reserves in their own vaults, and not 
on deposit at " redemption cities." 



Name. State. 

Adams, George Jf. Ky . 

Albert, William J Md. 

Albright, Charles Pa. 

Archer, Stevenson , . . .Md. 

■Arthur, William E Ky. 

Ashe, Thomas S N. C. 

Atkins, Johii'D. C Tenn. 

Averill, John T Minn. 

Banning, Hknkt B Ohio. 

Barber, J. Allen Wis. 

Barnum, William H Conn . 

Barrere, Granville 111. 

Barry, Henry W . .Miss. 

Bass, Lyman K N. Y. 

Beck, James B. Ky. 

Begole, Josiah W Mich. 

Bell, Hiram P Ga. 

Berry, John Ohio. 

Bierv, James S Pa. 

Blan d, Richard P. Mo . 

Blount, James U. Ga. 

Boicen, Reese T. Va. 

Bradley, Nathan B Mich. 

Bright, John M Tenn. 

Brombeeg. Frederick G..Ala. 

Brown, John Y. Ky . 

Buckner, Aylett H. Mo . 

Buffinton, James Mass. 

Bundy, Hezekiah S Ohio. 

Burch3rd, Horatio C HI. 

Burleigh, John H Me. 

Burrows, Julius C Mich. 



4.— April 14, 1874, the House, by a vote of 140 
to 102, passed the Senate Inflation Bill which, 
April 22, was vetoed by the President. The fol- 
lowing is the full text of this bill: 

A Bill to fix the amount of United States note? 

and the circulation of national banks, and 

for other purposes. 

Be it resolved, dec, That the maximum amount 
of United States notes is hereby fixed at $400,- 
000,000. 

Section 2. That $46,000,000 in notes for circula- 
tion, in addition to 6uch circulation now al- 
lowed by law, shall be issued to national bank- 
ing associations now organized, and which may 
be organized hereafter, and such increased cir- 
culation shall be distributed among the several 
States as provided in section 1 or the Act en- 
titled " An Act to provide for the redemption 
of the three per centum temporary loan certifi- 
cates, and for an increase of national bank 
notes," approved July 12, 1870 ; and each na- 
tional banking association now organized, or 
hereafter to be organized, shall keep and main- 
tain, as a part of its reserve required by law, 
one fourth part of the coin received by it as 
interest on bonds of the United States, deposit- 
ed as security for circulating notes or Govern- 
ment deposits, and that hereafter only one 
fourth of the reserve now prescribed by law for 
national banking associations shall consist of 
balances due to an association available for the 
redemption of its circulating notes from asso- 
ciations in cities of redemption, and upon which 
balances no interest shall be paid. 

5.— June 13, 1874, the House, by a vote of 108 
to 146, rejected the Maynard-Morton Compro- 
mise Inflation Bill, such inflationists as Butler, 
Coburn and Kelley voting against it as not fur- 
nishing adequate "relief** to the business com- 
munity. See 6, Record of the Senate. 

6.— June 20, 1874, the House, by a vote of 221 
to 40, passed the Dawes Compromise Currency 
Bill, which, June 22, was signed by the President 
and became a law. It is given in full on another 
page of this Almanac, under the Abstract of 
the more important acts passed at the first Ses- 
sion of the XLIIId Congress. 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Y 


Y 


Y 


NN 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


Y 


V 


A 


Y 


Y Y 


Y 


N 


,\ 


A 


AN 


X 


V 


1 


N 


Y N 


Y 


V 


i 


A 


AN 


Y 


A 


V 


N 


TN 


Y 


V 


V 


Y 


Y Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


N N 


Y 


V 


Y 


A 


Y Y 


Y 


A 


N 


N 


NN 


X 


Y 


A 


Y 


YY 


Y 


A 


V 


Y 


a'a 


Y 


N 


N 


X 


N 


N 


X 


N 


V 


N 


X 


N 


Y 


Y 


V 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


A 


A 


N 


Y 


V 


A 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


V 


V 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


V 


V 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


a 


N 


X 


Y 


X 


V 


A 


N 


Y 


X 


Y 


Y 


N 


X 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


X 


N 


NiN 


V 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y|Y 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


YY 


N 


N 


X 


NNY 


* 


A 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 



Name. 



State. 12 3 4 5 6 



Butler, Benjamin F Mass. 

Butler, Roderick R Tenn. 

Cain, Richard H S. C. 

Caldwell, John H. Ala. 

Cannon, Joseph G Ill . 

Cason, Thomas J Ind. 

Cessna, John Pa. 

Clark, Amos, jr N. J . 

Clark, John B.Jr Mo. 

Clarke, Freeman N. Y. 

Clayton, Charles Cal . 

ClementSjIsaac 111. 

Clymer, Heister Pa. 

Cobb, Clinton L N.C. 

Cobb, Stephen A Kas. 

Coburn, John Ind. 

Comingo, A bram Mo . 

Conger, Omar D Mich. 

Cook, Philip Ga. 

Corwin, Franklin HI . 

Cotton, Aylett R Iowa. 

Cox, Samuel S N. Y. 

Creamer, Thomas J. N. Y. 

Crittenden, Thomas T. Mo. 

Crocker, Alvah Mass. 

Crooke, Philip S N. Y. 

Crossland, Edward Ky. 

Crounse, Lorenzo Neb. 

Crutchfield, William Tenn. 

Curtis, Carlton B Pa. 

Danford, Lorenzo Ohio. 

Darrall, Chester B La. 



NY 
YY 
YA 
NY 
YY 
NY 
YY 
YY 
NY 
NY 
AA 
YY 
NY 
YY 
YY 
NY 
NY 
YY 
NY 
NY 
YY 
NN 
NY 
NY 
AA 
NN 
NY 
YY 
YY 
YY 
NY 
YY 



Name. State 

Davis, Alexander M. Va 

Davis, John J. W.Va 

Dawes, Henry L Mass 

De Witt, David M. N. Y, 

Dobbins, Samuel A N.J, 

Donnan, William Gf Iowa. 

Duell, R. Holland N. Y, 

Dunnell, Mark H Minn. 

Durham, Milton J Ky. 

Eames, Benjamin T R. I. 

Eden, John R HI. 

Eldredge, Charles A Wis . 

Elliott, Robert B S.C. 

Farwell, Charles B 111. 

Field, Moses W Mich. 

Fort, Greenbury L Ill . 

Foster, Charles Ohio . 

Freeman, James C Ga. 

Frye, William P Me. 

Garfield, James A Ohio . 

Giddings, De Witt C. Tex. 

Glover, John M. Mo . 

Gooch, Daniel W Mass. 

Gunckel, Lewis B Ohio. 

Gnnter, Thomas M Ark. 

Hagans, J.Marshall W.Va. 

Hale, Eugene Me . 

Hale, Robert S ..IS. Y. 

Hamilton, Robert 1ST. J. 

Hancock, John Tex. 

Harmer, Alfred C Pa. 

Harris, Benjamin W Mass. 

Harris, Henry R Ga. 

Harris, John T Va. 

Harrison, Horace H Tenn. 

Hatcher, Robert A Mo. 

Hathorn, Henry H N.Y. 

Havens, Harrison E Mo. 

Hawley, John B 111. 

Hawley, Joseph R Conn. 

Hays, Charles Ala. 

Hazelton, Gerry W Wis. 

Hazleton, John W 1ST. J. 

Hendee, George W Vt. 

Hereford, Frank W. Va. 

Herndon, William S Tex. 

Hersey, Samuel F Me. 

Hftar, Ebenezer R Mass. 

Hoar, George F Mass. 

Hodges, Asa Ark . 

JJolman, William S. Ind. 

Hooper, Samuel Mass. 

Hoskins, George G N. Y. 

Houghton, Sherman O Cal. 

Howe, Albert R Miss. 

Hubbell, Jay A Mich. 

Hunter, Morton C Ind. 

Hunton, Eppa Va. 

Hurlbut, Stephen A 111. 

Hyde, Ira B Mo. 

Hynes, William J Ark. 

Jewett, Hugh J Ohio 

Kasson, John A Iowa. 

Kelley, William D Pa. 

Kellogg, Stephen W. Conn. 

Kendall, Charles W. Nev. 

Killinger, John W Pa. 

Knapp, Robert M. 111. 

Lamar, Lucius Q. C ."Miss. 

Lamison, Charles iV". Ohio 

Lamport. William H N. Y. 

Lansing, William E N. Y. 

Lawrence, William Ohio. 

Lawson, John D N.Y. 

Leach, James 2i N. C . 

Lewis Barbour Term . ' 

Lofland, James R Del. 

Loughridge, William Iowa. 

Lowe, David P Kas. 

Lowndes, Lloyd, jr Md. 

Luttrell, John K. Cal. 

Lynch, John R Miss. 



State. 123 4 5; 6 



Yj * j * I * | * | * I Magee, John A 

Y YITINYi Marshall, Samuel S 

. 'N -N'NlNiNlY! Martin, James S 

NN!N|NAIaI Maynard, Horace 

iY ( Y|YlYjY 
YiYlYjYN 
'AY|A;AA 
TITTTT 
!N:Y|n!y!N 

Inhstnun 



NY 
■NY 
N'A 
AY 

Y Y 

Y Y 
NY 

Y Y 
iN'N 

;NN 

;N Y 

Y Y 
NN 
NY 
! * i * 
|*!Y 
NN 
NN 
NN 
YN 
AY 
NN 
YiY 
IT 



NNN 
NN A 

aIaIa 

Y 

Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
N 
N 
A 
A 
N 
Y 



NiN 

n:y 

A!N 

AN 
NN 



Y 

N 
N 

N 

N|N 
Yjr A 
NIN!N 
YjYIN 
Y YiN 
YIYjYiYjY 
YTTIT 



N'YiN 

Y Y[Y 

Y.YY 
N.NN 

Y YIY 



Y 

Y 

A 

N 

X 

A 

N 

NNlNjNiN 

*!N|YYiY 

YjYNN A 

nn!nn|n 

NNiNNN 



AY 
Y l A 

NN 
Y Y 

NN 
NA 

AN 



A!N 
YIN 
N;N 
A A 

n!n 



AjYiY 

a!tt 



Y Y 
YY 
YY 
YY 



YY 

AT 

A A 

YY 

NIN 

NN 

N|N 
YiYiY 
YiYlNIYlN 
YIY'ANN 
YJY AlYiN 
A YIYA Y 
A'Y YjA|Y 
YIY AA!n 
AlNNlNN 
YiYlAAlN 



Y Y 
YIN 
YiY 
Y|N 
YIY 
NN 
NN 
N;N 
YlA 



Yl McCrary, George W. . . 

Yj McDill. Alexander S 

Y ; McDill, James W 

MacDougall, Clinton D. 

McJunkm, Ebenezer.... 

McKee, George C 

McLean , William P. 

MaNulta, John 

Merriam, Clinton L 

Milliken, Charles W. ... 

Y j Mills, Roger Q 

Yj Mitchell, Alexander 

Y MonroejJames 

A Moore, William S 

Y, Morey, Frank 

Yl Morrison, William R... 

N| Myers, Leonard 

Yi Weal, Lawrence T. 

Negley, James S 

Nesmith, Jau es W. 

Niblack, William E 

Niles, Jason 

Nunn, David A 

O'Brien, W lliam J. 

O'Neill, Charles 

Orr, Jackson 

Orth, Godlove S 

Packard, Jasper 

Packer, John B 

Page, Horace F 

Parker, Hosea W. 

Parker, Isaac C 

Parsons, Richard C 

Pelham, Charles 

Pendleton, James M 

Perry, Eli 

Phelps, William W 

Phillips, William A 

Pierce, Henry L 

Pike, Austin F 

Piatt, James H., jr 

Piatt, Thomas C 

Poland, Luke P 

Potter \Clarkson N. 

Pratt, Henry O 

Purman, William J 

Rainey, Joseph H 

Randall, Samuel f. 

Ransier, Alonzo J 

Rapier, James T 

Rawls, Morgan 

Ray, William H 

Read, William B 

Rice, John B 

Richmond, Hiram L. . 

Robbins, William M 

Roberts, Ellis H 

Roberts, William R 

Rob nson, James C 

Robinsonj James W 

Ross, Sobieski 

N! Rusk, Jeremiah M 

A Sawyer, Philetus 

Sayler, Henry B 

Sayler, Milton 

Schumaker, John G 

Scofield, Glenni W 

Scudder, Henry J 

Scudder, Isaac W 

N Sener, James B 

_ X 1 Sessions, W alter L 

A YIYIY YY, Shank8> John P. C 

JATMl; Sheats, Christopher C... 

|YiY:tT|T Sheldon, Lionel A 

YYYYYY Sherwood, Isaac R 

N|NNNN|Y Shoemaker, Lazarus D... 

NNN A N|N sloan) Andrew 

Y Y A A YiYi sioss, Joseph H. 



....Pa 

ni 

111. 

.Tenn. 
..Iowa 
...Wis 
.Iowa 
. .N. Y 
....Pa 
. .Miss 
...Tex 
. . . .111. 
..N.Y. 
...Ky. 
...Tex. 
...Wis. 
..Ohio. 
....Pa. 

La. 

....111. 
....Pa. 
..Ohio. 
....Pa. 
....Or. 
...Ind. 
..Miss. 
.Tenn. 
...Md. 
....Pa. 
.Iowa. 
...Ind. 
...Ind. 
....Pa. 
...Cal. 
..N.H 



NNjN 

YiNIN 

YY 

YY 

YY 



.Mo. 
..Ohio. 

...Ala. 
...R.I. 
..N.Y. 

..N.J. 
...Kas. 

. .MaBS. 
..N.H. A 

....Va.|N 
..N.Y.iN 
....Vt. N 

..n.y.In 

.Iowa. I Y 
...Fla.JY 

...S.C. IN 

....Pa. In 

...S.C.JY 
...Ala. y 
....Ga. Y 
....111. Y 
...Ky. n 
....lll.N 
....Pa. Y 
..N.C.JY 
..N.Y. 
..N.Y. 
....111. 
.Ohio. 
....Pa. 
..Wis. 
..Wis. 
...Ind. 
.Ohio.! A 
.N.Y.IN 
....Pa.!N 
.N.Y.|N|N 
..N. J.iN Y 
...Va.iYY 
.N.Y. I YIY 
.Ind.lY'Y 



NIN 

Y 

N 

Y 

N 

N 

N 

Y 



Y 

Y 
Y 

YiY 
T" 
N 



NN 
NY 
YY 



Y 
Y 

N 
Y 

NiY 
YN 

NiN 
n!a 

YY 

n-In 

YIY 



YiY 

YiY 

NN 

N:N 



YjYJN 
N ! N Y 
YlYY 
NNN 
NiNN 

n!n|n 

Y|Y|Y 
NtNIN 

n!n|n 

Y;NjY 
NIN;N 
N;N'N 
N'NiN 
YiYiY 
A YY 
YNiY 



N 
A 
Y 

* 

Y 

N 

NN 

YIY 

YjY 

NN 

NN 

A 

Y 

Y 

Y 

Y 

A 



NN 

a!y 

YiY 

* * 

YY 

NiN 

Y 

Y 

A 

N 

A 

N 

Y 

Y 

Y 

Y 

N 



..Ala.Y 
...La.Y 
.Ohio.Y 
...Pa. Y 
...Ga. * 
..Ala.Y' 



A 

Y 

Y 

Y 

Y 

A 
NIYjN 
NiNN 
NiNY 
AiAlN 
TNT, 
TlYiNT 
YiNNlY 



Y YN 

Y YY 
YiYYA 
YIY Y Y 

TTTT 

»IA A'NiY 
YiYA AIY 



28 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR lfffo 



Name. State.' \ 2 3 4 5 6 

Small, William B . . . .N. H. jj a 

Smart, JameaS N. Y. \ n 

Smith, A. ilerr Pa. jj r 

Smith, George L La. x A 

Smith, H. Boardmau N. Y. ^ Y 

Smith, J. Ambler Va. y y 

Smith, John Q Ohio, n X 

Smith, William A N.C.UU 

Snvder, Oliver P Ark. \ x 

Southard, Milton 1 Ohio, y y 

Speer, R. Hilton Pa. x.Y 

Sprague, William P Ohio. Y Y 

Stanard, Edwin O Mo.'y A 

Standeford, Elijah D Ky . A. Y 

Starkweather, Henry H Conn, x N 

Stephens, Alexander H Ga. A A 

St. John, Charles N. Y. A A 

Stone, William H. Mo. Y N 

Storm, John Ji Pa. X X 

Stowell, William H.H Va. A A 

Strait, Horace B Minn. Y Y 

Strawbridge, James D Pa. Y Y 

Sicann, Thomas Md. N A 

Sypher, J. Hale La. Y A 

Taylor, Alexander W Pa. Y Y 

Thomas, Charles R N. C. A A 

Thomas, Christopher Y Va. | * A 

Thornburgh, Jacob M Tenn. Y Y 

Todd, Lemuel Pa. Y Y 

Townsend, Washington Pa. X X 

Tremain, Lyman N. Y. AN 

Tyner, James N Ind. Y Y 



N N N Y 
X N X X 

Y Y Y Y 

Y Y YY 
X X N Y 
A A YY 
N X Y Y 
A A A A 

Y Y YY 
N Y N Y 
X X N Y 
YY Y Y 
YYN Y 
N Y N Y 

x x x r 

A AAA 
r X A Y 
X X X Y 
A ANN 

Y Y Y Y 
A A Y Y 

Y X Y Y 
X X X X 
A A X Y 
A A A A 
A A YY 
X Y X Y 
A A YY 
A A Y Y 
A A AX 
X X X Y 

Y YN Y 



Name. 



fl*atfi.'l|2|3l4 5 6 



Vance, Robert B N. C. 

Waddell, Alfred M X . C. 

Waldron, Henry Mich . 

Wallace, Alexander S S. C. 

Walls, J osiah T Fla. 

Ward, Jasper D 111. 

Ward, Marcus L X. J. 

Wells, Erastus Mo. 

Wheeler, William A X. Y. 

White, Alexander Ala. 

Whitehead, Thomas Va. 

WHIT£HOUSE, Johtt O X'. Y . 

Whitely, Richard H Ga. 

Whitthbrne, Wash. C Tenn. 

Wilber, David N. Y. 

Willard, Charles W Vt. 

Willard, George Mich . 

Williams, Charles G Wis. 

Williams, John M. S Mass. 

Williams, William Ind . 

Williams, William B Mich . 

Willie, Asa II. Tex. 

Wilshirc, T7. \ Ark. 

Wilson, Ephraim K. Md. 

Wilson, James Iowa. 

Wilson, Jeremiah M Ind. 

Wolfe, Simeon K. Ind. 

Wood, Fernando N. Y. 

Woodford, Stewart L N. Y. 

Woodworth, Laurin D Ohio. 

Young, John D Ky. 

Young, Pierce M. B Ga. 



YY 
Y|A 
N N 



YY 

YIY 

N A 



X 
X 
T 

A 
Y 

y 

A 
A 
A 
Y 

y 

Y 

y 
x 

Y Y 

Y Y 

Y Y 



Y Y X Y 
A A A A 
X X Y Y 

Y Y X Y 
A A X A 

Y Y Y Y 
X A Y Y 

Y YX Y 
X X X Y 

Y Y X Y 

Y Y X Y 
X X X X 

Y Y Y Y 
X X X Y 
X X A Y 
X X X X 
X X Y Y 

Y Y Y Y 
X X AY 

Y Y Y Y 
A A Y Y 
X X NY 

Y Y Y * 
X X A A 

Y Y Y Y 

Y Y A Y 
A A X Y 
XX X A 
X X T X X' 

Y Y Y Y 
X A X Y 
X'Y A'Y 



Monthly Range of the liold Premium for Thirteen Years. 



The following tables show the lowest and 
highest prices of gold at New York, for each 
month in the last thirteen years. The left- 
hand column of each year snows the lowest 
price, and the right-hand column the highest. 



The last two columns of the second table 
show for each month the lowest and h%hest 
prices for the five years since 1870, when the 
lower range of the gold premium, from no 
to 120, was established : 



DATE. 

January.. .. 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



1862. ! 1863. 

134 i6of 

J 53 1 7^i 

139 i 7 ii 

146 159 

143* J 55 

140$ 148} 

123* MS 

122^ 129} 

127 i 4 3i 

M°i 156* 

143 J 54 

M7 152* 



par 


I05 


102^ 


I04* 


101* 


I02i 


IOl£ 


\oi\ 


102 \ 


i°4* 


103* 


109* 


109 


I20$ 


II2i 


n6± 


116* 


124 


122 


137 


129 


133* 


130 


134 



1864. 



186J 



1866. 



151* 

157* 

J 59 

i66i 

168 

189 

'222 

231* 

185 

189 

209 

211 



160 

161 

169* 

187 

190 

=5i 
285 
262 

255 
229 
260 
244 



J 97* 1 234* 
i 9 6| J 2i6f 
148$- 201 



144 

128* 

i35i 

138 

i45i 

I 4 2f 
I44 

145* 
I44I 



l6o 
145* 
M7* 
I46* 

i 4 8i 

MS 
149 
148J 
146I 



136* 

125 

125 

1 = 5* 

137* 

M7 

146* 

M3* 

145* 

137* 

131* 



144* 
140! 

I2Qi 
141* 
167* 
'55* 
IS?* 

M7* 
I54i 
148* 
141I 



1867. ! 1868. 



132 

137* 
133* 
132! 

134* 
13^ 
i36f 

139* 

141 

140} 

I37J 

133 



137* 
140* 
140* 
141* 
138* 
138* 
i4°i 
142* 
146* 
M5* 
141* 

i37* 



133* 
139? 
137* 
^37* 
J 39* 
*39t 
Mo* 
143* 
14 1 * 
133* 
132* 
134* 



42* 

44 

4if 

4°i 

4°* 

41* 

45* 

SO 

45* 

4c* 

37 

36* 



DATE. 

January 

February.. 

March 

ApriL 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October.. . 
November. 
December . 



1869. | 


134* 


136* 


i3°& 


138* 


130* 


132* ; 


131! 


T 34* 


134* 


144* : 


137 


139* j 


134 


*37i! 


131* 


137* 


no* 


162* 


128* 


131* , 


I2l£ 


1284; 


"9* 


124 | 



1870. 

119$ I 123J 

115 I J 2I* 

no* ! 116* 
in* ' "5* 
"3* i "5* 
nof ' "4* 
in* 122! 
114* 1 122 
1I2J- I n6| 
mi j n 4 i 
no 113^ 
no}- mi 



1871. 



105 

io| 

io£ 
II 

11} 
II* 

III 

12* 
II* 

i<* 
o8f 



in* 
112J 
m* 
in* 
112J 

113* 
113I 

113* 
115* 
"5 . 

II2f 

nof 



1872. I 1873. 



io8i 
109* 
109J 
109* 

112^ 
"3 
113* 
112^ 

us} 

112! 
III* 
m| 



no* 

m 

not 

113*1 

"4*1 

"4* 

"5* 

115* 

115* 

m* 

114* 
"3* 



mi 

112$ 

H4* 
n6J 
Il6| 

"5 J 
115 
"4* 
iioj 



"4* 
"5* 
n8i 

119* 
118* 

n8± 
n6| 
116* 
n6* 
107I1 111J 
io6i no} 
io8J II2i 



1874. 



noi 

mf 

in* 

in* 

mi 

noi 

109 

109* 

i°9* 

109} 

no 



112* 

"3 

113* 

"4t 
n 3 i 

II2± 

not 

no* 
noi 
nof 

II2f 



'70-4. 



o8i 

09* 

09* 

09* 

n 

10J 

09 

09* 

09* 

°7* 
o6i 
o8f 



23* 
21* 
18* 
i 9 i 
i8i 

18* 

22$ 

22 

16} 

15* 

14* 

13* 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



29 



THE AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE 

OF NEW YORK. 



The method prescribed by chapter 330 of the 
laws of 1874 for voting on the proposed amend- 
ments to the Constitution was by a ballot, on 
which was printed er written the following words : 

For all propositions on this ballot which are 
not canceled with ink or pencil ; and against all 
which are so canceled. 

(1) For the proposed amendments to article 
two, " relative to suffrage and bribery." 

(2) For the proposed amendment to article 
three, part first, " Legislature and its organiza- 
tion," sections one to eight, inclusive. 

(3) For the proposed amendment to article 
three, part two, " powers and forms of Legisla- 
ture," being sections seventeen to twenty-five, 
inclusive. 

(4) For the proposed amendments, to article 
four, " the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, 
their powers and duties." 

(5) For the proposed amendments to article 
seven, "finance and canals." 

(6) For the proposed amendments to article 
eight, part one, being sections four and eleven, 
"relating to corporations, local liabilities and 
appropriations." 

(7) For the proposed amendments to article 
eight, part two, section ten, " State appropria- 
tions." 

(8) For the proposed amendment to section 
nine of article ten, being section " relative to 
compensation of certain officers." 

(9) J'or the proposed amendment to article 
twelve, " oath of office." 

(10) For the proposed amendment to add a 
new article to be known as article fifteen, " relat- 
ing to official corruption." 

(1 1) For the proposed amendment to add a 
new article to be known as article sixteen, " time 
for amendments to take effect." 

Each ballot was counted as a vote cast for 
every proposition thereon not canceled with ink or 
pencil, and against each proposition so canceled. 

The following synopsis of the provisions of the 
amendments is made to refer to the propositions 
on the above ballot : 

(1) Amendments to Article II — Sec. 1. 
Every male citizen, of the age of 21, a citizen for 
10 days, inhabitant of the State one year, of the 
county for 4 months, and for thirty days a resi- 
dent of the election district in which he may offer 
his vote, is entitled to vote for all officers and on 
all questions submitted to the people. 

" Sec. 2. No person who shall receive, expect 
or offer to receive, or pay, offer or promise to pay, 
contribute, offer or promise to contribute to an- 
other, to be paid or used, any money or other 
valuable thing as a compensation or reward for 
the giving or withholding a vote at an election, 
or who shall make any promise to influence the 
giving or withholding any such vote, or who shall 
make or become directly or indirectly interested 
in any bet or wager depending upon the result of 
any election, shall vote at such election; and 
upon challenge for such cause, the person so 
challenged, before the officers authorized for that 
purpose shall receive his vote, shall swear or af- 



firm before such officers that he has not received 
or offered, does not expect to receive, has not 
paid, offered or promised to pay, contributed, of- 
fered or promised to contribute to another, to be 
paid or used, any money or other valuable thing 
as a compensation or reward for the giving or 
withholding a vote at such election, and has not 
made any promise to influence the giving or with- 
holding of any such vote, nor made or become 
directly or indirectly interested in any bet or 
wager depending upon the result of such elec- 
tion. The Legislature, at the session thereof 
next after the adoption of this section, shall, and 
from time to time thereafter may, enact laws ex- 
cluding from the right of suffrage all persons con- 
victed of bribery or of any infamous crime." 

(2) Amendments to Article III, part 1. — 
Members of the Assembly, 128 in number, elected 
for one year, shall be apportioned among the 
several counties by the Legislature, as nearly as 
may be, according to population, as determined 
by the State census of 1875, and those taken de- 
cennially thereafter. The Board of Aldermen in 
New York, and the Supervisors in the other coun- 
ties, shall district their several counties. No 
town is to be divided in the formation of Assem- 
bly Districts. Every county, except Hamilton, 
shall be entitled to at least one Assemblyman. 
No new county shall be formed having not suffi- 
cient population to entitle it to a member of As- 
sembly, and the county of Hamilton may be 
abolished, and its territory annexed to the con- 
tiguous counties. 

Sec. 6. Each member of the Legislature shall 
receive $1,500 a year for his services, and 10 
cents a mile, going and returning from his 
home once in each session, for traveling ex- 
penses. Senators, in the trial of impeachments, 
and managers of the trial appointed from the 
Assembly, not exceeding 9 in number, shall re- 
ceive $10 a day additional. 

Sec. 7. No member of the Legislature shall re- 
ceive any civil appointment within this State, or 
the Senate of the United States, from the Gov- 
ernor, the Governor and Senate, or from the Leg- 
islature, or from any city government. 

Sec. 8. If any person shall, after his election to 
the Legislature, be elected to Congress, or ap- 
pointed to any office, civil or military, under the 
Government of the United States or any city 
government, his acceptance thereof shall vacate 
his seat, and no person can be elected to the 
Legislature who, within 100 days of his election, 
has beer a Member of Congress, an officer of the 
United States, or an officer under any city gov- 
ernment. 

(3) Amendments to Article III, part 2. — 
The following are additional sections to Article 
HI as it formerly stood. On account of their 
great importance, we give them in full : 

Sec. 17. No act shall be passed which shall 
provide that any existing law, or any part there- 
of, shall be made or deemed a part of said act, or 
which shall enact that any existing law, or any 
part thereof, shall be applicable, except by insert- 
ing it in such act. 

Sec. 18. The Legislature shall not pass a private 
or local bill in any of the following cases i 



30 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1575. 



Changing the names of persons. 

Laying out, opening, altering, working or dis- 
continuing roads, highways or alleys, or for 
draining swamps or other low lands. 

Locating or changing county seats. 

Providing for changes of venue in civil or 
criminal cases. 

Incorporating villages. 

Providing for election of members of boards of 
supervisors. 

Selecting, drawing, summoning or impaneling 
grand or petit jurors. 

Regulating the rate of interest on money. 

The opening and conducting of elections or 
designating places of voting. 

Creating, increasing or decreasing fees, per- 
centage or allowances of public officers, during 
the term for which said officers are elected or ap- 
pointed. 

Granting to any corporation, association or in- 
dividual, the right to lay down railroad tracks. 

Granting to any private corporation, associa- 
tion or individual, any exclusive privilege, im- 
munity or franchise whatever. 

Providing for building bridges, and chartering 
companies lor such purposes, except on the Hud- 
son river below Waterford, and on the East river, 
or over the waters forming a part of the bound- 
aries of the State. 

The Legislature shall pass general laws provid- 
ing for the cases enumerated in this section, and 
for all other cases which, in its judgment, may be 
provided for by general laws. But no law shall 
authorize the construction or operation of a street 
railroad except upon the condition that the con- 
sent of the owners of one-half in value of the 
property bounded on, and the consent also of the 
local authorities having the control of that por- 
tion of a street or highway upon which it is pro- 
posed to construct or operate such railroad 
be first obtained, or in case the consent of such 
property owners cannot be obtained, the general 
term of the Supreme Court in the district in which 
it is proposed to be constructed mav, upon appli- 
cation, appoint three commissioners, who shall 
determine, after a hearing of all parties interested, 
whether such railroad ought to be constructed or 
operated, and their determination, confirmed by 
the court, may be taken in lieu of the consent of 
the property owners. 

Sec. 19. The Legislature shall neither audit nor 
allow any private claim or account against the 
State, but may appropriate money to pay such 
claims as shall have been audited and allowed 
according to law. 

Sec. 20. Every law which imposes, continues or 
revives a tax, shall distinctly state the tax and 
the object to which it is to be applied, and it shall 
not be sufficient to refer to any other law to fix 
such tax or object. 

Sec. 21. On the final passage, in either house 
of the Legislature, of any act which imposes, con- 
tinues orrevivesatax, or creates a debtor charge, 
or makes, continues or revives any appropriation 
of public or trust money or property, or releases, 
discharges, or commutes any claim or demand of 
the State, the question shall be taken by yeas and 
nays, which shall be duly entered upon the jour- 
nals, and three-fifths of all the members elected to 
either house shall, in all such cases, be necessary 
to constitute a quorum therein. 

Sec. 22. There shall be in the several counties, 



except in citieB whose boundaries are the same 
as those of the county, a board of supervisors, to 
be composed of such members, and elected in such 
manner, and for such period, as is, or may be, 
provided by law. In any such city the duties and 
powers of a board of supervisors may be devolved 
upon the common council or board of aldermen 
thereof. 

Section seventeen of said article is hereby 
made section twenty-three of the proposed 
amendment, and is amended so as to read as fol- 
lows : 

Sec. 23. The Legislature shall, by general laws, 
confer upon the boards of supervisors of the sev- 
eral counties of the State such further powers of 
local legislation and administration as the Legis- 
lature may from time to time, deem expedient. 

Skc. 24. The Legislature shall not, nor shall the 
common council of any city, nor any board of 
supervisors, grant any extra compensation to any 
public officer, servant, a>;ent cr contractor. 

Sec. 25. Sections seventeen and eighteen of this 
article shall not apply to any bill, or the amend- 
ments to any bill, which shall be reported to the 
Legislature by commissioners, who have been ap- 
appointed pur.-uant to law to rt-vise the statutes. 

(4) Amendments to Article IV. — The terms 
of office of the Governor and Lieut.-Governor are 
extended to three yeai"3, but this provision does 
not apply to the terms of Gov. Tilden and Lieut.- 
Gov. JJorsheimer, who go out of office Dec. 81, 
1876. 

Sec. 2. Citizens of the United States, aged 30 
years or more, and for at least 5 years residents of 
the State, are alone eligible as Governors and 
Lieut.-Governors. 

Skc. 3. Increases the salary of the Governor 
to $10,000 a year, and provides him with a resi- 
dence. 

Sec. 8. Gives the Lieut.-Governor $5,000 a 
year. 

Sec. 9. Requires a vote of two-thirds of all the 
members elected to pass a bill over the Govern- 
or's veto. Allows-the Governor 30 days after the 
adjournment of the Legislature in which to sign 
bills. Authorizes the Governor to veto items in 
appropriation bills without vetoing the entire 
bill. 

(5) Amendments to Article YI1. — Adds to 
section 3 a provision that no extra compensation 
shall be made to any canal contractor, but if the 
terms of any contract shall prove to be unjust 
or oppressive, the Canal Board may cancel the 
contract. 

Sec. 6. Leaves it within the discretion of the 
Legislature to sell or lease any of the canals, ex- 
cept the Erie. Oswego, Champlain, and Cayuga 
and Seneca. The expenditures for collections, 
superintendence, ordinary and extraordinary re- 
pairs on the four canals named, shall not exceed 
in any year their gross receipts for the preceding 
year. 

Sec. 13. The Sinking Funds for the payment of 
the State's debts shall be separately kept and 
safely invested, and neither of them shall be ap- 
propriated or used except for the specific purpose 
for which it shall have been provided. 

Sec. 14. Neither the Legislature. Canal Board, 
Canal Appraisers, nor any person or persons act- 
ing in behalf of the State, shall audit or allow any 
claim which, as between citizens of the State, 
would be barred by lapse of time. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



81 



(6) Amendments to Article VIII, part 1. — 
Section 8 is made to require the Legislature, by 
general law, to conform all charters of savings 
banksio a uniformity of powers, rights, and lia- 
bilities '' The trustees shall have no interest, di- 
rect or indirect, in the profits, or interested in any 
loan, or in the use of any money or property of 
such institutions. 

(7) Additional Sections to Article VIII — 
Two sections are added to Article VIII, prohibit- 
ing the State, or any couuty, town, or city, from 
loaning its credit cr giving its money in aid of 
any association, corporation, or private under- 
taking, provision for the education and support of 
the blind, deaf and dumb, &c, being excepted. 

(8) A dditional Section to Article X. — Sec. 9. 
No officer, whose salary is fixed by the Constitu- 
tion, shall receive any additional co-npensation. 
Each of the other State officer.*, named in the 
Constitution, shall, during his continuance in 
office, receive a compensation, to be fixed by law, 
which shall not be increased or diminished during 
the term for which he shall have been elected or 
appointed ; nor shall he receive, to his use, any 
fees or perquisites of cffice or other compensation. 

(9) Amendment to Article XII — Prescribes 
a form of oath or affirmation to be made by 
members of the Legislature and executive and 
judicial officers, including an asseveration in the 
case of elective officers, that they have not prac- 
ticed bribery or corruption. 

(10) Additional Article XV.— "Sec. 1. Any 
person holding office under the laws of this State, 
who, except in payment of his legal salary, fees, 
or perquisites, shall receive or consent to receive, 
directly or indirectly, anything of value or of 
personal advantage, or the promise thereof, for 
performing or omitting to perform any official 
act, or with the express or implied understanding 



that his official action or omission to act is to be 
in any degree influenced thereby, shall be 
deemed guilty of a felony. This section shall 
not affect the validity of any existing statutes in 
relation to the offense of bribery. 

" Sec. 2. A ny person who shall offer or promise 
a bribe to any officer, if it shall be received, shall 
be deemed to be guilty of felony, and liable to 
punishment, except as herein provided. No per- 
son offering a bribe shall, upon any prosecution 
of the officer for receiving such bribe, be privi- 
leged from testifying in relation thereto, and he 
shall not be liable to civil or criminal prosecution 
therefor, if he shall testify to the giving or offering 
of such bribe. Any person who shall offerer prom- 
ise a bribe, if it be rejected by the officer to whom 
itis tendered, shall be deemed guilty of an attempt 
to bribe, which is hereby declared to be a felony. 

" Sec. o. Any person charged with receiving a 
bribe, or with offering or promising a bribe, shall 
be permitted to testify in his own behalf in any 
civil or criminal prosecution therefor. 

"Skc. 4. Any district attorney who shall fail 
faithfully to prosecute a person charged with the 
violation in his county of any provision of this 
article which may come to his knowledge, shall 
be removed from office by the Governor, alter 
due notice and an opportunity of being heard in 
his defense. The expenses which shall be incur- 
red by any county in investigating and prose- 
cuting any charge of bribery, or attempting to 
bribe any person holding office under the laws of 
this State,, within such county, or of receiving 
bribes by any such person in said county, shall 
be a charge against the State, and their payment l 
by the State shall be provided for by law." 

(11) Additional Article XVI. — Provides i 
that the amendments shall be in force from Jan- j 
uary 1, 1875, except where otherwise provided. 



THE PROPOSED NEW CONSTITUTION FOR OHIO. 



The new Constitution proposed for the State of 
Ohio was submitted to the people on the 18th of 
August, and voted down by a large majority. A 
.full synopsis of it may be found in McPherson's 
Handbook of Politics for 1874, pages 72-77. It 
contained many excellent provisions designed to 
restrict special legislation, the growth of public 
indebtedness, &c, but we can give only such in- 
formation regarding it as is necessary to explain 
the voting. Four votes were taken on it : 

1. For and Against the Constitution. 

2. For and Against a separate proposition pro- 
viding that where three or more judges of either 
the Supreme or Circuit Courts were to be chosen 
at the same election, no elector should vote for a 
greater number of candidates than a majority of 
the number to be chosen to each bench. 

3. For and Against a separate provision author- 
izing towns, cities and villages, under general 
laws, to aid railroad companies, subject to the 
following restrictions and such others as may be 
prescribed by law: "No subscription, loan or 
contribution, for such purpose, shall be made, 
unless authorized at an election held in pursuance 
of law, b/ at least two-thirds of all the electors of 
such township, city or village, to be ascertained 
in such manner as may be prescribed by law, and 
subject to the further conditions of section four 
of article eleven, when applicable. Nor shall 
such aid be granted until the township, city or 
village granting the same shall have adequate se- 



curity that the road so aided will be completed. 
At such election, no person shall vote who shall 
not have resided in the township, city or village 
for s'x months prior thereto. No such election 
shall be held until the part of the road upon which 
the expenditure is to be made has teen located 
and established, nor oftener than once a year, nor 
shall aid be voted to more than one railroad at 
any election. The order for election shall specify 
all the conditions of such loan, subscription or 
contribution, the consideration proposed to be 
given therefor, the estimated cost of the proposed 
work, the means secured for its completion, and 
the part of the work on which the proposed sub- 
scription, loan or contribution is to be expended. 
Provision may be made by law, for the issue of 
stock or bonds for the amount of any such sub- 
scription or loan ; but no township, «ity or vil- 
lage shall be liable for the debts of the company. I 
The obligations of a township, city or village, in- \ 
purred for such purpose, shall not bear a greater j 
interest than 7 per centum per annum, nor shall I 
the aggregate thereof at any time exceed 5 per 
centum of the value of the property of such town- | 
ship, city or village, as ascertained by the latest j 
tax duplicate. The aggregate of taxes levied by 
a township, city or village, to pay such obliga- | 
lions and interest, shall in no year exceed 1 per j 
centum of such value." 

4. For and Against giving the Legislature power j 
to license the trade in spirituous liquors. 



82 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



THE PUBLIC DEBT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Statement of November 80, 1874. 

Debt Bearing Interest in Coin. 



* 



Title of Loan. 



Loan of 1858 • 

Loan of February, 1861 ('81's).. 

Oregon War Debt 

Loan of July & Aug. 1861 ('81's), 

Five-twenties of 1862 

Loan of 1863 ('81's) 

Ten-forties of 1864 

Five-twenties of March, 1864. .. 

Five-twenties of June, 1864 

Five-twenties of 1865 

Consols of 1865 

Consols of 1867 

Consols of 1868 

Funded Loan of 1881 



Authorizing Act. 



June 14, 1858 

February 8, 1861 . . . 
[March 2, 1861 

July 17 & Aug. 5, '61 
! February 25,1862.. 

March 3, 1863 

March 3, 1864 

March 3, 1864 

June 30, 1864 

March 3, 1865 

iMarch 3, 1865 

■March 3, 1865 

(March 3, 1865 

J'yi4.'7o&J an -2o-'7i- 



When Redeeniab:e. 



After Jan. 1, 1874. 



After June 30, 1881. 
After May 1, 1867.. 
After June 30, 1881. 
After March 1, 1874 
After Nov. 1, 1869. . 
After Nov. 1, 1869. . 
After Nov. 1, 1870.. 
After July 1, 1870.. 
After July 1, 1872.. 
After July 1, 1873.. 
After May i. 1881 . 



When Pay'le. 



Dec. 31, '80. 
July 1, 1881 



May 



M'h. 1, 1904 
Nov. 1, 1884 
Nov. 1,1884 
Nov. 1,1885 
July 1, 1885 
July 1, 1887 
July 1, 1888 



Title of Loan. 



Interest Payable. 



Loan of 1858 Jan. and July... 

Loan of February, 1861 ('8i's) . . . Jan. and J uly . . . 

Oregon War Debt Jan. and July... 

Loan of July& Aug. 1861 ('8i's).. Jan. and July... 

Five-twenties ot 1862 iMay and Nov.. 

Loan of 1863 ('81's) Jan. and July... 

.March and Sept. 

May and Nov.. 

May and Nov. . 

May and Nov. . 



Ten-forties of 1864 
Five-twenties of March, 1864 
Five-twenties of June, 1864.. 

Five-twenties of 1865 

Consols of 1865 Jaa and July 

Consols of 1867 Jan. and July . 

Consols of 1868 Jan. and July . 

Funded Loan of 1881 Feb., May, &c 

Total 



Interest due and 
unpaid. 



Amount 
Outstandini. 

$260,0001 

18,415,000 

945,000 

189,321,3501 

121,306,350! 

75,ooo,oooJ 

i94o67,300! 

946,600 

58,046,200! 

i52,534,350j 
202,663,1001 
310,622,750 
37,474,000! 
357,697,900 
$1,719,799,900 $6,395,76798 



§21 

4 

228 

1,202 

68 

231 



275 

i,735 

782 

ii i3 2 
146 

563 



,159 00 
,9 6 7 75 
,501 79 
,600 72 

,9 l6 55 
,307 68 

,479 33 
,646 77 
,740 66 
,175 52 
,275 44 
,21648 
.780 29 



Accrued j merest 
to dite. 

$5,416 67 

460,375 OO 

23,625 OO 

4,733,°33 75 

606,531 75 

1,875,000 00 

2,432,091 25 

4-733 00 

290,231 OO 

762,671 75 

5,066,577 50 

7,765,568 75 

936,850 00 

1,490,407 92 



$26,453,113 34 



Debt on which Interest has Ceased since Maturity. 



Title of Loan. 
Old Debt 



Mexican Indemnity Stock. . . 

Loan of 1847 

Loan of 1858 

Bounty Land Scrip 

Texan Indemnity Stock 

Loan of i860 

Five-twenties, 1862 (called). 
Treasury Notes prior to 1846 

Treasury Notes of 1846 

Treasury Notes of 1847 

Treasury Notes of 1857 

Treasury Notes of 1861 

Seven-thirties of 1861 

One-year N otes of 1863 .... 

Two-year Notes of 1863 

Compound-interest Notes. . . 
Seven-thirties of 1864 & 1865. 
Certificates of Indebtedness. 



When Matured. 



At various dates prior to Jan. 1, 1837. 

At various dates in 1851 & 1852 

Dec. 31, 1867 

Jan. 1, 1874 



July 1, 1849. 
De 



ec. 31, 1864 

Jan. 1, 1871 

Dec. 1, 1371, and at subsequent dates. 

A t various dates from 1838 to 1844 

At various dates in 1847 an( l J 848 

At various dates in 1848 and 1849 

At various dates in 1858 and 1859 

March 1, 1863 

Aug. 19 and Oct. 1, 1864 

At various dates in 1865 

At various dates in 1866 

June 10, 1867, and May 15, 1868 

Aug. 15, '67, June 15 and July 15, 1868. 

A t various dates in 1866 

October 15, 1866 



Temporary Loan 

Three pr. ct. certifi's (called). I February "28, 1873 
Aggregate of Debt on which Interest has ceased 



Amt.Outataod'g Interest Ac'd 



$57,665 OO 

1,104 9 1 

1,250 00 

78,000 00 

3,400 00 

172,000 00 

10.000 00 

17,258,90000 

82,575 35 

6,000 00 

950 00 

2,000 00 

3.15000 

19,200 00 

70,555 00 

51,450 00 

396,47000 

218,300 00 

5,000 00 

3,060 00 

5,000 00 

$18,446,030 26 



$64,174 81 
85 74 



223 60 

9,300 OO 

625 OO 

10,615 30 

2,670 76 

206 00 

57 00 

108 OO 

378 00 

1,423 44 

3.539 85 

3,3 2 7 03 

79,423 32 

17,151 90 

3 J 3 48 
256 06 

394 31 
$194,395 60 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T5. 



83 



Debt Searing Interest in Lawfal Money. 



Title of Loan. 


Rate. 

3 P- ct. 

4 p. ct. 

t bearin, 


When Payable. interest Pay'le. 


Amount. 

$14,000,000 

678,000 
$14,678,000 


Past 
duelnt. 


Aecr^rnt. 


Navy Pension 
Fund 


Interest applied to pen- 
sions 


January and 

July 

March and 




$2,030 

$2,020 


$175^000 

6,780 

$181,785 


Cert. . of Indebted- 
Aggregate of Deb 


Payable September i, 
1875 


% Interest in lawful money 



Debt Bearing no Interest. 



Title of Loan. 



Old Demand Notes 

Legal Tender Notes . . 
Certiticates of Deposit. 
Fractional Currency . . . 

Coin Certificates 

Unclaimed Interest 



Authorizing Acts. 



Amount. 



July 17, 1861 and Feb. 12, 1862 

Feb. 25, 1862, Jujy 11, 1862, and March .3, 1&63. 

June 8, 1872 (Clearing House Certificates) 

July 17, 1862, March 3, 1863, and June 30, 1S64. 
March 3, 1863 



Aggregate of Debt bearing no Interest 



$75.^67 .50 

382,000,000 00 

47,120,000 00 

47,385,698 33 

2 3,°45,4°o 00 

23,954 84 



$499,650,320 67 



Recapitulation. 



Debt bearing interest in coin 

Debt bearing currency interest 

Debt on which interest has ceased . 
Debt bearing no interest 



Description of Debt. 

Bonds at 6 percent. 



Amount. 



Bonds at 5 per cent 

Certificates of indebtedness at 4 per cent 

Navy Pension Fund at 3 per cent 



Old Demand and Legal-tender Notes. 

Certificates of Deposit 

Fractional currency 

Coin certificates 



Total Principal of Debt 

Add interest unpaid and accrued 

Total Debt 

Cash in the Treasury — Coin $83,043,762 23 

Currency : 1.6,699,311 48 

Special deposit for redemption of certificates of deposit 47,120,000 00 

Debt, less cash in the Treasury, December 1, 1874 

Debt, less cash in the Treasury, November 1, 1874 

Decrease of Debt during the past month 

Decrease of Debt since December 1, 1873 



$1,1 67, 274,70a 00 

532,525,200 00 

678,000 00 

14,000,000 00 

18,446,030 26 

382,075,267 50 

47,120,000 00 

47.385,698 33 

23,045,400 00 



>2,252,55o,296 09 
33,251,111 76 



$2,285,801,407 85 

146,863,073 71 

^,138,938,334 x 4 

2,139,061,761 82 



$123,427 68 



$11,923,719 32 



Currency Bonds Issued to tlxo Pacific Railroads. 

(Not Included in the Public Debt as above stated.) 



Rate of Int. 



Name of Railroad. 



Central Pacific 

Kansas Pacific 

Union Pacific 

Central Branch,U. Pacific. 

Western Pacific 

Sioux City and Pacific. . . . 



Authorizing Acts. 



July 1, '62 & July 2, '64 
July 1, '62 & July 2/64 
July 1, '62 & July 2/64 
July 1, '62 & July 2/64 
July i,'62 & July 2/64 
July 1, '62 & Julv 2/64 



6 per cent 
6 per cent 
6 per cent 
6 per cent 

5 per cent 

6 per cent 



When Payable. 



30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 



Interest Payable. 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 



Name of Railroad. 



Central Pacific 

Kansas Pacific 

Union Pacific 

Central Branch, U. Pacific. 

Western Pacific 

Sioux City and Pacifis 

Totals 



Principal 
Outstanding. 



$25,885,12© 
6,303,000 
27,236,512 
1 ,600,000 
1,9^0,560 
1,628,320 



$64,623,512 



Inter t accrued 
& not yet paid. 



$647,128 00 

157,575 00 

680,912 80 

40,000 00 

49,264 00 

40,708 00 



interest 
United 



paid by 
5tat.es. 



$9,474,59° 47 
2 ,7 2 5<7 I 3 °9 

10,250,133 93 
685,808 26 
604,146 54 
585,004 69 



$1,615,58780 $24,325,39698 



Int. repaid oy 
trans, mails &c. 



$1,156,816 78 

1,327,722 26 

2 ,97 8 ,85g 63 

29,424 So 

9,367 CO 

7,853 9° 



$5,510,04407 



ttal. ot Int. paid 
by U. btates. 



&8,3I7,773 69 

1,397,990 83 

7,271,274 30 

6*6,383 76 

594,779 54 

577,i50 7g 



18,815,352 91 



The foregoing is a correct statement of the Public Debt, as appears from tho books 
and Treasurer's Returns in the Department at the close of business, November 30, 1874. 

BENJAMIN H. BRISTOW, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 

BBS i 1 • a -t — ' I '■-'' ' Ja ^* 



34 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



RECORD OF EVEMS. 



General Record. 

December, 1878. 

5. — Robert N. Woodworth, President of the 
New Brunswick Carpet Co., arrested on a charge 
of conspiring to defraud the Bank of New Bruns- 
wick of $70,000. 

8. — Uenry E. Hosford, cashier of Augustus W. 
King, broker, of No. 84 Pine Btreet, New York, 
disappears, leaving his account $10,925 short. 

10. — Conclusion of the trial of Marshal Bazaine, 
who i3 found guilty and sentenced lo death. 

11. — Theodore A. Wick, late Treasurer of Clarke 
County, Ohio, found guilty of embezzling $30,0<J0 
of the public funds, and csntenced to a fine of 
$60,000 and one year's imprisonment. 

12. — Marshal Bazaine's sentence commuted to 
20 years' seclusion. 

16.— David A. Gage, ex-City Treasurer of Chi- 
cago, confesses himself a defaulter to the amount 
of $352,000. 

Surrender of the steamer Virginius at Bahia 
Honda by the Spanish authorities to Capt. Whit- 
ing, U. S. N., and, De«. 26, the Virginius is aban- 
doned eff Wilmington, N. C, and sinks 10 miles 
from shore. 

19. — Salary of the French President increased 
by a vote of 472 to 136 in the Assembly frqm 
162.000 to 3u0,000 francs a year. 

22. — Henry W. Genet, ex-Senator and Assem- 
blyman elect, found guilty of defrauding the city 
of New York, escaped from the sherifTs custody, 
and was not recaptured. 

Creation of twelve new Cardinals at Rome. 

£6. — W. W. Storrs, Treasurer of the National 
Savings Bank of Concord, N. H., is discovered to 
have misappropriated $54,000. 

■31.— R. H. Rowland, Treasurer of Richland 
County, Ohio, absconds, leaving a deficiency of 
$111,412 in his accounts. 

January, 1874. 

2. — Reopening of the Spanish Cortes, and, 3d, 
defeat of Senor Castelar's Government. 

4. — New ministry announced at Madrid, with 
Serrano as President. 

7. — F. S. Bacon, Cashier of the Holyoke Na- 
tional Bank of Mass., discovered to be a default- 
er to the amoirat of $4,570. 

8. — George W. Smith, ex-Deputy Collector of 
Internal Revenue for the Northern District of 
Mississippi, indicted for embezzling $25,000 of 
the Government money, arrested at Marblehead, 
Mass. 

Resignation of the French Ministry. 

10. — John A. Butterick, Cashier of the Wamesit 
National Bank, of Lowell, Mass., is ascertained to 
be a defaulter in his accounts to the amount of 
113,272 50... Thomas N. Still well, President of 
the First National Bank, of Anderson, Ind., ar- 
rested for embezzling the funds of the bank. L. 
B. Kline, cashier of same bank, absconds. 

12. — Charles M. Thompson, an ex-clerk in the 
Canal Department of New York, arrested at 
Adrian, Mich., on a charge of altering contracts 
involving a large amount of money. 

The French Assembly passed a vote of confi- 
dence in the Ministry by a majority of 58 in a 
house of 700, and the Ministry withdraw their 
resignations. 

23. — Alexander D. Hamilton, defaulting Treas- 
urer of Jersey City, absconds. 

Marriage of the Duke of Edinburgh to the 



Grand Duchess Marie Alexandrovna at St. 
Petersburgh. 

26. — Proclamation published dissolving the 
British Parliament and declaring the calling of 
another. 

Febecary. 

5. — A dispatch from Sir Garnet Wolseley re- 
ceived in London, announcing that the King of 
Ashantee agrees to pay £200,000 indemnity. 

8.— John C. Henry, chief clerk in the U. S. 
I. Rev. Office at Lynchburg, Ya., absconds with 
a large amount of public money. 

H. A. Dudley, Treasurer of Wyoming Co., dis- 
covered to be a defaulter to the amount of f 5,040. 

13,. — Rush R. Sloane, ex-President of*the Cin- 
cinnati, Sandusky and Cleveland Railroad Com- 
pany, arrested on charges of embezzling the com- 
pany's money. 

15.— Philio D. Corie, Cashier of the Atlanta 
branch of the Freedman's Savings Bank and 
Trust Company, arrested for embezzling the 
estimated sum of $10,000. 

17. — The Gladstone ministry resigned, and 
their resignations were accepted by the Queen. 
The Parliamentary elections showed a net Con- 
servative gain of 56 seats. 

18. — Mr. Disraeli undertook the formation of a 
Cabinet, and, 21st, the chief members of the new 
ministry took the oaths of office. 

28. — Arthur Orton, the Tichborne claimant, 
found guilty of perjury and sentenced to 14 years 
of penal servitude. The trial had been protracted 
through 188 days. 

March. 

5. — Opening of the IXth Parliament of Queen 
Victoria's reign. 

14. — John R. McLean, managing editor of The 
Cincinnati Enquirer, is sent to jail by a police 
justice for refusing to disclose the names of con- 
tributors to his paper, while under examination 
in an action for libel. At the expiration of two 
days bail was furnish ed and Mr. Mc Lean relea sed . 

26.— C. P. Wright, teller of the Savings Bank 
at Bradford, Yt., absconds with a large sum of 
money belonging to the bank. 

81. — Arrest of Mgr. Melchers, R. C. Archbishop 
of Cologne, by order of the German Government. 

April. 

2. — Eight indictments found against 
Rankin, a former State Treasurer of Ohio, and 
Isaac Brandt, his deputy, for embezzling the 
funds of the State. 

6. — An examination made into the condition 
of the National Bank at Brighton, Mass., and a 
misapp»opriation of $70,000 to $100,000 dis- 
covered. 

7.— Oliver T. Searing, Secretary of the Mon- 
tauk Insurance Co., of Brooklyn, discovered to 
be a defaulter to the amount of $10,0i'0. 

8.— T. T. Brooks, late President of the Mer- 
chants' National Bank of Petersburg, Ya., in- 
dicted for embezzling $90,000 belonging to the 
bank. 

17. — Emil Sauer, President of the German- 
American Bank of New York, removed for 
irregularities. 

18. — Dr. Livingstone's remains buried in the 
nave of Westminster Abbey. 
Mat. 

9. — C. A. Haynes (colored), a mail agent, pleads 
guilty to the charge of robbing the mails, and is 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



85 



sentenced to four years' imprisonment in the 
North Carolina penitentiary. 

14.— Charles Claiborne, clerk of the U. S. Dist. 
Court at New Orleans, absconds with $80,000 be- 
longing to litigants. 

16. — Defeat of the Due de Broglie's Govern- 
ment by 64 votes, and their resignations accepted 
by Marshal MacMafton. 

18. — the Grand Jury of Orangeburg County 
indicts Gov. Moses, of South Carolina, for breach 
of trust and grand larceny. 

21. — Marriage of Mr. Algernon C. F. Sartoris 
and Miss Nellie Grant. 

June. 
13. — Three and a half million people in India 
stated to be in receipt of Government relief on 
account of the famine. 

24. — The .French Government prohibits the 
distribution of the Prince Imperial's photographs. 
July. 
4. — Formal opening of the great bridge over 
the Mississippi at St. Louis. 

7. — The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher demands 
an investigation of the charges against him. 

13. — Attempt to assassinate Prince Bismarck by 
Kullmann at Kissingen. The Prince escapes 
with a slight injury. 

16. — Resignation of M. Pierre Magne, the 
French Minister of Finance. 

21. — Publication of Mr. Tilton's charges against 
the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 

23. — M. Casimer Perrier's bill, definitively con- 
stituting a Republic, rejected in the French 
Assembly by a vote of 833 to 374. » 

24 — Publication of Mrs. Tilton's statement. 
29. — Proposition to dissolve the French Assem- 
bly rejected by a vote of 332 to 375. 

81. — Celebration at Northumberland, Penn., 
of the 100th anniversary of Dr. Priestley's dis- 
covery of oxygen. 

August. 
1. — Festivities in Iceland over the granting of 
a new constitution by the King of Denmark. 
5. — The French Assembly closes its session. 
7. — The British Parliament pron gued by com- 
mission. 

9. — Ex-Marshal Bazaine escaped from the island 
of St. Marguerite. 

13. — Publication of the Rev. Henry Ward 
Beecher' s statement. 

19. — Prof. Tyndall addresses the British Asso- 
ciation at Belfast. 

21. — Publication of Mr. Moulton's first state- 
ment. 

28 — The Plymouth Church Investigating Com- 
mittee acquits Mr. Beecher. 
September. 
2. — Goldsmith Maid trotted a mile at Mystic 
Park in 2:14, the best time on record. 

The Marquis of Ripon resigns the Grand Mas- 
tership of the English Freemasons, having joined 
the Roman Catholic Church. 

11. — Mr. Moulton published his second state- 
ment in relation to Mr. Beecher. 

12. — Strike of 13,000 persons employed in 74 
cotton mills at Bolton, Eng. 

18. — Mr. Til ton makes an elaborate supple- 
mental statement in the Beecher case. 

25.— Trial of Charles H. Phelps for robbing the 
State Treasury \va* commenced at Albany. 

26. — The American team win a victory over 
the Irish rill. men in the international shooting 



match, beating them by 3 points, the score beintr 
934 to 981. 

The Prince of Wales accepts the Grand Mas- 
tership of the English Freemasons. 

30. — Meeting of the second of the series of 
National Triennial Councils of the Congregational 
Church in the United States at New Haven. 

Unconditional cession of Fiji to the British 
Government feigned by the Fijian Kiig. 
October. 

2. — General Convention of the P. E. Church 
opened in New York. 

5. — Count Von Arnim thrown into prison at 
Berlin for having State papers in his possession 
contrary to law. 

9. — Report of the English accountants sent over 
here to invest igate the finances of the Erie Rail- 
way Co. made to the London Stock Exchange, 
showing that dividends had been declared which 
had not been earned. 

Release of the Archbishop of Cologne after six 
months' imprisonment. 

18. — Charles H. Phelps, formerly a clerk in the 
Treasurer's office at Albany, convicted of forgery 
in the third degree, and, 19th, sentenced to 15 
years' imprisonment. 

14. — Unvailing of Meade's statue of Lincoln at 
Springfield, 111. 

15.— Opening of the new Court of Arbitration 
connected with the N. Y. Chamber of Commerce, 
ex-Judge Enoch L. Fancher presiding. 

16. — Report of the annexation of the Fiji 
Isl .nds to Great Britain. 

17. — The I'. E. General Convention confirms 
the election of E. R. Wells as Bishop of Wisconsin. 

21. — Famine and deaths from starvation re- 
ported in Nebraska. 

22. — Capture of the person claiming to be 
Nana Sahib, leader of the Cawnpore massacre in 
1857. 

23. — Alex. D. Hamilton, the defaulting Treas- 
urer of Jersey City, returns and surrenders him- 
self. 

24. — Total eclipse of the moon.... Argument 
begun in regard to the bill of particulars asked 
by the defendant in the libel suit of Tilton 
against Beecher. 

28. — Count von Arnim released at Berlin on 
100,00i) thalers bail. 

29. — Trial of Kullmann for attempted assassina- 
tion of Prince Bismarck begun at Wurzburg.... 
The German Reichstag opened. 

30. — Kullman sentenced to 14 years' imprison- 
ment, and 1 years' deprivation of civil rights, for 
his attempted assassination«of Prince Bismarck. 

31. — In the P. E. General Convention an 
amended canon on Ritualism was adopted, the 
proposed baptismal rubric voted down, and a 
shortened form of service authorized. 
November. 

3. — An unarmed man was killed and ar other 
fatally wounded in an afiray in New York be- 
tween James O'Brien, candidate for Congress in 
the 10th district, and Coroner Croker and their 
respective friends. 

6. — An appeal taken from Judge Neilson's de- 
cision denying a bill of particulars in the suit of 
Tilton against Beecher. 

7 — Charlotte Cushman's farewell to the stage 
in New York. 

8. — Settlement of the difficulties between China 
and Japan reported. 



9. — Francis D. Moulton called to plead to the 
indictment for libeling Miss Edna Dean Proctor. 

10. — Constitutionality of the police justices act 

affirmed by the N. Y. Court of Appeals Third 

annual session of the American Public Health 
Association begun at Philadelphia. 

11. — General transfer of police captains made 
in New York. 

12.— Rev. Dr. Thomas U. Dudley. Jr., of Balti- 
more.electeid Assistant Bishop (P. E.) of Kentucky. 

18. — Formal demand at Boston by the govern- 
ment on the Treasurer of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road to pay, within CO days, the 5 per cent, 
earnings of the road from Nov., 1869, to Oct. 81, 
1874, amounting to $1,040,056 Dr. John Scar- 
borough, of Pittsburgh, elected P. E. Bishop of 
New Jersey at Burlington. 

16. — The 'longshoremen's strike against a re- 
duction of wages begun. 

17.— First operatic performance of Verdi's 
Requiem Mass in New York. • 

19. — The denial of a bill of particulars in the 
suit of Tilton against Beecher affirmed in the 
General Term of the Brooklyn City Court. 

21. — Close of the 43d American Institute Ex- 
hibition in New York. 

23. — The Italian Parliament was opened 

Resignation of Supervising Architect Mullett 

offered and accepted The first train eastward 

over the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's through 
line left Chicago. 

26. —Thanksgiving Day generally observed in 
the north and west, and to some extent in the 
south. 

27. — ITeavy snow storms prevailed in central 
Illinois . End of the District Safe Burglary trial 
at Washington, the jury acquitting A. B. "Wil- 
liams but disagreeing in the cases of Whitley and 
Harrington. 

28. — Snow fell in Ohio Reception of the Rt. 

Hon. Wm. E. Foster, Sir Fowell Buxton, and 
Prof. Bonamy Price by the Century Club of New 
York. 

-'.'.— Arrival of King Kalakaua of the Sand- 
wich Islands at Sun Francisco Return from 

the Black Hills to Ft. Laramie, W. T., of Prof. 
Marsh's «xpedition, with two tons of fossils, in- 
cluding many rare specimens. 

DO. — Meeting of the French Assembly. 

United States Polities. 

December, 1873. 

1. — Meeting of Congress. James G. Blaine, 
Rep., re-elected Speaker ot the House of Repre- 
sentatives, over Fernando Wood, the Democratic 
candidate. The President's message states that 
the Virginius affair is in process of settlement. 

2.— The President nominates Attorney-General 
George II. Williams for Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Court. Benjamin H. Bristow, for Attorney- 
General, and Alexander K. Shepherd, for Gov- 
ernor of the District of Columbia. 

9.— Samuel C. Cobb, citizen's candidate, elect- 
ed Mayor of Boston. 

11.— Matthew H. Carpenter, of Wisconsin, 
elected I'r evident ji ro tern, of the Senate. 

12.— Secretary Richardson proposes to the 
Ways and Means Committee of the House of Rep- 
resentatives the restoration of the import duties 
on tea and coffee, an increase of 10 cents ji gallon 
in the tax on distilled spirits, 4 cents per pound 
additional on tobacco, and ether taxation, tuffi- 



cient in all to raise $40,0 0,000 per annum, to 
provide for anticipated deficiencies in the na- 
tional revenue. 

16. — Alexander R. Shepherd's nomination to 
the Governorship of the District of Columbia 
confirmed by the Senate The new Constitu- 
tion of Pennsylvania adopted by the people by a 
majority of 145,150. 

19. — Congress adjourned until January 5, 1S74. 
January, 1874. 

5. —James W. Husted, Rep., elected Speaker 
of the New York Assembly, ever Smith M. Weed, 
Dem... The Supreme Court of Texas declares 
the last election unconstitutional. 

8. — The President withdraws the nomination 
of Attorney-General WiUiams for Chief Justice. 

9. — The President nominates Caleb Cushing 
for Chief Justice. 

12. — The President suggests to Mr. Davis, of 
Texas, that it would be "prudent, as well as 
right," to yield to the verdict of the people, and 
declines to interfere. 

13. — The President withdraws the nomination 
of Caleb Cushing for Chief Justice. 

15. — Richard Coke (Dem.) inaugurated as Gov- 
ernor of Texas. 

17. — The President declines to furnish Federal 
troops to aid Mr. Davis, of Texas. 

19. — The House of Representatives votes in 
favor of inflating the currency, by ayes, 135 ; 

noes, 98 The President nominates, and 21st, 

the Senate confirms, Morrison R. Waite, of Ohio, 
as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. • 

February. 

2. — Ex-Gov. James M. Harvey elected U. S. 
Senator from Kansas. 

11. — The Senate of Massachusetts, by a vote of 
26 to 7, rescinds the resolution of 1872, virtually 
censuring Charles Sumner. 

12. — Mr. Dawes, of Mass., makes a speech in 
the House, exposing the extravagance of the 
National Government. 

17. — William Stokley, Rep., again elected 
mayor of Philadelphia bv a large majority. 
Total vote, Stokiey, 60,128 ; McClure, Ind., 49,138. 

27. — William A. Simmons confirmed by the 
Senate as Collector of the port of Boston. 
Match. 

8.— George G. Claikson, Rep., elected mayor 
of Rochester, by 489 majority, over Frederick 

Cook, Dem James G. Lindsley, Lib. Rep., 

elected mayor of Kingston, without opposition. 

TheodoreS. Sayre, Rep., elected mayor of 

Utica by 423 maj B. Doolittle, Rep., elected 

mayor of Oswego by 100 maj John Arnot, 

Dem., elected mayor of Elmira by 851 maj 

Chauncey M. Leonard, Dem., elected mayor of 

Newburgh Charles N. Ross, Dem., elected 

mayor of Auburn. 

April. 

17.— Governor Wm. B. Washburn, Rep., chosen 
Senator from Massachusetts, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Charles Sumner, after a 
contest of nearly a month's duration. 

22.— President Grant sends to Congress his 
veto of the bill increasing the greenbacks to 
$400,000,000, and authorizing the issue of 
$46,000,01)0 additional national bank notes. 
May. 

6. — Mayor Ilavemeyer appoints Abraham 
Di>becker to the office of Police Commissioner. 

15. — The President issues his 2 ,r oclamation 



TIiE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



recognizing Elisha Baxter as Governor ef Ar- 
kaneas t and commanding all turbulent and dis- 
orderly persons to disperse. 

June. 

1.— Resignation of Mr. Wm. A. Richardson, Sec- 
retary of the Treasury, and appointment cf Gent 
Beuj. H. Bristow, of Kentucky, as his successor. 

2.— B. H. BristoW unanimously confirmed as 
Secretary of the Treasury William A. Rich- 
ardson confirmed as judge of the Court of Claims, 
by a bare majority. 

5. — The President makes public his " memo- 
randum of views entertained on the subject of 
desirable legislation on the finances." This 
document waa enclosed in a letter to Senator 
Jones, and strongly urged active measures for 
the restoration of specie payments. 

6.— Resignation of the Indian Peace Commis- 
sioners because of inharmonious relations be- 
tween them and the Interior Department. 

IT.— The House passes the bill abolishing the 
District of Columbia Government. 

18. — Same passed by the Senate. 

20. — The Compromise Currency bill signed by 
the President. 

23. — The President nominates Ex-Gov. Alex. 
R. Shepherd to be a member of the Governing 
Commission of the District of Columbia ; rejected 
by the Senate by a majority of 10 or 15. 

24. — Resignation of Postmaster-General John 
A. J. Creswell. 

July. 

2. — Mayor Havemeyer reappoints Oliver Char- 
lick and Hugh Gardner as Police Commissioners. 

3. — The President appoints Marshall Jewell, 
of Connecticut, N to be Postmaster General, in 
place of Mr. Cresswell. 

7. — Mayor Havemeyer accepts the resignations 
of Messrs. Charlick and Gardner, and appoints 
John R. Voorhis and George W. Matsell Police 
Commissioners. 

August. 

SI. — Senator Spencer and Congressman Hays 
report terrible outrages in Alabama. 

September. 

14.— Overthrow of the Kellogg Government at 
New Orleans. 

15. — President Grant issued a proclamation 
ordering the Louisiana belligerents to disperse 
within five days. 

17. — The McEnery Government in Louisiana 
submits to the orders of the President, and sur- 
renders to the officers of the V. S. army. 

19. — The Kellogg Government reinstated. 
October. 

12. — Letters from Alabama show that the state- 
ments of Congressman Hays to the effect that a 
reign of ter.or prevailed va the State were not 
true John McEnery offefife to submit the Loui- 
siana returns for 1ST2 to a Board of Arbitration. 

13. — Ohio and Indiana elect the Democratic 
State ticket and a large aajority of Democratic 
Congressmen. The same* day a Convention on 
"Southern Outrages "'assembles at Chattanooga. 
....Gov. Kellogg* of Louisiana, agrees to Mr. 
McEnery's proposition 

14. — Adjournment of the Chattanooga Con- 
vention. 

20. — George F. Edmunds re-elected Senator 
from Vermont. 

21. — Reports from special agents sho)w great 



unfitness among Federal officials in Texas, and 
that fees were paid to Senator Flanagan (Rep.), 
for procuring confirmations. 

23. — Four citizens of Sumter County (Ala.) ar- 
raigned at Mobile for conspiracy against Special 
Agent Hester. It afterwards appears that sub- 
poenas for witnesses were issued before the al- 
leged crime was committed. 

26. — Trial of the Sumter County (Ala.) prison- 
ers postponed to Nov. 10, and the prisoners re- 
leased on their own recognizances. 

Gov. Dix declares against a third Presidential 
term. 

31. — Publication cf President Grant's letter of 
1872, referring to a second term, and expressing 
his position regarding a third term. 

November. 

2. — The Louisiana election passed off quietly, 
resulting in a Conservative victory. 

8. — The November elections resulted in large 
Opposition gains throughout the country, and 
the election of an Opposition majority in the 
House to the XLIVth Congress. 

11.— Trial of Ex-Senator S. C. Pomeroy, of 
Kansas, for bribery, postponed till April, 1S75. 

12.— rMayor Havemeyer removes Messrs. Howe 
and Bowlend, the Commissioners of Accounts, 
and appoints John F. Joy and Ezra M. Kingsley 
in their places. . . Gov. A. H. Garland and other 
State officers elected on the Conservative ticket 
in Arkansas in October were sworn in. 

13. — The Sumter County (Ala.) prisoners ad- 
mitted to bail. 

14. — Gov. A. H. Garland (Dem.\ of Arkansas, 
procured warrants for the arrest of V. V. Smith 
and others claiming to be the legal State officers. 

Smith appeals to the President for military 

aid, and issues a proclamation, claiming to be 

Governor Speaker Blaine, of Maine, declines 

to be a candidate for U. S. Senator against Sena- 

ator Hamlin Ex-Gov. Horatio Seymour writes 

that he prefers not to be a candidate for U. S. 
Senator from New York Meeting of the Ala- 
bama Legislature. 

17. — The Cabinet decides to take no notice of 
the proclamation of V. V. Smith, of Arkansas. 

20. — Return to Washington of Special Agents 
Hester and Beach without prosecuting the Sum- 
ter County (Ala.) prisoners. 

24. — Meeting of the South Carolina Legislature. 

Inauguration of Geo. S. Houston (Dem.) as 

Governor of Alabama. 

25. — Meeting of Convention of Inflationists at 
Indianapolis, and adjournment to meet at Cleve- 
land, March 11, 1875. 

30. — Mayor Wm. F. Havemeyer having died of 
apoplexy in hi3 office, President Vance, of the 
Board of Aldermen, becomes Mayor of New York. 

Calamities and Disasters. 

December, 1873. 

6. — Steamboat Royal George exploded her 
boiler near Shreveport, La., killing 4 men. 

Propeller City of Detroit foundered in Saginaw 
Bay, with loss of about 15 lives. 

9. — Dense fog in London; serious accidents 
and loss of cattle at the Islington show. 
February, J 874. 

27. — The steamer Pennsylvania, of the Ameri- 
can line, encounters a violent gale, and Capt. 
Bradbmn, the first and second officers, and two 



38 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST5. 



seamen are washed overboard and drowned. A 
passenger named C. L. Brady, formerly third 
mate of the ill-fated White Star steamer Atlantic, 
brings the Pennsylvania hit > port. Upon her 
arrival at Philadelphia, Capt Brady refuses a 
tender of $1,000 from the company, and brings a 
suit for salvage. 

March. 

The French steamer Nil sunk while on a voy- 
age from Hong Kong to Yokohama, and 80 per- 
sons drowned. 

April. 

1, — Great fire in Millerstown, Butler County, 
Pa. ; 69 buildings destroyed and 7 persons burned 
to deaih. 

Explosion of the boiler of the steamer Tigress, 
late of the Polaris expedition, causing the death 
of 22 persons. 

2. — The General Transatlantic Co.'s (French) 
steamer Europe, bound from Havre to New York, 
abandoned at sea in a sinking condition. The 
passengers and crew were taken off in safety by 
the steamer Greece. 

14. — Sinking of the General Transatlantic Co.'s 
(Prench) steamer Amerique near the island of 
Ushant. 

Colliery explosion at Dunkinfield, near Ashton- 
under-Lyne, Lancashire, England, killing 53 
persons. 

18. — Disastrous floods ia Louisiana, oaused by 
the Red river overflowing its banks. Twenty- 
lire thousand people reported to be in danger of 
slarvatioa, having lost everything. 

25. — Great flood at Bagdad, caused by the 
overflow of the Tigris. Several persons drowned. 
May. 

17. — Bursting of a storage reservoir on Mill 
river, Hampshire County, Mass. Four villages 
flooded, and 188 lives lost. 

JCNI. 

23.— The floor of the Central Baptist Church at 
Syracuse gives way during a strawberry festival, 
killing 18 persons and Injuring 100 more or less 
severely. 

Jcly. 

6. — Great tornado. The long railroad bridge 
over the Juniata river at Lewistown blown down, 
and three persons killed. Two church steeples 
ia the same town blown over, and four persons 
killed. 

9.— M. de Groof, the ''flying man." killed at 
Chelsea, England, while descending from a bal- 
loon. 

10.— Erie Oil Works at Weehawken, N. J., 
struck by lightning and consumed. 60,000 bar- 
rels of oil destroyed. 

14.— Great fires at Chicago and Oshkosh. Loss 
at Chicago, $4,000,0^0; Oshkosh, $1,000,000. At 
Chicago 7 persons are known to have perished. 

26-27.— Terrible flood at Pittsburgh and Alle- 
gheny City. About 200 lives lost. 

A CGPST. 

5.— The steamboat Pat Rogers burned on the 
Ohio river, one mile below Aurora, Indk Over 40 
lives lost. 

Birraun. 

3. — Severe earthquake in Guatemala; two or 
three towns entirely destroyed, and over 2l0 lives 
lost. 

11. — Railway collision near Norwich, England, 
killing 20 persons and wounding 50. 

19.— Burning of the "Granite No. 1 " ootton 



mill, at Fall River, Mass., and loss of 20 lives, 
with an equal number severely injured. 

22. — Severe typhoon at Hong Kong ; over 8,000 
lives, numberless junks, and many vessels lost, 
and over $5,000,000 worth of property damaged. 
October. 

2. — Explosion of 4 tons of gunpowder on a 
barge In the Regent's canal, London. Great de- 
struction of property and loss of three lives. 

13.— Report that the Turkish town of Akhiolyl, 
Gulf of Burghas, Black Sea (population 5,000), 
had been totally destroyed by fire. 

20. — During a severe storm in the North of 
England and Scotland, great damage was done on 
land and sea ; over 50 lives were lost, mostly off 
the coast. 

22. — F.xplosion of the boiler of the City of 
Brooklyn near Windsor, Ont. ; 15 persons killed 
and several wounded. 

November. 

1. — Great damage was done to shipping by the 
hurricane in Jamaica. 

13. — Several houses were destroyed by an 
earthquake at Yera Cruz. 

IT. — Three persons drowned, one killed, and 
several wounded, and a tug boat sunk by the 
explosion of her boiler in Hell Gate ...Nearly 
20 lives lost by the sinking of the steamer Empire 
at her wharf at New Orleans. 

1$. — Three men killed and two buildings de- 
stroyed by an explosion at the Mount Sterling 
(Ky.) Gas Works. 

20. — Twenty-four persons killed by an explo- 
sion in a coal mine at Warren Yale, Yorkshire, 
England. 

23. — A severe storm prevailed in the lake 
region and on the Atlantic coast ; nearly half the 
town of Tuscumbia, Ala., was destroyed, and 12 
or more persons killed. 

29. — Severe storm off the west coast of England 
and Scotland, attended by great loss of life. 



Obituary Record. 

Dfcpmber, 1S78. 

7.— Rt. Rev. William K Armitage, Prot. Ep. 
Bishop of Wisconsin, 44, New York, N. Y ... 
John C. Underwood, U. 8. Judge of the E. Dist. 
of Virginia, 66, Washington, D. C. 

18.— Samuel Nelson, ex-Associate Justice U. S. 
Supreme Court, 81, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

14. — Louis John Rudolph Agassiz, naturalist, 
66, Cambridge, Mass Elizabeth, Queen Dow- 
ager of Prussia. 72, Dresden, Prussia. 

16. — John M. Parker, Judge N. Y. Supreme 
Court, , Oswego, N. Y. 

22.— Sir Richard A. Glass, maker of the first 
Atlantic cable, 63, Southampton, Eng. 

24. — Johns Hopkins, merchant and philan- 
thropist, 78, Baltimore, Md. 

Jan cart, 1874. 

9. — James Uannay, novelist, 45, Barcelona, 
Spain. 

11. — Gail Borden, Inventor of condensed milk, 
72, I'.ordenville, Texas. 

15. — Charles As-tor Bristed, 58, Washington. 

17. — (hang and Eng, the Siamese twins, 62, 
Surrey county, N. C. 

21. — Euphrosyne Parepa Rosa, singer, 36, 
Maida Vale, England. 

24.— Adam Black, publisher, 89, Edinburgh, 
Scotland. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



39 



28.— James Thompson, ex-Chief Justice of 
Pennsylvania, 6T, Philadelphia. 
February. 

2.— N. S. Dodge, author, 63, Boston. 

S. — William Lunalilo, King of the Sandwich 
Islands, 39, Hawaii, 

6. — Baroa Meyer de Rothschild, 54, London. 

7. — James W. Gerard, lawyer, 80, New York. 

8. — David Friedrich Strauss, theologian, CO, 
Berlin. 

Herman Merivale, author, 63, Cornwall 
Gardens, England. 

10. — Jules Michelet, man of letters, 76, Paris. 

11.— N. P. Trist, 74, Alexandria, Va. 

12. — Sir Franci3 Pet tit Smith, inventor of the 
screw propeller, 65, Kensington, England. 

18.— Ex-Senator Lewis T. Wigfall, 50, Galves- 
ton, Texas. 

23. — Henry Smith, President of the Board of 
Police, 53, New York. 

Shirley Brooks, editor of The London 
Punch, 53, London. 

25. — Rev. John Bachman, naturalist, 85, Char- 
leston, S. C. 

March. 

2. — Elder Jacob Knapp, revivalist, T4, Rock- 
ford, 111. 

Neil Arnott,M.D., inventor, Ac, 85,London. 

8. — Forbes Winslow, M. D., distinguished writer 
on insanity, 63, Brighton, England. 

5. — Jane McElhenny Noyes (Ada Clare), ac- 
tress, 38, New York. 

8.— Millard Fillmore, ex-President, 74, Buffalo. 

10. — Aimee Desclee, French actress, Paris. 

11. — Charles Sumner, Senator, 63, Washing- 
ton. 

13. — Rear Admiral Joseph Lanman, U. S. N., 
63, New London. 

18. — Ossian B. Hart, Governor of Florida, 
Jacksonville. 

27.— Rev. Edward N. Kirk, D.D., 72, Boston. 
April. 

5. — Jfchn W. Edmonds, jurist, 75, New York. 

7. — William Von Kaulbach, painter, 69, Mu- 
nich. 

13. — James Bogardus, inventor, 74, New York. 

16.— Rev. Thomas Carlton, D. D., 65, Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

17. — Alpheus Crosby, professor, 74, Salem, 
Mass. 

19. — Owen Jones, architect, &c, 64, London. 

23.— Rev. Henry Sheer, D. D., 73, Baltimore. 

24.— John Phillips, geologist, 73, London. 

27.— Rev. John N. McLeod, 67, New York. 

Mowbray Morris, lato manager of The 
London Times, 56, London. 

23. — John II. Griscom, physician, 64, New 
York. 

80.— Jonas C. Heartt, ex-Speaker of the N. Y. 
Assembly, 81, Troy. 

Mat. 

1. — Charles Farrar, merchant, 70, Brooklyn. 

4. — Beriah Green, reformer, 80, Whitosboro, 
N. Y. 

7. — John necker, merchant and philanthrop- 
ist, 61, New York. 

15. — Edwin Hoyt, merchant, 70, New York. 

16.— Major-Gen. George L. Hartsuif, U. S. A., 
44, New York. 

18.— Rev. Thomas De Witt, D.D., 82, New York. 

21.— Charles H. DoolitUe, Judgo N. Y. Su- 
preme Court, at sea. 



23.— David B. Mellish, M. C. from the IXth 
Dist. of New York, 43, Washington. 

27.— Rear Admiral William B. Shubrick, , 
Washington. 

John Edgar Thompson, railroad manager, 
G8, Philadelphia. 

29. — Jean Loui3 namon, painter, 53, St. 
Raphael, France. 

81. — Samuel Jaudon, cashier of the old U. S. 
Bank, 80, New York. 

Isaac Green Pearson, retired merchant, 87, 
New York. 

June. 

8. — Robert Norris, manufacturer, Philadel- 
phia. 

4. — George Memlenhall, physician, 60, Cincin- 
nati. 

10. — John Carter Brown, manufacturer, 77, 
Providence. 

11. — Eliza Sharpe, water-color painter, 78, 
England. 

13. — James Miller McKim, reformer, 74, West 
Orange, N. J. 

14. — Sir Charles Fox, engineer of the London 
World's Fair building of 1S51, 64, Blackheath, 
England. 

19. — Jule3 Janin, critic, 7£, Paris. , 

20. — Charles Cheney, manufacturer, 77, South 
Manchester, Conn. 

2<3. — Howard Staunton, che?3 player and 
Shakespeare scholar, 64, London. 

28. — Marshal Manuel de la Concha, general 
and statesman, 80, killed in battle. 

30. — Henry Grinnell, merchant, and originator 
of the first Arctic expedition in search of Sir 
John Franklin, 75, New York. 
July. 

1.— George B. Upton, merchant, 70, Boston. 

4. — M. de Goulard, statesman, 66, Paris. 

5. — Henry Stephens, author of the ''Book of 
the Farm," 79, Bonnington, England. 

6. — Earl of Dalhousie, English statesman, 73, 
Brechin, Scotland. 

11.— Tod R. Caldwell, Governor of North Caro- 
lina, Hillsboro, N. C. 

13. — Agnes Strickland, authoress, 63, South- 
wold, England. 

18. — Samuel Williston, philanthropist, 79, East 
Hampton, Mass. 

James Winslow, banker, 59, New York. 

27. — Baron Anselm de Rothschild, banker, 72, 
Vienna. 

81. — Charlea T. Beke, African^ explorer, 73, 
Beakesbourne, England. 

August. 

8.— John Stanton Gould, 63, Hudson, N. Y. 

10. — Henry John Whitehouse, P. E. Bishop of 
Illinois, 72, Chicago. 

16. — M. de Forcade de la Roquette, French 
minister of Finance, &c, 53, Paris. 

IS. — William Fairbairn, civil engineer, 82, 
Farnham, England. 

24.— William Henry West Betty, the "Infant 
Roscius," 82, London. 

Kenny Meadows, artist and illustrator ef 
Shakespeare, 86, England. 

25. — John E. Gavit, engraver, 58, Stockbridge, 
Mass. 

27. — Mark Smith, comedian. 

John Henry Foley, R. A., sculptor, 55, 
London. 



40 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



September. 

2 —Gen. John G. Foster, U. S. A., 51, Nashua, 
N. EL 

Tho Rev. Thomas A. Morris, Senior Bishop 
of the M. E. Church, 80, tpr.nsrfi«ld, eh'.o. 

4.— Pro/. Jeff i las Wyman, anatomist, 80, Beth- 
lehem, N. II. 

6— Michael Banku, author, 81, Ireland 

7. — Frederick B. Conway, actor, 53, Manches- 
I ter, Mass. 

12. — Francois P. G. Guizot, statesman and 
historian, 86, YalR'.cher, France. 

Franois E. Anstie, 40, LondCn. 

14. — Charles Vaudevoort, Grand Master of the 
©dd Fellows, 64, New York. 

15. — Ex-judge Benjamin R. Curtis, 64, New- 
po-t, A. I. 

22. — Charles Swain, poet, 71, Manchester, En- 
gland. 

27. — John A. TTows, artist, 43, New York. 

2-* — John Ganson, lawyer and Stato senator, 
66, Buffalo. 

iSO. — Gardner Brewer, merchant, 03 Newport. 
R.I. 

October. 

6. — Bryan Wallace Proctor (Barry Cornwall), 
96, London. 

11.— E. Kumsey Wing, U. S. Minister to Ecua- 
dor, 80, Quito. 

12— Francis Patrick McFarland, R. C. Bishop 
of Hartford, 56, Hartford. 

17. — Martin Yan Buren Wllcoxson, formerly 
U. S. Minister to Italy, 45. Loudon. 

19. — John Austin Stevens, merchant, 79, New 
York. 

21. — Thomas Benny, banker, 70, New York. 

23. —Commodore \Vidlam Inman, U. S. X., 
Philadelphia. 

Kx-Gev. Harris Flanigan, Arkadelphia, 
Texas. 

Bishop Payne, lato P. E. Bishop of Africa, 
Westmoreland County, Ya. 

2J. — John II. Authon, Past Grand Master for 
New York, lawyer. Cooperstown. N. Y. 



John Laird, M. P., builder of the "Ala- 
bama," 09, Birkenhead, England. 

30. — Leopold von Blerwisih, merchant, 74, 
New York. 

November, 
2. — James Kolly, Inspector of Common Schools, 
72, New York. 

John Adriance, lawyer, 4?, New York. 
5.— Rt. Rev. D. W. Bacon, B. D., R. C. Blihop 
of Portland, Me.; 59, New York. 

9. — Col. John W. Head; lawyer, 55, Gallatin, 
Tenn. 

MouseigneLir Fruchaud, Archbishop of 
Tours. 

11.— Robert W. Roberts, newspaper publisher, 
03. Utica, N. Y. 
13. — Baniel N. naskell, journalist, 56, Boston. 
Col. Wm. Wilson, organizer of the Wil9on 
Zouave Guard, New York. 

14 — Hammatt Billings, of Boston, artist and 
architect, 56, New York. 

Ralph C. Johnson, merchant, 84, Belfast, 
Me. 

17. — Francisco Lersundi, cx-Captain-General 
of Cuba, Spain. 
20. — Joseph Stuart, banker, 71, New York. 
Wm. Eno, lawyer, 74, Pine Plains, N. Y. 
Thomas Hood, editor of Fv/rt, 09, London. 
Archduke Charles Ferdinand of Austria, 
50, Yienna. 

Samuel B. W. McLean, of The Enquirer, 
Cincinnati. 

Isaac Butts, journalist, Rochester. 
22. — Fortuny, artist, 85, Spain. 
26. — John Richard Dennett, journalist, C7, 
Westborough, Mass. 
23. -Jonathan Sturges, merchant,73, New York. 
29. — John M. Rea«l, ex-Lhief Justice of Penn- 
sylvania, 73, Philadelphia. 

Charles N Talbot, merchant, 72, New York. 
80. — William F. Havemeyer, three times elected 
Mayor of New York, 70, New York. 

Nathaniel G. Hichboru, shipbuilder, 65 
Stockton, Me. 



Presidents and Vice-Presidents of the United States. 

Presidents. | Vice Presidents. 



Name. 



f-tatn 
of which 
a Citi- 
zen. 



Term of 
Office. 



1789 George Washington Virginia. 8 years 

1797 John Adams Mas* '4 " 

1801 Thomas Jefferson.. Virginia. 8 " 

1809! James Madison Virginia. 8 " 

1817J James Monros Virginia. 8 " 

1825' John Q. Adams Mass. ... 4 " 

1829 Andrew Jackson... Tenn 8 " 

1837: Martin Van Bureo..!N York. '4 " 

1841! W.Henry Harrison*, Ohio 1 month. 

1 441! John T ylar Virginia.'3yrs. 11 mos. 

184s James Kn >x Polk. . Tenn 4 voars. 

1849 Zachary Taylorf ... La 1 jr. 4 m. ?d. 

1850 Millard Fllinoie N. York. 2yrs.7m.26d. 

1853 Franklin Pierce N.TIamp. 4 years. 

i8s7 James Buchanan . . . Penn .... 4 " 

1861 Abraham Lincoln^ .111 4 yra. 1 m. iod. 

i86n Andrew Johnson. . . Tenn ... 3yra.iom. 2od. 
1869 Ulysses S. Grant. ... Ill 



Name. 



State 

of which a 

Citizen. 



* Died in office, .* p 11 4, 1841. 
t Died la office, Jui / g, 18^0. 
t Assassinated April 14, 186s. 
Note.— The year is that In which the Individ- 1 
ual accedad to the office. 



1789 John Adams I Massachusetts. 

1797 Thomas Jefferson Virginia. 

1801 Aaron Burr :N ew York. 

1805 George Clinton [New York. 

1813 Elbriage Gerry Ma-sachusetts. 

1817 Daniel D. Tompkins |New York. 

1825 John C. Calhoun "South Carolina. 

1833 Martin Van Buren New York. 

1837 Richard M. Johnson Kentucky. 

1841 John Tyler I Virginia. 

1842 Samuel L. Southard-... 'New Jersey. 

1845 George M. Dallas Pennsylvania. 

1849 Millard Filmore New York. 

1851 Wm. R. King* ; Alabama. 

18=3 David R. Atchison * 'Missouri. 

185s Jesse D. Bright" Indiana . 

1857 John C. Breckenridge. . 'Kentucky. 

)86i Hannibal Hamlin ... Maine. 

1865 Andrew Johnson Tennessee. 

1865 Lafayette Foster* Connecticut. 

1866 Benjamin F. Wade* Ohio. 

1869 Schuyler r olfax Indiana. 

1873 J Henry Wih»on Ma ssachusetts. 

* Ex-Qfflcio as President pro tern, of the Senate'. 



r *li.JLJHMJ,UJ 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



41 



NEW YORK STATE GOVERNMENT, 1875. 

SAMUEL J. TILDEN, Governor. 

WILLIAM DORSHEIMER, Lieutenant Governor. 

NELSON K. HOPKLNS, Controller. 

DIEDRICH WILLERS, Jb., Secretury of State. 

THOMAS RAINES, Treasurer. 

DANIEL PRATT, Attorney General. 

ADIN THAYER, REUBEN W. STROUD, JAMES JACKSON, Ja., Canal Commissioners. 

SYL VANUS II. SWEET, State Engineer and Surveyor. 

NEIL GILMOUR, Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

FRANCIS S. THAYER, Auditor, Canal Department. 

ORLOVV W. CHAPMAN, Superintendent, Insurance Department. 

DE WITT C. ELLIS, Superintendent, Bank Department. 

GEORGE WAGENER, EZRA GRAVES, MOSS K. PLATT, Inspectors cf State Prisons. 



Elec. 



CHARLES J. FOLGER, THEODORE MILLER, Associate Judges, Court of Appeals 
EDWIN O. PERRIN, Clerk of Court of Appeals. 

Sheriffs and County Clerks in the State of New YorJt. 

County. Count]/ Seat. /Sheriff. 

Albany Albany Albert Gallup 

Allegany Belmont Stephen N. Ben^et 

Broome Binghamton . . PhiletUB Edmister 

Cattaraugus . . Little Valley . . . William W. Henry 

Cayuga Auburn Andrew J. Sanders 

Chautauqua.. . May ville Corydon Hitchcock 

Chemung Elmira Allen Cooper 

Chenango Norwich William W.Brown 

Clinton Plattsburgh John H. Hopkins 

Columbia Hudson William H . Van Tassel . 

Cortland Cortlandviilo .. Nicholas H. Haynes 

Delaware Delhi Darius S. Jackson 

Dutchess Poaghkeepsie . . John G. Halstead 

Erie Buffalo John B. Weber 

Essex Elizabethto wn .. Samuel S. Olcott 

Franklin ' Malon e Robert A. Delong 

Fulton Johnstown John Dunn 

Genesee Batavia George H. Robertson. . . 

Greene Catskill Piatt Coonley , 

Hamilton Sageville Caleb R. Carpenter 

Herkimer Herkimer Volney Eaton 

Jefferson Watertown George Babbitt 

Kings. Brooklyn , Aras G. Williams 

Lewis Lowville J. Mather House 

Livingston .... Geneseo Elijah Youngs 

Madison Morrisville Milton Delano 

Monroe Rochester Charles S. Campbell .. . . 

Montgomery . . Fonda James W. Kline 

New York New York William C Conner 

Niagara Lockport Norman O. Allen 

Oneida Utica George Benedict 

Onondaga Syracuse Davis Cossitt 

Ontario Canandaigua... Nathaniel R. Roswell .. 

Orange Goshen James W. Hoyt 

Orleans Albion Thomas Parker 

Oswego ....... Oswego Henry H.Lyman 

Otsego Cooperstown... Alexander N.Benedict. 

Putnam Carmel .' James O. Cole 

Queens Jamaica Charles O. Sammis 

Rensselaer .... Troy John A. Quackcnbusk . 

Richmond Richmond C.H. -William C. Denyee 

Rockland Clarkstown Charles P. Bensen 

St. Lawrence.. Canton ......... Edward J. Chapin 

Saratoga Ballston Spa . . . Franklin Carpenter 

Schenectady . . Schenectady . . . James McMillan, jr 

Schoharie Schoharie John F. Sawyer. 

Schuyler '. Watkins John Wood 

Seneca Waterloo Abram B. Slauson ...... 

Steuben Bath Holland B. Williams .. . . 

Suff Ik Riverhead Egbert G.Lewis 

Sullivan Monticello Benjamin "W. Winner. . . 

Tioga Owego Charles C. Brooks 

Tompkins Ithaca Eron C. Van Kirk 

Ulster Kingston Silas Saxton 

Warren Caldwell Gideon Towsley 

Washington. . Argyle JohnLarmon 

Wayne Lyons Richard P. Groat 

Westchester .. White Plains ... Zlba Carpenter 

Wyoming Warsaw George M. Wilder 

Yates Pen Yan Theodore Bogart 



d. County Clerk. 

873 William E. Haswell 

873 Wm. H. H. Russell 

872 Pliny A. Russell 

873 Eugene A. Nash 

874 Lyman C.Comstock.... 

873 Herman Sixbey 

873 John G.Copley 

873 Andrew Shepardson.... 

874 William J. McCaffrey . . 

873 Henry B.Hall. 

873 Frank Place 

873 SmithH. White 

873 Andrew C. Warren 

873 George L. Remington . . . 

873 Joseph A. Titus 

872 Almerin W. Merrick. . . . 

874 William S . McKio 

872 Carlos A. Hull 

873 Omar V. Sage 

874 William H. Try 

873 Edward Simnis 

872 Jacob Stears,jr 

872 George G. Herman 

873 Charles E. Mitchell 

873 Hurlbert E. Brown 

872 Lucius P. Clark 

872 John H.Wilson 

873 Abner H. Burtch 

873 Willi m Walsh 

872 George L. Moote.. ...... 

863 James 3. Paddon 

873 Charles E. Hubbcll 

873 Washington L. Hicka... 

873 William E. Mapes 

874 Lucius R. Post 

872 Brainard Nelson 

872 Walter H. Bunn 

873 JohnK. Wyatt 

873 John H. Sutphin 

873 Eben C. Reynold 

873 David H. Cortelyou 

873 Cyrus M.Crum 

873 Tiras H. Ferris 

873 James W. Horton 

872 James G. Caw ,. 

872 Thomas W. Zeh, jr 

874 Edward Kendall 

873 Samuel S. Gulick 

873 Archie E. Baxter 

873 George C. Campbell 

873 Friend W. Johnston 

872 John J. VanKleeck.... 

872 Doctor Tarbell 

873 Peter D.Lefever 

873 Albert F . Ransom 

873 William H.Kincaid 

873 Alfred H.Gates 

873 ' J. Malcolm Smith 

873 Charles J. Gardner 

873 Joseph F. Crosby 



Zlec 



42 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



UNITED STATES GOTERNMENT. 

December 20, 1874. 



THE EXECUTIVE. 

ULYSSES S. GRANT, of Illinois, President of the United States Salary $50,000 

HENRY WILSON, of Massachusetts, Vice-President of the United States _" 10,000 



THE CABINET. 



rONFTSH, of New York, Secretary of State Salary $10,000 

dIN H. BRISTOW, of Kentucky, Secretary of the Treasury 8,000 

.11 W. BELKNAP, of Iowa, Secretary of War " 10.000 



HAMILTON 
BENJAMIN 
WILLIA L_ 

GEORGE M. ROBESON, of New Jersey, Secretary of the bavy " 10,000 

COLUMBUS DELANO, of Ohio, Secretary of the Interior 10,000 

GEORGE H. WILLIAMS, of Oregon, Attorney- General " io,«oo 

MARSHALL JEWELL, of Connecticut, Postmaster' General " io.oco 



THE JUDICIARY; 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

MORRISON R. WAITE, of Ohio, Chief Justice Salary $10,500 

\atbas Cliffobd, of Maine, Associate Justice. I Stephen - J. Field, of Cal., Associate Justice. 
Noah H. Swayki, of Ohio, " " William M. Stbono, of Pa., " " 

Samitel F. Miller, of Iowa, " M Joseph P. Bbadley, of N. J., " " 

David Datis, of Illinois, " " | Ward Hunt, of N. Y., * " 

Salary of Associate Justices, $10,000. Court meets first Monday in December, at Washington. 



?IIMSTEKS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

ENVOYS EXTRAORDINARY AND MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 
Country. Capital. Minii'.tri. Salary .Appointed. 

Austria— Hungary Ylenna John Jay, N. Y % 12,000 1S6S 

Brazil Rio Janeiro James R. Partridge, Md 12,000.... 1871 

Chill Santiago Cornelius A. Logan, Kansas 10,000.... 1S73 

China Pekin Benjamin P. Avery, Cal 1 2,000 1S74 

France Paris Elihu B. Washburne, 111 17,500 ...i860 

Great Britain London Robert C. Schenck, Ohio 17,500 1870 

Ital / Rome George P. Marsh, Vt 12,000 1S61 

Japan Ycdo John A. Bingham, Ohio.. 12,000.... 1.73 

Mexico Mexico John W. Foster, Indiana 12,000 — 1873 

Peru Luc a Francis Thomas, Md 10,000 1872 

Germany Borlin J. C. Bancroft Davis, Mas3 17,500 — 1S74 

Russia St. Petersburg 17,500 — 

Spain Madrid Caleb Cushing, Ya 12,000 — 1S74 

MINISTERS RESIDENT. 

Argentine Republic Buenos Ayros Thomas O. Osborn, HI ... 7,^00 1874 

Bulgium Brussels J. Russell Jones, 111 7,500 1869 

Bolivia La Paz Robert M. Reynolds, Ala 7,500. . . . 1874 

Central American States. San Jose George Williamson, La 10,000 1873 

Denmark Copenhagen M. J. Cramer, Ky 7,500 1870 

Ecuador Quito 7,500.... 

Greece Athens J. Meredith Read, Pa. 7,500 1873 

Hawaiian Islands Honolulu Ilcnry A. Peirce, Mess 7.500.... 1U.9 

Netherlands Hague Chas. T. Gorham, Mich 7,500.... 1S70 

Portugal Lisbon Benjamin Moran 7,500 — 1874 

Sweden and Norway Stockholm C. C. Andrews, Minn 7,500 — 1869 

Switzerland Berne Horace Rublee, Wis 7,500 — 1869 

Turkey Constantinople.. . .George H. Boker, Pcnn 7,500 1870 

Uruguay & Paraguay Montevideo John C. Caldwell, Mo 10,000 1&74 

U. S. of Colombia Bogota Wm. L. Scruggs, Ga 7,^00 1873 

Yenezuela Caracas Thomas Russell, Mass 7,500 — 1S74 

MINISTERS RESIDENT AND CONSULS GENERAL. 

Hay tl Port-au-Prlncc E. D . Bassett, Pa 7,500 1S69 

Liberia Monrovia J. Milton Turner, Mo 4,000. . . .1871 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



43 



XLIIID CONGRESS. 

SENATE. 



HENRY "WILSON, of Massachusetts, President. 
Geobge C. Gobham, of California, Secretary. 

The Senate is composed of Republicans (in Roman), no. democrats (in Italics), iq. Liberal 
Republicans (In small capitals), 4. Vacancy, 1. The full Senate consists of 74 members. The 
ligures before the name indicate the year in which (on the 4th of March) the term of the Senator 
expires. Those marked with a (*) were not members of the Senate during the XLIId Congress. 



ALABAMA. 

Term exr>. Penator. Home Post-Office. 

1877 George Goldthwaite Montgomery. 

1879 George E. Spencer .Decatur. 

ARKANSAS. 

1877 Powell Clayton Little Rock. 

1879 'Stephen W. Dorsey Helena. 

CALIFOBNIA. 

1875 *John S. Eager San Francisco . 

1S79 *Aaron A. Sargent Nevada. 

Connecticut. 
1875 Will'm A. Buckingham.. Norwich. 
1879 Orris S. Ferry Nor walk. 

DELAWARE. 

1875 Thomas F. Bayard Wilmington. 

1877 Eli Saulsbury Dover. 

FLOBIDA. 

11875 Abijah Gilbert St. Augustine. 

1879 •Simon B. Conover Tallahassee. 

GEORGIA. 

1877 Thomas 3f. Norwood.. . .Savannah. 
|i379 m John B. Gordon Atlanta. 

ILLINOIS. 

81877 John A. Logan Chicago. 

1879 *Eichard J. Oglesby ....Decatur. 

INDIANA. 

1875 Daniel D. Pratt Logansport. 

1879 Oliver P. Morton Indianapolis. 

IOWA. 

1S77 George G. Wright Des Moines. 

1879 * William B. Allison Dubuque. 

KANSAS. 

1877 * James M. Harvey Vinton. 

1879 *John J.Ingalls Atchison. 

KENTUCKY. 

1877 John W. Stevenson Covington. 

1879 * Thomas C. McCreery. .OwenSboro'. 

LOUISIANA. 

1877 J. Rodman West New Orleans. 

1879 

MAINE. 

1875 Hannibal Hamlin Bangor. 

1877 LotM. Morrill Augufata. 

MARYLAND. 

1875 William T. Hamilton Hagerstown. 

1879 * George Ji. Den?iis Kingston, 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

187s *William B.Washburn.. Boston. 
1877 *Goorge S. Boutwell Groton. 

MICHIGAN. 

1875 Zachariah Chandler Detroit. 

1877 Thomas W. Ferry Grand Haven. 

MINNESOTA. 

1875 Alexander Ramsey St. Paul. 

1877 William Windom Winona . 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1875 *Henry R. Pease Jackson. 

1877 James L. Alcorn Friar's Point. 



MISSOURI. 
Term txp. Fenator. Home Po»t-Office. 

87s Cabl Sohurz St. Louis. 

879 *Lewis V. Bogy St. Louis. 

NEBPASKA 

875 Thomas W. Tipton Brownsville. 

877 Phincas W. HitchcocB.. Omaha. 

NEVADA. 

87c; William M.Stewart Virginia City. 

879 *John P. Jones Gold Hill. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

877 Aaron H. Cragin Lebanon. 

S79 *Bainbridgo Wadleigh..Milforl. 

NEW JERSEY. 

875 John P. St0ckton Princeton. 

S77 Fred'kT.Frelinghuysen.Newark. 

NEW YORK. 

875 Reuben E. Fbnton Jamestown. 

879 Roscoe Conkling Utica. 

NOBTH CAROLINA. 

877 Matthew W. Ransom Waldon . 

S79 * August us S. Merrimon.Baleigh. 

OHIO. 

871; Allen G. Thurman Columbus. 

879 John Sherman Mansfield. 

OREGON. 

877 James K. Kelly Portland. 

879 *John H. Mitchell Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

875 John Scott Huntingdon. 

879 Simon Cameron Harrisburg . 

RHODE ISLAND. 

875 William Sprag-ue Providence. 

877 Henry B. Anthony Providence. 

SOUTH CABOLINA. 

877 Thomas J. Robertson ...Columbia. 
879 *John J.Patterson Columbia. 

TENNESSEE. 

875 William G. Brownlow...Khoxville. 
877 Henry Cooper Nashville. 

TEXAS. 

875 Joseph W. Flanagan Walllng's Ferry. 

877 Morgan C. Hamilton.. Austin. 

VERMONT. 

875 George F. Edmunds Burlington. 

879 Justin S . Morrill Stratford . 

VIRGINIA. 

875 John F. Lewis Lynwood. 

877 John W. Johnston Abingdon. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

87"; Arthur I. Boreman Parkersburg. 

877 Henry G. Davis Piedmont. 

WI8CONSTN. 
875 Matthew H. Carpenter. .Milwaukee. 
877 Timothy O. Howe Green Bay. 



44 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

JAMES G. BLAINE, of Augusta, Maine, Speaker. 

Edwabd McPhesson; of Gettysburg, Pcnn., Clerk. 

; Liberal Republicans, in em m/l capitals, 
,«. Total, 292. Those marked with a (*) 



[Republicans, In Roman, 198 ♦, Democrats, in Italic, 
4; Independent Republican, in CAPITALS, 1; vacancy 
were members of the XLild Congress.] 



ALABAMA. 

1 Fbedeb'k G.BBOMBEKGiMobile. 

2 James T. Rapier Montgomery. 

3 Charles Felham Talladega. 

4 *Charles Hays liavsville. 

5 John H. Caldvcell Jacksonville. 

6 * Joseph H. Sloss 'fuse umbia . 

At Large, Alexander White. .Selma. 

At Large, Christ'r C. Sheats.. Decatur. 

ABKANSA8. 

1 Asa riodges Little Rock. 

2 "Oliver F. Snyder Pine Bluff. 

3 Thomas M. Guntor Fayetteville. 

At Large, Win. J. Hynes Little Rock. 

OALIFOBNIA. 

i Charles Clayton San Francisco. 

2 Horace F. Page Placerville. 

3 John K. Luttrell Fort Jones. 

4 * Sherman O. Houghton . . .San Jose. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1 * Joseph R. Hawley Hartford. 

2 *Step .en W. Kellogg Wuterbury. 

3 *Heury H. Starkweather.. Norwich. 

4 * WUttam H. Barnum Lime Reck. 

DELAWABE. 

1 Jame3 R. Lofiand Milford. 

FLO BID A. 

1 Mosiah T. Walls Gainesville. 

2 William J. Purmau Tallahassee. 

GEOBGIA. 

i Andrew Sloan Savannah. 

2 *iiich'd H.Whiteley Bainbridge. 

3 Philip Cook Aniericus. 

4 Henry R. Harris Greenville. 

5 James C. Freeman Griffin. 

6 James H. Blount M aeon . 

7 * Pierce M. B. Young Cartersville. 

8 Alexander H. Stephens. .Crawfordsville. 

9 Hiram P. Bell Cumming. 

ILLINOIS. 

1 John B. Rice ..Chicago. 

2 Jasper D. Ward Chicago. 

3 *ChiirlesB . Farwell Chicago. 

4 Stephen A. Hurlbut Belvidere. 

5 *Horatlo C. Burchard Freeport. 

*John B. Hawley Rock Island. 

7 Franklin Corwin Peru. 

8 Greenbury L. P'ort Lacon. 

9 Granville Barrere Canton. 

io William H. Ray Rushviile. 

11 Robert M. Knapp Jersey ville. 

12 ''J.tmes C. Robinson Springfield. 

13 John McNulta Bloomington. 

14 Joseph G. Cannon Tuscola. 

15 John R. Elen Sullivan. 

16 James S. Martin Salem. 

1 7 Win. R. Morrison Waterloo . 

18 Isaac Clements Carbondale. 

19 * Samuel S. Marshall McLeansboro'. 

INDIANA. 

i * William E. Niblavk Yincennes. 

2 Simeon K. Wolfe New Albany. 

3 * William S. Ilolman Aurora. 

4 •Jeremiah M. Wilson Conn.rsville. 

5 *John Coburn Indianapolis. 

6 Morton C. Hunter Bloomington. 

7 Thomas J. Cason Lebanon. 

8 *James N. Tvner Peru. 

9 * John P. C. Shanks Jay < ourt House. 

10 Henry B. Sayler Huntington. 

11 *Jasper Packard Laporte. 

At Large, Godlove S. Orth ...La Fayette. 
At Large, 'William Williams.Warsaw. 



IOWA. 

1 *George W.McCrary Kookuk. 

2 *Aylett R.Cotton Lyons. 

3 * William G. Donnan Independence. 

4 Henry O.Pratt Charles City. 

5 James Wilson Buckingham. 

6 William Loughridge Oskaloosa. 

7 John A. Kasson .Des Moines. 

8 James W. McDill Afton. 

9 * Jackson Orr Boone. 

KANSAS 

1 *David P. Lowe '.Fort flcott. 

2 Stephen A. Cobb Wyandotte. 

3 William A. Phillips Saiina. 

KENTUCKY. 

1 * Edward Crossland Mciyficld. 

2 John Young Brown Henderson. 

3 Charles W. Milliken Franklin. 

4 * William B. Read Hodgens ville. 

5 Elisha D. Stancleford Louisville. 

6 * Wm. E.Arthur. Covington. 

7 * James B. Beck Lexington. 

8 Milton J. Durham Danville. 

9 * George M.Adams Barboursville. 

10 John D.Young Owensville. 

LOUISIANA . 

1 * Jay Kale Sypker New Orleans. 

2 * Lionel A. Sheldon New Orleans. 

3 ^Chester B. Darrall Brashear. 

4 George L. Smith Shreveport. 

<; *FraikMorey Monroe. 

At Large (vacancy). 

MAINE. 

1 Jchn H. Burleigh South Berwick. 

2 * William P. Frye Lewiston. 

3 * James G. Blaine Augusta. 

4 Samuel F. Hersey Bangor. 

5 *Engeiie Hale Ellsworth. 

MABYLAND. 

i Ephratm K. Wilson Snow EilL 

2 * Stevenson Archer Belair. 

3 William J. O'Brien Baltimore. 

4 * Thomas Swann Baltimore. 

5 William J. Albert It altimore. 

6 Lloyd Lowndes, jr. Cumberland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1 * James Buffinton Fall River. 

2 Benjamin W. Harris East Bridge-water. 

3 Henry L. Pierce Boston. 

4 ; Samuel Hooper. Boston. 

5 Daniel W. Gooch Melrose. 

6 *Beniamin F. Butler Lowell. 

7 Ebenezer R. Hoar Concord. 

8 John M. S. Williams Cambridge. 

9 *George F. Hoar Worcester. 

10 *Alvah Crocker Fitchburg. 

11 *Henry L. Dawes Pittsfield. 

MICHIGAN. 

1 Moses W. Field Detroit. 

2 *Henry Waldron Hillsdale. 

George Willard Battle Creek. 

Julius C. Burrows Kalamazoo. 

William B.Williams... .Allegan. 
Josiah W. Begole Flint. 

- Omar D. Conger Port Huron. 

Nathan B. Bradley Bay Citj . 

Jay A. Hubbell Houghton. 

MINNESOTA. 

*Mark H. Dunnell Owatonna. 

Horace B. Strait Shakopee. 

* John T. Averill Saint Paul. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Lucius Q. C. Lamar Oxford. 



2 Albert R.Howe Sardis. 

3 *Henry W. Barry Columbus. 

4 Jason Niles Kosciusko. 

5 * George C. McKee Jackson. 

6 John R. Lyncb Natchez . 

MISSOURI. 

i Edwin O. Stanard Saint Louis. 

2 *Erastus Wells. ..'. Saint Louis-. 

3 William H. Stone Saint Loui . 

4 Robert A. Hatcher New Madrid. 

n Richard P. Bland Lebanon. 

6 *Harrison E. Havens Springfield. 

7 Thomas T. Crittenden. . . Yv arren6bnrg. 

8 *Abram Comingo Independence. 

9 * Isaac C. Parker Saint Joseph. 

io Ira B. Hyde Princeton. 

ii JohnB. Clarkjr Fayette. 

12 John M. Glover La Grange. 

13 Aylett H. Buckner. Saint Charles. 

NEBRASKA. 

1 Lorenzo Crounse Fort Calhoun. 

NEVADA. 

1 * Charles W. Kendall Hamilton. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1 William B. Small New Market. 

2 Austin F. Pike Franklin. 

3 *Hosea W. Parker Claremont. 

NEW JERSEY. 

i * John W. Hazelton Mullica Hill. 

2 Samuel A. Dobbins Mount Holly. 

3 Amos Clark, jr Elizabeth. 

4 Robert Hamilton Newton. 

5 William Walter Phelps.. .Englewood. 

Marcus L. War d Newark. 

7 Isaac W.Scudder Jersey City. 

NEW YORK. 

1 Henry J. Scudder Nsw York. 

2 John O. Schumaker Brooklyn. 

3 SIM. B.CHITTENDEN.. Brooklyn. 

4 Philips. Crooke Brooklyn. 

5 * Wm. R. Roberts New York. 

6 * Samuel S. Cox New York- 

7 Thomas J. Creamer MewYcrk. 

8 John D. Lawson New York. 

9 Richard Schell N ew York. 

10 "Fernando Wood New York. 

11 * Clarkson N. Potter New 1'ochelle. 

12 *Charles St. John P01 1 Jervis. 

13 John O. Whitehouse...! oughkeepsic. 

14 David M. Dewitl .Kingston. 

15 *Eli Perry Albany. 

16 James S. Smart Cambridge. 

17 Robert S. Hale Elizabeth town. 

18 *William A. Wheeler Malone. 

19 Henry H. Hathorn Saratoga Springs. 

20 David Wilber Minora. 

21 *Clinton L. Merriam Locust Grove. 

22 * Ellis H . Roberts Ctica. 

23 "Wm. E. Lansing Chittenango. 

24 *R. Holland Duell Cortland. 

25 Clinton D. MacDougall.. Auburn. 

26 * William H. Lamport Cauandaigua. 

27 Thomas C. Piatt Owego. 

28 *H. Boardoiaa Smith Elmira. 

29 *Freeman Clarke Roch ster. 

30 George G. Hoskins Attica. 

31 Lyman K. Bass Buffalo. 

32 - Walter L. Sessions Panama. 

At Large, Lyman Tremain.. . Albany. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1 *Clinton L. Cobb Elizabeth City. 

2 *Ch rles R. Thomas Newbern. 

3 * A/fred M. Waddell Wilmir gton. 

4 William A. Smith Princeton. 

s * James M. Leach Lexington. 

6 Thomas S. Ashe Waterborough. 

7 William M. Robbing Statesville . 

8 Robert B. Vance Asnvillc. 

OHIO. 

1 Milton Sayler Cincinnati. 

2 Henry B. Banning Cincinnati. 

3 John Q. Smith Oakland. 

4 Lewis B. Gunckel Dayton. 



5 * Charles JV. Lamison Lima. 

6 Isaac R. Sherwood Bryan. 

7 Lawrence T. Neal Chillicothe. 

8 William Lawrence Bellefontaine. 

9 James W. Robinson Marysville. 

10 * Charles Foster Fostoria. 

11 Hezekiah S. Bundy Reed's Mills. 

1 2 William E. Finck Somerset. 

13 Milton I. Southard Zanesville. 

14 John Berry Upper Sandusky. 

15 *William P. Snrague McConnellsville. 

16 Lorenzo Danford. Saint Clairville. 

17 LaurinD. Woodworth...Youngstown. 

18 * James Monroe Oberlin. 

19 *James A. Garfield Hiram. 

20 Richard C . Parsons Cleveland. 

OREGON. 

1 James W. Nesmith Salem. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1 * Samuel J. Randall Philadelphia. 

2 Charles O'Neill Philadelphia. 

3 ^Leonard Myers Philadelphia. 

4 * William D.Kelley Philadelphia. 

5 'Alfred C . Harmer Germantown. 

6 James S. Biery Allentown. 

7 "Washington Townsend..West Chester. 

8 Hiester Clymer Reading. 

9 A. Her" Smith Lancaster. 

10 * John W. Killinger Lebanon. 

1 1 *John B. Storm .Stroudsburg. 

12 *Lazarus D. Shoemaker... Wilkesbarre. 

13 *JamesD. Strawbridge... Danville. 

14 *John B. Packer Sunbury. 

15 John A. Magee New Bloomfield. 

16 JohnCessna Bedford. 

17 * R.Milton Speer Huntingdon. 

18 Sobieski Ross Condersport. 

19 Carlton B. Curtis Erie. 

20 Hiram L. Richmond Meadville. 

21 Alexander W. Taylor ....Indiana. 

22 *Jame8 S. Negley Pittsburgh. 

23 *Ebenezer McJunkin Butler. 

24 WilliamS. Moore Washington. 

At Large, Lemuel Todd Carlisle. 

At Large, Charles Albright. .Mauch Chunk. 
At Large, *GlenniW. Scofield. Warren. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1 *Benjamin T. Eames Providence. 

2 *James M. Pendleton Westerly. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1 *Joseph H. Rainey Georgetown. 

2 Alonzo J. Ransier Charleston. 

3 *L. Cass Carpenter Columbia. 

4 * Alexander S. Wallace... Yorkvillc. 
At Large, Richard H. Cain. ..Columbia. 

TENNESSEE. 

1 *Roderick R. Butler Taylorsvillc. 

2 Jacob M. Thornburgh . . .Knoxville. 

3 William Crutchfield Chattanooga. 

4 * John M. Bright Fay etteville. 

5 Horace H. Harrison Nashville. 

6 * Wash' ton C.WMtlhorne.. Columbia. 

7 JohnB. C. i47 :iii3 P^ris. 

8 Dai"'-i A. I l n Brownsville. 

9 B;u L>~ur Lewis Memphis. 

At Large, 'Horace Maynard. Knoxville. 

TEXAS. 

1 * William S. Herndon Tyler. 

2 Wm . P. McLean Mount Pleasant, 

3 *De Witt C. Giddings Brenham. 

4 *John Hancock Austin. 

At Large, Roger Q. Mills Corsicana. 

At Large, Asa H. Willie Galveston. 

VERMONT. 

1 -Charles W. Willard Montpelier. 

2 *LukeP. Poland ifaint Johnsbury. 

3 Geo. W. Kendee Morrisville. 

VIRGINIA. 

1 James B. Sener Fredei icksburgh. 

2 * James H. Piatt, jr Norfolk. 

3 J. Ambler Smith Richmond. 

4 * Will: am H. H. Stowell....Burkeville. 

5 Christopher Y. Thomas. ..Martinsville. 



46 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



6 Thomas Whitehead Amherst C. H. 

7 •John T. Harris Harrisonburg . 

8 Eppa Hunton Warrenton. 

9 Bees T. Bowen Maiden Sp Ing. 

WIST VIRGINIA. 

i 'John J.Davis Clarksburg. 

2 J. Marshall Hagans Morgantown. 

3 'Frank Hereford Union. 

WISCONSIN. 

i Charles G. Williams Jantsville. 

a *Gerry W. Hazelton Columbus. 

3 *J. Allen Barber Lancaster. 

4 ♦ Alexander Mitchell Milwaukee. 

5 • Chas. A. Eldrcdge Fond du Lac. 



6 *Philetns Sawyer Oshkosh. 

7 •Jeremiah M. Rusk Viroqua. 

8 Alexander S.McDlll.... Madison. 

DELEGATES FROM TERRITORIES. 
Arizona.— *Richard C. McCormick, Tucson. 
Colob ado.— 'Jerome B. Chaffee, Denver. 
Dakota.— "Motes K. Armstrong, Yunkton. 
Dist. Col.— 'Norton P. Chipman, Washington. 
Idaho.— John Hailey, Boise City. 
Montana.— Martin Maginnis, Helena. 
New Mexico.— Stephen B. Elkins, Santa Fe. 
Utah.— George Q. Cannon, Salt Lake City. 
Washington.— Obadiah B,McFadden,Olympi&. 
Wyoming.— William E, Steele, Cheyenne. 



XLIV TH CONGRESS 

As far as chosen December 25 1874. 



SENATE. 

Republicans (in Roman), 3s; Democrats (In Italic) 
vacancy, 1 ; not yet chosen, 16 ; total, 74. 



2^; Independents (In shall, caps), 2; 



ALABAMA. 
Term exp. Senator. 

877 George Goldthwatte. 
879 George E. Spencer. 

ABKANSA8. 

877 Powell Clayton. 
879 Stephen W. Dorsey. 

OALIFOBNIA. 

879 Aaroa A. Sargent. 
881 Nbwton Booth. 

CONNECTICrT. 

879 Orris S. Ferry. 
881 William W.Eaton. 

DELAWARE. 

877 Ell Saulsbury . 

881 Thomas F. Bayard. 

FLORIDA. 

Simon B. Conover. 



% 



GEORGIA. 

877 Thomas M. Norwood. 
879 John B. Gordon. 

ILLINOIS. 

877 J<--bn A. Logan. 
879 Richard J. Uglesby. 

INDIANA. 

879 Oliver P. Morton. 
881 

IOWA. 

877 George G. Wright. 
879 William B.Allison. 

KANSAS. 

S77 James M. Harvey. 
679 John J. Ingalls. 

KENTUCKY. 

877 John W. Stere-nson. 
879 Thomas C. McCreery. 



LOUISIANA. 
Term «P- Senator. 

1877 J. Rodman West. 
879 

MAINE. 

877 Lot M. Morrill. 
881 

MARYLAND. 
8:9 George R. Denni*. 
881 William P. Whyte. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

S77 Geoige S. Boutwell. 

881 

MICHIGAN. 

877 Thomaa W. Ferry. 

MINNESOTA. 

877 William Windom. 
881 

MISSISSIPPI. 

877 James L. Alcorn. 
881 Branch K. Brace. 

MISSOURI. 

1879 Lewis V. Bogy. 

881 

NEBRASKA. 

877 Phincas NV. Hitchcock. 

881 

NEVADA. 

879 John P. Jones. 

881 

NEW nAMP8HIRE. 

877 Aaron H. Cragin. 
879 Bainbridgc Wadlcigh. 

NEW JERSEY. 

877 Fred'l: T. Frelinghuysen. 

881 

NEW YORK. 

879 Roscoe Conkling. 



NORTH CAROLINA. 
Term exp. Senator. 

877 Matthew W. Ransom. 
879 Augustus S. Merrimon. 

OHIO. 

879 John Sherman. 
881 Allen G. Thurman. 

OREGON. 

877 James K. Kelly. 
879 JohnH. Mitchell. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

879 Simon Cameron. 
881 

RHODE ISLAND. 

877 Henry B. Anthony. 

SOUTn CAROLINA. 

877 Thomas J. Robertson. 
879 John J . Patterson. 

TENNESSEE. 

877 Henry Cooper. 



TEXAS. 

Morgan C. Hamilton. 
Samuel B. Maxey. 

VERMONT. 

Justin S. Morrill. 
George F. Edmunds. 

VIRGINIA. 

John W. Johnston. 
Robert E. Withers. 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

77 Henry G. Davis. 



WISCONSIN. 

, 1877 Timothy O. Howe. 
I *88i 



Note.— In regard to the States having Senators to elect, eupposlng the caucus machinery to 
work successfully, Republicans will be chosen from Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Nebraska, .Nevada, Rhode Island and Wisconsin (8), and Democrats from Florida, Indiana, Mis- 
souri, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia (8) . If these supposi- 
tions are correct, the next Senate will stand, Republicans, 43; Democrats, 28 ; Independents, 2 ; 
total 73, leaving vacant the seat now claimed by Mr. Pluchback, of Louisiana. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



47 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Democrats, in Italic, 161 ; Republicans, in Roman, 100 ; Independent Republicans, in bmaxl 
caps, 3 : Independent Reformers, in ROMAN CAPS, 5 ; Liberal Republicans, in ITALIC CAPS,6. 
To beelected, 17. Total, 292. 

Names of members of the XLIIId Congress are followed by a *. • 



ALABAMA. 

At Large. 
William LT. Forney. Burwell B.Lewis. 



1 Jeremiah Haralson. 

2 Jere. N. Williams. 

3 Taul Bradford . 

Democrats, 6. 



4 Charles Hays.* 

5 John H. Caldwell.* 

b GoldsmithW. Hewitt. 
Republicans, 2. 



ARKANSAS. 

1 Lucien C. Cause. 3 Wm. W. Wilshire. 

2 William F. Slemons. 4 Thomas M. Gunter .* 

Democrats, 4. 

CALIFORNIA. 
Elects four representatives in 1875. 

CONNECTICUT. 
Elects four representatives in April, 1G75. 

DELAWARE. 

James Williams. 

Democrat, 1. 

FLORIDA. 

1 William J. Purman.* 2 JosiahT. Walls.* 

Republicans, 2. 

GEORGIA. 

6 Jam*s LT. Blount. * 

7 William H. Felton. 

8 Alex. H. Stephens.* 

9 Garrett McMillan. 



1 Julian Hartr dge. 

2 William E. Smith. 

3 Philip Cook.* 

4 Henry R. Harris* 

5 Milton A. Candler. 

Democrats, 9. 

ILLINOIS. 



Barney G. Caulfteld. 
Carter H. Harrison. 
Charles B. Farweil.* 
Stephen A. Hurlbut. 
Hor'io C . Bur chard.* 
ThOB. J.Henderson. 
ALEX. CAMPBELL. 
Greenbury L. Fort.* 
Richard H. Whiting. 
JOHN C. BAGBY. 

Democrats, 8. 

Ind. Reformers, 3. 



:i Scott Wike. 

12 Wm. M. Springer. 

13 A.E.STEVENSON. 

14 Joseph G. Cannon. 

15 John B. Eden* 

16 Wm. A. J. Sparks. 

17 Wm. B. Morrison.* 

18 William Hartsell. 

19 Wm. B. Anderson. 

Republicans, 7. 
Ind. Republican, 1. 



INDIANA. 



1 Benoni S. Fuller% 

2 James D. Williams. 

3 Michael C. Kerr. 

4 Jeptha D. New. 

5 William S . Holman .* 

6 Milton S. Robinson. 

7 Franklin Landers. 

Democrats, 8. 



8 Morton C. Hunter. 

9 Thomas J. Cason.* 

10 Wm. S. Haymond. 

11 James L. Evans. 

12 Allen H. Hamilto7i. 

13 John H. Baker. 

Republicans, 5. 



IOWA. 
1 George W.McCrary.* 6 Ezekiel S. Sampson 



2 John Q. Tufts. 

3 L. L. Ainsworth. 

4 Henry O. Pratt.* 

5 James Wilson.* 

Democrat, 1. 



7 John A. Kasson. 

8 James W. McDill. 

9 Addison Oliver. 



Republicans, 8. 

KANSAS. 

1 William R. Phillips.* 3 William R. Brown. 

2 John B. Goodin. 

Democrat, 1. Republicans, 2. 



KENTUCKY. 



1 A. It. Boon. 

2 John Y. Brown.* 

3 Charles W. Milliken* 

4 J. Proctor Knott. 

5 Edward Y. Parsons. 

Democrats, 9. 



6 Thomas L. Jones. 

7 J. C. S. Blackburn . 

8 Milton J. Durham* 

9 JohnD. White. 
10 John B. Clarke. 
Republican, 1. 



LOUISIANA. 

1 E. Randall L.Gibson. 4 William M. Levy . 

2 John Ellis. 5 Benj. E. Spencer. 

3 Chester B. Darrall.* 6 Charles E. Nash. 

Democrats, 4. Republicans, 2. 

MAINE. 

1 John II. Burleigh.* 4 Samuel F. Hersey. 

2 William P. Frye.* 5 Eugene Hale.* 

3 James G. Blaine.* 

Republicans, 5. 

MARYLAND. 

1 Philip F. Thomas. 4 Thorn as Swann.* 

2 Charles B. Boberts. 5 Eli J. Henkle. 

3 Wiliam J. 0'Brie?i.* 6 William Walsh. 

Democrats, 6. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1 Jame8Bufllnton.* 7 John K. Tarbox 

2 Benjamin W. Harris.* 

3 Henry L. Pierce.* 

4 RufusS. Frost, 
s NATHLP. BANKS. 
6 Chas. P. Thompson. 

Democrats, 4. Republicans, 5. 
Liberal Rep . , 1 . Ind. Republican, 1 . 



William W. Warren. 
9 George F. Hoar.* 

10 Julius H. Seelye. 

11 Chester W. Chapin. 



MICHIGAN. 



1 Alplieus S. Williams. 

2 Henry Waldron.* 

3 George Willard.* 

4 Allen Pott r. 

5 Wm. B. Williams.* 

Democrats, 3. 



6 George H. Durand. 
1 Omar D. Conger.* 

8 Nath'IB. Bradley. 4 

9 Jay A. Hubbell.* 

Republicans, 6. 



MINNESOTA. 

1 Mark H. Dunnell.* 3 William S. King 

2 Horace B. Strait.* 

Republicans, 3. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Elects sis members in November, 1875. 

MISSOURI. 



1 Edward C. Kehr. 

2 Erastus Wells.* 

3 William H. Stone.* 

4 BobertA. Hatcher.* 

5 Richard P. Bland.* 
5 Charles H. Morg.in. 
7 John F. Phillips. 

Democrats, 13 



8 Benj. J.Franklin. 

9 David Rea. 

10 B. A. De Bolt. 

11 John B. Clark, Jr.* 

12 John M. Glover.* 

13 Aylett H. Buckner. 



NEBRASKA. 

Lorenzo Crounse.* 

Republican, 1. 

NEVADA. 

William Woodbum. 

Republican, 1. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Elects three members in March. 



48 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



NEW JERSEY, 
i Clcm'tH. Sinnickson 

2 Samuel A. Dobbins.* 

3 Miles Boss. 

4 Robert Hamilton.* 

Democrats, 5. 



5 Augustus W. Cutler. 

6 Frederick II. Teese. 
j A. A. Hardenburgh. 

Republicans, 2. 



NEW YORK. 
1 Henry B. Metcalfe. 18 Andrew Williams. 



2 Jno.G. Schu maker.* 
■x 8. B. Chittenden. : 

4 ARCH. M. BLISS. 

5 Edwin R. Meade. 
t> Samuel S. Cox.* 

7 Smith Ely, Jr. 

8 Elijah Ward. 

9 Femnido Wood* 

10 Abram S. Hewttt. 

11 HEN J. A. WILLIS. 

12 N. Holmes Odell. 



19 Wm. A. Wheeler.* 

20 fly. A. Hatborn.* 

21 Samuel F. Miller. 

22 George A. Bagley. 

23 Scott Lord. 

24 William H. Baker. 

25 E. W. Leavenworth. 

26 C. D. MacDougall.* 

27 Elbridgo G. Lapham. 
23 Thomas C. Piatt.* 
29 Chas. C. D. Walker. 



13 J.O. WHI TEH USE 30 John M. Davy 



14 George M. Beebe. 

15 John H. Bagley, Jr. 

16 Charles H. Adams. 

17 Martin I. Townsend. 

Democrats, 13. 
Lib. Republicans, 4. 



31 George G. Hoskins.* 
7,2 Lyman K. Bass.* 
33 A UG. F. ALLEN. 



Republicans, 15. 
lnd. Republican, 1. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 



1 Jesse J. Yeates. 

2 John A. Hyman. 

3 Alfred M. Waddell.* 

4 Joseph J. Davis. 

Democrats, 7. 



1 Milton Sai/ler.* 

2 HY.B. BANNING* 

3 John S. Savage. 

4 John A. McMahon. 

5 Americus V. Rice. 

6 Frank H. Hurd. 

1 L • wrence T. Neal* 

8 William Lawrence.* 

9 Early F. Poppleton . 
10 Charles Foster.* 

Democrats, 12 



Alfred M. Scales. 

6 Thomas S. Ashe.* 

7 William M. Robbins* 

8 Robert B. Vance.* 
Republican, 1. 

OHIO. 

11 John L. Vance. 

12 Ansel T. Walling. 

13 Milton J. Southard.* 



14 John P. Coican . 

15 N. II. Van Vorhes. 

16 Lorenzo Danford.* 

17 L. D. Woodworth.* 

18 James Monroe.* 

19 James A. Garfield.* 

20 Henry B. Payne. 
Republicans, 7. 



Liberal Republican, 1. 

OREGON. 

George A. La Dow. 
Democrat, 1. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 



1 Chapman Freeman. 

2 Charles O'Neill.* 

q 8 imuel J. Randall.* 
4 William D. Kellcy.* 
c, John Robbins. 

6 Wash. Towns-md.* 

7 Alan Wood, J:\ 



15 Joseph Powell. 

16 Sobieski Ross.* 

17 John Reilly. 

i3 > illiam S. Sienger 

19 Levi Maish. 

20 Louis A. Mack ey. 

21 Jacob Turney. 



3 Hiesier C'ymer.* 
9 A. Herr Smith.* 

10 William Mutchler. 

11 Frank D. Collins. 

12 W. W. Ketcham. 

13 James B. Reilly. 

14 John B. Packer. 

Democrats, 17. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
1 Benjamin T. Eames.* 2 Latimer W. Ballon. 



22 James H. Hopkins. 

23 Alex. G. Cochran. 

24 John W. Wallace. 

25 George A. Jenks. 

26 James Sheakley. 

27 Albert G. Egbert. 

Republicans, 10. 



Republicans, 2. 
SOUTH CAROLINA. 



4 Alex. S. Wallace. 

5 Robert Smalls. 



1 Joseph II. Rainey.* 

2 E. W. M. MACKEY 

3 Solomon L. Hoge. 

l.epublicans, 4. Ind. Reformer, 1 . 

TENNESSEE. 

1 William McFarland. 6 John F. House 

2 J. M. Thornburgh.* 

3 George G. Dibrell. 

4 John W. Head. 

5 John M. Bright.* 

Democrats, 9. 



7 W. C. Whitlhorne. 

8 John D. C. Atkins. 

9 Wm. P. Caldwell. 
10 H. Casey Young , 
Republican, 1. 



Note.— Mr. Head, representative elect from 
the 4th dist., died soon after his election. The 
vacancy is to be filled on the 31st day of Dec, 
when a Democrat will probably be elected . 

TEXAS. 

1 John H. Reagan. 4 Roger Q. Mil's.* 

2 David B. Culberson. «; John Hancock .* 

3 J. W. Throckmorton. "6 Gustave Schleicher. 

Democrats, 6. 

VERMONT. 

1 Charles H. Joyce. 3 George W. Hendee.* 

2 Dudley CD enison. 

Republicans, 2. Independent Rep., 1 . 

VIRGINIA. 

6 John R. Tucker. 



1 Beverly B. Douglas. 

2 John Goode, Jr. 

■x Glloert C. Walker. 

4 Wm. H. II. Stowell.* 

5 George C. Cabell. 

Democrats, 8. 



7 John T. Harris.* 

8 Eppa Hunton.* 

9 Wiliam Terry. 



Republicans, 1. 
WEST VIRGINIA. 

3 Frank Hereford.* 



1 Benjamin Wilson. 

2 Chas. G. Faulkner. 

Democrats, 3. 

WISCONSIN. 

1 Charles G. Williams.* 5 Sam'l D. Burchard. 

2 Luc en B. Caswell. 6 Alansou M. Kimball. 

3 Henry S. Magoon. 7 Jeremiah M. Rusk.* 

4 William P. Lynde. 8 George W. Cale. 

Democrats, 3. Republicans, 5. 



Elections of Representatives 



in Congress 
years. 



in 1S7G and following 



The following sections of Chapter XI of the 
Statutes at Large, passed at the Hd Session of 
the XLIId Congress, fix the Tuesday after the 
ist Monday of November as the day on which 
elections of representatives in Congress shall 
hereafter be held in all the States ; 

Seo. 3. That the Tuesday next after the first 
Monday in November, in the year eighteen hun- 
dred and seventy-six, is hereby fixed and estab- 
lished as the. dav, in ea^ h of tlu States and Ter- 
ritories of the United States, for the election of 
Representatives and Delegates to the forty-fifth 
Congress; and the Tuesday next after the first 
Monday in November, in every second year 
[ thercafter,is hereby fixed and established as the 
I day for the election, in each of said States and 
I Territories, of Representatives and Delegates to 



the Congress commencing on the fourth day of ; 
March next thereafter. 

Sec. 4 . That if, upon trial, there shall be a fail- 
ure to elect a Representative or Delegate in 
Congress in any State, District, or Territory, 
up-m the day hereby fixed and es ablished for 
such election, or if, after any such election, a 
vacancy shall occur in any such State, District, 
or Territory, from death, resignation, or other- 
wise, an electionshall beheld to fill any vacancy 
caused by such failure, resignation, death, or 
otherwise, at such timeasia or mav be provided 
by law for filling vacancies in the State or Ter- 
ritory in which the same may occur'. 

Sec. s. That no State shall be hereafter admit- 
ted to the Unio 1 without having the necessary 
population to entitle it to at least one Repre- 
sentative according to the ratio of representa- 
tion fixed by this bill. 



ELECTION" RETURNS. 



VERMONT. 

GOVERNOR, '74. GOV.,'72. GoV.,'7<>. 
Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Bern. Rep. 
islngliam Peck Gardner Converse Heaton Stewart 

2600 
i960 
3035 

793 
2243 

366 
1314 
2831 
1972 
3891 
2701 
2854 
3571 



Addison.... 


232 


3763. 


712 


385S. 


393 


Bennington 


1123 


2255. 


1501 


2519. 


1170 


Caledonia .. 


mi 


2476. 


1 198 


2679. . 


831 


Chittenden. 


1616 


3348. 


1831 


3728. 


1362 




338 


576. 


402 

1697 

268 


764. 


343 
842 


Franklin.... 


1299 


3060. 


3255- 


Grand Isle. 


241 


386. 


1850 '. 


203 


Lamoille.... 


707 


1205. 
2608. 


650 


500 




1437 
586 


1523 


3164. 


1384 




I7Q«. 


2064 


2564. 


579 


Rutland ... 


1 158 


3413- 


4544- 


1256 


Washingt'n 


1837 


2362. . 


1820 


3451 • • 
3$6;. 


1=72 


Windham . . 


gg 


2651. 
3681. 


916 


703 


Windsor.... 


1435 


5293. 


920 



Total 13257 33582.. 16613 41946.. 12058 33367 

Percent 28.30 71.10.. 28.37 71.63.. 26.54 73.46 

Asahel Peck's maj., 20,325; Julius Converse's 
maj. in 1872, 2^333; John W. Stewart's maj. in 
1870, 21 ,309. Total vote in 1874, 46,839 ; in 1872, 58,5^9; 
in 1870. 45,425. 

The fellowing was the aggregate vote of can- 
didates for the other State offices : 

Lt.- Gov, , . .Lyman G. Hinckley, Rep 33718 

Henry Chase, Dem 13000 



Chasers maj. 2071^ 

_ J.Kep.. 
Otis Chamberlain, JDe 



Treasurer. John A. Page, 



174 
55 



203 

4 

138 



tep. 33790 

>em 12736 

Page's maj.. 21054 

Legislature, 1874-5. Senate. Mouse. Joint Sal. 

Republicans 29 

Democrats 1 

Liberal Reps — 

Independents — 

No politics — 

Rep. maj "28 

Representatives in Congress. 

1874. 1873. 1870. 

Districts. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. 

I. Heaton Joyce Heaton WillarJ Cam Willard 

Addison 54 2808.. 253 3619.. 369 2470 

Bennington. 390 1754.. 858 2447.. 596 2272 

Rutland 656 3793.. 1331 4749-. 1230 3017 

Washington .i49t 1283.. 1176 3246.. 1480 2708 

Total.... 2597 9638.. 3618 14061.. 3675 10476 

Charles H. Joyce's maj., 7041; Charles W. 

Willard's maj. in 1872,10,443; in 1870, 6801. In 

1870, A. L. Miner, Ind. Rep ., received 1550 votes, 

and in 1874, Charles W. Willard received 1635. 

II. Denison Poland Steele Poland Partridge Poiand 

Caledonia. ..1142 1222.. 535 2018.. 659 1828 

Orange 2650 1002.. 027 2100.. 1157 2484 

Windham,.. 395 2042.. 33 3508.. 653 2771 

Windsor 2851 1490. . 1734 3444.. 737 339° 

Total 7038 5756.. 2929 11070. . 3206 10479 

Dudley C. Denison (Ind. Rep.) over Luke P. 
Poland. 1282 ; Poland's maj. in 1872, 8141 ; in 1870, 
7273. In 1872, J. M. Pierce, Ind., received 2554 
votes, and there were 389 scattering. In 1874, 
John B. Mead, the Gr ^nger candidate, received 
654, C. W. Davenport, Dem., i960, and there were 
325 scattering. At this election there wa3 no 
choice . At the second election Luke P. Poland 
received 4079, Alexander McLean 1524, and Dud- 
ley C. Denison 8295, with 11 scattering, giving 
Denison 2685 maj. over all. 

III. Edwards Hendee Adams Hendee Gillett Smith 

Chittenden.. 1294 2747.. 1206 3118.. 1248 3008 



Essex 313 

Franklin 753 

Grand Isle.. 216 

Lamoille 367 

Orleans 703 



552. . 

2509. . 

267.. 

1303.. 
1665.. 



263 
028 
i 7 6 
332 
272 



746.. 
29+}.. 

382.. 
1720. . 
2563.. 



47 
544. 
1 86 
487 
53^ 



647 
1993 

282 
1303 



Total 3646 9043.. 3 l8 2 11473.. 3047 9n6 

George W. Hendee r s maj., 5397; in 1872, 8291 ; 
Worthington C. Smith's maj. in 1870,6069. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Goveenoe,'74. Gov. '73. Gov. '72. 

Counties. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. 

Gaston Talbot Gaston Washbn. Bird Washbn. 

Barnstable. 563 1607.. 230 logo. . 352 2679 

Berkshire.. 4783 3878.. 3348 3286.. 3497 6052 

Bristol 6371 6713.. 1916 4992... 2629 10056 

Dukes 190 . 375.. 23 155.. 123 



Essex 12274 

Franklin.... 2116 
Hampden... 7466 
Hampshire. 3094 
Middlesex .16876 
Nantucket.. 107 

Norfolk 5120 

Plymouth.. 3404 

Suffolk 20099 

Worcester..i39i3 



14373. 
2539- 
3709- 
2916. 

17527. 

353- 
4972. 
4500. 
12275. 



, 8406 
• 1425 

■ 4347 
. 1646 
,12392 

40 

3682 

, 2168 

■ 953? 



10005., 
2806., 
3513. 



13547.. ioic 



9157 
1151 

4153 
3042.. 1633 
14879. .12476 
220.. 22 
4314.. 4012 
4788.. 2060 
8442..11101 
10651.. 7260 



18617 

4341 
6652 

20673 

8580 

7029 

17891 

19736 



Total... 96376 89344- .5936o 72183.. 59626 i339©o 
Percent 61.89 48.11.. 46.13 54.87.. 30.81 69.19 

William Gaston's maj., 7032 ; William B.Wash- 
burn's maj. in 1873, 12,823; m 1872, 74,274. Total 
vote in 1874, 18^,720 ; in 1873, 131,543 ; in 1872, 193,526. 
la 1874 there were 270 scattering votes. In 1873, 
Henry K, Oliver received 39, and all others 399. 
In 1872, there were 254 scattering. 

The aggregate vote in 1874 of candidates for 
the other State offices was as foliows : 

Lieut- Gov... .Horatio G. Knight, Rep 99151 

William L. Smith, Dem 87138 

Knights maj 12013 

Sec. of State. Oliver Warner, Rep 104465 

Benjamin F. Mills, Dem 82026 

Warner's maj 22439 

Treasurer.. .Charles Adams, jr. , Rep 103529 

Nathan Clark, Dem 82187 

Adams's maj 21342 

Auditor Charles Endicott, Rep 1034:4. 

C. Osgood Morse, Dem 80666 

Endicott's maj 22788 

AWy- Gen Charles R. Train, Rep 103071 

Waldo Coburn, Dem 81395 

Train's maj 22576 

Legislatt/re, 1375. Senate, House. Joint Sal. 

Republicans 24 155 179 . 

Democrats 15 79 94 

Independents.... _j 6 7 

Rep. maj 8 70 78 

Representatives in Congress. 
The names of those elected are printed in Italic. 
Di8ts. Opposition. 1874. Administration 



1 Loui3 Lapham. . 4161 

2 Edward Avery.. 6688 

3 Benjamin Dean. 4927 

4 Josiah G.Abbott 6511 

5 Nath'l P. Sanks.i343& 

6 C. P. Thompson 8716 

7 John JT. Tarbox 8979 

8 Wm.W. Warren 8585 

9 Eli Thayer 8961 

10 Julius H. See'ye. 7773 

Henry C. Hill... 3474 
ir Ches'r W. Chapin ngb^ 

Totals 94177 

Majority 6578 

Dists. Liberal. 1872. 



Jos. M. Day 2609 

2 Edward. Avery... 5090 

3 Samuel C. Cobb. 5139 

4 Leopold Morse.. 6262 

5 Nath'l P. Banks. 8039 
o C. P. Thompson. 5737 

7 JohnK. Tarbox. ^989 

8 Wm.W. Warren. 5829 

9 George F.Verry. 5007 

10 D. W. Bond 4=;88 

11 JohnF. Arnold.. 0927 

Totals 61216 

Majority 



9927 James Sufflnton. 
9651 SenJ. W. Morris. 
801 1 Menry L. Pierce. 
6721 Rufus S. Frost. 
7263 Daniel W. Gooch. 
7747 Benj'n F. Butler. 
7415 James C. Aver. 
7861 J. M.S. Williams. 
9423 George F. Hoar. 
7353 Chas. A.Stevens. 

6227 Henry Alexander. 

87599 

Administration . 
12441 James Buffinton. 
12752 Benj. W. Harris. 

8931 Wm. Whiting. 

8715 Samuel Hooper. 
12472 Dan'l W. Gooch. 
11881 Benj. F. Butler. 
11742 Eben'r K. Hoar. 
1 1929 J. M. S. Williams. 
12691 George F. Hoar. 
14919 Alvah Crocker. 
12260 Henry L. Dawes. 



130733 
69517 



9E 



50 



323- • 2 9 r 
W. Hartford "98 199.. 94 
Wethersfl'ld 120 194.. 108 

\ Windsor 300 192.. 258 

Wind'r L'ks 219 in.. 195 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



CONNECTICUT. 

GOVEBNOB, '74. GOV.*73. 

Dem.Rep. Dem.Rep. 

Ingeroll Hanian. ln?al. Haven 

Fairfield 8274 6937.. 7867 6792. 

Hartford 10714 8307.. 94°7 9°£- 

Litchfield 5078 3886.. 4»=i2 3893- 

Middlesex 2892 2452.. 2627 2736. 

New Haven... 10672 90^4.. 12338 7084. 

!New London.. 4*87 4739.. 4081 4800. 

Telland 2009 1828.. 1947 J945- 

Windham 2429 2710.. 1940 2957- 



Charles R. Ingersoll's maj. In 1874, 6782 ; in 1873. 



ftov.^. 
Dem.Rep. 
Hubd. Jewell 
. 7767 7645 
. 9399 9820 
. 4804 4428 
. 2857 3075 

.IO99I IOvU 

. 4783 S5o8 
. 1893 2188 
. 2068 3295 



Total 467" 39973- -4SOS9 3?245 

fer cenx 63.V1 -io.09 . . 53.45 48.56 



.44^62 46563 
. 4»".90 51.10 



5814 ; Marshall Jewell's maj". In 1872, 2001.' Total 
vote in 1874, 86728; in 1873, 84304; in 1872, 91125. 
In 1874, Henry D. Smith, Temp., received 4960; 
in 1873, 2451 ; and in 1872, Gillette, Temp., 1549. 

Lieut. 'Gov.. George G. Sill.Dem... 46316 

John T. Walt, Rep 40274 

Sill's maj 6*42 



Legislatube, 1874. Senate. 

Democrats 17 

Republicans 4 

Independents — 

Democratic maj.... 13 



Mouse. 

■2:: 



Joint Bal. 

160 

100 



45- 



58 



VOTB FOB GOVBEXOB BY TOWNS I2T 1873 AXD 1874. 



HARTFORD CO. 

1874. ^ 1873. 
ToiC7i8. Dem.Rep. Dem.Rep. 

Ingereoll Harr.-n Ing. Haven 

Hartford.... 4087 2880. .36K 3147 

Avon 95 100.. 74 I0 6 

Berlin 240 217.. 235 222 

Bloomfleld . 172 87.. 154 w6 

Bristol 477 

Burlington . 150 

Cantoi 152 

E. Granby.. 133 
E.Hartford. 233 
I E. Windsor. 243 

fnneld 294 
armlngton 204 
Glastonbu'y 333 251.. 308 
Granby 177 '97.. i = 



38> 
61. 



2-^2. 
217. 
317- 
231. 



1874. 1873. 

ToiC7i8. Dem.Rep. Dem.Rep. 
Ingersoll Huirau. Ing. Haven 

Bozrah 63 86.. 43 79 

Colchester.. 191 217 
East Lvme.. 135 104 

Franklin 56 79 

235 



60 



Hartland. 



126 
167 
109 



X 



397 



Manchester. 268 274- • 197 2 9 



Marlboro'... 59 
New Britaimo43 
Newington . 91 
Plain ville... 105 
Rocky Hill.. 114 
Simsbury.... 213 
Southlngton 398 
S. Windse* - . 189 
Suffleld 3^7 



4i- 

573- 
64. 

154. 
107. 

179- 
274. 

144. 



52 42 

954 82 t 

M 

no 
181 
263 

I4 Z 
278 

179 
207 
196 
135 



70 

112 
85 
144 
351 
173 



Total ....10714 8367.. 9407 9038 

NEW HAVEN CO. 

NewHaven.4111 3549- • 5634 *77i 

Beac'n Falls 46 70. . 50 55 

Bethany 86 26.. 96 m 

Branford 299 169.. 286 109 

Cheshire... 199 208.. 207 188 

Derby. 757 543.. 764 59' 

East Haven. 211 275.. 265 179 

Guilford 224 251.. 211 2=3 

Hamden 248 99.. 247 84 

Madison 150 189.. 179 198 

Meriden 1077 94-- • ion 9'9 

Middlebury. 37 72.. 48 80 

Milford 385 282.. 379 276 

Nangatuck . 280 130. . 290 1 " 

N. Branford 76 117.. 98 n 

N'rth Haven 125 128.. 143 101 

Orange 148 244.. 241 168 

Oxford 118 109.. 117 106 

Prospect 47 61.. 48 68 

Seymour.... 186 217.. 176 164 

Southbury.. 130 12a.. 125 no 

"Wallingford 381 278.. 374 286 

"Watcrbury..i239 842.. 13^6 957 

"Wolcott... 63 43-- 49 47 

Woodbridge 4 3 84- • 44 5° 

Total 10672 9054.. 12338 7084 

NEW LONDON CO. 

New Lond*n 650 «,*-;.. 522 604 

Norwich 1069 1259.. 920 1296 



124 

80 

Griswold... 139 235.. 139 216 

Groton 384 389-. 374 3°5 

LebaneD 103 184.. 118 224 

Ledyard 138 120.. 112 118 

Lisbon 03 53.. 62 58 

Lyme in 94.. 122 94 

Montville... 89 16b. . 77 157 

N. Ston'gt'n 185 204.. 143 222 

Old Lyme... 13; 107.. 118 129 

Preston 283 147.. 268 152 

Salem 61 81.. 54 75 

Sprague 134 120.. 114 141 

Stoninpton. 457 393.. 335 394 

Waterford . 181 1*7 6.. 191 144 

Total 4687 4739. .4081 4800 

FAIRFIELD CO. 

Fairfield.... 33 s ; 241.. 365 

Bridgeport.. 1988 1718..2004 

Bethel 246 197.. 220 

Biookfleld.. 117 74.. 115 

Danbury 660 544.. 628 

Darien 153 142.. 89 

Kaston 146 108.. 150 

Greenwich . 546 438. . 514 

Huntington. 176 144.. 143 

Monroe 1-48 114.. 134 

New Canaan 282 184.. 234 

New F'rfl'ld 107 39.. 101 

Newtown... 396 199 

Norwalk.... 808 828 

Redding 155 151 

Ridgefleld.. 260 190 

Sherman 95 07.. 98 

Stamford... 584 738.. 566 

Stratford... 3^0 30.. 288 

Trumbull... 170 126.. 157 

Weston. ... 120 46.. 144 

Westport... 284 151.. 311 



1874. 1873. 

Towns. Dem.Rep. Dem.Rep. 
Ingeraoll Harreu. Ing. Haven 

Woodstock. 143 293.. 133 304 
Total. 



151 

if: 



Wilton 212 144.. 214 

Total ^274~ 0937..7867 



V 4 
1642 

211 

601 
123 

94 
427 
141 

97 
217 

45 
194 

775 

\u 

52 

734 
331 
97 
47 
187 
166 



.2429 2710 
LITCHFIELD C 
Litchfield... 278 201 
Barkh'mst'd 170 
Bethlehem . 88 
Bridg'water 121 

Canaan 185 

Colebrook. . 124 
Cornwall.... 190 

Goshen 113 

Harwinton . 74 

Kent 159 

Morris 96 

N. Hartford 148 
New Milford 389 

Norfolk 115 

N'th Canaan 166 
Plymouth... 3^6 361. 
Roxbury... . 127 83 
Salisbury-. •■ 519 

Sharon 3*5 

Torriugton. 308 

Warren 70 

Washington 17 



I OB. 

68. 

?/. 

105. 

85. 
1 o. 

99- 
238. 

3: 

103 



Watertown. 120 

Winchester. 424 380 

Woodbury. . 21 7 204 

Total 5078 3886 



MIDDLESEX CO 
Mlddlet'n...ioo2 561. 



WIN 
Brooklyn ... 

Ashford 

Canterbury. 

Chaplin 

Eastford 

Hampton.... 
Killinglv.... 
Plainfleid.... 

Pomfret 

Putnam 

Scotland 

Sterling 

Thompson.. 
Voluntown. 
Windham. . . 



DHAM CO. 
138 116.. 123 



161 
164 



328 
221 

60 

8c 

95 
122 

459 



6;. 



132 

I5 2 
40 

98.. 79 

§4-. 50 

360.. 208 

229.. 182 

no.. 73 

222.. 120 

89.. 38 

91 •• 54 

279-. 84 

69.. 71 

354- • 392 



6792 



137 
107] 
132! 

73 
105 1 
ioij 
468' 
269 
123. 
249 i 
85 
95, 
271 
107 

33il 



Haddam 

Chatham 180 

ChCBter 92 

Clinton 87 

Cromwell ... 177 

Durham 141 

E. Haddam. 212 

Essex 150 

Killingw'rth 118 
Mlddlefleld. 46 
Old Sayb'k. 66 
Portland.... 166 251 
Saybrook... 07 150 
Westbrook . 09 10 3 

Total 2892 2452. 



U7 
94- 

119. 

155. 

143- 
90. 

212. 

183. 
55- 
74- 

ii=i. 



TOLLAND "CO. 

Tolland 157 96.. 150 106 

Andover 50 54. 

Bolton 78 66. 

Columbia... 93 64. 

Coventry.... 136 108. 

Ellington .. 167 1^6. 

Hebron 116 126. 

Mansfield... 180 196 

Sorners 129 137. 

Stafford 344 186. 

Union 91 

Vernon 380 

Willington . 79 



82. 
35o. 
137. 



Total 2009 1828. 



8? 



40 2957 



264 231 
177 120 

93 71 

104 32 

164 86 

109 93 

230 115 

106 84 

75 "5 
149 no 

86 49 
172 242 

393 
103 
172 
290 

318 
282 

.S 

115 



.4852 3893 



966 


<8o 


2=3 


190 


163 


120 


«3 
74 


161 


137 


154 


Iff 


3 


"8 


214 

8 


60 


114 


154 


283 



V7 

57 



2627 2736 



59 


8| 


77 
97 


106 


183 f 


164 


141 


122 


131 


16s 


201 ' 


123 


131 1 


346 


33<> j 


92 


82 j 


359 


326 1 


87 


131 | 

A 



1947 1045 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



51 



NEW YORK— Vote on the Constitutional Amendments. 



The numbers refer to the synopsis of the 

Counties. Art. III. p. i. Art. III. p. . 

For. Agst. For. Agst. 

Albany 18144 2034.. 18290 1686. 

Allegany 2249 2857.. 3096 2010. 

Broome 3230 2708.. 4143 1817. 



Amendments given on pages 29, 30 and 31 

z. Art. IV. 
For. Agst 
18120 2022 



{5 vii. ■ - yj ® 



Cattaraugus 



3560 1613. 



3979 1079. 
4679 1503. 



Cayuga 3694 2491. 

Chautauqua 4361 1768.. 5185 940. 

Chemurg 3389 739.. 3419 718. 

Chenango 2836 2579. 4066 1228. 

Clinton 5671 214.. 5676 208. 

Columbia 4335 2068.. 5711 692. 

Cortland 1141 2426.. 2215 1367. 



2627 2478. . 

3158 2777.. 

3754 1427.. 

3710 2487., 



Art'. VII. Art. VlII.p.i. Art. VIII.p.2. 

For. Agst. For; Agst. For. Agst. 

12364 7793.. 11927 8000 



18640 1535 
2820 2286 



4903 
3364 
3167 
5651 



121?. 

774 
2146 

233- 



4219 

3917 
4806 

544 
3256 



17621 
1258. 



3022 2085. 
3780 2158.. 



4066 



1378.. 391 1 
714.. 5338 



"57- 

2293. 

792. 



2996 21 10 

3726 2212 

4043 1 169 

3840 2359 



5265 



379-- 



Delaware 2907 2853. . 



Dutchess 8665 

Erie . 
Essex 

Franklin 2976 

Fulton 4931 

Genesee 1364 

Greene 2010 

Hamilton 90 

Herkimer 2597 



1248 

21592 1047.. 21765 

2037 206.. 2033 

667.. 3238 

■575- • 495? 



4382 1372. 
9643 273. 



1785 
39° 
2352. 



877. 
210. 
409. 
550. 
2516 1745. 



4375 2028. 

1545 2063. 

3412 2342. 

8S20 1398. 



2833 2528 
5607 277 



5778 
2364 



625 

761.. 1611 



3295 
4226 

5664 220 
4354 2049 



840.. 3310 
1061.. 4235 



861 
828 
1051 

5672 211 
4350 20=3 



. 2I7IO 

. 2O4I 

3177 

4926 



93i- ■ 
202.. 
581.. 
576.. 



2173 1622. 
90 398. 
3146 1806. 



1548 2715. 
2047 1744. 



Jefferson 1274 6639.. 4319 3669. 



1281 

21IC.. 4024 I2H2. 
I45S. • 9740 

1379-- 1678 

5987 

4220 

830 

6927 



1756. 

2947- 

710. 

793 



639., 

1205. , 
758.. 



Kings 29748 22829.. 48091 4186. 

Lewis 1073 4081.. 1221 3933. 

Livingston 2298 1041.. 2477 864., 

Madison 2777 2361.. 3705 1425., 

Monroe 6^4 3931.. 7626 2895., 

Montgomery 3667 1174.. 4026 807., 

New York..' 58107 57137-. 99527 16948. 

Niagara 3904 1568.. 4588 892.. 

Oneida 4842 10906. . 6555 9193 

Onondaga 9480 4269. . 12449 

Ontario 3170 

Orange 8508 

Orleans 1504 

Oswego 4989 

Otsego 3035 

Putnam 483 

gneens 6287 

ensselaer 8917 6820.. 15311 

Richmond 3086 268.. 3322 

Rockland 2216 94 1 -- 3°83 

Saratoga 4199 1875.. 4718 

Schenectady 3505 401... 3597 

Schoharie 2225 3454.. 2248 

Schuyler 1177 1032.. 1242 967.. 

Seneca 1553 1528.. 2073 1013. , 

Steuben 4522 3765.. 5048 3243., 

St. Lawrence 5900 2959. . 7220 1640. , 

Suffolk 3335 1620.. 43^3 625., 

Sullivan 1578 1582.. 2661 553., 

Tioga 2346 2239. . 3036 1549. . 

Tompkins 2314 1007.. 2909 536.. 

Ulster 5373 3665.. 6761 2275.. 

Warren 1438 685.. 1809 313.. 

Washington 3008 1942.. 3780 1174.. 

Wayne 2159 2125.. 3418 908.. 

Westchester 9891 2425.. 11420 893.. 

Wyoming 2374 1500.. 2938 929.. 

Yates 1289 1570.. 2033 905.. 



90 

3°39 
2482 



398.. 
1908.. 
5486.. 



4737 1025. 
9689 244. 
21793 
2041 
3296 
4972 
2654 
2195 



2785 



202. , 
401., 

530.. 
1608.. 

1597- • 
397- 
2164. 



4607 1 149. 

7819 2096. 

17987 4497- 

2025 21&. 



3302 
4984 
2116 
2186 
91 



390.. 

517.. 
2145., 
1605., 

397- 



1597 
4533 
7802 
18101 
2035 
3298 
4982 
2132 
2186 
9i 



3104 1846. . 3047 



. 296^,6 22818. 

• "96 3957- 
. 2308 1029. 

• 3387 J75i- 
6755 3737. 
3921 912. 

56875 58086. 

41*6 1363., 

6513 9235- ■ 

9807 3969., 

3629 1675. , 

8374 1985.. 

1533 x 35o-' 



1982 
1224 
2112 
4400 
208 
350 

519 
2127 
1610 

397 
1900 
4014 



2971 4985.. 4010 3958.. 3952 

, 48412 4069.. 29152 23201.. 29164 23128 

38 5118.. 1239 3914.. 1230 3923 

2440 902.. 2249 1086.. 22=;i 1084 

3195 1932.. 3730 1398.. 3722 1409 

7523 2998.. 5759 4753.. 5873 4640 

4194 640.. 394° 899.. 4453 874 

100226 15638.. 56641 58444.. 55756 58531 

4408 1085.. 4005 i486.. 3999 14.°" 



2528 13220. 
12713 1007. 



121.. 

225., 

289., 

32.. 

74.. 

1408.. 

309.. 

2248 3431 . 



5018 
39i8 

6266 
8901 
3085 
2203 



1727-. 
2294.. 

73i • • 
79i •• 
6838.. 
261.. 
954 



4263 181 7.. 

3474 432. . 

21 13 3567.. 

1 166 I0 43" 

1597 i486.. 
4631 3659.. 
6761 2089.. 
3441 1530.. 

1598 1576.. 
2726 1859.. 



4072 
9053 
1715 
5850 
41 19 
1024 
6961 
15324 
3324 
3094 

4755 
3604 



7112 
9898 

3725 
9199 

1577 

5077 

4435 
536 

6275 
8969 
3087 
2220 
1383.. 4463 
302.. 3592 



1210., 
940.. 
1168.. 

2085!: 
172.. 
229.. 
263.. 



3875.. 
1568. 
1203. 
1306. 



7100 8648 
9877 389 6 



3687 
9171 
1572 



2366 33I3-- 23 



1669.. 5657 

1773.. 44°i 

658. . 465 

780.. 6259 

6770. . 8946 

259- 3095 

937- 2224 

1676.. 4473 

314. . 3599 

332 1- 2353 



1662 
1488 
131 1 
1688 
1806 
830 
803 
6323 
269 
933 
1665 
3°7 
3324 

1266 



1230 979.. 1166 1043.. 1132 

2006 1078.. 1878 1206.. 1807 

4909 3372.. 5 I0 5 3192.. 5024 3265 

7438 1428.. 7195 1667.. 7353 1505 



2335 
5472 
1476 
3627 



66.. 
3560.. 
646.. 
1330. . 



4398 
2679 
3183 
2959 



580. 

499- 
1402. 
476. 



6675 2 1 51 
1825 3°3 



2273 2006. 
9747 2470. 



3949 1009. 
351 1 783- 



3515 1462.. 3499 147a 

1783 1394- i7 6 3 1403 

3074 151 1.. 3050 1535 

2628 701.. 2512 813 

5544 3286.. 5527 3300 

*579 546.. i486 642 

1009. . 3931 

1546.. 2742 



2735 
1389 



"35- 
1532.. 



395i 

2753 
11331 1009.. 9960 2403.. 9877 
3117 754.. 3007 862.. 3028 
1629.. 1653 



1 175 



1248. . 1659 



1023 

1553 
2441 

837 
1239 



Total 325904 206029. .435313 98050. 

Percent 61.27 38.73.. 81.62 18.38. 

Majority for. . 119875 —..337263 — . 



.336197 196125.. 428200 104129.. 337891 194236. .336237 195047 

63.16 36.84.. 80 44 19.56.. 63.50 36 50.. 63 29 36.71 
.140072 — ..324071 — ..143655 — ..141190 — 



The following are the aggregate votes on all tfee amendments : 

1. Amendment to Article_II For 357,635 Against 177,033 Total vote 

-i. <*.*♦•' 

3. 



4. 

a. 
e. 
7. 

8. 

0. 
10. 
11. 



Ill, pt. 1, 

lll.pt. 2, 

IV.... 

VII.... 

vni.pt. 1, 

VIII, pt. 2, 
X,sec. 9, 

XII.... 

XV ... 
XVI.... 



325*904 
435-313 
336,197 

428,200 
337,891 
336,237 
335,548 
352,514 
351,693 
446,883 



206,029 
98,050 
196,125 
104,129 

194,236 
195,047 
194,933 
179,365 
177,923 
85,758 



534,668 
531,933 
533.363 
532,322 

532,329 
532,127 
531,284 
530,481 

531,879 
529,616 
532,641 



Maj. 



for 180,602 
119,875 
337,263 
140,072 
324-571 
143,655 
141,190 
140,615 
173,149 
173,770 
361,125 



52 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



NEW YORK. 

1874— GOVEKXOK— 1872. LT.-GOV. '74. CAJT.COM.'74- PkTS.IN8.'74- Jt7DGE,'74. 

, ' 1 , « , , ' , , ^- , , " > 

Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. 

Dix Kernan Dix L>orsh. Robin'n Thayer Burkley Wagen. Kiikp. Miller Johns'n 



Counties. Dem. 

Tildeii 

Albany 15466 13234.. 14037 1.1367. 

Allegany 3268 ^187.. 3107 6122.. 

Broome 4296 4881.. 44^1 5764.. 

Cattaraugus 4517 5255.. 3883 ^568.. 

Cayuga 5018 5977.. 49/8 7953.. 

Chautauqua 5355 7827.. 5018 8220.. 

Chemung 4226 34=;3.. 3981 4266.. 

Chenango 4242 4896.. 4338 5686.. 

Clinton 3004 5065.. 4393 4331.. 

Columbia 5780 4434.. 6109 5486.. 

Cortland 2268 2927.. 2375 3047.. 

Delaware 4392 4608.. 4303 5^37.. 

Dutchess 8767 5354.. 8682 8327.. 

Erie 15686 15146.. 13419 17320.. 

Essex 3191 3395.. 2103 3648.. 

Franklin 2029 2780.. 2177 3342.. 

Fulton 2943 35 2 3.. 2991 354 1 -- 

Genesee 2672 3088.. 2604 4061.. 

Greene 3998 3043.. 3718 3536.. 

Hamilton 403 246.. 536 344.. 

Herkimer 4377 4728.. 4145 M9^.. 

Jefferson 5666 6838.. ^971 84^3.. 

Kings 39809 2681 1 . . 35774 36071 . . 

Lewis 3219 2764.. 3170 3332.. 

Livingston 3753 4347.. 3477 47°7--. 

Madison 3938 5450.. 4013 6089.. 

Monroe 10094 9701.. 9572 12814.. 

Montgomery 4139 3773.. 3828 4165.. 

New York 87436 44908.. 77915 56296.. 

Niagara 4S79 4625.. 4649. 5277.. 

Oneida in 37 im88. . 10765 12921.. 

Onondaga 9380 11610.. 10191 12582.. 

Ontario 4449 4536.. 4099 ^624.. 

Orange 7878 7319- • 7497 8729.. 

Orleans 2^67 3147.. 2518 3872.. 

Oswego 6440 7580.. 6932 9292.. 

Otsego 6083 5330.. 6219 6429.. 

Putnam 1706 1478.. 1324 1749.. 

Queens 6257 4961.. ^417 6500.. 

Rensselaer 10702 9881.. 8990 11847.. 

Richmond 3021 2150.. 2492 2867.. 

Rockland 2632 1817.. 2362 2300.. 

Saratoga 4953 6264.. 4904 6988.. 

Schenectady 2648 2263.. 2224 2817.. 

Schoharie 4545 2712.. 4310 3351.. 

Schuyler 2260 2110.. 2087 2475.. 

Seneca 3202 2569.. 2990 2917.. 

Steuben 7688 7072.. 7039 8589.. 

St. Lawrence 3866 9106.. 4567 11327.. 

Suffolk 3529 3601.. 3201 5182.. 

Sullivan 3681 2294.. 3360 3295.. 

Tioga 3237 3502.. 3283 4100.. 

Tompkins 3340 3370-. 34S2 4391. . 

Ulster 8303 5884.. 7913 8063.. 

Warren 2400 2334.. 1985 2851.. 

Washington 4346 5410.. 3865 6554.. 

Wayne 4017 5103.. 3883 6264.. 

Westchester 9166 7145.. 10507 10903.. 

Wyoming 2416 343 \.. 2363 3945. . 

lates 1721 2334.. 1912 2778.. 



15408 
3252 
4135 
4532 
4976 
5412 

4257 
4221 
3«42 

57-'4 
22^0 

4497 
8779 
J 57i2 
3186 
2010 

2953 
2651 

3959 

398 

4363 

R678 

39647 
3222 
3766 

3939 

9988 

4142 

88176 

4577 
11188 

9365 
4470 

7924 

25U 

6416 
6050 
1705 

1 0601 
3036 
2649 

2063 
4542 
2270 
3J93 
7693 
387S 
356t 

3D79 
3246 

3354 
8235 
2408 
4356 
3987 
9158 
2506 
1715 



13224. 

5208. 
5064. 
5270. 
5968. 
7791- 
3459- 
49J3- 
5065. 

4490- 
2957. 
4807. 

5343- 
15091. 

341 1 • 
2796. 

3514. 
3148. 
3045- 

2S6. 



26972. 
2793- 
43I5- 
5465. 

9751- 
3741. 

43436. 
4626. 

11411. 

11583. 

4559- 
7276. 
3104. 

7591- 
5408. 
1484. 
4876. 
9907. 

2134- 
1802. 
6278. 
2258. 

2747- 
2109. 
2599. 

9094. 

3549- 
2298. 
3494- 
3380. 
5921. 
2328. 
5433- 
5127. 
7066. 
3456. 
2302. 



Total 416391 366074. 

Perceut 53.22 46.78. 



,392350 445801.. 416714 36 
46.31 53.19.. 63.29 



26. 
46.71. 

John A 



• 15414 


133I7- • 


3262 


5203 . 


4269 


4920. . 


4534 


5267.. 


4995 
■408 


5957- • 


7793- • 


4296 


3454- • 
4926.. 


4207 


3162 


5070. . 


5767 


4456.. 
2964.. 
4820. . 


2245 


4482 
8789 


5345-. 


15096 


15158.. 


3M5 


3442.. 


2021 


2798.. 


2950 


35i6.. 


2640 


3153- • 


4020 


3025. . 


398 


257.. 


4362 

5688 

39372 

3210 


82:: 

27328.. 
2809.. 


3759 


43I7-. 


3920 
10118 


5475- • 
9691.. 


4206 


3709.. 


88347 


43322.. 
4621.. 


4588 


11141 


11483-. 


939° 


11582.. 


4458 
7894 


4563.. 
7293. -. 


2595 


3073.. 


6420 


7591 . . 


6062 


5382.. 


1704 


1483. . 
4868.. 


6339 


10861 


9717.. 


3023 
2664 


2143.. 
1788.. 


4970 


6259. . 


2719 


2204.. 
2756. . 


4536 


2260 


2110.. 


3195 


2598. . 
7067.. 
9095.. 


38*69 


: "M 


3557.- 
2302.. 


. 3243 


349°.. 


. 3346 


3389.. 


. 8230 


5929.. 


. 2396 


2331.. 


4224 


5457.. 


■ 3997 
9162 


5132.. 
7067.. 


2403 


3463.. 


1704 


2319.. 


417023 . 


$65244.- 


53.31 


46.69.. 



3020 

2654 

2676 

4537 
2267 
3148 
7710 
3&57 

3684 
3245 
3324 
8145 
2407 

4355 
3981 
9127 
2401 
1761 



4152^3 365734. 
53.17 46.83. 



15209 
3062 
4126 
4528 
4826 
c,822 
4198 • 
4M5 
3°53 
6297 
2153 

15599 
3071 
I981 
2880 
2605 

3994 
388 

4247 

5587 
37836 

W 

3799 
9675 

J 12S 
88119 

455i 

10871 
9025 
4424 
7895 
2 =,09 
6366 
5962 
1586 
61 16 

10534 
2894 
2619 
4783 
2652 
4538 
2192 
3103 
7516 
376i 
3465 
3619 
3178 
3285 
8109 
2358 
4292 
3950 

8934 
2277 
1625 



410172 360760 
53.20 46 80 



Samuel J. Tilden's maj. for Governor, ^0,317 ; John A. Dix's maj. in 1872, 53,451 ; William Dors- 
heimer's maj. for Lieutenant-Governor, 51,488 ; Adin Thayer's mai. for Canal Commissioner, 51,779; 
George Wagener's maj. for Inspector of State's Prisons. 49,519 ; Theodore Miller's maj. for Asso- 
ciate Judge of the Court of Appeals, 49,412. Total vote for Governor in 1874,782,465; in 1872,838,151; 
for Lleuteuant-Governor in 1874, 781,940; for Canal Commissioner, 782,267; for Inspector of State's 
Prisons, 780,987 ; for Associate Judge of the Court of Appeals, 770,932. The foregoing totals do not 
include the Temperance and scattering votes. 3,619 votes returned from Sullivan County for 
Theodore Miller as " Judge of the Court of Appeals," and not allowed by tiie State Canvassers, 
are given to Mr. Miller in our table. 

The Temperance ticket received the following vote : Myron H. Clark, for Governor, 11,768 ; 
James L. Bagg, Lieutenant-Governor, 11,310; Daniel Walford, Canal Commissioner, 11,328; Ira 
Bell, State's Prison Inspector, 11,344; Horace v. Rowland, Associate Judge of Court, of Appeals, 
9,537. In 1872, Charles C. Leigh, ,r Anti Dram Shop " candidate for Governor, received 177 votes. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



53 



NEW YOKE BY TOWNS ANB COUNTIES. 



ALBANY COUNTY. 

Gov. '74. Sec. St.'73- Pres.'72. 
Towns, dec. Bern. Rep. Bern. Rep. Lib. Adm. 

Tilden Dix WillersXhaye; GreeleyG.atit 

Albany, Wd i .. . 398 385.. 330 358.. 178 544 
2 . . . 703 ' 408 
3... 871 238 
4... 1043 444 
5... 500 465 
"_ 6.. . 408 610. 



361 496. , 
954 380. , 



9- 

10., 



6go 

533 
817 
414 
3°7 
525 
433 



459- 
481. 

799- 
275. 
572. 
663. 



218 
259. 

449. 

430. 

506. 

403- 

344- 

343- 

314- 

702. 

263. 

503. 

284 587. . 297 

481 300. . 478 

409 549. . 395 



70(3 

737 

803 

431 
405 
322 
878 
484 
445 
482 
748 
435 



619 
838 

849 
461 

444 

358 
1023 

438 

483 

502 
794 
39o 



4i5 
254 

470 
404 
430 
599 
833 
287 

Pi 
o 7 b 

338 
6S7 



Total, city . . .9574 7581 . 

Berne 316 297. 

Bethlehem 352 424. 

Coeymans 432 267. 

Cohoes 1350 1160. 

Guilderland ... 363 516. 

Knox 128 273. 

New Scotland. . 336 449. 

Rensselaerville.439 229.. 354 227 

Watervliet 1872 1738.. 1S13 1453 

Westerlo 304 294.. 279 



8380 6528.. 8547 8266 

319 307.. 339 451 

333 348.. 330 355 

405 210. . 414 287 

1169 814'.. 1138 1049 

317 463.. 3°4 552 

106 

293 




Total 15460 13234. .13568 11348.. 13793 14414 

Majority.... 2232 — .. 2220 — — 021 
ALLEGANY COUNT Y. 



Alfred 32 276. 

Allen 45 99., 

Alma .'. 88 44., 

Almond, 183 170.. 

Amity 155 252. . 

Andover 147 244.. 

Angelica 124 208., 

Belfast 138 210., 

Birdsall 87 60., 

Boliver 84 136. . 

Burns 131 173.. 

Caneadea 144 219.. 

Centerville . . . . 60 136.. 

Clarksville .... 41 125.. 

Cuba 255 265.. 

Friendship .... 190 234.. 

Genesee 42 176.. 

Granger 45 171 . . 

Grove 70 91-.. 

Hume 131 279.. 

Independence. 54 179.. 

New Hudson. . . 04 137. , 

Rushford 63 234.. 

Scio 166 172.. 

Ward 62 53.. 

Wellsville 4^6 432. . 

West Almond.. 68 91.. 

Willing 84 147. . 

Wirt 58 174.. 



25 


237- 


20 


103. 


51 


39- 


132 


171. 


147 


243. 


up 


214. 


87 


265. 


no 


174. 


95 


57. 


72 


102. 


149 


170. 


'» 


109. 
88. 


20 


7 |- 
236. 


222 


154 


228. 


14 


108. 


27 


118. 


72 


79- 


130 


231. 


58 


145. 


*5 


105. 


5« 


214. 


141 


157. 


5« 


64. 


379 


357- 



II 



92., 
125., 
117.. 



62 

41 
60 

155 

IS2 
131 

79 

8l 

82 

130 

143 

44 

23 

257 

211 



49 

122 

74 
5i 

146 

5i 

423 

$ 

64 



277 
129 

55 
201 
306 
289 
291 
223 

78 
135 
194 
237 
168 
168 

317 
250 
164 
217 
139 
324 
176 
200 
313 
191 

97 
514 
103 
180 
214 



Total 3267 5187.. 2730 4483.. 2981 6150 

Majority — 1920.. — 1753.. — 3169 

BEOOME COUNTY." 

Barker 120 141.. 83 136.. 126 199 

Binghamfcon . . . 244 244.. 146 182.. 209 221 

* City, 1.. 452 401.. 350 287.. 443 399 

2.. 194 230.. 131 180.. 185 230 

" " 3.. 300 316.. 202 261.. 311 350 

" " 4.. 315 370.. 239 297.. 350 416 

5. . 126 142.. 98 ic6.. 140. 131 

Total, city ...1387 1459.. 1020 1131.'. 1429 1532 



Chenango 06 203.. 67 

Coles v ille 361 377 . . 286 

Conklin 116 125.. 92 

Fenton 140 210.. 99 

Kirkwood 165 122.. 136 

Lisle 172 378.. 150 



165.. 

295. 

108. 

162. 

126. 

291. 



10 

336 

133 

148 
223 



200 
450 



238 
136 
400 



Maine 1^5 

Nanticoke 78 

Sanford . . .• 335 

Triangle 212 

Union 234 

Vestal 22i 

Windsor 260 



Tilden D'x WillersThayerGreeleyGrani 



26=;.. 94 

I03.. 50 

292.. 251 

228.. 144 

233.. 220 

102.. 182 

319.. 208 



231.. 

93-. 

224. 

228.. 

K: 

317.. 



140 

73 

291 
182 
300 
250 
263 



341 
136 

374 
293 
342 
242 

405 



Total 4296 4881.. 3234 4109 

Majority — 585.. — 875 

CATTARAUGUS COUNTY. 



Allegany 316 181.. 

Ashfjrd 179 187.. 

Carrolton 115 91.. 

Cold Spring 114 94.. 

Conewango 128 174.. 

Dayton 132. 126.. 

East Otto 94 154.. 

Ellicottville ... 253 158.. 
Farmersville . . 92 101.. 
Franklinville . . 196 181 . . 

Freedom 80 174.. 

Great Valley... 173 169.. 

Hinsdale 184 

Humphrey 92 

Ischua 98 

Leon 71 

Little Valley . . 100 

Lyndon 34 

Machias 103 

Mansfield 79 

Napoli 91 

New Albion 177 

Olean 256 

Otto 83 

Perry sburg 124 

Persia 145 

Portville 164 

Randolph 265 248 

Red House.... 67 41.. 

Salamanca 274 257.. 

South Valley . . 87 70. . 
Yorkshire 151 241.. 



234 
124 

P 

s 

80 
155 
45 

181 



133.. 
144.. 

59.. 
97.. 

174- • 

121.. 
138.. 

137- • 

125.. 

154-. 



4322 5719 

— 1397 

259 223 

149 208 

91 
70 



154- • 
126.. 
106. . 

179- • 
161.. 
136.. 
171.. 
144.. 
185.. 
199.. 
300.. 
161.. 
164.. 
135- • 
227.. 



50. I53-. 

95 87.. 

113.. 

78.. 

82.. 

142.. 

142.. 



ibi 

£ 4 
60 
95 
23 

60 
123 
202 

63 

89 
137 

85 
135 

ci 
187 

41 
121 



152.. 
116.. 
148.. 
192.. 
246.. 
152.. 
I3<5.. 
125.. 
i63.. 
241.. 

36.. 
173.. 

40.. 
208.. 



100 

93 

188 

59 > 

178 

67 
133 
211 

74 

I 

81 
26 
87 
79 
54 
114 

% 

in 

159 
104 
224 

2 § 
158 

44 
113 



109 
197 
164 
166 

178 
188 
210 
178 
144 
122 
126 
209 
169 

159 
166 

145 

192 
204 
302 
187 
198 
128 
252 
278 

29 
225 

73 
237 



Total 4517 5255.. 3183 4316.. 3606 5615 



Majority 



Auburn, 1 307 

" 2 203 

" 3 
4 



— 738.. — 1133. 
CAYUGA COUNTY. 



— 2009 



214 

253 



J Z4 



384. 
425.. 
329-. 
200., 

151.. 

273.. 

75-. 



217 

161 
210 
124 

122 

77 



35°. ■ 
3*7.. 

317.. 
255., 
152.. 
278.. 
00., 



260 
203 

248 
157 

"8 



455 
477 
380 
270 

151 
312 
81 



Total, city ...1378 1897 

Aurelius 225 142 

Brutus 2*0 

Cato 154 

Conquest 174 

Fleming 115 

Genoa 160 

Ira 189 

Ledyard 140 

Locke 87 

Mentz 327 

Montezuma ... 188 

Moravia 226 

Niles 220 

Owasco 66 

Scipio 114 

Sempronius ... 100 

Sennett 97 

Springport .... 230 

Sterling 160 

Summerhill 56 

Throop 121 

Venice 102 



^victory":::::::: , 



39 



305-. 
227.. 
138.. 
165.. 
284.. 

171.. 

281.. 
120.. 
129., 
IO9.. 
212.. 
153.. 
II5-. 
157.. 

io.->. . 

173.. 

204. . 

254.. 
95-. 
122.. 
224.. 
140.. 



I064 1799.. 1271 2126 

l6l I46.. I93 I94 

4°7-> 213 

276.. IQ7 



200 
III 
I76 

99 

105 
144 
90 
52 



145 
55 

100 
62 
83 

159 

159 
40 

"o 
no 



158. 
156.. 
253.. 
187.. 

243.. 
150.. 
210. . 
114.. 

244.. 
150.. 
150.. 
154- • 
90. . 
167.. 
239.. 

3 8§:: 
109.. 
183.. 



196 
103 

ISO 
186 
105 
9i 



326 267 
180 123 



237 
175 
57 
134 
in 

"5 

205 
178 
59 
151 
100 



344 
241 
176 
291 
152 
231 
240 
423 
175 
HS 



170.. 139 250 



Total 5018 5977.-3924 6iv>.. 4782 7989 

Majority — 959.. — 2226.. — 3207 



54 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST5. 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

Tilden \Ax W'ille sThayerUree!eyGr*nt 



Arkwright 82 

Baati 122 

Carroll 113 

Charlotte 241 

Chautauqua 330 

Cherry Creek.. 129 

Olvmer 86 

Dunkirk 860 

Ellery '.. 123 

Ellicott 599 1143 

Ellington...... 08 26s. 

French Creek.. 61 

Gerry 56 

Hanover 375 

Harmony 232 

Kiantone 51 

Mina 67 

I Poland 79 

J Pomfret 433 

1 Portland 190 

Ripley 175 

Sheridan 151 

Sherman 91 

Stockton S02 

Villenova 153 

Weatfleld 250 



% 

265. 
167. 

354- 
1*4. 
225. 
430. 
272 



149, 
211 



161, 
277. 

515- 
222. 
152. 
U3. 
249. 
263. 

416 



Total 5355 7825 

Majority — 2470. 

CHEMUNG 

Ashland 106 108. 

Baldwin 107 108. 

Big Flats 201 181. 

Catlln 119 109. 

Chemung 167 191. 

Elmira 161 103. 

ElmlraCIty, 1.. 169 212. 

" 2.. 357 194. 

" 3- 271 3". 

'• 4-. 425 255. 

" t. . 267 250. 

" 6.. 259 281. 

" 7.. 191 93. 

Total, city ...1939 1=196. 

Erin 189 "83. 

Horaeheads 410 332. 

Southport 403 215. 

VanEtfren 209 150. 

Veteran 215 277. 



4054 5653 

— I 5?9 
COUNT?. 
138 
no 
187 

154 
230 
119 
219 



Total 4226 3453. 

Majority 773 — . 

CHENANGO 

Afton 229 173. 

Bainbridge 215 244. 

Coluoibus 64 154. 

Coventry 139 151. 

German 59 

Greene 443 

Guilford 263 

Linklaen 73 

McDonough... 144 

New Beihu 293 322 

N'rth Norwich. 101 138 

Norwich 696 

Otselic 150 

Oxford 319 

Pharsalia 169 

Pitcher 134 

Plymouth 130 

Preston in 

Sherburne 208 453. 

Smlthville 211 163 

Smyrna 91 222 



389. 
aw. 

138. 
122. 



753- 
222. 
365. 

ft 



Total 4242 4896. 

Majority...... — ^.654. 



Altona 152 

I Ausable 256 

Beekmantown. 106 



CLINTON COUNTY. 



300. 
28s. 
294 



Black Brook... 215 341 
Champlain 297 426 



i] 

95 
i»3 
235 
no 

611 

538 

93 

37 

78 133 

226 401 

200 391 

58 

101 

156 



186 

155 

316 

146 

200 

703 
178 



44 

t 7 , 

374 450 
101 167 



116 
139 
53 



127 
109 
174 



140 200 
97 139 

192 355 



129 

177 
113 

173 
161 

328 201 
289 319 



393 
253 



227 275 
177 119 



1820 1628 
210 95 

38) 397 



375 
183 
192 323 



a§4 
[81 



401 1 3816 
CO?TNTY\ 



187 
170 

45 
130 

54 

3»7 
237 
48 
118 
248 

623 640 



283 

157 
112 

89 

,8 

187. 

8o 



173 
332 

148 
123 

3&8 
137 
203 



3595 4062 
467 



3 

233 



217 
256 
230 



234 276 
297 264 



567 
in 

n 

339 

■s 

E 

444 
I8l 



87 
102 
176 
112 



87 
186 



I65 
142 



173 
263 

255 

ibo 



7 i 

120 

133 

20O 

289 406 

H3 201 

86 246 
748 561 
121 301 



907 
282 
itf 
189 

573 
589 

161 
255 
54* 
243 



135 229 

149 173 

67 252 

176 260 

125 208 

164 462 



4880 8145 
— 3265 



127 
119 

187 



170 240 

118 129 

144 238 

348 236 

240 374 

385 300 

233 277 
223 
141 



296 
154 



1714 1875 

204 142 

318 467 

344 283 

175 191 

208 325 



3728 4350 

— 022 

255 295 

254 248 



209 

195 

55 95 

404 429 

268 3^9 

61 163 

207 

117 

740 704 

113 281 

455 
105 

157 



35o 
153 



114 207 

87 106 

217 466 

222 145 

79 294 



4280 5576 

— "1296 

236 279 

216 3-50 

239 209 

231 340 

417 388 



Chazy 176 296 

Clinton 162 67 

Daunemoi a 84 212 

EUeuburg 240 250 

Mooera 101 507 

Peru 198 304 

Plattsburg 574 1062 

Saranac 277 501 

Schuyler Falls. 135 223 



Tilden Dix "Wi!l«wThayerGreeleyGrant | 
181 296.. 207 413 



Total 3093 5068 

Majority — 1975 

COLUMBIA 

Ancram 230 117 

Austerlitz 131 140 

Canaan 149 200 

Chatham 532 538 

Claverack 446 340 

Clermont 157 44 

Copake 224 219 

Gallatin 136 143 

Germantown... 134 158 

Ghent 298 288 

Greenport 147 126 

Hillsdale 278 207 

Hudson, 1 242 144 

" 2 347 156 

" 3 225 209 

" 4 343 303 

Total City.... 1154 812 

Kinderhook 507 389 

Livingston 233 153 

New Lebanon.. 332 164 

Stockport 145 130 

Stuyvesant 292 170 

Taghkauic 250 88 



Total. 5780 4434 

Majority 1346 — 

CORTLAND 

Cincinnatus 143 105 

Cortlandville... 501 852 

Cuyler 57 

Freetown 73 

Harford 80 

Homer 251 

Lapeer 08 

Marathon 172 

Preble 144 

Scott 84 

Solon 129 

Taylor 117 

Truxton 142 

Virgil 195 

Wlllett no 



Total .226a 2927 

Majority — 039. 

DELAWARE 

Andes 2^9 284 

Bovina 78 

Colchester 313 

Davenport 305 

Delhi 285 

Franklin 249 411 

Hamden 106 269 

Hancock 348 266 

Harpersneld ... 162 147 

Kortright 188 172 

Masonville 187 181 

Meredith 123 188 

Mlddletown.... 448 251 

Roxbury 344 183 

Sidney 311 198 

Stamford 185 175 

Tompkins 459 395 

Walton 241 428 



o 
447 



Total 4591 4607 

Majority — 16 

DUTCHESS 

Amenla 390 196 

Beekman 227 113 

Clinton 238 138 



3726 3672. 
54 — • 
COUNTY. 

226 166. 



5502 4752, 
C0 7 fJNTY. 



204 

73 

228 

259 
234 

263 
205 



36 
164. 
209. 
369- 
239. 
641. 

332- 
143. 



123 
127 
510 
411 
170 
232 
119 
125 

293 
158 

293 
237 
372 
218 
329 



153 
113 

595 

423 

34 

230 



317. 
135- 

*£• 

109. 
199. 
220. 
312. 



1156 



171 
128 
252 
249 



900. 
372. 
198. 
137- 
127. 

126. 



136 
434 

72 

209 
6:5 

165 

139 
71 

125 

85 

III 
08 



117. 
894. 
182. 
102. 
119. 

%: 

194. 
82. 

135- 

,3: 

139- 
210. 

71- 



2003 3037. 
COUNTY*." 



186 

226 
263 
253 
193 
82 
223 
130 
177 
137 



293. 
140. 
294. 
142. 
434- 
354- 
271. 
187. 
133- 

ill; 

76 164. 

377 268. 



291 
220 

153 
300 
229 



is? 

i63. 
174. 
377- 
427. 



3589 43/8. 

COUNTY. ' 
305 229. 
140 149. 
210 183. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T5. 



55 



Dover 

EastFishkill... 410 128. 

Fishkill 1164 1013.. 

Hyde Park 328 211.. 

Lagrange 201 133.. 

Milan 177 

North East 277 

Pawling 294 116. . 

Pine Plains. ... 255 107. . 

Pleasant Valley 257 161.. 

Poughkeepsie.. 478 236.. 

City, 1. 472 127.. 

2. 450 236.. 



Tlden I>ix WillersThayerGreeleyGrant 
305 151.. 228 209.. 255 321 



288 

9 



162.. 

901., 

200 243., 

165 221.. 

108. . I57 I43. . 

161.. 170 263.. 

158.. 



340 259 

I 122 I393 

326 201 

233 239 

230 I74 

300 262 



".?* 



3. 25 

4. 322 246 

5. 296 226. 
0. 226 248. 



184 151. 

248 212. 
354 

410 238.. 

368 275.. 

288.. 218 327.. 

270 313.. 

264 238.. 

210 272., 



248 

303 
281.. 41? 



163 
217 
400 



515 254 

440 384 

235 37 2 

291 378 

304 33& 

239 308 



Total City 2018 1371. 

Red Hook 513 258.. 402 272.. 

Rhinebeck 338 326.. 314 341.. 

Stanford 281 157.. 279 206., 

Union Vale 247 80.. 189 173., 

"Washington.... 369 188.. 



1740 1663.. 2024 2032 
461 471 
413 432 



323 230 

206 176 

301 302.. 339 321 



Total 8767 5354.. 7116 6462.. 8637 8235 

Majority 3413 — .. 654 — .. 402 — 

ERIE COUNTY. 

Alden 237 

Amherst 390 

Aurora 211 

Boston 180 

Brandt 121 

Buffalo, 1 141 1 

2 W2 

3 87.2 

" 4 74i 

5 1345 1349- • 1229 1236.. 1001 1476 

6 1047 753.. 997 712.. 885 956 

" 7 971 1140.. 828 1985.. 698 1334 

" 8 839 45 6 -- 643 478.. 603 618 

" 9 514 844.. 421 795. . 402 866 

" 10 C98 1091.. 503 ic82.. 445 1175 

" 11 534 890.. 422 811.. 357 827 

" 12 450 377.. 414 343.. 403 444 

' 13 210 187 . . 1 95 154. ■ 149 237 

Total City... 10124 9768.. 8703 9482.. 7658 11337 



167. 


213 


170.. 


225 


219 


197. 


304 


179- • 


339 


3b0 


252. 


184 


X:. 


243 


309 


90. 


171 


193 


123 


123.. 


9 2 


99-. 


in 


147 


74^" 


109s 


717.. 


1013 


720 


sis 


Z2 2 -- 


447 
670 


918 


694- 


748 


689.. 
678.. 


939 


705. 


090 


585 


827 



Cheektowaga. . 157 

Clarence 190 

Colden 207 

Collins 161 

Concord 270 

East Hamburg. 18s 

Eden 204 

Elina 214 

h vans 226 

Grand Island... 101 

Hamburg 342 

Holland 194 

Lancaster 351 

Marilla 198 

Newstead 264 

North Collins.. 124 

Sardinia 18a 

Tonawanda 461 

A- ales 168 

"West Seneca... 223 



173- • 
360., 
140., 
3°7- • 
432.. 
225.. 
213., 
153.. 



135 307.. 

183 98. , 

14& 278.. 

187 357.. 



181 
192 
147 



125.. 82 

182.. 257 

166.. 128 
239 
183 

363-. 158 

226.. 106 

203, . 133 

290. • 334 

149.. no 

136.. 192 



107.. 

19a.. 

148.. 

243.. 

114.. 

187.. 

153.. 
286 242.. 
149 152.. 

334-. 

183.. 

is6.. 

268.. 

in.. 

I55-. 



238 

158 447 

185 170 

147 3M 

218 447 

209 238 

147 254 

218 229 

209 353 

70 136 

279 225 

143 172 

340 351 

146 229 

21 s 460 

88 220 

152 2o3 

292 258 

140 178 

222 203 



Total. ..• 15683 15149.. 13049 14196.. 12468 17831 

Majority 534 .. — 1147. . — 5363 

ESSEX COUNTY. 



Chesterfield... 264 335. 

Crown Poiut... 176 388. 

E izabethtown. 78 182.. 

Essex 185 125.. 

Jay 276 228. . 

Keene 37 101.. 

Lewis 124 143.. 

Minerva 122 46.. 

Moriah 941 570.. 

Newcomb 8 28.. 

North Elba 33 33.. 

North Hudson. 85 61.. 



268.. 
332.. 
177.. 

98 



157 
68 

4i 
124 

242 208.. 

16 74. 

88 149. 

70 47. 

573 39o. 



23 



181 319 
54 407 
44 213 

115 160 

243 253 
28 1 19 

101 

104 

501 
4 



22 

4i 



191 

37 

45 
79 



Tilden Dtx WillersThayerGreeleyC 

St. Armand 27 71.. 18 59.. 22 

Schroon 146 136.. 77 133.. 89 

Ticonderoga.... 308 411.. 164 267.. 178 

Wellsboro' 138 192.. 80 143.. 93 

"Westport 220 224.. 73 153.. 107 

"Wilmington.... 22 121.. 2s 106. . 12 

Total 3191 339s.. 1900 2707.. 1939 

Majority — 204.. — 807.. — 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Bangor 96 286.. 6s 244.. 118 

Belmont in no.. 56 04.. 132 

Bombay 131 in.. 114 100.. 141 

Brandon 29 73.. 25 69.. 24 

Brighton 20 19.. 14 n.. 5 

Burke 160 173.. m 142.. 167 

Chateaugay... 302 229.. 220 204.. 304 

Constable 27 150.. 100 124.. 132 

Dickinson 39 275.. 30 199.. 45 

Duane 36 21.. 30 20.. 25 

Ft. Covington . 150 216.. 131 229.. 161 

Franklin 107 105.. 62 79.. 86 

Harrietstown. . 44 23.. 12 24.. 17 

Malone 428 740.. 277 626.. 455 

Moria 148 130.. 121 106.. 17I 

Westville 101 119.. 74 10 1 . . 93 

Total 2029 2786 . . 1442 2342 . . 2076 

Majority — 7^7.. — _q«>.. — 

FULTON COUNTY. 

Bleecker 170 43.. 105 37.. 135 

Broadalbin . . . . 187 310.. 176 258.. 267 

Caroga 135 47.. 67 .28.. 106 

Ephratah 216 225.. 137 148.. 248 

Johnstown 1366 1930.. §33 1443.. 1176 

Mayfield 202 288.. 173 191.. 245 

Northampton.. 290 215.. 23* 163.. 305 

Oppenhefm 190 239.. 165 137.. 209 

Perth 85 122.. 85 108.. 107 

Stratford 102 104. 92 83 . . 129 

Total 2943 3S23.. 2165 2S96. . 2927 

Majority — s8o. . — 431. • — 

GENESEE COUNTY. 

Alabama 85 204.. 27 152.. 90 

Alexander 122 250.. 77 176.. 123 

Batavia 678 ^23.. 401 551.. 644 

Bergen 194 178.. 115 106.. 176 

Bethany no 179.. 55 128.. 89 

Byron 90 183.. 32 139.. 91 

Darien 186 144.. 98 124.. 192 

Elba 197 1S5.. 144 168.. 177 

Le Roy 425 468.. 310 388.. 451 

Oakfield 117 173.. 73 144.. 128 

Pavilion 124 176.. 50 137.. 100 

Pembroke 237 267.. 133 215.. 255 

Stafford 107 188.. 43 146. 74 

Total 2672 3088.. 1558 2654.. 2590 

Major.ty — 416.. — 1096.. — 

GREENE COUNTY. 

Ashland 8s 113.. 78 120.. 64 

Athens 326 330.. 281 320.. 283 

Cairo 320 235.. 319 220.. 267 

Catskill 888 775.. 803 800.. 801 

Coxsackie 475 344- • 4+4 344-. 488 

Durham 234 264.. 251 263.. 271 

Greeneville.... 250 225.. 243 226.. 256 

Halcott 79 12.. 70 10.. 00 

Hunter 217 155.. 193 168.. 181 

Jewett 163 86.. 127 104.. 115 

Lexington 247 44.. 200 45.. 228 

New Baltimore 330 255.. 311 224.. 327 

Prattsville 184 71.. 216 72.. 181 

Windham 200 134.. 231 142.. 182 

Total 3998 3°43-- 3767 3°s8.. 3704 

Majority qm — . . 709 — . . 263 

HAMILTON COUNTY. 

Arietta 18 8.. 31 11.. 31 

Benson 74 13.. 73 4.. 103 

Hope 88 59.. 63 32.. 103 

Indian Lake .. . 32 29.. 23 32.. 27 

Lake Pleasant. 42 17.. 34 14.. 44 

LongLake 5 22.. 1 31.. — 



*ant 

78 

208 

% 

239 
137 

3728 
1789 

332 
140 
132 
94 
32 
238 
258 
154 

"II 
255 
142 
47 
794 
199 
151 



3371 
1295 

67 
3 c8 

54 
242 

1884 

304 
215 
238 
120 
_ii9 

624 

293 
246 
708 
261 
236 
244 
252 
239 

52 | 
196 

210 

383 
248 



4044 
1454 

3<»8 
251 
8x6 

427 
277 

275 
21 

171 
no 

26s 

87 

174 



344i 



18 

62 

64 
30 
53 



56 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



Ti deu Dii WillersThay^ 

Morehouse 24 15.. 30 8. 

Wells 120 83.. 112 30. 

Total 403 246.. 364 171. 

Majority 137 — .. 193 — . 

HERKIMER COUNTY. 

Columbia 15s 193.. 113 206. 

Danube 146 i6j.. 122 180. 

Fairfield 124 ias.. 107 180. 

Frankfort 317 308.. 258 551. 

German Flats.. 720 724.. ^35 053. 

Herkimer 373 391.. 300 337. 

Litchneld 113 149.. 89 144. 

Little Falls 827 650.. 6^ 564. 

Mauheim 2bj 201.. 211 162. 

Newport 172 233.. 132 237. 

Norway 148 89.. 12b 92. 

Ohio 115 104.. 67 101. 

Russia 154 3 12 -- 139 337- 

Salisbury 153 221.. 178 229. 

Schuyler 125 189.. 76 179. 

Starke 151 224.. 157 200. 

AVarren 191 167.. 162 174. 

Wilmurt 26 20.. 11 25. 

Wintield 99 19 4.. 76 20 2. 

Total 4377 4728.. 3568 4559^ 

Majority — 351.. — 991. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Adams 2y 428.. 176 337. 

Alexaud la 384 293.. 304 240. 

Antwerp i2> 409.. 155 256. 

Brownville 226 340.. 155 303. 

Cape Vincent.. 3^3 209.. 232 183. 

Champion 188 208.. 165 227. 

Clayton 405 209.. 299 204. 

Elllsburgb 404 585.. 269 439. 

Henderson 133 210.. 82 170. 

HouDsfield 222 245.. 137 177. 

Le Roy 258 346.. 207 309. 

Lorra ne 121 129.. 70 96. 

Lyme 198 230.. 202 217. 

Orleans 216 269.. 175 192. 

Pamelia 85 127.. 69 106. 

Philadelphia... 223 151.. 146 119. 

Rodman 65 221.. 58 148. 

Rutland 136 245.. 109 211. 

Theresa 105 .2^8.. 123 188. 

Watertown.... 81 149.. 58 130. 

" City, 1. 192 225.. 114 193. 

" '* 2. 166 277.. 140 258. 

" " 3. 219 210.. 184 179. 

" " 4. 288 246.. 220 204. 

Total, city . . . I565 958.. 6=;8 834T 

Wilna 364 4»5-- 3°7 291. 

Worth 77 53- • fo 44- 

Total 5666 6837.. 4222 S42i. 

Majority — 1171.. — 1199. 

KINGS COUNTY. 

Brooklyn, 1 1151 1324.. 920 1302, 

" 2 1260 267.. 057 348. 

" 3 1 in 1174.. 925 1199. 

4.... 998 875.. 797 973. 

" C 2077 021.. 2043 766, 

" 6. ...2842 II99-. 2213 1212. 

7.... 1894 1834.. I486 1894. 

8....I3SO 652.. 827 68l. 

9 1260 493.. 1421 499, 

" 10 2352 1011.. 1900 1015, 

" 11 1040 1328.. 1415 1431 

12.... 2741 286.. 2275 347. 

13 1210 1534., 1031 1106 

" 14 2682 7°3" 2<y *3 "80 

" jt, i4<3 1278.. 1061 1434 

16 1966 1551.. 1462 1924 

" 17 1939 1102.. 1346 1322 

" 18 1128 811.. 775 710 

19... .1144 1296.. 779 1423 

" 20 1242 2048.. 970 2015 

" 21 1406 1034.. 1300 1032 

" 22 1227 1210.. 888 1141 

23.... 514 809.. 422 752 



OrtelevOrnnt 

. 25 13 

159 99 



204 463 
354 285 



66 306 
124 303 



968 1046 

400 558 

57 » 



Tll.len Db WilleiVThaye 

Brooklyn,24 389 283.. 349 350 

25.... 619 754.. 052 749 



Total, city... 37660 25479.. 30166 26425 



Flatbush 541 

Flatlands.....*. 103 

Gravesend 20s 

New Lota •. . 803 



wi 280 
'170 214 
194 124 



293. 

3:: 

500.. 695 637 
New Utrecht . . 347 244.. 365 2 22 

Total 39809 26811.. 32087 27902 

Majority 12098 —..418=; — 

LEWIS COUNTY. 

252 76 
117 282 



Croghan 328 106. 

. Denmark 149 300. 

Diana 192 171. 

Greig 194. 151. 

Hamsburgh.... 85 129. 

High Market... ic.7 40. 

Lewis 1^7 ^2. 

Leyden 226 216. 

Lowville 255 381. 

Lyonsdale 14s 123. .new town 



263 
85 
118 



121 
192 
100 

35 

206 
230 371 



Martinsburgh.. 19b 

Montague 02 

New Bremen... 280 

Osceola. 64 

Pinckney 170 

Turin 121 

Watson 190 

West Turin. 



i:: 
si.. 
92.. 

53-- 

95- • 

21s.. 

82.. 

224 221., 



170 276 

48 43 

287 74 

41 46 

138 88 

IIQ 22 : 

143 I0O 

177 213 



Total 3219 2764.. 2606 2493 

Majority 45^ — .. in 

LIVINGSTON COUNTY 

Avon ..272 333.. 186 270 

Caledonia 133 185.. 69 140 

Coneaus 102 187.. 44 129 

Geneseo 256 381.. 194 352 



Groveland 153 

Leicester 173 

Lima 295 

Livonia 231 

Mount Morris.. 494 

N. Dansville... 563 

Nunda 272 

Oesian 147 



126. 



412.. 

348., 

109. . 

109 144., 



5769 8481 
— 2712 



Portage. 

Sparta 167 128. 

Springwater.... 139 361. 

We6t Sparta 141 129. 

York 106 315. 



167 166 

197 265 

100 296 

428 370 

373 297 

211 340 

114 95 



,16 



100 233 
107 120 
103 249 



Total 3753 4346.. 2687 3638 

Majority — cm 

~IS0N 



MAD1S( 
Brookfield. 
Ctzenovia 365 



47°.. 

568.. 

De Ruyter 127 279., 



'COUNTY 131 



Eaton 310 

Fenner 114 



Georgetown. 



493 
148 
90 205. 



228 337 

253 417 

93 24° 

266 444 

54 130 

78 183 

199 457 
192 



Hamilton 271 6fi. 

Lebanon 117 218.. 192 

Lenox 1014 mi.. 818 703 

Madison 197 318.. 155 232 

Nelson H2 211. 

Smithfield 82 189. 

Stockbridge . . . 207 240. . 151 



137 190 
45 M9 
165 



Sullivan ■ 596 379.. 4' 3 29 5 

Total 3938 =45,0.. 2985 4200 

Majority — ni2.. — 1215 

MONROE COUNTY. 

Brighton 165 

Chili 1^9 154 

ClarkBon 189 

Gatea 151 

Greece 324 

I Hamlin 82 

Henrietta 197 204. 

Irondequoit.... 129 117. 

Mendon 2*8 247. 

Ogden 2^4 279. 



209. , 
103.. 

270.. 



326 271 

120 143 

182 220 

243 144 

290 223 

74 300 

162 185 

315 163 

237 202 

240 264 



Parma 160 261.. 116 265 



Ore. UyGrant 

new ward 



36403 31729 

449 37» 

119 221 

150 149 

767 622 

280 270 



38108 33369 

4739 — 

321 191 

146 3»i 

1^9 198 

271 310 

94 i?5 

1/4 5i 

161 52 

190 267 

226 426 
new town 

205 325 

75 7i 

254 114 

5i 83 

161 121 

116 272 

I96 IIQ 

233 266 



3033 3402 
— 369 



232 

107 

94 
243 



374 
195 
204 

384 

128 135 

129 222 

303 330 
187 428 
430 413 

483 355 
271 39b 
i?3 127 

99 175 
114 132 

171 383 

110 142 

35* 



335o 4753 
— 1403 

333 5*5 
354 627 
135 313 
306 558 
192 

708 

27 l 
136 

363 
253 
212 



3« 
120 



311 
"3 
953 
J 95 

i 

204 247 
573 44a 



3808 6096 

— 2198 

249 402 

193 19$ 

204 240 

240 270 

369 360 

82 364 

199 253 

320 309 

294 318 

261 322 

153 397 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST5. 



5T 



TUden DLr WillersThayerGroeleyGrant 

Penfield Mi 278.. 129 242.. 144 393 

Perinton 314 437.. 290 421.. 305 506 

Pittsford 197 192.. 207 175.. 221 205 

Riga 144 218.. 115 193.. 168 258 

Rochester, 1.. 281 213.. 282 137.. 276 290 

" 2.. 346 216.. 382 195.. 379 348 

" 3.. 428 541.. 436 47I-- 421 033 

4-- 301 ' 351.. 3io 294.. 331 411 

" §.. 592 347.. 4&o 37L. 430 628 

" 6.. 306 284.. 272 273.. 255 415 

" 7. 309 437.. 280 416.. 255 516 

" 8.. 663 540.. 624 435.. 597 668 

" 9.. 463 436- • 455 4i6.. 438 559 

10.. 297 339.. 250 302.. 253 429 

*' 11.. 525 206.. 545 206.. 489 408 

" 12.. 432 322.. 367 333.. 330 436 

" 13.. 483 238.. 363 304.. 268 531 

" I4-- 330 396.. 303 377-. 285 510 

" 15.. 198 68.. new ward, .new ward 

" 16 . . 35 5 196.. " ... " 

Total City.... 6309 5130.. 5349 4572.. 5 OI 3 6791 

Rush 132 128.. 132 121.. 153 169 

Sweden 335; 446.. 379 491.. 325 620 

Webster 172 283.. 170 299.. 154 387 

Wheatland 232 233.. 202 213.. 214 268 

Total 10094 9701.. 9278 9108.. 9261 13033 

Majority 393 — . . 170 — .. — 3772 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Amsterdam 867 1012.. 799 948.. 842 1004 

Canaioharie 461 401.. 385 391.. 388 464 

Charleston 131 209.. 131 195.. 135 243 

Florida 393 284.. 337 285.. 360 349 

Glen 387 281.. 311 354.. 326 318 

Minden 562 580.. 432 570.. 441 658 

Mohawk 400 317.. 339 335.. 366 341 

Palatine 355 283.. 298 224.. 354 279 

Root 308 192.. 232 171.. 249 228 

St. Johnsvllle.. 273 214.. 223 171.. 281 229 

Total 4139 3773- • 3509 3 6 44-- 3742 4113 

Majority .366 — .. — JJK.. — 37* 

NEW YORK COUNTY. 

Ass. Dist. 1 — 4341 1122.. 3313 1164.. 3904 2038 

" 2 — 3926 691.. 3748 469.. 3831 1017 

" 3 ...3601 592.. 3059 464.. 3286 1034 

" 4 — 5104 989.. 4437 1079.. 5006 1488 

" 5.... 3710 2144.. 3032 1733.. 3574 2986 

6. ...3537 957-. 2629 958.. 3132 1531 

" 7 2279 2329.. 1953 1789.. 2312 3019 

" 8... 4596 2421.. 3305 2531.. 4634 3013 

" 9 3302 3413.. 2729 3087.. 3107 3914 

" 10 3459 1964.. 2561 1*30.. 3304 2384 

" 11 2597 3345. . 2226 2449.. 2517 4118 

" 12.... 3750 1*54.. 3328 1400.. 3057 1872 

" 13 3008 2832.. 2370 2392.. 2817 3204 

" 14.... 3070 1059.. 2424 824.. 29*2 1497 

" 15 4678 2169.. 3801 1622.. 4368 2906 

" 10 5000 1848.. 4310 1481.. 4701 2194 

" 17- .-5334 3427- • 39i8 2758.. 4806 4030 

" 18 4377 2014.. 3861 1703.. 3453 2903 

" 19 2732 1091.. 2608 801.. 2213 1481 

" 20.... 6058 35c6.. 4747 2392.. 5334 3947 

r 21 6156 3629.. 5143 2884.. 4866 4091 

Ward 23 1805 1047.. with Westchester. 

" 24 ■ 987 505-- " 

Total 87436 44908.. 69702 35710.. 77814 34667 

Majority 42528 — ..33992 — ..23147 — 

NIAGARA COUNTY. 

Cambria 175 244.. 92 196.. 126 277 

Hartland 264 322.. 190 275.. 291 419 

Lewiston 227 273.. 170 219.. 239 305 

Lockport 235 291.. 191 251.. 261 325 

City, 1.346 373.. 295 352.. 373 394 

" 2. 281 195.. 226 181.. 269 212 

" 3. 363 475-. 331 374-. 379 494 

" " 4. 224 222.. 174 210.. 209 236 

Total City 1214 1265.. 1026 1123.. 1230 1336 

Newfane 283 278.. 208 225.. 287 360 

Niagara 648 465.. 425 424.. 572 536 

Pendleton 197 133.. 122 120.. 181 154 

Porter 201 210.. 156 202.. 158 262 



Tilden Dix WiltersThayerGreeleyGrant 

Royalton 495 401.. 290 345.. 443 482 

Somerset 78 248.. 56 189 

Wheatfleld 304 196.. 168 135 

Wilson 237 299.. 218 258 



Total 4578 4625.. 3312 3962 

Majority — 47.. — 650 

ONEIDA COUNTY. 

Annsrille 305 210. . 209 179 

Angnsta 219 276.. 173 231 

Ava 107 116.. 83 103 

Boonville 386 599.. 300 540 

Biidgewater ... 130 

Camden 301 

Deerfleld 232 

Florence 343 

Floyd 125 

Fores tport 150 

Kirkland 497 

Lee 308 

Marcy 135 

Marshall 217 

New Hartford.. 328 470. 

Paris 284 407 

Remsen 54 241 

Rome, 1 271 194.. 222 

" 2 264 114.. 223 

" 3 388 158.. 290 

" 4 266 165.. 218 

" 5 262 327.. 236 



210. . 
276.. 
116.. 

599-- 
165.. 

43L. 
222. . 
123.. 
121.. 
135- • 
459- ■ 
243-. 
174- • 
220. 



5 

157 
213 
106 
132 
447 
279 247 

88 no 
189 191 
254 482 
229 36* 

42. 190 



3f3 
i8e 

75 
n: 
121 
465 



182 
H4 
1*1 
175 
3*9 



Total, city... 1451 958.. 1 if 



Sacgerneld 373 271 . 

Stenben 60 186. 

Trenton 171 547.. 

Utica, 1 151 117.. 

400 219., 



372 
48 



94i 



3 409 484.. 

3«9.. 

44-. 

215 104.. 

461 501 . . 

350 208.. 



233 



9 386 330.. 

10 212 202., 



148 470 

109 130 

296 224 

321 460 

194 373 

184 52 

171 101 

329 469 

265 178 

320 268 

193 195 



Total, city . . .3039 2598. . 2388 2456 



Vernon 285 

Verona 424 

Vienna.. 
Western 
Westmoreland. 223 



308. 

593- 
317 289. 
288 194. 



34?. 



Whitestown.... 385 526 



230 336 

312 569 

226 240 

2=4 202 

188 368 

318 484 



no 242 

125 267 

232 278 

2*8 286 



Total 11137 11488.. 8830 10*38 

Majority — 3*1.. — 1708 

ONONDAGA COUXTY. 

Camillns 264 240.. 192 

Cicero 119 408.. 

Clay.. 215 370.. 

DeWitt 292 286.. 

Elbridge 469 346.. 

Fabins 140 257.. 

Geddes 334 533.. 

Lafayette 223 235.. 

Lysander 373 *4o.. 

Manlins 651 700. . 

Marcellns 197 278.. 

Onondaga 501 692. . 

Otisco 147 143.. 

Pompey 331 398.. 

Salina 345 203.. 

Skaneateies.... 355 427.. 

Spafford 96 213.. 



166 
232 
497 



Syracuse, 1 448 

" 2 637 



3 •■ 



292 



389. 
621., 



4 594 842.. 



664 

563 
315 



662.' 
622. 
656. 



150 204 

385 481 

96 97 

250 275 

265 233 

231 
80 

$ 

300 

509 589 

472 474 

511 465 

434 449 

205 409 



136 

467 
168 



Total, city . . .3928 4803. . 3231 3423 
Tnlly 96 189.. 120 163 



106 296 

2*6 275 
246 375 



4396 5402 
— 1006 

303 280 
194 289 
92 

331 
104 
281 



i 

554 
182 270 

331 172 



125 



139 
141 



506 500 

309 311 

11b 202 
229 253 
270 590 
272 

38 

20S 



480 

275 
210 
165 

299 207 

214 



338 



1196 1114 
372 309 

.g 

154 
341 
39i 



572 
152 



547 
236 439 
238 60 
103 174 

404 5S4 



301 341 
203 203 



2802 3029 

266 412 

333 692 

231 374 



242 
254 
351 



307 
407 
547 



10078 13384 
— 33°° 

233 295 
148 4=U 

234 4" 
283 331 



136 372 



360 
223 
392 
560 
223 



580 
286 
676 

3^8 



150 



483 722 

IS 
274 286 

407 477 
130 233 

527 353 



55 

639 
621 
430 



274 
800 
802 
641 
763 
667 



4036 4963 
18* 186 



68 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



Van Bnren 



Total 9379 11610.. 7234 ^77- • 9749 12708 1 Total, city ...1862 1704.. 1267 1663 



Bristol 127 

Canadice 48 

Canandaigua . . 622 
E. Bloomneld.. 251 

1< arming ton 94 

Geneva 725 

Gorham 263 

Hopewell iw 

Manchester 371 

Naples 271 

Phelps 613 

Richmond 121 

Seneca 252 

South Bristol... 106 

Victor 29s 

"W. Bloomneld.. 134 

Total 



Tilden Dbt WillenTTiayeiGreelfyGraiit Til.len Dix WiliersThayerGreeleyGrant 

..303 289.. 275 236 .. 372 377 { Oswego City, 8. 229 133.. 157 172.. 2 40 198 

1926 1999 

103 329 

187 255 

93 129 

303 561 

169 438 

357 3*9 



Majority — 2231.. — M43- 

ONTARIO COUNTY. 



178. 
121.. 
744.. 
215.. 

170.. 
629.. 
236.. 
162.. 
334- • 
324- • 
328.. 

262.. 
135.-. 
237.. 
214.. 



— 2959 ; Palermo 187 

I Parrish 168 

Redfleld 103 



84 162 . . 104 235 Kichlaad - ; ; ; ; ; ; 28 g 



432. 



104 
105 

79 
203 



686 
J 72 
74 
664 
227 

202 
159 
547 

72 
179 

74 
193 

91 



&Z" £\ in, I Sandy Creek '.'. 164 392. 121 



686.. 637 
208.. 209 



H82 

274 
166.. 77 247 
526.. new town 
237.. 242 308 

321 



154.. 

373- • 
232.. 
403.. 
166.. 

!•• 

206.. 
182.. 



191 

431 

189 340 

608 506 

109 271 

8n 1041 

89 161 

269 301 

137 238 



Majority. 



4449 4536.. 3744 4'52.. 4°47 5578 



87.. 408. 

ORANGE COUNTY. 



1531 



BloomingGrove 206 243. . 168 

Chester 189 206.. 183 

Cornwall 263 277.. 140 

Crawford 219 142.. 195 

Deerpark 1237 738.. 1 143 

Goshen 461 383.. 430 

Greenville 164 32.. 121 

Hamptonburg.. 141 92.. 127 

Highlands 190 194.. 129 

Minisink 223 69.. 175 

Monroe 340 49 1 -- 233 

Montgomery .. 375 49°- • 33° 

Mount Hope... 173 173- *35 

Newburgh 261 325. . 205 

" City, 1.. 506 345.. 371 

" " 2.. 501 507.. 420 

" 3-. 175 359-. 1% 

" " 4.. 267 :&3.. 199 



224. 
182. 
233- 
144. 

360. 
36. 
70 



207 
220 

391 

198 

1113 

445 

155 

147. 

172. .new town 

67.. 180 97 

303 574 

416 519 

174 191 

239 379 

436 464 



400. 
417. 
161. 
310. 
313- 
455- 
33i" 
247. 



190. 

165. 

77- 

326. 
291. 
227. 
607. 



Schroeppel — 384 344.. 311 

Scriba 213 302.. 89 

Volney 632 734.. 567 

"West Monroe . . 144 119.. 83 
Williamstown . 173 7 5- • *7Q 

Total 6439 7380.. 4678 6446.. 6443 9558 



£: 



i 51 
634 

117 

195 



398 

847 

127 

133 



189 
249 



40=; 
329 



Total, city... 1449 1494.. 1153 1346.. 131 5 1803 

New Windsor. . 233 200.. 200 134.. 251 235 

Wallklll 1012 1096.. 7^3 1209.. 1139 1112 

Warwick 544 488.. 5 J 3 494-. 627 592 

"Wawayanda... 196 186.. 170 186.. 192 201 

Total 7878 7319. . 634 j 6740.. 7712 8468 

756 



Majority 559 — .. — 199.. 

ORLEANS COUNTY. 



BarTC 664 827.. 441 601.. 615 

Carlton 191 318.. joi 230.. 184 

Clarendon 172 218.. 153 207.. 182 

Gaines 186 226.. 110 166.. 176 

Kendall 156 224.. 84 141.. 134 

Murray 307 232.. 213 206.. 294 

Ridgeway 488 481.. 310 416.. 457 

Shelby 309 310.. 139 278.. 238 

Yates _94 2 91. 42 213.. 91 

Total 2^67 3147-. 1593 2500.. 2391 3857 

Majority — 580.. — 907.. — 1466 



933 
393 
235 
303 
259 
293 
640 
466 
333 



Majority — 1141.. — 1768. 

OTSEGO COUNTY. 

Burlington 1^3 151.. 146 153.. 

Butternuts iv> 201.. 145 235.. 

Cnerry \ alley. 303 196.. 247 153.. 

Decatur 104 92.. 88 100.. 

Edmeston 209 190.. 141 131.. 

Exeter 148 169.. 76 129.. 

Hartwick 290 225.. 235 192.. 

Laurens 241 255.. 214 244.. 

Maryland 289 247.. 252 184.. 

Middlefleld 402 219.. 317 167.. 

Milford 351 204.. 271 166.. 

Morris 233 274.. 211 257.. 

New Lisbon 209 152.. 163 132.. 

Oneonta 431 474.. 35° 422.. 

Otego 228 223.. 215 178.. 

Otsego 334 4S7- • 382 409- • 

Pittsrield 1^7 134.. 103 101.. 

Plainfield 83 194.. 62 143.. 

Richfie d 218 250.. 175 242.. 

Roseboom 178 179.. 132 118.. 177 

Springfield 324 134.. 256 139.. 299 

Uoadilla 362 226.. 297 150.. 414 

Westford 166 m.. 153 in.. 190 

Worcester 318 293 .. 320 2 49.. 335 

Total 6083 5330.. 40m 4345 

Majority 753 — . . 406 — 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 



— 3"5 



191 
190 
276 
104 
214 
124 

311 
2^1 
348 
375 
3«) 
228 
232 

345 

27c 

565 
170 
88 
228 






230 
332 



248 
235 
279 
25 * 
255 
244 
201 
327 

478 

243 

*'$ 
182 

222 

319 
210 
172 
232 
J 39 
293 



6275 6235 
40 — 



Carmel 300 282.. 278 

Kent 162 152.. 105 

Patterson 137 174.. 84 

Phillipstown .. 621 456.. 386 

Putnam Valley 233 102.. 165 

South East 233 312.. 151 



261. , 
216.. 
198.. 

332. 



262 
128 
115 
487 
137 



3" 
184 
192 
512 
164 
343 



Total 1706 1478.. 1169 1683 

Majority 228 — .. — 314 

QUEENS COUNTY^ 

Flushing 1293 1072.. 748 834 

Hempstead.... 847 1123. 

Jamaica 716 396. 

Long lsl. CJty.iJ83 417. 

Newtown 660 ^ij. 



N. Hempstead. 369 643 
Oyster Bay 881 791 . 



430., 
462.. 
538. 



OSWEGO COUNTY. 



Albion 167 232., 

Amboy 101 126., 

Boylston 44 95., 

Constantia 346 327 . , 

Granbv 422 368., 

Hannibal 186 288.. 

Hastings 307 324., 

Mexico 221 487., 

New Haven 56 243 . , 

Orwell 71 133. 

Oswego 180 297. 

" City, 1. 311 235. 

" " 2. 203 90. 

" " 3- 395 356. 

" "4. 264 255. 

" 5. 294 189. 

'• 5. 171 275. 

" 7- 85 145. 



113 
82 
26 
312 
318 
123 

m 

27 
57 

124 



205 
180 
234 
103 

/9 



164.. 
121.. 
85.. 
259.. 
235.. 
291. . 
291.. 
43L. 
151.. 
140.. 
263.. 

IS:: 

341.. 

250.. 
188.. 
256.. 
123.. 



.3 
42 

306 
236 
209 
255 
54 
^7 
218 

228 

319 
292 

273 

2 8 



9^8 1040. 

712 

1071 

sat 

639 

Total 62^7 4961.. 4900 4561. 

Majority iag.-jxajL .~~ -SM_ 



1337 1706 

— 369 

1165 1199 

723 1490 



765 
1413 

t,6i 



562.'.' 682 



RENSSELAER COUNTY. 



571 

691 
95? 

3635 6077 
— 422 1 



Berlin 208 

352 Brunswick ....311 
178 E. Greenbush... 215 

156 Grafton 113 

411 Greenbush.. .. 723 

437 Hoosick 710 

495 Lansingburgh.. 622 

401 Nassau 300 

605 N. Grt-enbush.. 367 
330 Petereburgh ... 228 

213 Pittstown 253 

355 Pcesten kill 225 

300 Sand Lake 306 

160 [ Schaghticoke.. 338 

388 Schodack ■ 532 

319 I Stephentown .. 230 

22; Troy, 1 430 

293 " 2 344 

116 ' " 3 145 



3i3 
329- 
187. 
233. 



392.. 
399- • 
183.. 
«Uo. . 



200 

276 
165 
171 
575 

219 

279 
190 
214 
167.. 230 
272.. 247 



281 

347 
127 
209 



170 
21 x 

x 3 



347 
390 
194 
329 
504.. 615 393 

698 •• 560 742 
420 1016 
203 451 
272 
113 

2iO 
179 



8l2. 
386. 
258. 



333- • 
420., 
272., 
336.. 
368., 
284.. 



292 

443 
210 
383 
305 
115 



558.. 
I79-. 

446.. 
353- • 
228.. 

39J. • 
595.. 
290.. 



439 
173 

377 
291 
122 



416 
294 

575 
207 

375 

440 

434 
295 
403 
675 
333 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



59 



Troy, 4 286 523. 

" 5 2 44 440. 

" o 406 253. 



Tilden Dii WillersThayerGreeleyGrant 



7 
477 



310. 

134- • 408 

162.. 417 

527 336. . 399 

450 106. . 409 

56.. 352 



2^6 586.. 256 6Ue 

218 475.. 179 547 

364 219.. 343 308 

573 366.. 550 45c 

234.. 440 232 

181.. 460 224 
32; 



187 282.. 149 302.. 133 



480 448 

128.. 408 163 

99 

327 



56.. 358 



" 13... 

Total, city . .. 5019 3 79 Q-- 434 8 4M9-- 4397 4<%2 

Total 10702 9881.. 91^7 10054.. 8671 11936 

- 3265 



TildenDix Willers ThayerGreeleyGrant 

Stillwater 343 30s.. 328 309.. 329 336 

Waterford 470 479.. 382 439.. 430 499 

Wilton 75 159- • 83 177.. 88 1 93 

Total.. 4953 6264.. 4336 6087.. 4734 69^5 

.Majority — 1311.. — 1751.. — 2221 

SCHENECTADY COUNTY. 



Majority 821 "—.."— 897. 

RICHMOND COUNTY. 



Castleton 899 790., 

Middletown ... 813 353., 

Northneld 513 359., 

Southfield 431 260.. 

Westfield 365 388.. 



719 689. 
691 415. 
412 



Total 3021 2150.. 2471 2133 

Majority 871 — . . 338 

- com 



ROCKLAND 

Clarkstown .... 543 264., 

Haverstraw 601 318 , 

Orangetown... 709 689.. 

Ramapo 527 393., 

Stony Point ... 252 153., 



790 812 

587 573 

333-- 453 521 

316 286.. 348 289 

333 410- • 303 533 

254c 2728 

- 187 



NTY. 

518 253. 

in 1%: 

478 412. 



518 512 

749 751 
469 482 



272 122.. 208 i83 



Total 2632 1817.. 24 ^9 1792.. 2432 2221 

Majority 815 — .. 667 — .. 211 



ST. LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



Brasher 175 163.. 

Canton 388 681.. 

Clifton 4 12.. 

Colton 65 201.. 

De Kalb 67 362.. 

DePeyster 32 167.. 

Edwards 05 133.. 

Fins 33 96.. 

Fowler 87 207.. 

Grouverneur . . . 180 471.. 

Hammond 65 175.. 

Hermon 120 205.. 

Hop&iuton «3 290.. 

Lawrence 89 302.. 

Lisbon 134 597.. 

Louisville 149 178.. 

Macomb 88 115.. 

Madrid 95 260. 

Massena u5 246. 



Morristown 



80 307. 
231.. 



Norfolk 131 

Oswegatchie ... 678 1027., 

Pari6hville . 43 305.. 

Pierpont 89 109.. 

Pitcairn 20 310.. 

Potsdam 296 901.. 

Rossie 99 141 . . 

Russell 149 17s.. 

Stockholm. ... 119 456.. 

Waddington .. 151 283.. 



109 

211 

2 

42 
35 
25 
44 
12 

9i 
134 

i\ 

38 
38 
27 
75 
63 
46 
74 
41 
100 



154. 
467. 

i5§. 
211. 

90. 

HI. 

75- 
118. 

284. 

91. 

133 
199 
202. 
33i. 

106. 



265 274 

422 766 

— , 14 

49 251 

60 499 

iqo 

175 

134 

110 232 



33 

77 



178 
92 



530 
249 



345 659 
34 181 



40 
21 

184 
60 

103 
62 
54 



90 238 

50 321 

103 375 

159 752 

180 214 

66 238 

117 314 

134 291 

100 322 

174 291 

784 1213 

82 383 

90 388 

15 126 

578.. 403 1114 

54.. in 200 

128.. 123 330 

255. . 138 585 

161.. 168 320 



Duanesburg . . . 279 359. 

Glenviile 411 291., 

Niskayuna 82 123. 

Princeton 82 127., 

Rotterdam 269 292., 

Sohenectady, 1. 190 102., 

" 2. 187 182. 

3. 364 192. 

4. 415 323. 

5. 369 272. 



236 320. 
375 383. 



nt 



117.. 
297.. 
115.. 181 

279 2^4.. 308 
324 375-. 319 



221 
165 

I70 212., 



282 412 

3*3 383 

136 
229 332 



u 



131 

212 
271 
430 



253 360- • 285 364 



Total, city ...1525 1071.. 1191 1316.. 1276 1408 



Total 2648 2263.. 2195 2549.. 2242 2809 

Majority 385 — . . — 354.. — 567 

SCHOHARIE COUNTY. 

Blenheim 147 97.. 146 100.. 126 132 

Broome: 189 193.. 132 175.. 186 238 

Carlisle ! 244 162.. 201 143 

Cobleskill c.33 223.. 414 195 

Conesville 171 80.. 148 65.. 15 

Esparance 126 185.. 80 139. 

Fulton 436 135.. 360 113. 

Gilboa 255 213.. 171 183. 

Jeiferson 153 183.. 119 149. 

Middleburgh . . 509 104.. 377 101. 

Richmondville. 292 182.. 265 154. 

Schojarie 459 262.. 407 221. 

Seward 256 98.. 191 92.. 250 148 

Sharon 321 256.. 308 174.. 313 255 

Summit 236 112.. 187 94.. 234 138 

Wright 217 137.. 204 113.. 217 149 



229 1 77 

455 276 

154 115 

146 213 

359 180 

221 239 

15? 234 

429 265 

286 226 
440 
250 
313 
234 



Total 4544 2712.. 3713 2271.. 4196 3283 

, Majority 1832 — . . 1442 — . . 913 — 

SCHttrLER COUNTY. 

Catharine 115 182.. 97 183.. 106 

Cayuta 125 42. . 87 

Dix 608 423.. 462 

Hector 545 663. 

Montour 190 230. 

Orange 224 177.. 200 

153. • 185 

240.. 174 



43- 
392. 
357 582. 
166 228. 



256 
in 36 
527 481 
475 730 



Reading 204 

Tyrone 249 



162 262 

184.^ 224 227 

170 227 

214 259 



184 
222 



162. . 
205., 
149.. 



155- 

58. 



Total 3866 9106.. 2215 5726.. 4395 11335 



Majority — 5240. . — 3^11 . 

SARATOGA COUNTY. 



178.. 179 131.. 211 

174.. 147 143.. 199 

361.. 173 35! 

89 29 



122 
108 
184 



102. 

174. 
241. 



Ballston 207 

Charlton 189 

Clifton Park ... 227 

Corinth 72 270. 

Day 132 110. 

Edinburgh 127 186. 

Gal way J92 239. 

Greenfield 185 362.. 206 423. 

Hadley 43 . no.. 44 135.. 

Halfmoon 305 357.. 280 344.. 

Malta no 174.. u8 153.. 

Milton 480 638.. 333 693. 

Moreau 188 231.. 133 192.. 

Northumberl'd. 145 172.. 156 190.. 

Providence.... 103 147.. 87 129.. 

Saratoga 414 512.. 360 490.. 

" Springs 940 1100.. 824 959.. 



6940 

209 

165 

238 363 

49 267 

I07 122 

121 224 

222 248 

228 420 

39 169 

348 395 



356 
I6S 



133 224 

104 161 

368 568 

881 1205 



Total 2260 2110.. 1728 2018.. 1996 247 

Majority 150 — .. — 290., 

SENECA COUNTY. 

Covert 260 188.. 236 166., 

Fayette 470 321 . . 404 193. , 

Junius 124 144.. 103 119.. 

Lodi 203 240.. 174 182.. 

Ovid 225 200.. 242 211.. 

Romulus 218 164.. 185 139.. 

Seneca Falls •■ 828 601.. 877 412.. 

Tyre 145 132.. 144 132.. 

Varick 223 182.. 193 129.. 

Waterloo 506 337.. 457 273.. 



— 482 

240 194 

385 316 

130 158 

177 278 

213 304 

201 175 

765 777 

140 128 

104 192 

455 381 



177- 



379 
201 

710 75: 



Total 3202 2569.. 3015 1956.. 2870 2903 

Majority 633 — .. ioso — . 

STEUBEN COUNTY. 

Addison 314 216. . 

Avoca 225 218. . 

Bath 752 617.. 

Bradford 124 76.. 

Cameron 155 162.. 

Campbell 178 199.. 

Canisteo 279 320. . 

Caton 100 186.. 

Cohocton 299 302.. 

Corning 890 558. . 

Dansville 231 104.. 

Erwin 204 215.. 

Fremont 133 122.. 

Greenwood .... 133 69.. 

Hartsville 60 92.. 

Hornby 135 137. . 

Hornellsville ... 967 763. . 



113 
140 
142 
231 

77 

291 
861 

T 2 5 
189 

109 

123 

62 

141 



74- ■ 
155.. 
216.. 

285., 

38:: 
537.. 
91.. 
212.. 



— 33 

256 2S4 

735 828 

133 103 

144 171 

149 273 

218 374 

81 253 

292 319 

763 674 

255 139 

174 248 

112 143 



% 

135 



815 585. . 790 



138 
124 
173 

810 



60 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



Tilden Dix WillensThayerG 

noward 248 332.. 165 204.. 

Jasper 69 249.. 62 199.. 

Lindley 153 125.. 125 113.. 

Prattsburgh . . . 301 234.. 339 246.. 

Pultney 145 172.. 160 172.. 

Hathbone 122 136.. 117 13s.. 

Thurston 122 131.. 107 148.. 

Troupsburg 176 215.. 175 183.. 

Tuscarora 103 127.. 73 133.. 

Urbana 220 227.. 239 225.. 

Wayland 278 197.. 271 174.. 

Wayne 99 10=;.. 82 115.. 

West Union.... 121 6f.. 92 46.. 

Wheeler 188 in. . 171 133.. 

"Woodhull 158 294.. 129 2^4.. 

Total 7688 7072.. 7076 065s.. 

Majority 616 — .. 421 — .. 

SUFFOLK COUNTr. 

Babylon 356 261.. 225 334. 

Brookhaven ... 682 604.. 632 617. 

Easthampton . . 179 263.. 112 187.. 

Huntington — 539 S54-. 422 397. 

Islip 282 330. . 231 33s. 

Kiverhead 270 284.. 248 348. 

Shelter Island.. 31 43.. 20 40. 

Smithtown 122 91.. 99 120. 

Southampton .. 389 68s.. 312 668. 

Southold 679 486.. 580 482. 

Total 3529 3601.. 2881 3528. 

Majority — 72.. — 647. 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Bethel 251 212.. 204 206.. 

Callicoon 392 80.. 320 74.. 

Cochecton . . . . 152 69.. 137 no., 

Delaware 318 57.. 287 52.. 

Fallsburgh 257 253.. 98 122. 

Forestburgh .. 130 47.. 47 29. 

Fremont 306 92.. 256 123. 

Highland 77 53.. 55 44- 

Liberty 313 202.. 371 296. 

Lumberland... 160 41.. 83 39., 

Mamakating.. 340 349.. 278 396. 

Neversink 204 203.. 217 174. 

Rockland 197 165.. 184 163. 

Thompson.... 392 370.. 356 347. 

Tusten 132 39.. 103 41. 

Total 3681 2294.. 2996 2216. 

Majority 1387 — .. 780 — . 

TIOGA COUNTY. 

Barton 496 565.. 398 474. 

Berkshire 101 180.. 91 139. 

Candor 471 378.. 394 382. 

Newark Valley 157 320.. 128 303. 

Nichols 139 242.. 96 206. 

Owego 1117 1158.. 825 1080. 

Richford 118 153.. 78 138. 

Spencer 229 226.. 222 187. 

Tioga 409 278.. 312 218. 

Total 3237 3502.. 2544 3127. 

Majority — 265.. — 583. 

TOMPKINS COUNTY. 

Caroline 253 213.. 2n 194. 

Danby 137 282.. 131 215. 

Dryden 438 461.. 324 427. 

Enfield 184 196.. 156 177. 

Groton 273 401. . 214 357. 

Ithaca 1100 1019.. 1057 10S7. 

Lansing 333 276.. 20=; 216. 

NewfleTd 326 230.. 268 189. 

Ulysses 390 292. . 203 286. 

Total 3340 3370.. 2809 311&. 

Majority — 30.. — 309. 

» ULSTER COUNTY: 

Denning 112 75.. 96 80. 

Esopus 379 478.. 252 444. 

Gardiner 214 131.. 198 140. 

Harden bergh . . 6b 48.. 68 63. 

Hurley 246 220. . 236 326. 

Kingston 470 209.. 522 283. 

City. .1687 1211.. 1372 1374. 




6936 8S51 
— 1615 



. i8r 


448 


. 606 


908 


. no 


247 


• 591 


609 


• 345 


4»7 


. 294 


371 


■ l l 


79 


. 136 


217 


. 400 


760 


. 480 


6SI 


. 3160 


48S7 


— 


1677 


. 223 


239 


. 3SO 


122 


: M 


116 
8S 


. 202 
. 107 


3 & 


. 231 


1 


. 94 
. 313 


• x 39 


*2 


. 280 


Sib 


. 212 


264 
246 


• I3 ,* 


. 281 
. 107 


4 £ 


. 3°°i 


3260 


— 


199 



517 659 

99 184 

524 5i S 

192 381 

129 281 

1019 1257 

103 212 

226 267 

402 325 



. 321 1 4081 

. — 870 

. 234 301 

. 148 329 

. 427 676 

! 286 481 

. 1 165 1 183 

. 274 385 

. 320 305 

. 341 423 



. 3369 4318 

■ — 949 

. 88 103 

. 286 510 

• 213 144 

• 50 70 
. 207 357 
. 399 430 
. 1810 1535 



Tilden Dix WiKers ThayerGreeleyGrant 

Lloyd 244 194.. 228 294.. 201 333 

Marbleton 333 337.. 321 435.. 284 558 

Marlborough.. 264 230.. 213 254.. 282 322 

New Paltz 286 188.. 240 223.. 266 223 

Olive .357 189.. 349 238.. 290 325 

Plattekill 146 182.. 118 223.. 138 260 

Rochester 402 207.. 376 237.. 373 360 

Rosendale 491 221.. 394 333.. 379 384 

Saugerties 982 740.. 715 873.. 994 1168 

Shandaken 302 150.. 268 182.. 278 268 

Shawangunk.. 342 163.. 283 132.. 309 229 

Wawarsing 796 569.. 534 583.. 758 822 

Woodstock . . . . 184 142. . 186 249.. 140 26 5 

Total .8303 "5887.. 6969 6968.. 7760 8672 

Majority 2419 — .. 1 — .. — 912 

WARREN COUNTY. 

Bolton 112 146.. 80 132.. 92 176 

Caldwell iss 102.. 141 100.. 136 100 

Chester 236 254.. 188 241.. 156 276 

Hague 91 47.. 67 44.. 79 65 

Horicon 106 169.. 78 148.. 8s 211 

Johnsburgh ... 254 227.. 209 182.. 200 309 

Luzerne 76 214.. so 197.. 36 239 

Queensbury ... 826 800.. 646 694.. 668 1044 

Stony Creek .. . 146 116.. 95 120.. 61 17s 

Thurman 148 114.. 125 113.. 76 142 

Warrensburgh . 250 145.. 190 159.. 208 104 

Total 2400 2334.. 1869 2130.. 1803 2901 

Majority 66 — .. — 261.. — 1098 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Argyle.. 154 394- • 144 358.. no 473 

Cambridge 188 305.. 166 340.. 198 359 

Dresden 72 77.. sa 74.. 37 90 

Easton 163 3S2.. 118 348.. 156 468 

Fort Ann ... 373 354.. 362 334.. 294 396 

Fort Edward.. 521 519.. 528 454.. 494 533 

Granville 342 399.. 259 415.. 329 S34 

Greenwich 308 541.. 196 469.. 284 639 

Hampton 68 167.. 54 77.. 71 100 

Hartford 127 272.. 99 249.. 125 329 

Hebron 154 272.. 93 268.. 99 346 

Jackson 93 172.. 86 169.. 101 218 

Kingsbury — 443 427.. 360 401.. 3si 567 

Putnam 16 116.. 13 101.. 12 12a 

S^SP i.-"3S 3 ° 5 " 3I7 38x -- 337 489 

vvnitecreek . . . 268 314.. 232 375.. 233 388 

Whitehall 725 424.. 633 340.. 525 480 

Total 4346 5410.. 3714 S153.. 3765 6 535 

Majority — 1064.. — 1439.. — 2770 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

Arcadia 532 497.. 456 307.. 445 593 

Butler 160 295.. 109 308.. 145 309 

Galen 509 584.. 430 527.. 444 642 

Huron 151 178.. 125 165.. 159 255 

Lyons 506 sio. . 476 ^6o.. 490 538 

Macedon 143 262.. 184 242.. 181 313 

Marion 76 286.. 47 182.. 62 365 

Ontario 164 306.. 126 307.. 125 393 

Palmyra 388 474-. 333 391. • 381 5 2 7 

Rose 191 277.. 180 216.. 169 318 

Savannah 161 236.. 147 228.. 150 276 

Sodns 448 468.. 403 413.. 4S3 589 

Walworth 82 222.. 85 202.. iog 340 

Williamson.... 144 220.. no 235.. 130 344 

Wolcott 3 62 288 .. 261 260.. 331 362 

Total • 4oi 7 5103.. 3492 4743.. 3768 ~~6rfl 

Majority — 1086.. — 12m.. — 2396 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY. 

Bedford. 271 351.. 245 479- 319 44 1 

Cortlandt 1246 962.. 742 974.. 1064 1088 

Eastchester — 799 480.. 537 50s.. 658 «;82 

Greenburg 993 670.. 733 661.. 952 8^o 

Harrison n6 81.. 101 99.. 89 118 

Kingsbridge ...wlthN.Y.. 208 io6..newtown 

Lewisboro 116 203.. 87 225.. 126 213 

Mamaroneck... 167 107.. 89 113.. 114 127 

Morrisania wlthN.Y.. 1857 923.. 168s 1082 

Mt. Pleasant... 576 361.. 467 394.. 568 404 

Newcastle 194 177.. 152 194.. 212 190 

New Rochelle.. 400 304.. 3^5 260.. 417 313 

Northcastle 154 166.. 134 229.. 153 234 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



61 



North Salem .. 88 166. 

Ossining 761 665.. 

Pelham 136 59. . 

Poundridge 123 79.. 

Eye •• 54» 497-- 

Scai'sdaio 24 32.. 

Somers 144' 126.. 

Westchester . . . 452 240. . 

West Farms withN.Y.. 

White Plains . . 367 177. . 

Yonkers 1211 988.. 

Yorkto wn 257 245 . . 



Tilden Dix Willei-sThay.erGree!eyGrant 



.54 
617 

95 
120 

493 
29 
120 
266 
723 
372 
916 
176 



228.. 
625.. 
65.. 
108.. 
442.. 

35- • 

156.. 
255.. 

45L. 
211.. 

1000. . 
237.. 



103 
724 
104 
130 
607 
24 
154 
370 
658 
320 
1342 
219 



219 
626 
86 
128 
5" 



618 

198 

1463 

245 



Total 9166 

Majority 2021 



7145. 



Arcade 218 

Attica 292 

Bennington ... 281 

Castile 109 

Covington 36 

Eagle 72 

Gainesville 123 

Genesee Falls.. 87 

Java 206 

Middlebnry.... 78 

Orangeville 70 

Perry 125 

Pike 73 

Sheldon 203 

Warsaw 299 

Wethersneld. . . 144 

Total 24I6 

Majority 



)MING COUNTY 



1. .11112 10233 

-.. 879 - 



188.. 

327-- 
123. . 
28I.. 
170.. 
156.. 
233-. 
113.. 
143- • 
248.. 
130.. 
34°- • 
313- • 
128.. 

%v. 



120 

241 
129 

91 
40 

55 
9i 

xil 

51 
51 

% 
120 
189 

88 



103.. 
298.. 
91.. 
217.. 
108.. 
no.. 

173- • 
100.. 
102.. 
225.. 
133.. 
37°- • 
214.. 
118.. 
43i.. 



274 

289 
121 
36 



3433.. 1613 2882. 
. — 1017. . — 1269. 
Y'ATES COUNTY. 



79 
231 

68 

73 
154 

58 
204 
223 
_J5°_ 
2301 



183 
302 
190 

353 
190 
182 
248 
132 

155 
299 

152 
375 
361 
185 

479 
124 



3910 

1609 



Barrington 136 139.. 160 

Benton 174 327.. 194 

Italy 62 141 . . 103 

Jerusalem 237 267.. 259 

Middlesex 64 153.. 82 

Milo 554 561.. 597 

Potter 145 272.. 188 

Starkey 210 332.. 195 

Torrey 139 142.. 157 



141.. 
319-. 
106.. 
276.. 
154.. 



488.. 
244.. 
256.. 
in. . 



145 


192 


210 


3bi 


«3 


207 


202 


341 


60 


220 


628 


S8 J 


134 


318 


192 


300 


154 


140 



Total 1721 2334.. 1935 2095.. 1808 2660 

Majority — 613.. — 160.. — 852 

VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN. 
1874. 187S. 1870. 

Districts. De?n. Rep. Lib. Adm, Dem. Rep. 

X. MetcalfeFrench CovertScudderTowns Norvell 

Queens 5904 51 16.. 5922 6094.. 6175 4896 

Richmond . .3083 2032.. 2543 2756.. 2590 2132 
Suffolk 3197 3854-. 3332 5027-. 3861 4438 



Total 12184 11002..11797 13877.. 12632 11466 

Henry B. Metcalfe's maj. 1,182 ; Henry J. Seud- 
der's maj. in 1872, 2,080 ; Dwight Townsend's maj. 
in 1870, 1,166. William J. Spence, Temp., received 
281 votes. 

1874. 1873. 

Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. 

EX Kings Co. ScbuinakerWoodSchumakerPerry 



Brooklyn, Ward 1, pt. 



595 
1245 
1084 
2057 
2673 

1354 
2307 
2570 
1238 



351.. 572 564 

230 . . 1 1 19 330 

1098.. new ward. 

578.. 1985 861 

1238.. 2449 1504 

624.. 885 

1002.. 2855 

427.. 2437 

1 104.. 1043 



773 
2673 

398 
1275 



Total 15123 6652. .13345 8378 

John G. Schumaker's maj. 8,471 ; in 1872, 4*967- 
In 1872, Wm. E. Robinson, Ind., received 1,031 
votes. „. 

III. Kings Co. ChittendenOstranderGoodv. Wo df. 



Brooklyn, Ward 1, pt. 
" " 3 



1036 406. . new ward. 



13- 



1241 
2562 

1931 
I419 



632. 
1 140. 

985. 
1249. 



665 
1062 
2007 
1595 
1394 



1227 
1200 
2119 
1803 
1972 



CMttendenOstranderGoodr.Wondf' 



104" 1654 
ijMc 231 r 
2386 2891 
new ward, 
new ward. 



Brooklyn, Ward 19 1418 973.. 

" 20 1879 1387.. 

" 21 1678 953.. 

" 23 783 518.. 

25 592 75 3- ■ 

Total 14539 8996. .115- 15177 

Simeon B. Chittenden's maj. 5,543 ; Stewart L. 
Woodford's maj. in 1872, 3,671. Mr. Chittenden, 
who ran as an Independent Republican, was 
also elected by about the same majority to rep- 
resent the district for the unexpired term of Mr. 
Woodford. 

IV. Kings Co. Bliss Bennett ColahanCrooke 

Brooklyn, Ward 9 1253 489.. 1343 1207 



2488 
1392 
1703 
2071 
984 
372 

Flatbush 525 

Flatlands 177 

Gravesend 205 

iNewLots 919 

New Utrecht 350 



17. 

18. 

24. 



841.. 
1303.. 
1789.. 

960.. 

951.. 

283.. 

280.. 

164.. 

102.. 

461.. 

239.. 



1343 
2198 

131 5 
1783 
1491 
912 



962 
1730 
2292 
1668 

896 



new ward. 



176 
66 
92 

554 



685 
277 
204 

802 



7862.. IO202 II0T2 

4,577 5 Philip S. 



Total 12439 

Archibald M. Bliss's maj 
Crooke's maj. in 1872, 810. 

By chap. 798, Laws of 1873, the city of New 
York is divided into seven districts for the elec- 
tion of Members of Congress, as follows : 

V. Wards 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, B and 14, Bedloe's, Ellis 
and Governor's islands. 

VI. Wards 7, n and 13. 

VII. Wards 10 and 17. 

VIII. Wards 9, 15 and 16, and that part of the 
18th lying within 14th St., 26th St., and 4th and 
6th aves. 

IX. That part of the 20th ward lying within 
26th St., 40th st., 7th ave. and Hudson river, and 
those parts of the 12th and 22d lying within 40th 
St., Spuyten Duyvil creek, 8th ave. and Hudson 
river. 

X. The 18th ward, east of 4th ave.,Blackwell's 
island.and the 19th and 21st wards, east of 3d av. 

XI. That part of the 20th ward lying within 
26th st., 40th St., 6th and 7th aves., the 12th and 
22d wards, east of 8th ave., the 19th and 21st 
wards, west of 3d ave, Ward's and Randall's 
islands. 



V. N. Y. 

Ass.Dist. 



1874. 
Dem. Did. 
Meade Hogai 
.2496 2817 
.2472 208c 
.2141 1861 



5,pt209o 225! 



Total 9190 .9024 

Edwin R.Meade's maj. 

J 75- 

Dem. Rep. 

VI. N. Y. CoxCampbell 

Ass.Dist. 4... 5116 773 

" 6... 3=163 765 

" 8,pti37i 489 

" 12. . .3712 1401 

Total 13762 3428 

Samuels, fox's maj. 
10.334 • 

"VII. N. Y. Ely Spencer 

Ass.Dist. 8pt.236*7 2508 

" 10... 273 5 2475 

14. . .2587 143 



isrs. 



V. New York City, 
Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
14. Wm. R. Roberts, 
Lib., 20,281 ; Matthew 
Stewart, Adm., 5,356 ; 
Roberts's maj. 14,925. 



Total 7689 6418 

Smith Ely, jr.'s maj. 
1,271. 

VIII. N.Y. WardLawson 

Ass.Dist. 5,pt 704 386 

" 7...2211 2469 

" 9- -3384 2980 



VI. New York City, 
Wards 11 and 13, and 
those parts of the 18th 
and 21st lying east of 
3d ave. James Brooks, 
Lib., 16,645 ; Adolph G. 
Dunn, Admin., c,,oo> ; 
BrOoks'smaj. 11,640. 

VII. New York City, 
Wards 9, 15 and 16, and 
18th, west of 3d aye. 
Thos. J. Creamer, Lib., 
10,012 ; Conrad Geib, 
Adm., 8,279; Creamer's 
maj- ii733- 

VIII. NewYorkCitv, 
Wards 9, 15, 16 and 21st, 
west of 3d ave. John 
D.Lawson.Adm., 13,305 ; 



62 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T5. 



WardLawson j Charles P. Shaw, Lib., 
Aflst.Dis. u,pt 606 862,9,39^; Lawaon's niaj. 
" 13... 3208 253313,916. 



Total 10113 0233 

Elijah Ward's maj. 881. 
Dem. Ind. 

IX. N. Y. Wood Hardy 



ItV, 

Wards 20 and 22. David 
B. Mellish, Adm., 7,841 ; 



>t 8a7 'jMichael Connolly, Lib., 

Ass.Uibt. n,pt 847 722 , jQhn Ha , A _ 

« ;?3o5g S3» Wall, 7,068; MelTtsh 

i9,pfr>72 nulqver Hardy, 773; over 



Total 8763 6428 

Fernando Wood over 
John Hardy, 2,335. 

Robert S. Newton re- 
ceived 2,131 votes. 

X. N. Y. HewittO'Brien 
Ass.Dlst. 16... 3603 

" i8,pti963 

2o,pt2777 

" 2i,p tu6o 

Total 9503 

Abram S.Hewitt's maj 

1,420. 

XI. N.Y. WMUBuley 
A88.Dist.u,pt 948 1344 

15.Pt 413 

I7,pti35i 

' i8,pt 879 

" i9,p>; 241 

" 2O,pt2020 

*' 2i,pt4502 



2754 
23-59 

2192 

743 
8083 



I Connolly, 1,094." 

In November, 1874, R'd 
Schell,Dem.,waselected 
to fill the vacancy from 
the IXth Dipt. .caused by 
the death of Mr.Mellish, 
receiving 12062 votes, 
and having a maj. of 
6,615 over John Hardy, 
Ind. Dem. 

X. New York City, 
Wards 12 and 19. Fer- 
nando Wood,Llb., 10,^26 ; 
Wm. A. Darling, Adm., 
9,641 ; Wood's maj. 885. 



■7 

1680 
2916 



Total I0 35j„ 8036 

Benjamin A. Willis's 
maj. 2,318. 

Dem. Rep. 

XII. Odell \V g.t 

"\Vestchester.i2o82 8391 
N.Holmes Odell's maj. 
3,691. W. H. Van Cott 
(Temp.) received 285. 

XIII. WhitehouseBeal. 
Columbia ...e;7ii 450s 

Dutchess 8759 541" 

Putnam 1711 1422 

Total ?6T8i 11344 

John O. Whitehouse's 

maj.4,837. W.Farrington 

(Temp.) ree'd 768. 

XIV. Beebe Everett 

Orange 7872 7373 

Rockland . . .2641 1831 
Sullivan 4005 2025 



Total 14518 1 1229 

George M. Beebe's 



Lib. Adm. 
XI. Potter Flag* 

Putnam 1422 1667 

Rockland . . . 2495 2267 
Westchester 11287 10245 

Total 15204 14179 

Ciarkson N~. Potter's 
maj. 1,025. v 
XIII. Whiteh.Ketchum 

Columbia 5863 5788 

Dutchess 8996 81 

Total .14859 



M 



. 13932 
Juhn O. Whitehouse's 
maj. 927. 

XII. HortonSt.John 

Orange 7935 8527 

Sullivan 3383 3315 

Total .11318 ~nS42 

Charles St. John's maj. 
524. 

XIV. Dew ttMaxwell 

Greene 3809 3529 

Ulster 8222 848 5 

Total 12031 1 2014 

DavidM.Dewftt'smaj. 
17. 



maj. 3,289 

XV. BagleyStebblns 

Greene 4010 3051 

Ulster 7730 0769 

Schoharie . . .4465 2880 

Total . ....16205 12700 
John H. Bagley, jr.'e 
mal.3,505. 

XVI. Quinn Adamsl XV. Perry Adams 
Alba ay... 0903 12626! Albany 14279 14212 

CharlesH.AdamsoverjSchoharie... 4397 3326 

Terrence J. Quinn, 2,723. _ . . */ ' -^- a 

Eli Perry, Dem., ree'd J,?, 4 ", 1 ---;- l86 ~, 6 J 7538 

6,108 votes. Eli Perry's maj. 1,138. 

181-4. 1873. 1870. 

Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. 

XVII. HugbeaTowna'dThayer Sm.rtWanvn Duvia 

Rensselaer.. 10403 10197.. 9378 11475.. 12469 7361 
Washington 4528 5248.. 3974 636 0. . 5324 4298 

^^•••V 1 *? 31 !5445. .13352 1 7835 -.17793 1 1 659 
Martlu I. lownsend's maj. ^14 ; James S. 

Smart's maj. in 1872,4,483; Joseph M. Warren's 

maj. in 1870, 6,134. 

X VIII. W» d WilliamaHeatouHaeRogpraWilHama 

Clinton 2514 5751.. 4221 4466.. 4475 3723 



WaldoWil iamsHeatonHaleRo^eraWiltiama 

Essex 3380 3216.. 1967^ 37°7-. 2 35 r 3°s8 

Warren 2442 2284.. 1986 2852.. 2418 2491 

Total 8336 11251.. 8174 1 1025.. 9444 0272 

Andrew Williams's maj. 1,915 ; Robert S. Hale's 
maj. in 1872, 2,851 ; John Rogers's maj. in 1870, 172. 

XIX. SawyerWheelerCantwellWb.6elerMottWh.Ml 

Franklin "1861 303=;.. 2102 3443.. 2209 2994 

St.Lawrence.^692 9288.. 4463 11282.. 3490 10026 

Total .5sj;3 12323.. 6565 14725.. 5699 13020 

"William A. Wheeler s maj. 6,770; in 1872, 8,160; 
in 1870,7,321. 

XX. SandersHathomJudsinHathornCarTol! Marvin 

Fult n 2926 3498.. 3171 3384.-2749 2850 

Hamilton 385 264.. 507 362.. 487 158 

Montgomery. 4218 3708.. 3989 4043.. 4222 3337 

Saratoga 4660 6548. . 4738 7185. . 4955 5'4i 

Schenectady . 2994 1915.. 2351 2788.. 24 1 5 1895 

Total .i5 l8 3 i5?33-- I 475° 17762.. 14828 13390 

Henry H. Hathorh's maj. 750; in 1872, 3.006; 
John M. Carroll's maj. in 1870, 1,438. Samuel 
McKean, Ind. Rep., had 2,286 votes in 1870. 

XXI. AllMoeuAlille'-Stu' gesWilburJuluindPrindle 

Chenango.... 4173 5069.. 4378 5610.. 4081 5453 
Delaware — 4345 4912.. 4523 5380.. 4472 5354 

Otsego . .5913 5593-. 6270 6378.. 5836 5945 

Total 14431 15^74. .15171 17368. .14389 16752 

Samuel F. Miller's "maj. 1,143: David Wilbur's 
maj. in 1872, 2,197 ; Eliz'ur H. Prindle's maj. in 
1870, 2,363. 

X X 1 1. GraveaBagleyB'kwayMemamCornw . Mer'm 

Herkimer 4407 4774.. 4163 5480.. 4076 4953 

Jefferson ....5608 0873.. 5985 8451.. 5979 6862 
Lewis 3240 2744.. 3072 3406.. 2844 3048 

Total 1325=; 14391. .13220 1 7337.. 1 2809 14863 

George A. Bagley 's maj. 1,136 ; Clinton L. Mer- 
riam'smaj.in 1872,4,117; in 1870, 1,964. 

XX ill. LordttobeitsihermauRobertaVVeaverRoberts 

Oneida 11922 10496.. 10481 13284.. 10606 12322 

Scott Lord's maj. 1,426 ; Kills H. Roberts's maj. 
in 1872,2,803; in 1870, 1,716. In 1874, Richard E. 
Sutton (Temp.) received 380 votes. 

XXIV. Warner Uaker FoBterUmsiiigShoec'ftLaneing 

Madison 3944 «323-. 4047 6060.. 3763 5464 

Oswego 7105 6800.. 6794 9350.. 6017 7986 

Total 11109 12123.. 10841 15410. .9780 13450 

William H.' Baker's maj. 1,014; William E. 
Lansing's maj. in 1872, 4,5,69 ; in 1870, 3,670. In 
1870, Caleb Calkins (Temp.) received 593 votes. 

XXV. CumatxkLeav'tbHiscockDuell McC'thyDuell 

Cortland 2224 2951.. 2360 3658.. 1830 3520 

Onondaga . .8934 11998. .10929 11799.. 8710 9434 

Total 11158 14949. .13289 15457. .10540 12954 

Ellas W. Leavenworth's maj 3,791 ; R. Holland 
Duell's maj. in 1872, 2,168 ; in 1870, 2414. 

XXVI. WilsonMcD'gall r.vesMcD'gallDan'lBSeel'y 

Cayuga 4723 5897.. 5293 7510.. 481 1 7187 

Seneca 3111 2561.. 3016 2899.. 3086 2637 

Wayne ^4023 4975.. 4016 6077.. 4237 5452 

Total I1 857 13433.. 12325 16486. .12134 J 527^ 

Clinton D. MacDougalPs maj. 1,^76 ; in 1872, 
4.161 ; John E. Seeley's maj. in 1870, 3,142. 

XXVII. lierpontuipham vVnii'L«imp't omst'kLamp't 
Livingston.. 3759 4229.. 3640 4579-. 3258 4347 

Ontario 4417 4465.. 4171 5562.. 4234 5042 

Yates 1594 2120.. 1919 2745.. 1875 2726 

Total \?7Z° 10814.. 9730 12886.. 9367 12115 

Elbridge G. Lapham's maj. 1,044; William H. 
LamporCs maj. In 1872, ^,156; In 1870, 2,748. In 
1874, S. B. Ayres (Temp.") received 1,163. 

X.vVIII. J -t>e» Plan GoodrichPlatt Apgi rOoodrlcb 

Broome 4445 4681.. 4502 5719.. 3076 5114 

Sch yler.... 2187 2048.. 2131 2451.. 2107 2511 

Tioga 3061 3651 . . 3205 4153- • 309 6 3902 

Tompkins. . . 3320 3386.. 3568 4280. . 2950 39 44 

Total 13013 13766.. 13406 16603.. 12029 »547i 

Thomas C. Piatt's maj. 753; in 1872, 3,197 ; Milo 

Goodrich's maj. in 1870, 3,442. In 1874, Elbert W. I 

Cook (Temp.) received 957. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



XXIX. Walker Hakes Hayt 

Allegany — 3838 4582.. 3158 
Chemung ...4S49 33I3-. 395* 
Steuben 8633 6253.. 7153 



Smith RobinsonSmith 
5997- • 2744 5423 
4270.. 4117 3518 
8471.. 6491 7335 



Total 17020 14U8.. 14262 18738.. 13352 16276 

Charles C. B. Walker's maj., 2,872 ; Horace B. 
Smith's maj. in 1872, 4,476 ; in 1870, 2,924. 
XXX. Angle Davy Gordon Clarke White Clark* 

Monroe 10004 9/33" 99*3 i 2 539.. 8805 10252 

Orleans 2518 3037.. 2557 3803.. 2382 3^92 



Total 12522 12770.. 12470 16342.. 11187 13844 

John M.Davy's maj. 248; Freeman Clarke's maj. 
in 1372, 3,872 ; in 1870, 2,657. Alpbonso A. Hop- 
kins (Temp.) received 675 votes in 1874. 

XXXI. BuekHoskins^outW.H skinsihep'dWake. 
Genesee.. ...2628 3155.. 2678 3995.. 2386 3766 

Niagara 4475 4760.. 4631 5271.. < 295 4818 

Wyoming ...2295 3408.. 2290 3967.. 2358 3550 

Total 9398 11323.. 9599 13233.. 9039 12134 

George G.Hoskins's- maj. 1,925; in 1872, 3,634; 
Seth Wakeman's maj. in 1870, 3,695. 

XXXII. Nicholls Hass Williams Bass Williams Bass 
Erie 14970 15968.. 12813 17929.. 15018 14415 

Lyman K. Bass's maj. 99*; in 1872, 5,116; Wil- 
liam Williams's maj. in 1870, 603. 

XXXIII. Alle'iSessionsMurraySessionsMurray Sessions 
Cattaraugus .4990 4717.. 4006 5447.. 4089 4461 
Chantauqu a.73i2 5742.. 5567 7475.. 5704 5709 

Total 12302 104^9.. 9573 12922.. 9793 10170 

Augustus F. Allen's maj. 1,843 ; Walter L. Ses- 
sions Y s maj. in 1872, 3,349 ; in 1870, 377. 

VOTE FOR ASSEMBLYMEN. 



Democratic 
ALBANY CO. 

1 Joseph Hilton... .2213 3048 
Frederick Andes 8771 

2 L. C. G. Kshinka*2&2i 3395 

3 F. W. Vosburgh.. 3189 307S 
John Swinburne. 1 725 1 

4 Geo. E.Simmons. 2674 3047 
James McGuirk.. 1431 1 

ALLEGANY. 

lttai > . Elliott. .. .3246'4S4i 
BROOME. 

Benj. S. Curran.,4252'4977 
CATTARAUGUS. I 

1 Dan'lE.Bartlett.2240'2428 

2 Samuel Scudder .2soa]2a^; 
CATAUGA. 

1 C.S. Bear dsley, jr. 2804 



2 Jerome L. Fuller265i 
CHAUTAUQUA. 

1 Theodore S. M0SS2609 

2 Obed Edson 4038 

CHEMUNG. 

Jere. Mc Guire. . .4337 
CHENANGO. 

Daniel M. Holmess^& 
CLINTON. 

George Adgate...2389 
COLUMBIA. 

1 Hy. Lawrence* . .2978 

2 Henry H. Gibbs..23oo 
CORTLAND. 

Dan'l S. Lament. 2555 
DELAWARE, 
i Henry Welch..... 2099 
2 A. C. Edgerton.,1953 

Dutchess! 

1 James Mackin*.. 4464 

2 Benj.S. Broas .. .4206 
ERIE. 

1 P. Hanrahan*.. .3900 

2 JosephW. Smith*2972 

3 George Sandrock3io8 

4 Harry B. Ransom,2^ 
j> Bertrand Chaffee27o8 
ESSEX, 

Edw. F. Edgerly3i7 



18T4. Republican. 

Peter SUngerland. 

Christian SchTrr. 
Henry W. Dwight.. 

W. IF. Braman* 



Orrin T. Stacy.* 

George Slierwood* 

Coni're P. Tedder .* 
JohnManley." 

Leonard F . Hardy.* 
Garr't Van Doren.t 
Erastusil.Hussey r 

Otis D. Hinckley. 

Harvey S. Elkins. 



2689 

373 

3091 

2626 
3S13 



3543 Geo. W. Hoffman. 



4262 

5330 

2214 
254b 



Edwin J. Loomis. 

Shepard P. Bowen . 

John D. Langdon . 
Alonzo H. Farrar.* 



2693 DanlE. Whitmore. 



2369 
2652 



2471 

2b2J 

2713 
3125 
4182 
2267 
3147 



Warren G. WiVis. 
George C. Decker. 

Henry H. Hustis. 
Yirgil C. Traver. 

John O'Brien. 
Wm. W. Lawson. 
Edward Gallagher. 
Chris. Schwirger. 
Wm. A. Johnson. 



FRANKLIN. 

Thos.W.Cantwelli86 2 



2906 John P. Badger.* 
135 Edwin A. Taylor. t 



FULTON & HAMLL'N. 

Thos. R.Briggs..3449 
GENESEE. I 

CarlosA.HugginS25S9 3205 Newton LT. Green 
GREENE. 

Benj. F. Barkley .3807 
HERKIMER. 

JohnF. H0SCI1...4279 



3623 George W. Fay. 



3243 H. S. Lockwood. 



3436 Wm. E. Calkins. 



JEFFERSON, 
i Andrew Smith.. .2655 
2 John Johnston... 3075 

KINGS. 

1 John Connell 2240 

Daniel Bradley '%. 2331 

2 J. R. Kennaday .3314 

3 Michael Coffey* . .3*3 
Philip Claret 2218 

4 T. V. P. Talmage.6o<& 

5 W.C.B.Thornton3o62 

John Maertz 2475 

Isaac N. Holly $. 23b 

7 Steph.J.Colahan*^j 2 

8 BeriVd Silver man^22^ 

9 Jno. McGroarty*saic, 
LEWIS 

Jas. A. Merwin. .3156 

LIVINGSTON 

Jas. Faulkner ,jr 4152 
Joseph W. Davis 

MADISON. 

1 Chas. H. Maxson.1454 

2 George Berry 2541 

MONROE. 

1 Richard D. Cole. 2269 

2 George Taylor .. .597% 

3 JosiahRich 2453 

MONTGOMERY 

Martin Schenck.. 4278 
NEW YORK. 

1 Nicholas Muller.yog 
Terence Duffy*.. 1931 

2 William P. Kirk*2T±\ 
Thomas P. Wildti5i7 

3 John Brogan 2233 

James J. Sieving. 1563 

4 Charles Reilly ... 4613 

5 Warren C.Bennett2b2i 
Isaac Robinson}:. 102 1 

6 Tim. J. Campbelle242 
MatthewPatten*t2052 

7 Smith E. Lane . . .2158 

8 George A. Stauf.2gSc, 
Albert ElterickJ. 894 

9 RansomParker,.)r32i4 

10 L. C. Waehner".. 270c 
John A. Dinkel*. 663 

11 Oliver P. Bnell...2oi4 
C. H. Courtney.}:. 107 

12 John Keenan 2642 

L. S. GoebeU.... 879 

13 Alfred N. Beach.. 292b 

14 James Daly* 2090 

Luke F. Cozans..ii4i 

15 T. Costigan 2996 

M. P. Killiant... 846 

16 J. T. McGowan.2g6g 
P ter Woods 1939 

17 Leo C. Dessar 3407 

G. W. Plnnkettt.1874 
J. W. Cornish}.. 68 

18 T. C. Campbell. .3203 

19 Ger. Hauschel. ..1629 
James Deer ingj. 1364 

20 O. L. Stewart ...3705 
CharlesH.Reilly$i264 

21 John W. Smith , .405 



692 Warner Miller .* 
363 P'tr. Countryman.! 

_iio8 John F. Peck. 
3677 George E. Yost. 

146 JohnF. Milhall.t 

2873 SelahC. Carll. 
1344 A. E. Masters.jr. 

3878 JohnH. Clyne. 
3875 John H. Burtis. 
2928 Jacob Worth.* 

426 John P. Short. 
3006 David Williams . 

562 John N. Stearns. f 
4840 JohnF. Stinson. 

2874 Sidney Sylvester. 

3850 Jonat'n B. Moray.* 
174 Alb'tM.Bingham.t 



2843 D 

2514 A, 



G. Wellington. 
W. Armour. 



124 George A. Goss.* 
4551 Newell A. Stone. 

116 Geo. H. Roberts. t 
2294 Joseph A. Tozier. 

139 Mynck O.Randall.t 

3497 Martin L. Stover.* 

98 M.W.Burns. 
194 J.H. Madigan.t 
280 Charles Zoller. 

290 Thos. H. Reilly. 

830 Charles E. Abbott. 
1826 Austin Leake.* 

188 Frederick Sinzer. 

2500 Fred. W. reward. 
2141 Solon B. Smith. 
851 John Theiss. 
3354 Wm. H. Gedney. 
1763 Charles S. Strong. 

3573 Knox McAfee.* 

1767 Joseph Archbold. 

2860 Charles Blackie. 
818 George Henckinjr. 

2613 Wm. S.Murray. 

82 Martin F. Hayburn 
1897 C. E. L. Holmes. 

3238 Wilson Berryman. 
108 John E. Greene . % 

3042 Bernard Biglin. 
828 Sixtus Chas. Kapff. 

4369 Jacob LTess. 

23 George W. Reid.J 
2505 Granville P. Haws. 



WilliamG.Wood$2i23| 991 James W.Hazlett.J 



NIAGARA. 

i B.M. Skeels 248012602 ^4r<. W. Comstock.* 

I 114 J. W. GroBvenor.t 
2 Henry F. ricrcc .1944 2099 Orv. C. Bordrcell. 

I i^Beuj. S. Loughlin.t 
ONE ID A. 

1 It. V. Sherman . .3391 3136 G. W. Chadwick.* 

I 98 Harlow Skeele.t 

2 Silas F.Jces 2831 2656 John W. Boyle. 

I 106 Silas Purdy.f 

3 Edward Lewis. . .2764 2338 Stephen Crorawe.ll. 

I 14s J. C.Longland.t 

4 Harry Weed 2370 289s Harr'n Lillybridge. 

I 129 Wm. E. Clark. t 
ONONDAGA. 

1 Jabez 11. Norto:i.27oS 3896 Thos. G. Alvord.* 

I 334 War en S. White. t 

2 Matthias Britton.3234 3771 George Barrow* 

I 126 L. N. Strarton.t 

3 Charles Simon*.. 3449 3<;8o Charles Tremain . 

I 122 I. L. Sherwood. t 
ONTARIO . 

1 S.H.Hammond*. 2637 1959 Chas. D. Miller. 

2 II. Maxfleld 2212 2222 V. S. Lincoln.* 

ORANGE. I 

1 James W. Miller. 3277 2960 Lewis B. Halsey. 

I 685 Thos. Coldwell.t 

2 Joseph D.Friend^yx> 3905 Ellis Barring. 
ORLEANS. -"*y^ 

U. Timmerman...2583 3281 John Jf. Weiherbee. 
OSWEGO. I 

1 Alanson S. Page. 2698 ,2322 Cheney Ames. 

2 WillardJohnson*2g22 1952 Henry C. Howe. 
% Solomon White.. 1511 2471 H. J. Daggett. 

OTSEGO. I 

1 William H. Ely*. 3021I2615II. W.Brown. 

I 97 Geo. D. Hyde.f 

2 James E. Cook.. 2940 2022 Simeon R. Barnes. 

i 168 Fred. T. Jarvis. 
PUTNAM. 

W.H.Christopheri6j€ 1513 Hamilton Fish, jr.* 
QUEENS. I 

1 J. M. Oakley* 3496 243S n . W. Rowland. 

OwenSIavenJ ... 182] 85 H. T. Bedell. i 

2 S. Townsend 2120 2891 L. Bradf. Prince.* 

B. S. Whittemore 61 1 26 S. W. Albertson.J 

RENSSELAER. 

1 W. V. Cleary* . . .wi 3625 Joseph Egolf. 

2 A. A. Peebles 2,17 30^3 Wm. F. Taylor. 

^ J. M. Whitbeck* .3243 2953 Josiah W. Boyce. 
RICHMOND. I 

ft I). Stephens, Jr*2g8g 2072 Richard Cunliff. 
ROCKLAND. I 

James C. Broicn. 2580 1922 B. J. Allison. 
SARATOGA. 

1 B. H. Knanp 24^0 31 ^9 George West.* 

2 Albert S. Pease.. 2224 3193 Xath.JM. Houghton. ' 
SCHENECTADY. | 

ft T. Ben edict.... 2S78 2022 Charles Stanford. 
SCHOHARIE. 

John M. Roscce. .4576 2690 C. B. Fethers. 
SCHUYLER. I 

William H. JW&.2513 1Q07 H. L. Gregory.** 
BENECA. -| 2 45U.M.Hillerman. + 

Wm. Hogan 29 =£2823 Martin L. Allen. 

STEUBEN. 

1 S. D. Shattuck* ..3286 26 ?S Henry Scblev. 

| 163 Daniel B. Bryan. t 

2 L. C. Plerson — 4544 3732 G. S. Shepard. 
„_„ v „,„„ I 5o6A-brani Dudley. f 
ST. LAWRENCE. 

1 L. Hasbrouck, Jr.1436 3126 Seth G.Pope.* 
1 c 7 S. V. R.llendrickt 

2 C . N. Conkey — 1410 2931 A. Barton Hepburn. 
__ ,, „ ., 66 S. Dillingham. t 

3 \vra.M. Bailey... 1040' 2661 Jonah San ford.* 

„,™.„~,~ I 123 Orin Martin. t 

SUFFOLK. 

R- Jennings 3304 3715 Xath. D. Petty.* 

SULLIVAN - ^^v.M.Edward..t 

A . E. W< mel . . . .3678 228a Charles Johnson . 
TIOGA. 
Fred. O. Cable.. .3314 3427 James Bishop. 



TOMPKINS. 

G. W. Schuyler .3409 

ULSTER. 

1 John Fream . w . .2951; 

2 J.J). Wurz 2026 

3 Chas. U. Krack .2308 

WARREN. 

Steph. Griffln, 2d.249o 
WASHINGTON. 

1 George Shannon. 2174 

2 E. ET Davis* 263s 

WAYNE. 

1 Marion Conklin .2631 

2 Biram Westfall..iso6 
WESTCHESTER 

1 D. Jl. Shiel 4230 

2 C. IT. Schiefflin.. 3941 

3 John Hoag 2977 

WYOMING. 

S.N. Hopkins.... 2*12 
YATES. 

G. W. Spencer*_.2oo3 

Democrats, 



3380 Wm. L. Bostwick. # 
241 Geo. W. Paluaer.t 

2382 Moses Stone. 

21 18 Josiah Hasbrouck. 

227 Abram Smith. t 
1663 Edgar D. Russell. 

258 E. D. Lownsberry.f 

2244 George P. Wait. 

2867 Alexander P.Law* 
2088 Wm. H. refit . 

2732 TT»i. n. Clark. 
2275 Allen S. Russell. 

2892Ezekiel Y. Bell. 

138 Geo. F. Tremper.f 
2838 Gid. W.Davenport. 

rosDan. M. VanCott.t 
3421 James W. Husted* 

129 R. M. Underhill.t 

3120 S. W. Tewksbury.* 

2013 Hanford Struble. 
iy C1 uuvi».B,/ 5 , Republicans, 53. The names 
of those elected are printed in Ital cs. 

Stephen J. Colahan, elected from the 7th dis- 
trict of Kings, died in December. A special 
election has been ordered to fill the vacancy. 

The Senate, elected In 1873, numbers, Republi- 
cans, 18: Democrats, 12: Independents, 2. Hi 
1874, Alb%rtP. Lanning, Dem., was elected from 1 
the Erie district to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Senator Gauson. The vote was: 
Lanning, 1^,8^?; Alberger (Rep J, 14,868; Lan- 
ning'smaj., 984. 

* Members of the Assembly in 1874. + Tem- 
perance candidates. % Independent candidates. 



NEW YORK 

Mayor, i£ . 
Tamm. Rep. Ind. Tamm. 

\V ickhainWalesOttendorferH 1 ves 



Ass. Dist. 1.. 


• 3333 


871 


1258. 


. 2686 


" " 2.. 


. 3221 


534 


847. 


• 2799 


3.. 


. 3184 


479 
810 


515- 


• 2633 


4-. 


. 4635 


W. 


• 4I30 


" " <;.. 


. 3 OI 2 


18,5 


895. 


• 2463 


" « 6 " 


• 2975 


740 


807. 


. 2704 


; : t: 


. 1910 

. 2834 

. 2916 


m 


503- 
2738. 


. I360 
2625 


9.. 


3088 


639- 


. 2202 


" " 10.. 


. 1854 


1028 


2370. 


1651 


" " 11.. 


. 2217 


3041 


609. 

I058. 


1702 


" " 12.. 


. 3&°° 


s 


2745 


" 13.. 


. 2706 


532. 


22^9 


" 14.. 


• 2247 


819 


1071. 


1822 


" 1^.. 


• 352i 


1 771 


1463. 


2993 


" " 16.. 


. 4078 


K2I 


1221. 


341 1 


- :: it: 


• 43«2 

• 3492 


2842 
1696 


1471. 

1157. 


3951 
2803 
2136 


" 19.. 


. 2381 


906 


559-. 


" " 20.. 


• 4779 


2914 


1819.. 


3»-7 


" 21.. 


• 5292 


3223 


J 271.. 


4660 


24 


1236 
. 866 


839 

50O 


126.. 


1 103 
732 



CITT. 

rj. Register. 

Ind. Tamm. Opp. 

J one* 

2733 
1814 
1552 
1933 
3309 
1760 

3390 

4326 

434 

3576 

•4147 

2484 

3470 

2298 

3736 

3332 ! 

4039 

3,20 

1615 

5605 

Wl8 

J7"3 
801 



Total 70071 30933 24226. .59460 71107 I 

William H. Wickham over Wales, 33,118; over 1 
Oswald ottendorfer, 43.84c,; over Doth, 8,892. 
Patrick H. Jones'i niaj. for Register, 11,647. 

LOUISIANA. 

The attention of the whole country has been 
fixed on the rascally operations of Kellogg's so- 
called Returning Board, which does not permit 
the will of the voters of this State to have effect. 
It is well known that t e Conservatives carried 
the State in November bv a large maloritv, but 
the result of the election is not officially an- 
nounced. 



I 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



65 



1874. CONGRESS. 1872. 

Dists. Item. Rep. Lib. Adm. 

I. Thomas Golds Wilson Spence 

Caroline... 1121 925.. 1072 1107 
Dorchesteri544 isi2.. 1783 1872 

Kent 1655 1506.. 1678 1655 

Q. Anne's.. 1703 1358.. 1852 1653 
Somerset... 1417 1444-- 1200 l6o 9 

Talbot 1589 1527.. 1546 1664 

Wicomico. 1064 905.. 1533 1117 
WorceBter. 1772 970.. 1800 1149 
Total ...12465 10147.. 12464 11826 
Philip F. Thomas's maj. 2318; 
Ephraim K. Wilson's maj. in 
. 1872, 638. 

II. Roberts Elisor Archer Hanc'k 
Baltimore* s«6 2710.. 3590 3197 
Carroll.... 2664 2155.. 2556 2586 

Cecil 2268 1798.. 2223 2544 

Harford. . ..2224 1575.. 2222 1976 



Bait. 1. 



Total . . . 10682 8238 . . 10591 10303 
Chas. 1>. Roberts's maj. 2444; 
Stevenson Archer's maj. in 187 
88. 

* Exclusive of the City of Bal- 
timore, and the 1st and 13th 
Districts of the County, which 
are in the Vth Cong. District. 



MARYLAND. 

III. O'Brien Suter O'Brien 



9- 



361 
.1038 

.1033 
. 832 
.1003 

• 959 
.1309 
.1132 
. 620 



613. 
3I9-- 

C22. . 

284.! 
904.. 

749- • 
854.. 
303.. 
286.. 



1374 
1057 
1051 

877 
1107 

851 
1295 
1274 

784 



Total ... 9287 4834.. 9670 
William J. O'Brien's maj. 
in 1S72, 1324. 



Turn. 
1041 

699 

1022 

573 
1406 

1319 
1127 

572 

587 

8346 

4453; 



IV. Swain 


Cox S 


wann G 


rr>w. 


Bait. 10 805 


386. 


1 178 


809 


" 11 801 


593- 
481. 


1033 


908 


" 12.... 8^6 
" 13.... 665 


969 


728 


481. 


960 


791 


" 14.... 867 


523 1 


1081 


738 


" 15 1084 


824' 


1259 


I330 


" 16 1275 


962. 


. 1396 


IS08 


" 18....1561 


994- 


1596 


1 513 


" 19 1196 


685. 


. I3 2 


1179 


" 20 1144 


881. 


. 1356 


1322 

10886 


Total... 10244 


6810. 


.12148 


Thomas Swann's maj. 3434 ; in 


I1872, 1262. 









V. Henkle'KagnerMerrickAlbort 

Bait. Co. pt. 758 414-. 659 567 



130a 



552 



2289 2542 
719 1668 



1237 
1209 



1586 
1306 
2250 
1534 



Wd. 17. .133* 4°4- 

A.Arundel.2710 2299. 

Calvert 885 1025. 

Charles 1353 i5 61 - 

Howard ...1339 1042. 

P. George's 2136 2220.. 1707 

St. Mary's. .1 350 1427- • "72 
Total ...1 1862 10452.. 10300 1 1405 
Eli J. Henkle's maj. 1410 ; 

Wm. J.. Albert's maj. in 1872, 

1105. 

VI. Walsh Lownd.Ritrfi.Lownd. 
Allegany.. .2426 2710.. 2646 3611 
Frederick. 4220 4379.. 4301 5 9 2 
Garrett.... 596 615.. new Co. 
Montgo'ry.22^3 1732.. 2213 1920 
Washing 'n -3479 34 fo- ■ 3385 3°35 

Total ...12974 12896.. 12545 14258 
William Walsh's maj. 78 ; Lloyd 
Lowndes's maj. in 3872, 1713. 
Legislature, 1874-5. 

Senate. Home. J. Bat. 



Democrats 23 

Republicans... 2 
Independent . . 1 

Dem. maj 20 



59 



34 



54 



MONTANA TERRITORY. 

Congress Delegate. 

1874. 18?8. 1871. 

Counties. Dent. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. 
Maginnhtiedg. JVlagin. Clapett Toole Clag. 



Beaverhead 149 104. . 185 144. 

Big Horn no ret. .. no ret. . 

Choteau 160 30.. in 69. 

Dawson no ret. .. no ret. . 

Deer Lodge 973 699.. 995 036. 

Gallatin 440 216.. 

Jefferson .433 285 . . 

Lewis & Clarke. 938 986. . 

Madison 734 7°5-- 

Meagher 343 260.. 

Missoula 414 184. . 



515 


349-- 


432 


374-- 


911 


1087.. 


539 


585.. 


303 


252.. 


524 


400. . 



309 190 



128 

1 136 
341 
390 

1322 

719 
274 

557 



1178 

445 
470 
802 
578 
298 
718 



Total 4584 3529- • 45i5 4i9 6 - • 4861 5274 

Tercent 56 60 43.50.. 51.63 48.17. .47.96 52.04 

Martin Maginnis'smaj. 1055; in 1872, 319; Wil- 
liam H. Claggett's maj. in i8>i,4i3. Total vote 
in 1874, 8113 ; in 1872, 8711 ; in 1871, 10135. 

OREGON. 

Governor,^. Gov. '70. Pres.'72. 
Counties. Dem. Rep. Ind. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. 
Graver Tolm.Camp.G10v. Palmer Gre.l. Grant 



298 
481 
593 
211 

59 



Baker 478 

Benton 276 

Clackamas. ..6 o 

Clatsap 148 

Columbia 114 

Coos 399 408 

Curry 78 106 

Douglas 503 435 

Grant 198 206 

Jackson 828 572 

Josephine.... 163 133 

Lane 587 619 

Linn 947 646 

Marion 966 1058 

Multnomah.. .911 1556 

Polk ...321 

Tillamook.... c,o 

Umatilla 560 

Union 444 



Wasco 374 

Washington.. 286 
Yamhill 502 



334 
99 
134 
369 
202 
202 
442 



73-. 
392.. 
199.. 

it 
56.. 
17.. 
667.. 
242.. 
120.. 
27.. 
522.. 
672. . 

6tf.. 
<&. . 
501.. 

425 . 
90. 
355-- 

461., 
369.. 



579 
578 
698 
123 

261 

76 

786 

373 

793 

209 

831 

1204 

1068 

1023 

661 

49 

5°9 

418 

349 
355 
631 



402. 
607. 
756. 
179. 
85., 
260. 
106. 
738. 
321. 
490. 
130. 
705. 
939- 
1342. 
1412. 

599- 
64. 
252. 
235- 
34* • 

485.. 198 
647.. 411 



358 

439 

71 

81 

186 

566 

143 
570 
no 

569 
860 
606 
911 
303 



323 
3i4 



282 
547 
677 
198 
117 
321 
108 
771 
233 
526 
122 
815 
943 
1431 
1830 
488 

3&o 
415 
392 
530 
601 



over ThoniasF. Campbell, 3.181 ; over Palmer in 
1870, 631 ; Grant's maj. in 1872, 4,089. Total vote 
in June, 1874, 25,408; in June, 1870, 22,821 ; in No- 
vember, 1872, 19,549. 

Representative in Congress. 

18T4. 18?S. 18?3. 

Counties . Dem . Rep . Ind . Dem . Rep . Dem . Rep . 

La Uow W ms.lJav(.t.Kesin.fcmith Bur tt\\ Us 



70. 

275. 
379- 



223 
411 

474 
103 
102 

76 
619 
170 

559 

104 

657 

884 

829 

771 1303 

411 272 



52.. 
102.. 

65.. 
273- • 
129.. 
290.. 

49.. 
52b. . 
396.. 
861.. 



Total 9713 9163 6532..11726 11095..7730 11819 

Percnt 38.23 36 07 25.70.. 51.38 48.62.-39.54 60.46 

Lafayette F. Grover over J„ C. Tolman,55o; 



396 
609 
748 
204 
i35 
307 
no 

994 

305 
651 
150 
966 
928 

1435 

2084 

508 

99 

383 

403 

468 

539 

_?49 

Total .9642 9340 6350.. 8194 6123..12317 13167 

Per cent 38.06 36 87 25 07. -.57.23 42.77. .48.37 51.63 

George A. La Dow over Richard Williams. 302 ; 
over T.W.Davenport, 3,202 ; James W.N esmith s 
maj. in 1873, 2.071 ; Joseph G. Wilson's maj. in 
1872, S50. Total vote in 1874, 25,332 j in 1873. 14,317 ; 
ia 1872, 211,484. , 

The aggregate vote 111 1874, of candidates for 
the other State offices, was follows : 
Sec. of State. .S. F. Chadwick, Dem 10,977 

C. M. Foster, Rep 8,603 

J. H.Douthitt.Ind 5.733 

Chadwick over Foster.... 2,37.1 
Treasurer A. H. Brown, Dem 10,228 

D. G. Clark, Rep 9.043 

Demas Beach, Ind 6,132 

Brown over Clark 1,185 

StatelFr inter . Martin V. Brown, Dem 10.301 

E. M. Waite, Rep 9>°78 

William Hand, Ind 5,721 

Brown over Waite 1,223 



Baker 459 338 

Benton.... 276 506 

Clackamas 618 582 

Clatsap 143 216 

Columbia 118 62 

Coos 384 430 

Curry 73 103 

Douglas 461 441 

Grant 206 217 

Jackson .... 852 543 

Josephine 179 126 

Lane 635 624 

Linn 1046 654 

Marion 839 1085 

Multnomah... 843 1485 

Polk 356 35 1 

Tillamook 58 97 

Umatilla 494 158 

Union 4^7 393 

Wasco 364 244. 

Washington... 264 188 

Tamhili ^23 497 



61. 

370.. 
236., 

32- • 

79.. 

49.. 

24.. 
7c;., 
226. , 
131.. 

462. 
556.. 

731- 

708.. 

<*■ 

386. 
3i- 
3°9- 
486. 
283. 



41 
390 
255 
293 
199 
452 



67.. 
iob.. 
169.. 
140., 
176., 
3°7-. 



546 
613 

w 

180 
180 
274 

112 

860 

309 
906 
l8l 
893 

"79 
1040 
1185 

68 

556 
5" 
e;oo 
348 
5 6 3 



63 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOP. 1 T5. 



Sup.Pub.Inst.l.. L. Rowland, Hep 

K. .-'. Dawne, Deui 

M. M. Uglesby, lnd 

How Loud i \ cr I ; a\\ ue 40 

LXQISLATTTBX, J ; ;- . £ '' . Uotii . Joint Dal. 

Democrats 20 

Indapendenie 6 23 

RepubUcans 11 17 28 

Total Co 90 



VlitliiMA. 

Cii.vg. ';.|. COHO.*72. Gov. '73. 
.. Aiim. < tons. A< 

u bener Draxtuu a*nei KemperHughea 
37.. 1464 1178.. 1S45 life 



.'• ccomac... 

Essex 660 026., 647 c'69 

.-I IT. 8l2 654.. 67S 865 

King George 9 303 
KingTrt illiam <-•>•• - ; o.. 5 

King&Queeu 654 I fj2. 

Lancaster.. 411 ; 341. 

Matthews.. 591 361.. 558 379- 

505. 

Northampton^! c 859. 

th'mb'l'd 613 541.. 458 ■ ;. 

Prince WUrm6io 308.. T&S 4*2. 

Richmond.. 39^ 601.. 313 597- 

ipusyh'nia 1077 f.14.. 1211 866. 

Stafford 793 245.. 77a 251. 

YYestmorel'd 570 625. . 458 670. 

Total 1078 * ioib8..io3i4 10687. 

Beverly B. Douglas's ruaj- 295,; 



6;o 

1 .1 
6h 

546 
1266 

947 
691 



•' 1 
631 
328 

73» 

555 
490 
852 
531 
386 
541 
O95 
200 
613 



12434 97 2 o 
.lames B 



Seller's liiaj. In 1872,373 ; James L. Kemper's maj. 
2714. 



II. 
< harlee City ^70 
1 lizab'tht "v 1013 
Isie of Wight 018 
James City. 445 
Nansemond 943 
462 



Dntt 

381.. 

1198.. 

-44 • ■ 

405.. 

2:70. . 

1856.. 

1095.. 
.957. 



Lee Tlatt Kemrerllu^'.^s 



!New Kent 

Norfolk 2063 

Portsmouth 1042 
PrinctosAnne 726 
PriuceGeorge. .thr'n out 
Bouth'mpt'ni3i5 1574. 

Surry 007 

Sussex . ■ 040. 

Warwick... 247 139. 

tmsb'g 124 167. 

York 384 w>. 



182 

303 
940 
138 

1877 
1 140 
923 

, 1-1 

1087 

249 

439 

107 

02 



372.. 
1218., 

640. , 
387.. 

1-74.. 

470. 

1816.. 

■ 
819. 
029. 

1333. 
163. 

low). 
297. 
115. 



384 

302 
j "128 

320 
1368 

469 
2341 
1113 

04 

628 
I5J5 

638 
«3« 



651 

r-25 
ii93 

•127 
J5'3 

1^76 
740 
86j 

540 

1047 



692 



Total 13390 1 -,- 1 . . 1 

.Jubii Goode, Jr.'s, maj. 1 p. Tbe vote of Princi 
_.'s connl 1 , which v. as thrown out f >r In- 
formality, would have elected Piatt. Robert 
a (col'd), rnd. Rep., received 444 votes. 
James H.l tobert 

AV . ( 1 1 . for Govenor In 1873, 1839. 

* Vote for Governor i.i 18,-j included in James 
Citj (■■ 11 if . 

I he name? of oil ics •whose votes arc 
count . I 1 are printed 

III. *Vui er liur.«&i WiM Smith KeiuperHoghes 

line ... 1387 i-':;2.. 1278 1311.. 1430 ta 7 

Cbcstecneld 1511 1117.. 1742 1724.. 1019 1647 

nanover 1469 i.'38.. 1574 1260.. 1682 1331 

Henrico 1403 1309.. i .. 1556 1508 

Louisa 1102 1137.. 104} 1323.. 

.>/'///■ 
lUcA.i.ond.. 

Total 1 , ,_ 



Ilffl.. 


8^8 


1228 


726.. 

954.. 

2321.. 


1013 




1107. 


527 


1 149 


2260. 


2'- 63 




876. 


«;oo 




1139. 


910 





MannStowellMcK'n'yStow.KemperHtigbef 

Dinwiddle*. 614 1202.. 620 

-ville 351 743.. 361 

Lunenburg. eJo 877.. 029 

Mecklenb'g 985 2129.. 1231 

Nottoway.. ^ : - 071.. 

•i'iij. 1861 . 94. . 1 .6 
Powhatan.. 301 :.. , 

Prince Ed w'd703 1328 . . 

Total 68 15393. .10263 j 3003 

William J I. II. StoweB s maj. 6382 ; in 1872, 7325 ; 
Hughes's maj. iu 1873, 4738. 

A . Cube] 1 Ihoirms Ijuv'w Thomas Kemt'frllu^h-s 

343 

* 

326, 
IOI2 

412 



Carroll. 
! i<i in tile... 

Lloyd 

Franklin.. 

-uu... 

Halifax... 

Henry 

Patrick 



-r 6 
749 
1321 
936 

8~77 



l > iitsylvania242o 



m.. 
582.. 


735 
416 


335-- 
465.. 


854 


676. 


429 
iu3 


540.. 

1008. 


013 
1600 


113.. 


9:0 


104. 


977 


21 ( 1 . 


1780 


2845. 


1999 
1036 




904 


952. 


■ 


^ 


970. 


1015 


■ 


2298 


2596. 


3343 



^■10 5773.. 6084 537° 

12S14 13082. .14702 

Gilbert < . \\ alker's maj. 2015 ; John A. Smith's 
maj. i p ""- maj. 

1 1872 arid 1873 Manchester < itv was counted 
with Chesterfield County. 

I V. i\J inn Ston-all i.i.K n'yEVw'IKe.i perUup'iea 

Amelia 423 910.. 1040 

Brunswick. 1 15 1413.. 656 1437.. 9S1 im 

( harrotte.. 6.32 U49.. 6-9 1329.. 1023 i^oo 

Cumberland 421 873.. 486 593.. 564 994 



Total 10221 7723.- 917=; 987S..T1737 

George C. Cabell's maj. 2498; 1 hristophcr "i . 
Thomas's maj. iu 1072, 700; Kemper's maj. in 1873, 
2498. 

« Counted with Pittsylvania in 1873. 

VI. T :cke Johao nwhite'i lohaaoiiKemp'rHajjbed 



15.. 

907.. 
589., 

1033.. 

239- • 

109.. 
2240. , 

255.. 

300.. 



1286 

1926 
1023 
95a 
2761 
1086 
1367 



45., 
1217.. 

736.. 
1990.. 

012. . 
1381.. 
2794-. 
1048.. 



377 

890 
2727 
1223 
1132 
3032 
1349 



Alleghany.. 430 
Amherst .. 1295 
Appomatox 635 

Bedford 1944" 

Botetourt.. 980 
Buckingham 878 
1 Campbell . . 2337 

Nelson 

Itockbridge 1207 

Total 10708 E707..11401 10779.. 14233 "> v 8i 

John R. Tucker^s maj. tooi; Thomas AThitc- 
head"s maj. iu 1872, 622 ; Kemper's maj. in 1073, 

"" VIT. Harris Lewis Harris O'FarrellKemperllughes 

Augusta i^2i 204.. i;o4 

Albemarle. 1966 1144.. 243s 



930.. 1959 



142 
1246 



J 379 

2917 

899 



Bath 398 

Fluvanna .. 739 
Goochland. 057 

Greene 

Highland. .. 

Page 643 

Rockinghami3S4 
Shenandoah 1065 
Staunton... 346 



13.. 

3 £: 



317 
658 

60^ 

- 1 
422 

524 

2031 
1691 

420 







<..'- 


481.. 


2633 




103.. 


439 
798 
691 


110 


338. 


600 


903. 


7&9 


390. 


5'4 


3<H 


!:■ 


602 


>2 


1045 


226 


779. 


2833 


623 


267. 


2107 


3'4 


404. 


634 


4-7 



Totr.l 9266 3214.. 10894 6736.. 1 ^095 

John T. Harris's maj. 0052'; in 1872,4133; Kem- 
per's maj. in 187,. 

VIII. HuntouBurbin IIuntinDciielsKemperHufrh' • 



Alexandria 88 

Clarke 54^ 



1057.. 

48.. 
271.. 

, . . 

70.. 
543-. 

§13-. 

226.. 
180.. 



Culpcpcr... 2-9 

Fairfax 900 

Fauquier . . 1603 
Frederick.. 

Loudon 

Madison. ... 6S8 

Orange 699 

! 'appaban'ck 355 
\\ arren .... 
Wini I 

Total .... 9809*" 

EppaHuuton smaj. 518 ; iu 1872,2604 
maj. in 1873, c .4b;. 
IX. liny ll'liie \'c"Vt.BjwenHagbeBKemp.H 

lnd. Com. 



607 

1036 

1014 

1708 

936 

L-49 

J- 30 

84 

670 

069 

422 



1325., 
456. . 

: 70. 
ion. 
1127. 
1205. 

474- 

506. 

147- 
335 



1296 

120 

709 

1095 

1201 

1970 

1113 

2141 

1003 

1079 

840 

910 

442 



1 i i2 

; .0 



1: 12 

■: '3 

1 :_o 

i -8 

i-'39 



..11782 9178. . 139S1 G 
; lv(.mp. 



Bland no 

Buchanan. .148 

< raig 

Giles S26 

Lee 

Montgom'y 870 
Pulaski ....588 



3 
16 

7 

55 
82 

241 

240 



89., 
'59- • 

134. 



34i 

223 

319 

10=7 
780 

4^4 



90.. 


539 


145 




507 


\ 


38.. 




■7 


202. 


865 


'j . 2 


289.. 


14^1 


,|2 


893.. 


1002 


770 


34°- 


654 


403 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST5. 



6T 



;ow.?nHugbesKemp.Hu*h. 
690 018. . 9^4 77s 
1 143 
1270 



80 


96s. 


• 765 


361. 


87 


1249. 


• 730 


589. 


265 


455- 


. 820 


37° • 


<;q 


921. 


• 775 


180. 


122 


603. 


• I5°3 


712. 


10 


427. 


• 427 


179. 


• 30 


• 114. 


. 921 


389. 



1 183 

1405 

1998 

465 

1357 



495 
750 
448 



370 



Terry H'lile M 
Roanoke. . .890 524 
Russell.. '...395 

Scott 285 

Smyth 556 

Tazewell. ..706 
Washingt'D784 

Wise 262 

Wythe.... ^887 

Total 8052 1821 ' 6760.. 10352 5324. .15401 6202 

William Terry over McMuIlen, 1292 ;" Bees T. 
Bowen'smaj. in 1872, 5028; Kemper's maj. in 1873, 
9199. 

Total rote in 1873 in whole State for Governor, 
214,237; for Kemper, 120,747; for Hughes, 93,490; 
Kemper's maj., 27,257. 

Coiifetidilioual Amendment. 

The following was the vote in 1874 upon the 
question of the adoption or rejection of amend- 
ments to the Constitution abolishing the town- 
ship system 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



For.Agst. Sixth Dist... 8834 

First Dist 10547 1779 Seventh " ... 7085 

Second" 12933 12165 Eighth " .. .10138 

Third " ....9181 9509 Ninth " ...10933 

Fourth " .... 7830 13543 Total ^io" 

1' ifth " 8049 5937 *- 

Majority for the amendments, 26.516. 
Lbgislatttke, 1874-5. Senate. Rouse. 



Conservatives 33 

Republicans 9 

Independents — 

Vacancy 1 

Conservative maj 



-4 



99 



M 



J'l Bill. 
132 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Governor, '74. Gov. ,'73*. Gov., '72. 
Counties. Bern. Hep. JJem. Hep. Bern. Hep. 

Weston M:CutC' iris Wi^tou Siraw WcSfc n btraw 



Belknap.. 

Carroll 2365 

Cheshire ... 2870 

Coos 1865 

Grafton..:.. 4886 
Hilisboro'.. 6607 
Merrimac . . 5166 
R'ckingh'm 4994 
StraJiord... 2741 
Sullivan.... 1976 



28 1764., 

1822 : 

3460. . 

1311. 

3915- 
6378. 
4767. 

553°- 

3013. 



2066 
2097 
2532 
1607 
4325 
5555 
4759 
4752 
2470 
1853 



1826. 
1770. 
3428. 
1303. 
379=>- 
6473. 
4622. 
5546. 
3126. 
2134. 



2315 
23S3 

2fe0S 

1977 
5207 
6462 

5269 

5157 
2838 

2048 



1072 

3§90 

1453 
4046 
7478 
5129 
6108 
35^ 
2499 



Cong. '74. 
Bintricis. Bern. Rep. 

I. Wilson " 

Brooke 483 

Calhoun 408 

Doddridge.. 518 

Gilmer 577 

Hancock... 300 
Harrison... 1423 

Lewis 698 

Marshall . . 918 
Ohio 2755 



Gov. '72. Pkes.'72. 
Lid. Bern. Lib.Adm. 
Jjcob Camden Grei leyGrant 



Gotf 

397- • 

237.. 

710 . 

279.. 

410. . 
1560. . 

579- • 
1337- • 

2012. . 

260.. 
824.. 
613. . 
467.. 
300. . 
1980.. 1787 

Total 12709 12631.. 14525 

Benjamin YVilson'c maj. 168. 

II. Faulkner Botekr Ja''ol> Camden G 



Pleasants 
Ritchie. 
Tyler... 
Wetzel. 

Wirt 514 

Wood 



330 
750 

448 
952 




Barbour S07 

Berkeley... 1433 

Grant 192 

Hampshire. 846 

H*r4y 393 

Jefferson... 1210 

Marion 1410 

Mineral 630 

Monongalia 562 

Morgan 

Penaleton.. 
Pocahontas 

Preston 

Randolph . . 

Taylor 767 

Tucker in 

Upshur 297 

^ enster ... 320 



309 
472 
438 

756 
541 



465.. 
1113. . 

318.. 
293-. 
324.- 
781.. 
930.. 
504.. 
312.. 
382.. 
167. . 

50.. 
994.. 
143.. 
679.. 

18.. 
564.. 



9.76 
1346 

662 
886 
74i 

1118 

1446 
777 

1475 
§°5 
4°4 
269 

1694 
371 

1080 

133 

1036 

40 



943- • 628 

13.13.. 1283 

138.. 174 

437. . 418 
232. 



1501. 

1465. 
347- 
895., 
3°4- ■ 
589., 
470. 
788.. 
714. 
782., 

235-' 
424., 



440 
1471 
1133 
360 
807 
18J 
318 
342 
7U 
338 
637 
121 
299 



12523 

eleyGrant 

727 
131 1 

443 
221 
119 

985 

1247 
5,8 

1 530 
400 
247 
178 



89 



Total 11500 8064..14971 11937.. 9800 11773 

Ciiarles J. Faulkner's maj. 3430. J. Marshall 
Hagaus received 432 votes in Monongalia county . 



Total 3*598 34138. .32016 ■ 34023. .36584 3S751 

rercent U.05 48.95.. 43.48 51.52.. 48 56 5144 

A majority of all the votes thrown is required 
in thia State for the election of a Governor by 
the popular vote, otherwise the election is made 
by the Legislature. In 1874, John Blackmer, 
Temperance candidate, received 2097 votes, and 
there were 42 scattering. James A. Weston's 
maj. over Luther Met utchin?, 1460, which is 679 
votes short of a maj ority over all. W esfcon was 1 
subsequently chosen by the Legislature. Ezekiel ( 
A. Straw over Weston in 1873, 2007, from which i 
deduct 1779 for Blackmer and 1 catteriug, leaving i 
him 228 over all. Straw's maj. in 1872, 2167, from 
which deduct 1019 for Blackmer and scattering, I 
leaving him 1 148 over all. Total vote (Temper- j 
ance and scattering omitted) in 187.1,69,736; in j 
1873, 66,039 ; in 1872, 75,335. 
Legislature, 1874. Senate. House. Joint Sal. 

Democrats 8 177 i3g 

Republicans 4 164 168 

Democratic maj . . 4 13 17 

On Jun3 10, tne Legislature elected William 
Butterfield, Secretary of State ; J. G. Dearborn, 
Treasurer ; Charles C. Pearson, State Printer ; 
Aivah W. Sulloway, Railroad Commissioner; 
and Tobias D. Foes, Commissary General, all 
Democrats. At the election, the following votes 
were cast for Railroad Commissioner, there be- 
ing no choice : 

For Aivah Wc fTulloway, Dem 35428 

For Grjinville P. Conn, Rep 341SG 

For David Heaid, Prohibitionist 2107 



349 •• 

c 3°- ■ 

85.. 

268.. 

387.. 
695.. 
[338.. 

218.. 
86.. 



III. Her.; or i\Vi < he 

Boone 576 170. 

Braxton boo 

Cabell 622 

Clay 167 

Fayette 619 

Greenbrier. 923 

Jackson ... 860 

Kanawha. . 1652 

Lincoln ... 459 

Logan 462 

Mason 1158 

McDowell.. 176 

Mercer 522 

Monroe 819 

Nicholas... 467 

Putnam 497 

Raleigh 202 

Roane 618 

Summers... 593 

Wayne 936 

Wyoming.. 246 

Total...;. "Tiisz 



Jae b Ca'inion G.eelcyGr -snt 



441 
550 
641 
173 
411 
779. 
1067 
2720 
37i 



889.. IfvfO 

93.. "82 

185- • 
490.. 
258., 
284.. 
136., 
369.. 
313.. 
396.. 
206. . 



839 
337 
682 
459 
637 
290 
595 
311 



411. 

609. 
1055. 
202. 

590. 
1254. 
951 . 

1545.. 

686. 
768.. 
1332. 
17a. 
614. , 
834., 

P:: 
3S 7 .. 

070.. 
4S0., 
1361 . , 
210., 



c.61 



154 



745 


477 


107 


89 


382 


340 


836 


407 


706 


740 


338 


1638 



280 

147 

III2 



49 

1377 



no return. 
446 



603 

236 

167 
510 
290 
568 

99 



7745- -13392 15494- 



34V 
183 
451 
139 
392 
206 
297 
_£53 
8019 



Frank Hereford's maj. 5779. 
Grand total 37823 28440. .42888 40305.. 29451 32315 

i'er ent 5. .08 42.92. .«61. 55 48.45.. 47.68 52.32 

Democratic maj. for Congressmen, 9383; Gov. 
-Jacob's maj. in 1872, 2583; Grant's maj. 2864. 
Total votei'i 1874,66,263; for Governor in 1872, 
83.193 ; for President in 1872, 61,766. In 1872, Gov. 
Jacob ran as an Independent candidate against 
Johnson N. Camden, the regular Democratic 
nominee. 

Legislature, 1875-6. S note. House. Joint, Bal. 

Democrats ". 19 49 68 

Republicans 4 12 16 

Independents 1 4 5 

Democratic maj 14 33 47 



68 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

LT.-GOV.'74- TT!EA8.'73. PBZ8.'72. 

Counties. Item. Rep. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adrn. 
LatU Olmst. Hutch. Mackey Gieel. Grant 

Adani6 3014 2569.. 2488 2148.. 2580 2735 

Allegheny .13704 13080.. 8591 12012.. 9055 25846 

Armstrong.. 3523 38^8.. 2817 3088.. 2078 4297 

Beaver 2486 2877.. 2189 2536.. 1798 3517 

Bedford. ...2939 2524.. 2844 2570.. 2165 2901 

Berks 10010 5299.. 7980 3872. .10201 7741 

Blair 3226 -3390.. 2^94 3065.. 2183 4251 

Bradford ...4264 ^519.. 3032 4637-- 35°3 74.52 

Bucks 0C14 61^3.. 6227 ^814.. 5445 °9'3 

Butler .'4698 4123. . 2158 2541.. 2534 4015 

(ainona 3379 2238.. 3268 2657.. 2547 2841 

Cameron ... 449 479. 397 448.. 340 554 

Carbon 2420 2060.. 1926 1997. . 1946 2452 

Centre 3083 2118.. 2649 2557.. 2095 3142 

Chester 4^54 6152.. 3619 4786.. 3802 9249 

Clarion 32^4 1954.. 2609 i773-- 2 304 2558 

Clearfield... 30&5 1582.. 2609 1697.. 2329 197° 

Clinton 2436 1481. 2016 1458.. 1758 2003 

Columbia.... 2956 1123.. 2584 1103.. 3001 2009 

Crawford ...4724 4821.. 3808 4023.. 4887 6938 

Cumberland4378 3083.. 3978 3156.. 3557 3°95 

Dauphin ...4197 <393-- 3323 Vi9--333i 6954 

Delaware... 2207 3=>99-. 1975 3396.. 1166 4231 

Elk 1127 464.. >2i8 447- • 733 6 79 

Erie 4612 5087.. 2S99 3752.. 3787 7502 

Favetle 3714 3111.. 3348 2994.. 2063 3881 

Forest 328 367.. 199 287.. 155 360 

Franklin 3913 3639.. 3112 3153. .3146 4301 

Fulton 1019 700.. 914 614.. 808 737 

Greene 2663 1469.. 2450 1293.. 2829 1852 

Huntingdon 2588 2839.. 2234 2909.. 1805 3099 

Iudiana 1694 3590.. 1004 2616.. 1266 4386 

Jefferson ...2161 2048.. 1661 1996.. 1156 22=13 

Juniata 1536 1029.. 1460 1110.. 1265 1306 

Lancaster. ..6171 10538.. 4889 7933. . 5717 14208 

Lawrence... 1322 2781.. 1301 2323.. 945 3429 

Lebanon 2293 343 1 -. 2429 3377- • 2076 4171 

Lehigh 5813 4087.. 4061 3624.. 5622 5342 

Luzerne 10312 8631.. 0617 7178. .10904 12966 

Lycoming. ..4495 3=33- • 3^9° 3'73-- 3 8 37 4423 

McKean 918 915.. ^94 620.. 618 1040 

Mercer 3845 4275-- 3iM 373«-- 34" 55*7 

Mifflin 1540 1383.. 1638 1546.. 1127 1085 

Monroe 2067 508.. 1900 407.. 2205 787 

Montgoin'ry78o3 739c.. 7066 6860.. 5113 8080 

Montour...*. 1455 875.. 1316 850.. 1333 1384 

North am p'n 6891 3921.. 4034 2181.. 6155 4841 

Nortb.umb'd3547 "3263.. 3474 3273- • 335 6 4271 

Perrv 2424 2279.. 2246 20^3.. 1744 2563 

Philadelp'a 40887 598*0.. 3426b ^9677. 23407 68792 

Pike 1039 238.. 497 128.. 797 339 

Potter Q40 i=w6.. 645 823.. 5^4 1463 

Schuvlkill...g'i84 7*17.. 7817 6708.. 6983 86=7 

Bnyder 1087 ii=,2.. ms 1744- 915 "863 

Somerset ...1627 2835.. 1134 2315.. 1383 3495 

Sullivan 829 422.. 734 393.. 571 440 

Supquehan'a2766 3425.. 1745 2480.. 2907 4536 

Tioga 1698 3614. . 1419 3J"7- '"77 573° 

Union "..1176 1837.. 114s 1672.. 916 1997 

Venango 32^5 3281.. 22^9 2367.. 2986 4780 

Warren i960 2306.. 1682 1785.. 1538 3090 

Washington 4306 4252.. 4071 4063.. 3223 5134 

Wayne 2433 2236.. 1989 1594-. 2152 2463 

Westmorrd.s799 3916.. 47*7 3830.. 4719 5412 

Wyoming... 1687 1489.. 1458 1130.. 1399 »55a 

York 7111 4083. . 5249 37 l6 -- 6753 62 99 

Total 277195 272516. 219471 244823.212041 349589 

Percent 50.43 49.57.. 47.27 6173.. 37.75 62. V6 

John Latta'8 rnaj. 4679; Robert W. Mackey's 
maj. for Treasurer In 1873,25352 : Grant's niaj in 
1872, 137,^48. Total vote in 1874. M9.711 ; in 1873, 
464.204; in 1872, 561.630. Benjamin Rush Brad- 
ford, Temperance candidate, received 4632 votes 
for Lieut.-Governor in 1874. 

The followinc were the aggregate votes in 
1874, of the candidates for the other State offices : 

Auditor- Gen.— Justus F. Temple, Dem 276605 

Harrison Allen, Rep 272*11 



Calvin Parsons, Temp 4769 

Temple over Allen 4094 

Sec.Int.AJprs— Wm. McCandlese, Dem 276935 

Robert B. Beath, Rep 272310 

W. B. Cuthbertson, Temp. . 4598 
McCandlesB over Beath.. 4625 

Judge Sup. Ct—* Warren J . Woodward 277454 

•Edward M . Paxson 270330 

James Black 5069 

* Woodward and Paxson both elected under 
the provisions of the new Constitution. 
Legislature, 1875-6. Senate. House, JointBal. 

Democrats 20 110 130 

Republicans 30 89 119 

Independents — a 2 

Democratic maj...* 10 19 9 

* Republican majority. 

Note.— The new Constitution of Pennsylvania 

Provides that " Members of the General Assem- 
ly shall be chosen at the general election every 
second year. Their term of service Bhall begin 
on the first day of December next after their 
election. Senators shall be elected for the term 
of four years, and Representatives for the term 
of two years." It is further provided in the 
schedule that at the general elections in the 
years 1874 and 187*, Senators shall be elected in 
all districts where there shall be vacancies, 
those elected in 1874 to 6erve two years, and 
those elected in 1875 to 6erve one year, the Sen- 
ators already elected under the old Constitution 
continuing to represent the districts in which 
they reside until the expiration of the terms for 
which they were elected. Of the 22 Senators 
holding over, 13 were Republicans and 9 Demo- 
crats. 17 Republican and n Democratic Sen- 
ators were ejected. 

Congress, 1874. 



Disl. Bern. Rep. 

I. Florence Freeman 

Phil. W'd 1....1819 2250 
..2481 1748 



1305 
• 2365 



2421 
3218 



Totnl 7970 96^7 

Chapman Freeman's 
maj. 1667. David Bran- 
son, Ind. Rep 
2370 votes. 

Phi'l.W'd 8 

!! 9. 



V. Robbins Harmer 

Phil. W'd 18.... 1894 1270 

" 19 3225 2808 

" 22 1284 1699 

23 130J 1665 

25^.. 1996 1309 

" 17 pt. 525 335 



Total 10228 9095 

John Robbins over 

received Harmer, 1133. Leonard 

Myers, Rep., received 



Rush O'Neill 



, ,9 votes. 

1580I VI. Forward Town s'd 



757C 



:I°J 



14- -..I33I 

20 2502 

17 pt. 1455 



Total 06*? 11692 

Charles O'Neill's maj. 



2032. 
III. 

Phil. W'd 



Uin.la'l Houston 



16. 



, .1712 
• 1783 
• 1304 
.1027 
. 1362 
, .1204 
.1311 



1077 Chester 4507 6138 

2223 Delaware 2409 3347 

X H Total .6916 9485 

J&-\ Washington Town- 
^send's maj. 2560, 

i2? VII. Acker Wood 

Bucks, part 3825 5179 

Montgomery. . 7607 7451 
Total. ,iL«p 



966 

IOM 
1380 
656 
603 
1087 
1317 



Total 0703 7060 

Samnel J. Randall's 

mai. 2643. 
IV. McGratl. Keller 

Phil. W'd 15.... 2683 367*0 



24.. 



-9- 




12630 
Alan Woodjir/'s ma"). 
1 198. H. A. Hunsicker, 
Temp., received 223 

VIII. ClvmerMKni&ht 
Berks 10^3 ^358 

Hiester Clymer's maj. 
5'°5. 

IX. Patton Smith 
Lancaster 6220 io«>5 

A. Herr Smith's maj. 
4285. 

X. Mutcbler Kachline 

Bucks, part 264S 315 

Lehigh 5727 1172 

Northampton. . 5372 5223 

Total 13747 6710 

William Mutchler'a 
maj. 7037. William H. 



Total 9049 12436 

William D. E.elley's|Blumer" Rep., received 
maj. 3387. I644 votes in Bucks. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



69 



achline ran as an Ind.j XIX. Maish M'Nair 

Dem. Adams 3008 25^7 

XI. Collino Butler Cumber land... 4384 3660 

Carbon 2288 2158 *°ik 7143 1035 

Columbia 2964 



Luzerne, part. .3052 

Vlonroe 2009 

Hontour 1464 

?ike 116J 



1121 
1127 
43i 



Total 14535 7252 

Levi Maish's maj. 7283. 

William McConkey.Ind. 

925 Rep., receiv'd 2984 votes. 

^4l XX. Mackev Alexan. 

Total 12937 s846; Cen tre 2556 2553 

Frank D. Collins's maj., Clearfield 2854 1640 



091 

XII. W.ightKetcham 
-.uzerne, part.. 7165 7932 

Winthrop W. Ketch- 
im's maj. 767. Smith, 
Temp., rec'd 619 votes. 

XIII. Reilly Garretson 

Ichuylkill 8600 8056 

James B. Reilly 's maj. 
J44- William M. Randall, 
nd. Dem., received 144 
rotes. 

XIV. Breslin Packer 

dauphin 4210 5471 

jebanon 2363 3354 

>lorthumberrd3ioo 3703 



Total 9673 12528 

John B. Packer's maj 

2855- 

XV. Powell Laporte 

Bradford 5112 4991 

Susquehanna . . 2788 3406 

Wayne 2458 2269 

Wyoming 1825 1416 

Total 12183 12082 

Joseph Powell's maj. 
101. 

XVI. Ea'ley 

Cameron 470 

Lycoming 4487 

McKean 024 

Potter 015 

Sullivan 822 

iTioga 



• 1713 



Ross 
4S6 

3501 
922 
1566 

3656 



l Total 9331 10660 

I Sobieski Ross's maj. 

teg. 

[XVII. Reilly Blair 

gedford 2975 2501 

^ la i r -v. 3384 3296 

Cambria 3733 1928 

Somerset 1635 2855 

I Total .11727 10580 „ 

John Reilly'smaj.1147, £ utle + r ■ v; 4027 3862 

XVIII. Steoger winter ,Crawiord 4839 4772 



Clinton 2938 

Elk 1100 335 

Mifflin 1388 1484 

Union 1220 1766 

Total 12146 8677 

Louis A.Mackey 's maj . 
34j9-_ 

XXI. Tumev Stewart 

Fayette 3559 337< 

Greene 5863 3975 

Westmoreland 2643 1504 

Total .12065 8854 

Jacob Turney's maj. 
3211. 

XXII. HopkinsNegley 
Allegheny, pt.10091 7777 

James H. Hopkins's 
maj. 2314. Thomas How- 
ard, Ind. Rep., received 
213 votes. 

XXIII. Cochran Bayne 
Allegheny, pt.. 5256 4996 

Alexander G. Cochran 
over Bayne, 260. Samuel 
A. Purviance, Ind. Rep., 
received 2803 votes. 

XXIV. MilleiWallace 

Beaver ; ...27io 2710 

Lawrence 1318 2722 

Washington... 4510 3915 

Total .8538 9347 

John W. Wallace's 
maj. 809. 

XXV. Jenks "White 

Armstrong 3586 3863 

Clarion 3332 1843 

Forest 363 335 

Indiana 1893 3271 

Jefferson ..2453 1797 

Total. ... 11627 11109 

George A. Jenks's maj . 
518. 

XXVI. Sheaklev White 

Butler 4027 



Franklin 4220 

IFulton 1021 

[Huntingdon. . .2539 

Juniata 1606 

Perry 2328 

Snyder 1090 

Total... 
William 
maj. 1023. 



3354 

699 

2914 



Mercer 3944 4103 

Total 12810 12737 

Jas. Sheaklev'smaj.73. 
XXVII. Egbert Curtis 

2378 Erie 4873 4999 

1456 "Venango 3488 3104 

12804 II78I Warren -2032 _2278 

Stenger's Total 10393 10381 

1 A. G. Egbert's maj. "12. 



DELAWARE. 

GOVERNOR'74. PRES.'72. PRES.'68. 

Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. 

CochranJump GreeleyGraut fceym. Grant 

Kent 3178 2751.. 2863 2434.. 2878 1523 

Newcastle... 5796 5625.. 4565 5845.. 4963 4217 

Sussex . 3514 2883. . 2778 2836.. 3 i 39 1883 

Total 12488 11259.. 10206 11115.. 10980 7623 

Percent 52.59 47.41.. 47.87 52.13.. 59.02 40.98 

John P. Cochran's maj. 1,229 ; Grant's maj. in 
1872, 909; Seymour's maj. in 1868, 3,3^7. Total 
voto in 1874, 23,747 ; iu 1872, 21,321 ; in 1868, 18,603. 



Representative in Congress. 
„ ■ - 18?4. 183-8. 18?0. 

Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. 
WilliamsLoflai.dWrightL. fland Biggs Heald 

Kent 3244 2681.. 2993 2507.. 3056 2202 

Newcastle... 5820 5498.. 4988 5874.. 4715 4721 

bussex . 3538 2845. . 3034 2996.. 3675 2227 

Total 12602 11024.. 11015 11377.. 11446 9150 

Percent 53.2446.66.. 49.19 50.81.. 55.57 44.43 

James Williams's maj. 1,578; James R.Lofland's 
maj. in 1872, 362; Benjamin T. Biggs's maj. in 
1870, 2,296. Total vote in 1874, 23,026 ; in 1872, 
22,392 ; in 1870, 20,596. 

Legislature, 1875-6. Senate. Bouse. JointBal. 

Democrats 8 21 29 

Republicans 1 — 1 

Democratic maj... "7 "21 "28 

NEW JERSEY. 

Governor, '74. Gov. '71. Gov. '68. 

Counties. Dem. Re 0. Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. 

BedleHalseyParkurWalshRandolphBlair 

Atlantic 1158 1412.. 1003 1343.. 1000 1632 

2549.. 2878 2648.. 2789 2149 

5542 
5279 

829 

13 



2878 

4887 

3737 

5S8 

2434 



2648., 
5648.. 

4330- • 
728.. 
ill.. 



B128. .10237 
3386.. 4663 



Bergen 3680 

Burlington 5527 

Camden 4359 

Cape May 684 

Cumberland.. 2965 

Essex 13967 13^94 . . 1 1 360 1084 7 

Gloucester... 2343 2427.. i960 2501 

Hudson 13346 " 

Hunterdon 4829 

Mercer 5452 

Middlesex 5455 

Monmouth 6051 

Morris 4505 

Ocean 1382 

Passaic 4047 

Salem 2518 

Somerset 2784 

Sussex 2906 

Union 5062 

Warren 4263 



27S9 

R206 

3656 

688 

2394 



4120 
946 

3742 



.11720 I2g02 
I796 2460 



Si9». 

4464. 

4179.. 
4571 .. 

1610. , 
4051.. 

2445.. 

2552. . 
1729.. 

4275-. 



4594 
4307 
5224 

3733 
1112 
3322 
2348 
2457 
3148 
4304 



7281. .11301 
3023.. 4795 



4621. 

4175. 
4021. 

377i. 
1536. 
4141. 
2361. 
'64 



4480 
4325 
5303 
4074 
1020 

3431 
2220 

2539 



2217.. 4050 



1849.. 321 1 
3767.. 3789 
2117. . 4122 



7103 
3384 
4338 
3912 
3706 
4210 
1856 
4032 

2553 
2179 
2219 

3373 
2620 



Jo'nt Bal. 

49 
3£ 

17 



„ Total 97283 84050. .82362 76383. .83955 79333 

Ferce.t 53.65 46.35.. 51.88 48 12.. 5! 42 48.58 

Joseph D. Bedle's maj. 13,233; Joel Parker's 
maj. in 1871, 5979 ; Theodore F. Randolph's maj. 
in i«68, 4622. Total vote in 1874,181,333; in 1871, 
158,745; in 1868,163,288. 
Legislature, 1875. Senate. House. 

Democrats 8 41 

Republicans 13 19 

Democratic maj . . 5* 22 

* Republican majority. 

Only 7 Senators were elected in 1874, 14 holding 
over. The term of office of Senators is three 
years. The House of Representatives is elected 
annually. 

Representatives in Congress. 

1874. 1872. PRES.'72. 

Districts. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Lib. Adm. 

1. AlbtsitsoiiSin'ksonCluteHazletimGreeleyGraiit 

5064 



3785 
2827 
2672 



Camden 4430 5175.. 2284 5116.. 2025 

Cape May 691 828.. 411 "907.. 415 

2482 3780.. 2348 



2794. 
•2715. 



1514 
2161 



8 - 4( W 



Cumberland.. 3000 3449 

Gloucester 2357 2395.. 1567 

Salem 2541 2362.. 2204 

Total 13010 14209.. 8948 1 5312. 

Clement H. Sinhickson's maj. nqo; John 
Hazleton's maj . in 1872, 6364 ; Grant's maj . 6784 

II. SnvthDcbbinsFotkerDcbbinsGreeleyGrant 

Atlantic 1183 1384.. 1004 1320.. 954 1358 

Burlington 5248 5695.. 4983 6174.. 4605 6282 

Mercer 5229 5261.. 4684 4972.. 4471 4951 

Ocean 1351 1637.. 1116 1726.. 1061 1750 

Total 13011 13077. .11787 14192. .11091 14341 

Samuel A. Dobbins*3 maj. 966; in 1872, 2405; 
Grant's maj. 3250. 



rm tt-iii'nrn'ri u 



■ •i' turn — 



TO 



Tim tribune almanac fob 1S75. 



TIT. Ito«3 Cliuk rat'o'K-inCWVGreoWGrRTit i 

Middlesex 5270 4=<73-. 4 2 33 5023- 3v5^ 4953 

Monmouth ... ^840 4309.. ., 

Union 157-' 4 O87.. 3847^ 52 69.. 4 421 

Total 1568a ) 14094. .1308a 

Mile mod Clark, jr. 'rf.rnaj. 

j Grant's maj., 7^7. 

IV. H.inii'tonP BceTIum'totiPott* Greeley "rnnt 

ILmrerdon 4865 3349.41.11 3558.. 4112 31,;, 

Somerset 3745 : . 2227 2715 

•; a . 2835 2056.. 2812 2097 

Warren .; 1 ^4 2 231 . . 41 19 2*0 52.. 3 8b 5 

Total 14585 9931. .13458 1099.^.. 13036 1 1038 I 

Robert Il;imilto'n"8 maj., 4054; in .1072, 2464; 
Greeley's maj. 1&98. 

y. CutlciThe'psWooaniffrheirsGi'eeleyGriiit 

Bergen 3406 2808.. 3015 3046.. 3057 2000 

Morris 4544 4504.. 1-300 4602.. 3271 

Passaic 37-'7 43 ^- • 3 ^° ^ 4993- • Si>3 f [49 

Total 11077 11670.. 9086 12701.. ot>ii 12795 

Augustas W. Cutler's maj. ~; William av. 
Phelps's niaj. in 1872,2715; Grunt's maj. 2984. 
TI. Tcose VT-.i-A Rai>daHWard GreeleyGwnt 

- iy70 13768.. 10403 16061.. 10472 15452 

derick H. Toese'a maj., 108; Marcus L. 
d's nicij. ia 1S72, 5658; Grant's maj., 4980. 

ViT. Ilnt-deT^ e cn<l<1e T 8 yl rSca.McrGroeleyGrsnt 

Hudson 1 [89 £2,-2.. 910S 10377.. 10501 8954 

A. 1! irdenDurgh's maj., 4917: Isaac 
cuddersmaj. in 1S72, 1269; Greeley's maj. 
I n the whole State < w-eeley received 76,450 ; 
11,91,656; Grant's maj., 15,200. 

Vote for Senators. 
Democratic. 1S?4. Republican. 
ATLANTIC eO. , 

■ ■• F.Madden*i2c/z 1229 William Moore. t 
GEN. 
Qeorg Vairt ■ ■ . Award Jardlne. 

X.D.Engli6h,tInd. 1 

\\ ;•. 

Geo.B.Langlev^..3o - 1 ;: TJIowardWii 
■ >ON. 
oiAbbelt* 13131 8191 Jaa.N. Startup. 

TonV. LlaclctDi , . Larton.J 

iRIS. 
:.' ..' anfieldi. 4483 4526 John HUl.*t 

Edward MXonanti368 1605 John r.Cchultz.% 
Members of former Senates. 
+ Former members of Assembly. Names of 
those elected 1 1 italics, being: Democrats 4, Re- 
publicans 3. Holding over : Democrats 4, Re- 
lcana 10. T< id number of Senators 21. 

Voto of Awcmblrmen. 

p, -,, • (8 lepublican. 

ATLANT1 C 

. Osgood. 1240 1314 Lemuel Conover.* 

!?o John J.Anderson.t 
2 John W. Itoj/ert ..1^70 1403 J.Henry Stephens. 
[NGTON. I 

; "? Townpend Cox.t 
'. ...1570 1442 Darling < :onrow. 

j, John J. Willis ; 

lichtl H3" 1057 Josi'iiL 1*. Adams. i 

; -'. I 

DUTgnlnf i47i ■"' Alden f. Fcovet. 

2 \ - v I', lloim r ... .] I 11 ' . 

.1 lppincotti323 1, . V.Herring.% 

14 MAY. 'l " 

/.'. I ' Alex. Tonns-t 

I JRL/'Nl). 

.1 .Gropscap+i60i [749 LewisLT.Dowdney* 

2 ( b as. B.Wllej — 14a -6 ue . W. Payne. t 
)' SSI i . I 

, d.Sannder8.i2oe 1293 Avlrev- Teed. 
• Ju% 1880 1448 Jabez II. liarnrrt. 

3 T'i< 6 "Francis K. Howell, 

4 Hugh >>i- .1400 1237 SVCVanRensselaer 






5 Jo*. TT.VTijjhtman. 

6 Adam Tnrkis 1343 1759 Saml. Morrow Jr.* jj 

7 1 ' r 1 1 1 1-. t lMclicr m.II. Kirk.-" 

Doyli ;- 1564 BethnneL.Dodd, 

roltOf *..;. . . : .2 AN tn. 11 .Cleveland. 

I 

. Loa~ge%..\\i- M2i Edward P.Stewart. 
2 Sim. r : -"•' .H m'j 

; 134 AV.E.Heritago,Tem 

1 Altx.T. '■' : C'-o. p. Pa-r : er.t 

2 Patrick Sheerein* .1480 No nomination. 
D. Keardon.+ lnd.11411 

3 C.A.Hougbtaling 1392 1464 Jno.D.Car8caUenA 

Uonnelt* 131c 1129 Arend Steenken. 

2 J..i.Vanderzee,lnd 

5 Abrr.m ppcer 87S u 19 John J. Tojf y. 

b Thus:. \\ ,Careyt..i7j 1465 Simeon H. Smith. 

7 Rudolph P. Babe* 1 - - < harles Forbes. 

8 7A /A JJcJJOnuld..io(>c 1210 Alex. Jacobus. 
HUNTERDON. 

1 JamesBrd% r>-:> 1557 Stacy B.Uray, 

2 If"///, ir. Swayze. . 2354 1755 Clement! i.Lionncll. 

ER. I 

r Geo.O.Vanflrth'.ui-itf -, t:^2 Jno.F.Pogevran.jr. 

2 /'. M.Youmans - • no. H^Brcwer. 

i, R. 8. Woodruff, jr. 1384 :>2 JJav.S.llutchjibon. 
.'LESEX. I 

1 Jrts. H. Van Cleeftmi 1695 Jno.T'anDeui 

2 Joseph uy Shannfii: Charles M.D 

•} Jos. C.Mag c ....2057 15C4 Henry Arrowsmitli. 
MONMOUTH. 

1 Geo. W J utters n'l-Ai 1644 Chil!on P. PoMr.s. 

2 C.D.Hmdrick8on.yftj\ No nominati 

3 W. V. Conovrt... 1681 . 125 John S. Sproull.t 
A. Walling, jr. Tern. 

MORP i 

1 Daniel Cogril.",nt..i-.42'i7 c £ Jas.C. Toungbloomi 

2 John Blauvelt 80c 1413 Edm. D. Halsey. 

3 E. M. Skelltnger*. 1967 441 Edw. E. Pott< r. 



Jiufus Eli 
PASSAIC. 
1 David Ke 

1 John I '. /' 



.1468 1505 Jno. Goble.% 

I Fnmuel Newell, 
1 Edward Franci 



2 t/«/!'i J . /.■■!'■ ' ...... ,0 ■ .1 wiwani j ram r .. 

■^ Garrett I'laht' 77 Bobt. M. 2'orOtl.i 

EM. I 

1 12 "v~m.PT. iBzard.'t 
7 li niJS.Varpt ;iur.* 



No nomine 

2940 16S2 EliasE. Coble. 



1 Chas. P. 

2 (ohn ]5. Dunham 

1 Wm. P. Sutphen* .1807 

2 No nomination. 

•-.x. 

UNION. 

1 l;>//. ;T. r-,"< i^:-'itt6 Elihu". Pope?. 

2 / 1 ■■'.. i; < i.< ki ft. .!.!•• r25o Wm. McKinlay.t 
■\ James ]>itchic 1757 1846 JElUuB. J'j 

, ARREN. 

1 John M. WychQff. 1604 1020 J. Y. Johnston. 
Thos. Byrne, Lad. . - 

2 Jon 

"John Sullh an, lnd 

The nnrncs of tli09c elect* d are pri: 
Italics, being: Democrats 41, Republicans, 
I 60. ] emocratic majorifr; 
eel (Ct< d. f emberd of former / 
biles. J Cains. 

Vote for Covernor by Towns, 

ATLANTIC CO. Dedlellaleel 
Dem. ". cymoulh 91 43 

1 -i 8j 

Atlantic 1S0 

I'.ncna Vista.. =3 
EggHarbor,T . j 

Citv. . A 

Calloway .... 

ailton 113 

I Hammonton.. 60 
Mullica 60 









Mia 




Majority ... 


... 


A 


1 


BERGE2 


' < 0. 






Enpiewiood .. 




?r-o 


102 


i'l-anklin 




■ ■1 


■ - Harrington .. 


.287 


209 


146 


Ilohokus 




"IS 


:■?; 


Lodi 


• 255 


199 


"4 


Midland 


.161 


131 



t*vx *4 m r m m * . ' X i -itr* & t'><*?e3a : J*m 



THE TEIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1315. 



Bedie Kalscy 



NewBarb'doess27 

Palisades 267 

Eidgeneld ....343 
Saddie River. .114 

Union 2^5 

Washington ..377 

Total 3680 

Majority ...1131 
BUKLINGTON CO 
Bass River — 195 

Beverly 22(0 

Bordentown ..689 
Burlington — 734 

Chester 151 

Chesterfield... 104 
Cinnaminson. .433 
Egg Harbor... 84 

Evesham 122 

Florence 147 

Lumberton ...150 
Mansfield .....i83 

Medford 241 

Mt. Laurel 91 

New Hanover. 279 
North a*mpton. 355 
Pemberton — 294 

Eandolpn 37 

Sham on g 144 

Southampton .313 

Springfield 248 

Washington... 49 
I /esthampton.130 
Willingboio .. 02 
Woodland . . . . 3° _ 

Total S527 

Majority 

CAMDEN CO. 

Camden 1 393 

" 2 250 

3 3i4 

4 522 

" . 5 453 

6 3'4 

" 7 342 

" 8 201 



308, Caldwell 315 

1211 Clinton 225 

267 1 Franklin 123 

Livingston 84 



BedleHal'cyi 



Bed'e llalseyl 



174 
251 

2549 



237 
40/ 
704 
295 
217 
18S 

2 75 
166 
158 
194 
192 

273 

208 
242 
544 
247 
46 
114 
250 
148 

43 

121 



Milburn 136 

Montclair 306 

Newark, 1 667 

. .726 
..432 
..655 
••553 
. 89b 

• •979 
.■763 
. . 400 
..941 

...414 

• 1033 
• ■ -905 
. . .160 

•••584 



225 

175 
149 
130 
300 

816 
703 
620 
4i7 

1 1 13 
268 
806 
804 
762 
402 
405 

1261 
384 
5i7 



Dis.Prec't6..266 
7.. 270 



Bedle liabey 



Total 3 Dist. 


1467 


1421 


4Dis.Prec'ti. 


.302 


IV 


" 2. 


.388 


169 


" 3- 


.32=i 


iiia 


" 4- 


,ib 7 


195 


5- 


.209 


120 


" b. 


.270 


in 



Total City. 10114 9978 

Orange 1 258 244 

" 2 326 

" 3 ■&■ 

Total City.. 1 166 

Orange, East.. 363 

" South. 297 

" West.. 242 

Total 13967" 

Majority... 273 

GLOUCESTER CO. 

Clavton 280 4 

5542|Deptford 82 1 

15 " Westno 1 

I Franklin 314 1 

616 Greenwich 244 



Total 4 Dist.1061 

5Dis. Prec't 1. .219 

" 2.. 169 

3- -259 

4-- 231 

" 5- -152 

Total 5 Dist.1030 

6Di3.Prec'ti..2i3 

" 2..2C.Q 

3- .335 

" 4--i7'5 

5-- x 57 



£ 1! 



53 



722 
092 
222 
153 

13694 



Total City.. 2789 3370 

Centre 113 174 

Delaware 126 113 

Gloucester,C'y482 368 

" Town26i 232 

LTaddon 125 349 

Stockton 146 309 

Watertord 186 143 

Wiuslow . . . ...131 212 

Total 4359 5 2 79 

Majority 920 

CAPE MAY CO. 



Harrison 255 

Mantua 232 

Monroe 166 

Washington... 142 

Woodbury 127 

Woolwich. . . . .382 

Total 2343 

Majority 

HUDSON CO. 

Cayonne 1 75 

" ■ 2 127 

" q iot 

" 4. . . . .363 ■ 

Total City... '666 

Harrison 558 

Hoboken 1 g; 

43 



296 
127 
173 
91 
255 
_326 

2427 
84 



Total 6 Dist. 1211 
" J. City. 9162 

ivearney 113 

North Bergen. 197 
Town of Union3i5 
UnionTowns'p2io 
Weehawken .. 58 
West ilobokenju. 

Total 13346 

Majority... 5218 

HUNTERDON CO 

Alexandria 231 

Arnwell, East. .196 
" West.. 144 

Bethlehem 379 

104 
Town'p277 

Delaware soo 

Franklin 187 

Frenchtown . . 04 
Highbridge ...162 

Holland 175 ■ 

Kingwood 250 • 

Lamberrville. .473 

Lebanon, Fast 89 

Westi7> 

Raritan, Fast.. 208 

" West. 269 

425 



100 

^Eeadington 

Tewksbwry 
Union 



311 



Cape May 
Dennis ... 

Lower 

Middle ... 
Upper.. . 

Total... 
Majority 
CU'MBEl 



15^ 



142 

159 
in 
195 

jj_ 

684 82( 

14 

ELAND CO. 



Total City. 
1 67! Jersey City : 
212 1 Dis.Prec't.i 

173 



.563 

• 4- 
16^,6 



147 
146 
2 1 



.292 
.193 

4820" 
J 448 
CO, 



Bridgeton 712 

Commercial . . 124 

Deerfield :207 

Downe 133 

■airfield 316 

Greenwich.... 48 

Hopewell 164 

Landisi Vinel.)33i ' 
Maurice River 217 

Millville 628 

Stoe Creek &s_ 

Total 2965 

Majority -* 

ESSEX CO. 

Belleville 22c; 

Blooinfield 371 



«53 
199 
103 
103 
282 
169 
i75 
635 
231 

635 
128 

35i3 
548 



453 



329 

2.. 26; 

" 3. .229 

" 4.. 21 8 

" 5.. 120 

6.. 185 
" 7 »^ 6 5 

otal 1 Bist,rsi3 
2 Bis. Prec't 1.. 33 a 

2.. 402 

3. .223 

4 ..35? 

5. .190 

6.. 404 

7- -384 



Total...... 

Majority. .. 

MEBQE - 
li_ Cliarabei sb'gh 35 1 

6-3 ; Ewing 238 

Hamilton 274 

1--, dop 'well 48' 

136'Lavrenee 250 

224 Princeton 467 

142 Trenton 1 ■-- 1 

,.236 

198 " 3 593, 

116 " 4 -IV' 

• ! c, - > 

• i'7» 

• 5J 7 
2835" 

39 



271 Madison 267 Cu 

324 Monroe 228 267 

N.Lrunsw'k 1.3^4 293 

2.408 324 

" 3.271 213 

4. 96 134 

" c.-,co 43Q 

" 6.587 308 

Total City. .2082 1762 

Perth Amboy. 321 232 

94; Piscataway 24^ 287 

i 'Raritan 4^0 306 

3 South Amboy. 663 376 

u Woodbridgc .^33 _J>n 

Total 5455 44«4 

Majority 991 

MONMOUTH CO. 

Atlantic 265 11 1 

Eatontown — 249 294 

Freehold 629 411 

" Upper 331 414 

Holmdel 226 73 

Howell 466 219 

Munalapan 258 2.14 

to&r:borougli..275 200 

Matuv an 325 175 

Midcuc. :wn....497 4-~ 

Millstone "i 2ii 

Ocean.. 812 409 

_±l-fEaritan 424 2 59 

b.128 Shrewsbury . . .041 560 

wall 389_ _i8r 

Total 6051 4179 

Majority — 1872 
MORRIS i 0. 

Boonton 214 504 

Chatham 392 452 

Chester 269 146 

Hanover 387 ir?6 

Jefferson no 162 

Men dh mil re-) 170 

Monistown 681 709 

Vont\ide 8J j;,5 

Mt. Olive 213 113 

Passaic ...219 123 

Peqnannock .-. 86 217 

llando ph 576 s; 5 

\^.\ Rockaway — =08 491 

70 Roxbnry 250 156 j 

Washington. ..31° 

Total. 4505 

Majority 

OCEAN CO. 



241 

JS1 

968 
228 
243 
377 
117 
123 

1088 

6098 

86 

124 

290 

107 

24 



liib 

17' 
i 8; 5 
284 

1G\ 
9i 



Dri( 



..207 



33 J 

382 

l'.C 

117 



Total 2 Dist.228o 
3Dis.Pvec'fri..2io 

" 2..2C2 

" 3..I53 

4..2CO 

" 5..I03 



49 
no 

35 

l\ 

95 
117 

569 



i.9 
to 
iS3 



Total City 
Washington 
Windsor-, East.238 
. \Yest171 

Total .5452 

Majority — 2--\ 
MIDDLESEX CO 
i^Brsnswick, E. 417 

I52| K>. -/.? 

i&s'Cranbnry 13-2 



'over 270 

Eagles wood... 2s 

31] Jackson 275 

171 Lacey 58 

395 Manchester ... 171 

540 Pliupsced 175 

207 Stafford 101 

440 Union ioi _ 

473 Total 13^2 16:0 

3° b Ma.1ority 2. J 

PASSAIC CO. 
\cquaek'noncfe; 12-, 
Little Fails.... 81. 1.4 
L y Manchester ...ici n \. 
j*2_?|Pae>saic City... 344 '-:'> 

2452.Paterson 1 2; 6 :-,j 

174! " 2 245 379 



3--- 



369 



5108 

165 
ISlI 



8. 
Cit; 



;6 Ponrpton 

Wa.vno . . 



...411 
...275 
451 

• -Al 

r -.2945 
... 145 
109 



324 
195 

.807 

166 



72 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



Bedle Halsey 

West Milford . . 222 196 

Total 4047 4051 

Majority 4 

SALEM CO. 

Elsinboro 38 100 

L. A. Creek.... 109 162 

L. P. Neck 187 142 

Mannington...i32 288 

Pilesgro ve 209 505 

Pj/tsgrove 302 91 

" U..221 233 

Quinton 114 132 

Salem city 493 459 

U. A. Creek ..289 112 

U. P. Neck 424 221 

Total 2518 2445 

Majority 73 

SOMERSET CO. 

Bedminster ...290 132 

Bernards 361 196 

Br anchburg ... 130 180 

Brldgewater ..7-,9 666 

Franklin 349 454 

Hillsborough.. 309 414 

Montgomery . . 160 239 

NorthPainfield228 215 

Warren .198 56 

Total 2784 "2552 

Majority 232 

SUSSEX CO. 

Andover 178 59 

Byram 137 135 

Franklord 175 206 

Green 97 47 

Hampton 133 72 

Hardyston 236 123 

Lafayette 103 93 

Montague 102 41 

Newton 327 206 

Sandy ston 185 84 

Stillwater 191 104 

Sparta 241 167 

Vernon 232 101 

Walpack 118 22 

Wantage 4m 269 

Total 2906 1729 

Majority 11 77 



UNION CO. 

Bodle Halsey 

Clark 25 39 

Cranibrd 98 no 

Elizabeth 1... 376 468 

" 2 637 131 

" 3. ...466 159 

4.... 197 199 

5 305 45« 

6.... 155 239 

" 7 156 168 

" 8 253 12 3 

Total City.. 2605 1963 

Linden 152 174 

N.Providence. 64 107 

Plainneld 487 704 

Rahway 1 156 113 

" 2 189 149 

H 3 281 2:8 

" 4 -170 97 

Total City... 796 ^77 

Springfield 91 77 

Summit 107 70 

Union 276 181 

Westfield 301 273 

Total 5062 4275 

Majority "787 

WARREN" CO. 

Allamuchy .... 62 61 

Belvidere 232 133 

Blairstown 170 122 

Franklin 215 79 

Frelinghuysen no 129 

Greenwich 230 178 

Hackett9town.3og 156 

Hardwick 91 22 

Harmony 183 66 

Hope . . . . 213 109 

Independence. 124 51 

Knowlton 246 80 

Lopatcong .... 144 57 

Mansfield 195 120 

Oxford 530 197 

Pabaquarry 74 12 

Philipsburg 699 373 

Washington, B.255 175 

T.181 -97 

Total 4263 2217 

Majority 2046 



IOWA. 

Seo. State,^. Goy.'73. Sec. St. '72. 

Countien^lnti-JiOH Rep.An.M.ttep. Lib. Acl/n. 

Morgan Young Vale' arpenterGuilbert Young 

Adair 433 917.. 3^9 725.. 227 761 

Adams 398 529.. 548 376.. 271 879 

Allamakee.. 1400 1229.. 1536 1049.. 1430 1455 

Appanoose.. 1 139 1289.. 1430 1204.. 995 1565 

Audubon... 218 180.. 289 209.. 153 184 

Benton 1209 2012.. 1378 1785.. 967 2515 

Black Hawkj.257 1778.. 740 1613.. 835 2314 

Boone 877 1341.. 11 19 1229.. 858 1421 

Bremer 331 1078.. 399 136s.. 468 1500 

Bucbanan ..1161 1386.. 1429 1175.. 899 1886 

Buena Vista 72 503.. 31 549.. 61 515 

Butler 339 1082.. 202 1200.. 446 1442 

Calhoun 81 267.. 115 295.. 103 343 

Carroll 422 485.. 311 422.. 190 411 

Cass 556 1027.. 427 866.. 249 1008 

Cedar 1031 1726.. 1022 1549.. 1086 2219 

Cerro Gordo 154 969.. 118 1051.. 185 913 

Clierokee... 237 ^45.. 8 472.. 119 462 

Chickasaw.. 580 92=;.. 688 1157.. 532 1127 

Clarke 541 701.. 766 765.. 504 1050 

Clay^ 33 440.. none 573.. 47 584 

Clayton 1953 1371.. 1997 i 55 6.. 2133 2312 

Clinton 2023 2191.. 2004 2104.. 2425 3096 

Crawford ... 422 570.. 347 461.. 242 426 

Dallas 976 1426.. 962 q6o.. 598 1629 

Davis 1178 1207.. 12^2 1222.. 1388 1585 

Decatur 829 964.. 946 1076.. 933 1290 

Delaware... 973 1428.. 1041 1353.. 1033 1881 



Morgan YoUDg YaleCarpenterGui bertYoung 

Des Moines. 1677 1915.. 1315 1607.. 2108 2528 



Dickinson.. 81 

Dubuque 3258 

Emmett 32 

Fayette 1252 

Floyd 283 

Franklin 233 

Fremont 1304 

Greene 298 

Grundy 229 

Guthrie 567 

Hamilton ... 457 

Hancock 48 

Hardin 899 

Harrison 863 

Henry 1424 

Howard 350 

Humboldt . . 106 

Ida 33 

Iowa 1022 

Jackson 1840 

Jasper 1221 

Jefferson . . . 1062 

Johnson 191 7 

Jones 1610 

Keokuk 1337 

Kossuth Ill 

Lee 2637 

Linn 1598 

Louisa 563 

Lucas 6<;7 

Lyon 13 

Madison 1252 

Mahaska 1 94 

Marion 1663 

Marshall 227 

Mills 660 

Mitchell 357 

Monona...... 515 

Monroe 570 

Montgomery 487 
Muscatine ..1301 

O'Brien 83 

Osceola 3 

Page 764 

Palo Alto ... 255 
Plymouth... 158 
Pocahontas. 84 

Polk 1933 

Pottaw't'mei^s 
Poweshiek.. 848 
Ringgold.... 391 

Sac 135 

Scott 2546 

Shelby 306 

Sioux 57 

Story 709. 

Tama 940 

Taylor ^82 

Union 569 

Van Buren..ii2o 

Wapello 13-0 

Warren 1161 

Washington. 1358 

Wayne 1203 

Webster 919 

Winnebago. 51 
Winn eshiek. 1076 
Woodb«ry.. 586 

Worth 12 

Wright 77 



193" 
1920. . 

194- 
2221.. 

1331" 

mw 

687.. 

567.. 

882. 

694.. 

231.. 

1413.. 

946" 

1632.. 

678.. 

322.. 

93- 
1165.. 
1567. . 
2143. ■ 
1301 . . 
1708. . 
2093.. 
1418.. 
429.. 
2027. . 

2744- 

12m.. 

832. 



1 

3566 
16 

1059 
133 
113 

1395 

369 

4 

802 

466 

8l3 

I°34 

1592 

30 

135 

4 
1058 

2635 
1545 
1274 
2058 
1612 
1605 

2762 

1679 

828 

59° 



259.. none 
1522.. 1312 



1790 

2049 

none 

956 

243 

342 

«33 

414 

1505 

none 

1 

946 

261 

13 

39 

2124 

1238 

1 134 

252 

2833 

228 

69-0 

986 
650 

549 

1388 
1670 
1604 
185b 
1044 

853 
281.. none 
1522.. 41 
750.. «3 • 
314.. none 
471 .. 64 



1974. 
1761. 
1963. 

851. 

887. 

469. 

885. 
1029. 
1597. 

273. 

21s.. 
1139.. 

229.. 

578.. 

330.. 
3039- 
1634.. 
1299- 

510.. 

396.. 
I575-. 

490.. 

1408. '. 

i°37- 
742- 
718.. 

1378.. 

1608.. 

1669. . 

1707.. 

119O. . 
883. 



318 
2153. 

246. 
1686. 
1457- 

979- 

902. 

569. 

614. 

945- 

599- 

243- 
1252. 
1045. 
1601. 
1232. 

463. 

121. 
1259. 
187 1. 
2006. 
1298. 

1733- 
1658. 
1340. 
642. 
2207. 

2347- 
1383. 

836. 

241. 

I397- 
1626. 
1526. 
1498. 

768. 
1466. 

459- 

1653- 

461. 

293. 
1060. 

277. 

763. 

324. 
271a. 
156;. 
1293. 

731. 

332. 
™39- 

364. 

460. 

958. 
1120. 

801. 

588. 
1399. 
1776. 
1242. 
1450. 

910. 

839. 

343- 
2110. 

952. 

455- 

434- 



Total 79060 107243.. 82364 105122.. 74497 132359 

Percent 42.44 57.50. .43.99 66 01.. 36 01 63.99 

Josiah T. Young's maj. 28,183; Gov. Carpen- 
ter's maj. in 1873, 22,5^8; Young's maj. in 1872, 
57,862. Total vote in 1874, 186,303 ; in 1873, 187,686; 
lu 1872, 206,856. 

The following are the aggrpgates received in 
1874 by the candidates for the other State offices: 

Auditor Buren R. Sherman, Rep. .106,783 

J. M. King, Anti-Mon.... 78,368 
Sherman's maj 28,415 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST5. 



\Treusurer William Christy, Eep 106,299 

Henry C. Har- is, A. ti-M. 77,043 

Christy's maj 29,256 

Register L. Off. .David Secor, Ren 107,080 

K. H. Rodearmel, Anti-M. 79,146 

Secor's maj. 27,934 

Att. General M. E. Cutts.Rep 103,564 

J. H. Keatley, Anti-M 79,750 

Cutts's maj 23,808 

Clk.SupremeCt. Edward J. Holmes, Rep. .107,614 

G. W. Ball. Anti-Mon 71,581 

Holmes's maj 36,033 

[Rep.Supreme Ct. John S^Runnells, Rep 107,262 

J. M. Vv eart, Anti-Mon. . . 77,108 

Runnells's maj 30,154 

The above officers were elected for two vears, 
except the Clerk and Reporter of the Supreme 
Court, who are elected for four. 
(Legislature, 1875. Senate, Hoxise 

Republicans 34 

Democrats 

Independents 10 

Vacancy — 1 1 

Republican maj . . 18 1 19 

Representatives in Congress. 

1874. 1872. Tees. '72. 
Dlst. Anti-Mon. Hep. Lib.Adm. Lib.Adm. 

I. Palmer.VIe raiyShelleyM -^'yGreeleyGrant 

1800.. 2103 2510.. 2037 2501 
1565.. 1295 2522.. 1242 2507 
1300.. H48 1765. . H35 1765 
2350.. 2964 2825.. 2850 2907 
1273.. 750 1506.. 715 1503 
1354.. 1416 1862., 1348 1866 
1742.. 1285 2159.. 1221 2140 



50 

6 

43 



Joint Bal. 
84 
12 

53 



Des Moines 1738 

Henry 1463 

Jefferson 1052 

Lee 2289 

Louisa 538 

VanBuren 1128 

Washington . . .1313 

Total 9^21 11384. .10961 15149. .10=48 15189 

Guorge W. McCrary's maj. 1,863; hi 1872, 4,188. 

Grant's maj. 4,641 . 

II. t>h&>- inTiiftsLcffini?*r.Co!tonGree'eyGrant 

Cedar 1027 1712.. 1363 1849..* 927 2225 

Clinton 2011 2150.. 2709 2779.. 2364 3096 

1583.. 2477 1371.. 1857 1884 

2091.. 1426 2131.. 1237 2285 

1626.. 1524 2103.. 1421 2145 

1617.. 2847 2288.. 2648 2369 



Jackson i8u 

Jones 1563 

Muscatine 1226 

Scott 2484 



Total 10122 10779. .12346 12521. .10454 14004 

John Q. Tufts's maj. 6=7 ; Aylett R. Cotton's 
maj. in 1872, 175. Grant's maj. 3,550. 

III. AiiiswoithGiHngerstcm.-.UonnnnGreeleyGrant 



Allamakee 1285 

Buchanan 1151 

Clayton 1921 

Delaware 984 

Dubuque 3295 

Fayette 1393 

Winnasniek 1037 



1455 
1877 
2298 
1880 
2424 
2251 
2047 

Total 11066 11003. .1177413654. .10749 14232 

L. L. Ainswor-th's maj. 63; William G. Don- 



1340. 
1372. 
1414. 
1419. 
1838. 
2065. 
1555- 



1518 

945, 
2386 

IO=,0 

3585 
1 174 
1116 



1360. 
1880. . 
2101.. 
1869. . 
2366.. 
214=;.. 
1933- • 



863 
2097 

983 
3470 
1005 

949 



111's maj. in 1872, i,88o. 

IV. bowmauPiMtt 

Black Hawk. . .1621 1335 

Bremer 542 

Butler 380 

Cerro Gordo. . . 313 

Chickasaw 786 

Floyd 403 

Franklin 238 

Grundy none 

Hancock 77 

Hardin 1004 

Howard 744 

Mitchell 418 

Winnebago 56 

Worth 25 

Wright 82 

Total 



Grant s maj . 3,483 

Luscli Priitt GreeleyGrant 



793 • 
1013.. 

664.. 
1151.. 
721. . 

5 2 3" 
200.. 

1343- • 
309-. 
794-. 
277.. 
298.. 
461., 



949 
504 
440 
128 
506 
416 
161 
108 

56 
529 
225 
359 
19 
77 



2401 . . 
1476. . 

1445. ■ 

890.. 
1120.. 

1659. . 
869.. 

75° • • 
188.. 

I794-. 

681.. 
1238. . 

276. . 

398.. 

430.. 



402 
178 

406 

151 
112 

53 
502 
132 

358 
16 
89 
85 



2477 
1490 

1433 
906 
1120 
1620 
865 

757 
186 

1789 
772 

1226 
270 
400 
424 



. 4574 15615.. 4284 15735 
4,036; in 1872, 11,041. 



. ..6689 1072c;. 
Henry O. Piatt's maj. 
Grant's mai- n,45i. 

V. WMkins nWilson Irish WilaonGrcleyGrant 

Benton 1235 2048.. 1006 2487.. 909 2510 

Iowa 1008 1162.. 980 1512.. 906 1493 

Johnson 1810 1795.. 2012 2052.. 1889 2109 

Linn i637_26gi . ._i549_3356. -_i445_3373 



Wilkinson Wilson Iri h WilsonGree ley Grant 

Marshall 190 1994.. 389 2280.. 368 2246 

Poweshiek 811 1327.. 714 1939.. 559 1956 

Tama .7901707.. 784 1905.. 730 1933 



7434 15S31.. 6806 15620 
5,243 ; in 1872, 8,097. 



Total 7481 12724 

James Wilson's maj. 
Grant's maj. 8,814. 
VI. Gates^ampsnnTrimblt-Lough.GrepleyGrant 

Appanoose ....1 130 1295.. 1253 1313.. 897 1558 

Davis 1202 1160.. 1484 1451.. 1250 1582 

Jasper...: 1141 2196.. 1166 2711.. 945 2848 

1490 

2061, 

i860, 

800. 

1599 



Keokuk. 1276 

Mahaska 1361 

Marion 1602 

Monroe 652 

Wapello 1373 



1519 


1743. 


1361 


1852 


1477 


2162. 


1 175 


2532 


2083 


2043.. 


1811 


2241 


932 


1117. . 


856 
1647 


1205 


1789 


2098. 


2131 



Total 9737 12461..11703 14638.. 9948 15949 

Ezekiel S. Sampson's maj. 2,724; William 
Loughgriclge's maj. in 1872,2,935. Grant's maj. 

6,001. 

VII. WhitmanKa=sonPalmerKasson Greeley Grart 



Adair 570 737.. 233 

Clarke 545 683.. 500 

Dallas 966 1354.. 627 

Decatur 844 957.. 930 

Guthrie 575 839.. 404 

Lucas 717 736.. 745 

Madison 1285 1407. .1006 

Polk... 2143 2728.. 1439 

Warren 1132 1633.. 918 

Wayne 1196 1200.. 900 



757. 


211 


1046. 


482 


1603. 


564 


1290. 


885 


100 J . 


360 


1 107. 


698 


1756. 


946 


3126.. 


1473 


2004.. 


III 


1219.. 



757 
1035 
1620 
1283 

986 
1118 
1758 
3051 
2127 
1214 



Total .9973 12274.. 7702 14909.. 7248 14949 

John A. Kasson's maj. 2,301; in 1872, 7,207. 
Grant's maj. 7,701. 

VIII. RordMcFiillMerrittMcDillGreeleyGrant 

Adams 382 543.. 246 907.. 250 870 

Audubon 204 186.. 161 175.. 146 184 

Cass. 546 1036. . 262 1004. . 231 998 

Fremont 1071 101 1.. 1316 

Harrison 866 910.. 759 

Mills 598 881.. 709 

Montgomery.. 459 1027.. 493 

Page 712 1138.. 717 

Pottawattamie 1431 1654.. 1218 

Ringg old 432 457 . . 242 

Shelby 285 502.. 148 

Taylor 582 728.. 480 

Union - 547 7 35 • • 2 48 

Total 8115 10808.. 6999 12675.. 6628 12579 

James W. McDill's maj . 2,693 ; m l8 72, 5,676. 
Grant's maj. 5,951 . 

IX. w£ tiner OHverDunt'ombe Or Gre9leyGrant 



1255.. 


1292 


1261 


1161. . 


623 


1 150 
1169 


I 135.. 


683 


966.. 


453 


987 


1423. 


717 


1408 


1442. 


1153 


1451 
804 


808. 


2I 5 


373. 


138 


379 


1116. 


432 


1 122 


910.. 


295 


796 



Boone 8^9 

Buena Vista ... 75 

Calhoun 76 

Carroll 432 

Cherokee 238 

Clay 33 

Crawford 451 

Dickinson 54 

Emmett 30 

Greene 312 

Hamilton 447 

Humboldt 119 

Ida t 32 

Kossuth 115 

Lyon 21 

Monona 511 

O'Brien 88 

Osceola 10 

Palo Alto 244 

Plymouth 150 

Pocahontas 73 

Sac 134 

Sioux 48 

Story 709 

Webster 934 

Woodbury 613 



1314.. 
511.. 
266.. 
475-. 
545- • 
443- • 
552.. 
220. . 
196. . 
665.. 
693.. 
309.. 
95.. 
425.. 
250. . 
448.. 
263.. 
211.. 
241.. 
588.. 
312.. 
398.. 
281.. 
1389.. 
862.. 
705.. 



972 

113 
106 
191 
144 
58 
254 
121 
106 
277 
274 
171 

27 

139 

2 

226 

67 
9 
228 
170 
130 
117 

604 
ios.9 
453 



1336. 
498.. 
343- • 
409.. 

437- • 

581.. 

413.. 

249.. 
168.. 
737.. 
835.. 

% 3 :: 
499.. 
84.. 
575.. 
320.. 
204.. 
230.. 

434.. 
202. . 
287.. 
291.. 
1190. . 
836.. 
798.. 



79° 
59 

no 

52 

229 

11 

112 
219 

"5 

13 
119 

I 
176 

62 

196 

141 

68 
48 
117 

34° 
780 

439 



1414 
513 
340 
410 
463 

574 
420 

317 
:o8 
740 
862 
403 

82 
519 

87 
571 
333 
202 
249 
469 
263 

305 
310 

1389 

1076 

790 



6152 12402.. 4^31 13309 
5,849; Jackson Orr's 



Total 6808 12657 

Addison Oliver's maj, 
maj. in 1872, 6,250. Grant's maj. 8,778. 

Total in State for Greeley, 71,196 ; for Grant, 
131,566; Grant's maj. ^0,370. 



74 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



Counties, t or. 

Adams 108 

Allen s«3 

Ashland 156 

Ashtabula 

Athens ;.- 

Auglaize 239 

Belmont 

Brown 556 

Duller 1357 

Carroll log 

Champaign 763 

Clarke 1970 

Clermont 11418 

Clinton 519 

Columbiana 

Coshocton 604 

Crawford 1107 

Cuyahoga 1345° 

Darke 624 

Defiance 414 

Delaware 3=0 

Erie 836 

Fairfield 1101 

Fayette 47S 

Franklin 

Fulton "602 

Gallia 293 

Geauga 793 

Greene 759 

Guernsey 479 

Hamilton 14855 

Handock 4-;9 

Hardin < -.; 

Harrison 224 

Henry 451 

Highland 1129 

Hocking 4'*> 

Holmes 262 

Huron 1037 

Jackson 363 

Jefferson 

Knox 

Lake 1527 

Liwreuce ^031 

Licking 17J 

Logan 

Lorain 1487 

Lucas 

Madison ; 

Mahoning 

Marion 740 

Medina 

Meigs...: 

Mercer jK> 

Miami 971 

Monroe 3'-* 

Montgomery 

Morgan 267 

Morrow 351 

Muskingum 1028 

Noble..! 78 

Ottawa 902 

Paulding 

Perry 213 

Pickaway 670 

Pike 

Portage 1 

Preble 

Putnam 1-" 

Richland 1 . 

Ross <JS <: > 

Sandusky 

Scioto 97 

Seneca 688 

Shelby 807 

Stark 3804 



OHIO. 

!E ox the Proposed New Constittjti 
X. I).— For explanation of the 1 ropositions.set 

MINORITY llAILKOAD 

Constitution-. Rbbbbskktat'b . Aid. 



M.For 



240J. 








2234. 


8.3 




6^9 


2073- 






1424 


2631. 
1364. 


40 


2(M . 


241 




1 62 


1451 


2157. 


298 




1485 

620 


1980.. 






204 




235 








i36t 


5338. 




c,Oo2. 


524 




2461 


• 




305O. 


7 


■ 




353° • 
















2^00. 


81 






2?33- 

ICH2. 


550 
I07S 


■ 
2100. 


470 


1 no 


3321. 


1013 




106 c, 


- 




2769. 


323 




2947- 


983 


•1942 . 




5267. 


370 


6013. 


2163 


2515. 


2321 . 




2001. 


1203 




94S 


2241. 


225 


3043- 




4019. 


6974 




1519 


13172. 


11285 




499 


2735- 






2197 


1 Site. 


213 


1711?' 


10.3 


l8s3. 




3714. 


210 


3751. 


171 


3804. 




■ ;-;;• 


682 


1093. 






- 


2712. 




2".00. 


3-0 




1883 


1846. 




176b. 




■735- 


083 


4620. 




4172. 




O404. 


4°4 6 


1 5 !4 • 


060 


1373. 




'99-'- 






244 


2)590 . 








964. 




I281. 




1585. 

2800. 


^6 


2907. 




262 ^. 


600 




■ 


20-; 




441 


■ 


11 17 


Hon. 


; 


1 1 194. 


6252 






344a. 




3193. 


A-\> 


3357- 


2118 

1 


211:. 


57 « 






3541. 


2O0 




2«J0 


3351 • 


'V> 


3V- 






2196. 




29-14- 


V 




4IO 


■ 


1558 


IS08. 




1417. 


205 




2IM- 








2393. 


14CI 


3163. 




3028. 


592 


■ 




2063. 


330 


20O4. 






lOol 


3763- 


429 




2b 4 


3914. 








3219. 


-MS 


' 


1311 


• 17« 




J090 


?->(>.. 










273 


1 


2001 


. 


701 








I2f 1 




845 


3422. 


364 


4213. 


23U 






. 




2^00. 




. 






H)2 








1349 


S199- 


44'5 


4451- 






«44 




11 1 


2457. 




. 






180 


2901. 


1 ;< 1 




814 


. 












. 










2869. 




3100. 


1 4^-8 


2796. 






■U2 




3319. 


















56 j 




1063 


2602. 


353 


2503. 










770 












i-- 1 


1 


120 




- 




500 


1043. 


2'7 


848. 


1 262 


094. 






Il8 




. 




■ 








2607. 


oVs 


2210. 








' '.'••;. 


213 


1410. 




1 401. 






817 




















1 


















3-137- 




42 13. 




■ 




3076. 


. H07 




2094 


3H7. 




!$: 


272 


- 




2S18. 


715 








" 








43-9- 


2903 




Gc.7 




209 


1541. 


1092 


552 1 . 


3082 . 


6036. 


590 


8617. 


4900 



178a 

2=139 

2060 

831 

4167 

1300 
1553 

1806 

. 

2719 

I =,02 
3942 

'233 
2352 

1207 

2077 

5269 

3056 
980 

1289 

22QI 

2894 
2363 

1 J J I 

: 
^i7: 

I I-.! 
1516 

I* 

■ 

17^ 
2023 
1932 

- 

1427 

191 I 

904 

2023 
7M 



No. of Vote". Countic 

Ad ami 

3007 Allen. 

3236 \shlaiH" 

40=12 LshtabuU 

3319 Mheni 

2240 

6775 Belmoai 

3961 1 

- Duller. 

2724 ( 

Chan 

3710 < lar 

1 leimon 

< 

. . . . « oluml 

Coshocton. 

Crav ford. 

17070 Cuyahoga! 

3300 Dai ':c. 

2044 Defiance! 

4112 Delaware! 

2309 

FairfleidJ 

. ■ in-. 

5174 Franklin! 

2185 h niton. 

3292 Gallia] 

Geauga] 

3S1S < ■ 

41^6 Guei 

1 laroilton' 

37,^4 Hancock. 

309^ Hardin. 

llairison. 

Henry. 

4155 ItighlancQ 

19^,9 Ho 

Holmes. 

4322 .'.. .. Huron] 

Jackson. 

4363 teffci '-on. 

3967 Knox. 

Lake. 

4527 J.uvr, nee. 

Lit 

Logan! 

L< 

370) I 

2544 

.... . 

, 1 M 

> ' 

4074 MeigsJ 

Merceri 

.Miami. 

.Monroe. 

jon :•!•■■. 

r.:i. 

2987 Vi 

6081 M asking ami 

2990 Noble. 

Ottawa. 

1003 Paulding] 

326s Perry] 

PickawayJ 

F'ke. 

Pot 

Preble v ( 

1156 Putnam. 

4839 Richland. 

4127 

Sandusky] 

^867 Scioto. 

5016 Seneca. 

Shelby] 

Stark. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1 ST5. 



75 



Counties. 



uunnit 2112 

rurubull 1755 

use ar aw as 1540 

Dion 375 

an Wert 210 

Vinton 208 

Warren , 673 

Washington 660 

Wayne 1119 

Williams 482 

Wood 597 

Wyandot 3°5 

Total 102885 



For. Against. For. Against. For .Against. For. Against.No. of votes. Counties. 



2774.. 


1453 


3007.. 


4 r >9 


3970. 


977 


4343- • 


351 


3492.. 


1033 


37»».. 


434 


2870. . 


228 


2932.. 


287 


2234.. 


180 


2142.. 


557 


1795- 


107 


1792.. 


207 


328=;. 


S69 


3I44-. 


44b 


4266. 


473 


4247.. 


443 


4989.. 


699 


SI24.. 


514 


2002. . 


393 


1923.. 


190 


3163.. 


537 


2987.. 


301 


23!3-. 


461 


2137. . 


2 ib 



2501c 



. 172252 



73615 25941 5.. 45416 296648. 
Majorities against 147284. . 185800.. 251232.. 

Coil°"reSSIBieil. | Till. Pearson Lawr. Mus'n Lawr. 

*„ w . two iChampai'n.1838 2068.. 1970 2831 

1»7<4. J&7-*. Clarke 2716 3014.. 2539 3931 

Dists. Deni. Hep. Lib. AdmJLogzn j687 1820.. 1991 2686 

I. Sayl r Green • ayler Eggles'n Madison . . .1351 1267. . 1592 1815 

Hamilton.pt.11566 7252. .12474 8905. Miami 2786 2587.. 2613 3" 

Total 10378 10756.. 10705 14748 



4194.. 2465 239;.. 5004 Summit. 

5162.. 2215 3490.. 5848 Trumbull. 

4467.. 2465 2522.. 5098 Tuscarawas. 

2912... 1400 1826.. 3281 Urjion. 

1776.. 1207 1167.. 2470 Van Wei t. 

1784.. 712 1271.. 2036 Vinton. 

3403.. 2064 1901.. 4055 Warren. 

4360.. 1978 2905.. 5000 Washington. 

5443.. 2907 3117. . 6207 Wayne. 

2252.. 1243 1203.. 2484 Williams. 

3324.. 1980 1774. . 3836 — Wood. 

2426.. 1377 1305- • 2737 Wyandot. 

179538. .360427 Total. 

7_c6 

XIV. Cowan Armstr. Eerry D ue4. 

Ashland ...2124 1715.. 2401 2034 



Milton Sayler'a niaj. 4314; in 
1872, 3569 

II. Banning- Steven. Ban 'g Hayes 
iHaniil'n.pt. 10852 9317. .-11034 Q^3 2 

Henry B. Bahning's maj. 1535 ; 
in 1872, 1502. 

III. Savage Smith Sohn Smith 

Butler 4504 2405.. 4748 2877 

Clermont ..3389 2692.. 3655 3367 

Clinton 1681 2388.. 1752 3029 

Favette 1296 1496.. 1516 2005 

AVarren 2102 2829. . 2029 365] 

Total.... 12972 11810. 13700 1492c 

John 8. Savage's maj. 1162; 

John Q. Smith's maj. in ih72, 1229 

IV. McMahon Gunck.Wlnans Gun 

Darke 3663 2816.. 3388 287: 

Greene 2072 2743.. 1842 384 

Monteom'y7498 6529.. 7240 727' 
Preble 21 78 2224 .. 2 207 2 60 

Total .. .15411 14312. .14677 1660 

John A. McMahon's maj. 1099 

Lewis B. Gunckel smaj. in 1872 

1927. Campbell, Temp., had 21 

votes in 1874. 

V. Rice Lytle LainisXybi'. 

Allen 2078 1702.. 2422 1966 

Auglaize. . .1717 634- • 2485 9 s : 



William Lawrence's maj. 378; 
in 1872, 4043. Sullivan, Temp., 
received 994 votes in 1874. 

IX. ToipletonRob'n Morgan Rob'n 

Delaware .1971 1989. 2207 2576 

Hardin 2176 1869.. 2143 2222 

Knox 2678 2351.. 3251 2683 



36g. 
2351.. 
1169. , 
1788.. 
2033.. 



1862 
'693 



1489 
2161 
2442 



Deliance ..1705 
Mercer ...1641 
Paulding . . 863 

Putnam 1967 

Shelby 1833 

;Van Wert.. 1668 



659.. 

679.. 

915.. 

912., 
1 155.. 
1623.. 



1700 
1892 
815 
2228 
2215 
.1767 



948 
1141 
1572 
17& 



1550. 


1063 


2057 


901. 


1590 


ioss 


3833- 


4245 


4446 


8bs. 


1648 


964 


1749- 


1867 


2208 


2373. 


1085 


2741 



Total ...13477 8270.. 15530 10224 
AniericusV. Pace's maj. 5198: 

Charles N. Lamison'3 maj . in 1872, 

5306. 

VI. Hurd Pratt Ilurd Sherw. 

Fulton 1052 

Henry 1686 

Lucas 4641 

Ottawa 1836 

Williams... 1863 
Wood 2030, 

Total .. .13108 11271.. 12406 13471 

Frank M. Hurd's maj. 1837; 

Isaac R. Sherwood's maj. in 1872, 

1065. Granger, Temp., received 

87s votes in 1874. 

VII. Neal Gordon Nnal Wilson 

Adams 1536 1313.. 1907 1726 

Brown. ...3058 2024.. 31&2 2344 
Highland... 2278 2142.. 3008 3195 

Pike 1271 910.. 1611 1311 

Ross ..319 2719.. 3751 3 530 

Total ...1 1333 9108.. 13379 12106 
Lawrence T.Neal's maj. 2225; 
In 1872, 1273. 



Marion 1702 

Morrow ...1609 
Union 1491 

Total ...11627 11199..13146 13573 
Early F. Poppleton's maj. 428 ; 
Tames W. Robinson's maj. in 
1872, 427. Harrod, Temp., re- 
ceived 1045 votes in 1874. 

X. Seney Foster Sloane Foster 

"lie 2105 2619.. 2701 2877 

:Iancock...24i5 2297.. 2641 2384 

Huron 2409 3423.. 2433 3939 

;andusky..2969 2239.. 2910 2468 

ieneca 3721 3200.. 3586 3329 

Total 13619 13778. .14271 14997 

Charles Foster's maj. 159; in 

1372, 726. Mead, Temp., received 

289 votes in 1874! 

XI. Vance Bundy Nash Bundy 

Gallia 1847 i860. . 1601 2568 

Hocking... 1632 810 

Jackson.. ..1994 1917 

Lawrence.. 2456 2428 

Scioto 2872 2206 

Vinton 1636- 1275 

Total.... 12437 10406 
John L. Vance s 



. 1902 


1201 


. 1685 


2334 


. 1495 


2972 


. 2229 


28bi 


. 1448 


I33 1 


. 10366 


13267 


maj. 


1941 ; 



Ilezekiah S.Bundy'smaj.in 1872, 
2907. Leckley, Temp., received 
239 votes in 1874. 

XII. Walling Taylor Jewett Tayl. 
Fairfield... 2910 1659.. 3670 2263 
Franklin... 6308 4794 



1859 
932 
3333 
1767 



Crawford. .3007 1080.. 3201 

Holmes ....2495 948.. 2453 

Richland.. .3081 2338.. 3537 

Wyandot ..1687 1133.. 2076 

Total.. . .12394 7214.. 13668 9925 
John P. Cowan's maj. 5180"; 

John Berry's maj. in 1872, 3743. 

Deel, Temp., received 399 votes 

in 1874. 

XV. Oldham Van Vo Kuds.Sprag. 

Athens 1487 2748. . 1700 2644 

Meigs 1403 2856.. 2062 3285 

M onroe 2404 845 . . 2881 1 12 1 

Morgan 1551 1810.. 1840 2036 

Wasiiing'n.3811 3396.. 3513 3901 

Total .. .io6c6 11655.. 11996 12987 

Nelson H. Van Vbrhts s maj. 

999; W r illiam P. Sprague's maj. 

in 1872, 991. Alderman. Temp., 

received 363 votes in 1874. 

XVI. Boyles 1 anf Pooim. Fanf. 
Belmont... 3485 3776.. 3487 4297 
Guernsey.. 1793 2087.. 1948 2587 
Harrison ..1739 1976.. 1619 2175 
Jefferson... 2164 2517.. 2192 3305 
l\oble 1680 1741.. 1806 1986 

Total .. .10861 12097. .11052 14350 

Lorenzo Danford's maj. 1236; 
in 1872, 3298. 

XVII. Wilson Wood.BiownVVood. 

Carroll 1238 1568.. 1311 1716 

Columbi'na2364 2934.. 3242 4605 

Mahoning.. 2687 3074.. 3137 3495 

Stark ..... .4548 353 7- ■ 5416 555 2 

Total ...10837 11113. .13106 15368 
Lanrin D. Woodworth's maj. 
276; in 1872, 2262. Paine, Temp., 



2057 
2730 



Perry 2077 12m. 

Pick aw a y. .2285 1963 . 

Total.,.. 13580 0667.. 1 561 
Ansel T. Walling's maj 



received 445 votes in 1874 

XVIII. McBrideMonr.Town.Mon. 

Lorain 1649 3594.. 2142 4347 

Medina 1421 1913.. 1826 2685 

Summit 3178 3445.. 2650 4016 

Wayne 3847 3277.. 3680 3620 

Total 10095 12229.. 10208 14662 

James Monroe's maj. 2134; in 

1872, 4364. Miller, Temp"., re- 

7156 4 8io|ceived 105 votes io 1874 



1670 
2193 



10936 
. 3913 ; 
Hugh J. Jewett's maj. in 1872, 
46-7. Thompson, Temp., re- 
ceived 388 votes in 1874. 

XIII. Southard Earnh. South. Marsh 
Coshocton.2077 1520. . 2561 2107 

Licking 4215 2440.. 4581 3259 

Musking'm43i3 3502.. 4493 4354 
Tuscaraw'82997 2189 . . 3474 29 18 
Total ...1 '-•602 q6si. .15109 12638 
Milton J. Southard's maj. 3051 ; 
in 1872, 2471. Gertner, Temp., 
received 292 votes in 1874. 



XIX. Woods Garfi'd t'ulliff Gaifi'd 
Ashtabula. 755 3478.. 1717 5430 

Geauga 284 1798.. 639 2609 

Lake 634 1925.. 1021 2619 

Portage.... 2340 2543.. 2592 3306 
Trumbull.. 2232 2847.. 2285 5225 

Total 624s 12591.. 8254 19189 

James A. Garfield's maj. "6346; in 

1872, 10935. Hurlburt, Ind~. Rep. 

received 3427 votes, and Price, 

Temp., 391 in 1874. 

XX. Payne Parsons Cham. Pars. 

Cuyahoga. 13849 11330.. 10377 13101 
Henry B. Payne's maj. 2519; 
Richard C.Parsbns'smaj. in 1872, 
2724. Goodman, Temp., received 
364 votes in 1874. 



76 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



OHIO. 

Vote for State Officers. 

Sec. of St. '74. Gov. '73. Fees. '72. 

Counties, uem. Rep. Bern. Rep. -Lio. Adm. 

Hell WiCoff -Ailen Noyafl Grecleytirant 

Adams 1554 1334.. 1961 1558.. 1972 1877 

Alien 2077 1721.. 2286 1755.. 2463 2010 

Ashland ..2207 1668.. 2253 io;o.. 2368 2183 

Ashtabula 1165 4-~5-- 943 2944.. 1678 5764 

ALhena 1684 2316.. 145=, 2370.. 1398 3025 

Auglaize. .1823 557.. 1906 ^53.. 2535 1180 

Belmont . .3505 3707.. 3394 3^4- • 3^47 4267 

Brown 3080 2ob6.. 27=0 1780.. 3337 2593 

Butler 4483 2415.. 4178 2377.. 4926 2993 

Carroll 1231 1570.. 11S5 1347.. 1283 l8l 7 

Champai'n 1790 2134.. 1691 2341.. 2185 3059 

Clarke 2309 31^2.. 1700 2805.. 2612 4095 

Clermont .3293 2818.. 3473 3003.. 36^8 3408 

Clinton .. .14^5 2639.. 1342 2283.. 1785 3105 

Columb'na2439 2937.. 2188 3091.. 2897 4773 

Coshocton 2070 1531.. 2J02 1847.. 2656 2252 

Crawford .3019 1085.. 2879 1292.. 3395 2081 

Cuyahogai2gi9 12212.. £,644 8245.. 8033 1445 1 

Darke 3718 2758.. 3123 2108.. 2760 3069 

Denance. .1731 609.. 1711 749.. 1720 1093 

Delaware. 1059 2034.. 1937 2095.. 2013 2713 

Erie 2282 2410. . 1588 1998. . 2287 2905 

Fairfield.. 2977 1048.. 3551 2034.. 3888 2540 

Fayette... 1233 1604.. 1413 1889.. 1545 2140 

Fra iklin..6483 4682.. 64^3 4136.. 7345 5796 

Fulton '.010 1730.. ~,lf> 1417. . 826 2210 

Gallia 1614 2126.. 1463 2229.. 1554 2855 

Geauga.... 381 2334.. 430 1652.. 600 2711 

Greene 1924 2986.. 1496 2925.. 1961 4069 

Guernsey .1674 2108.. 1799 2i 3 6.. 1901 2629 

iiamilton.21999 17362.. 16784 16021.. 24941 20083 

Hancock. .2370 21^8.. 2239 1794.. 2449 ^311 

Hardin 2174 1834.. i8=,o 1936.. 1970 2238 

Harrison.. 1665 2020.. 1617 1998.. 1695 2303 

Henry 1698 928.. 1432 900.. 1510 1160 

Highland. .2290 2164.. 2791 2863.. 2933 3171 

Hocking . .1614 823.. 1365 867.. i860 1350 

Holmes ...2 301 944.. 2410 910.. 2330 1089 

Hurou 2448 3287.. 1829 2633.. 2182 3812 

Jackson... 1909 2033.. 1338 1905.. 1555 2258 

Jefferson.. 2131 2532.. 1924 3013.. 2102 3776 

Knox 2713 2298.. 2762 2108.. 2730 2773 

Lake 807 2321.. 649 1956.. 979 2731 

Lawrence. 2433 2402.. 1920 2733.. 1637 3624 

Licking... 4381 2271.. 4113 2749.. 4562 3493 

Lo^an 1384 1963.. 142O 1842.. 1935 2795 

Lorain 1698 3331.. 1360 35°5-- 2097 4432 

Lucas 4435 4i73- • 335i 4201.. 3082 3253 

Madison... 1323 1293.. 162; 1631.. 1623 1934 

Mahoning. 2916 3091.. 3003 3400. . 2518 3757 

Marion 1719 1143.. 1901 1240.. 1842 1340 

Medira 1432 187=,.. 1501 2027.. 1695 2794 

Meigs i=,i4 2738.. 1169 2514.. 1812 3501 

Mercer ...1774 S96., 1824 727.. 2090 1626 

Miinii 2539 2820.. 2230 2910.. 2910 3733 

Monroe . .2432 836.. 2340 734.. 2878 1307 

Mont2'mry7462 6396.. 6309 ^947.. 7183 6998 

Morgan ...1340 1815.. 1470 1608.. 1351 2339 

Morrow... 1607 1769.. 1379 1607.. 1689 2197 

Mnsk'guni4233 3610.. 4274 4048.. 4304 4558 

Noble 1668 1743.. 1677 1641.. 1627 2616 

Ottawa 1777 929.. 1451 772.. 1439 1122 

Paulding.. 881 903.. 890 "977.. 637 979 

Perry 2104 1230.. 2089 1660.. 2172 1907 

Pickaway. 2525 1900.. 2378 1783.. 2660 2353 

Pike 1273 914.. 1563 1161.. 1368 1284 

Portage... 2372 2784.. 2636 2283.. 2438 3478 

Preble 2163 223;.. 181S 2134.. 2101 2713 

Put nam ...2026 8V6. . 2167 973.. 2131 1275 

Richland. .3084 2326.. 3192 2580.. 3672 3369 

Koss 3203 2790.. 3791 3144.. 3711 3630 

Sandusky. 3033 2131.. 2740 2025.. 2729 2380 

Scioto 2763 2345.. 2183 2389.. 2091 2888 

Seneca 3871 3003.. 3182 2290.. 3462 3128 

irhelby 1878 113T.. 2022 1373.. 2311 1717 

Stark 4447 3675.. 4888 4868.. 5250 5817 

Summit .. .3205 3285.. 2014 2437.. 2738 4534 

Trumbull. 2096 3749.. 1027 3698.. 2321 5809 



Bell 
Tuscar'w'S309i 

Union 1478 

Van Wert. 1730 

Vinton 1637 

Warren . . . 1996 
Washing'n 3672 

Wayne 3832 

Williams ..1846 

Wood 2019 

Wyandot.. 171 1 



Wikoff 
2111.. 

2066. . 

1375- • 
1272.. 
2982.. 
3550. • 
3343 ■ 
i»y2.. 
2471.. 
1163.. 



Allen 
3518 
1364 
1750 
1460 
1665 
3004 

3053 
1097 
1804 
2039 



Noyes 


Greelev 


Gra.t 


2600.. 


3<#6 


3I7» 


1856. . 


1564 
1687 


2430 


1730.. 


1805 


1215.. 
3200.. 


2$ 


1314 

3763 


3124.. 


3680 


4231 
3768 


3434-. 
1856.. 


3533 


1419 
1896 


2213 


2078. . 


2994 
1816 


1364.. 


2095 



Total.. 238406 221204.. 214654 213837.. 244321 281852 

Percent ...51.87 48.13.. 60.10 49.90.. 40.43 53.57 

William Bell, jr.'s, maj. in i874for Secretary of 1 
State, 17,202; Gov. Allen's maj. in 1873, 817;- 
Grant's maj. in 1872,37,531. Total vote in 1874, 
439,610- in 1873, 428,491 ; in 1872, 526,173. In 1874, 
John it. Bucntel, Temp., received 7,815 votes for 
Sec. of State, and in 1873, Stewart, Temp., 10,277 
votes for Governor. In 1873, Collins, candidate 
of the "New" party, received 10,027 votes for 
Governor. Id 1873 the Republicans elected their 
whole State ticket, with the exception of Gov- 
ernor, by maj.'s ranging from 177 for Treasurer, 
to 1,754 f° r Member of the Board of Public W oiks. 
Temperance Vote. 

The following shows the Prohibition vote by 
counties for Secretary of State in 1874, ana Gov- 
ernor in 1S73 : 

1874.1878. 



1874.1878. 

BuchtelSwwart 

Adams 48 64 

Allen 4 

Ashland ,. 62 

Ashtabula 228 

Athens 101 

Auglaize — 

Belmont 85 

Brown — 

Butler 14 

Carroll — 

Champaign ... 208 

Clarke 364 

Clermont 6 

Clinton 121 

Columbiana... 215 

Coshocton — 

Crawford 201 

Cuyahoga 444 

Darke 9 

Defiance 8 

Delaware 317 

Erie 59 

Fairfield 18 

Fayette — 

Franklin 318 

Fulton 144 

Gallia 72 

Geauga 20 

Greene 123 

Guernsey 32 

Hamilton 4 

Hancock 31 

Hardin. ..» 193 

Harrison 66 

Henry 83 

Highland 1 

Hocking 18 

Holmes — 

Huron 232 

Jackson 94 

Jefferson 88 

Knox 304 

Lake 40 

Lawrence 83 



4 
94 

166 
230 



Buchtel-Mow&rt 

Logan 265 265 

Lorain 17 

Lucas 112 

Madison 167 

Mahoning *8 

Marion 73 

Medina 121 

Meigs 37 

Mercer — 

Miami 134 

Monroe 14 

Montgom'ry . . 85 

Morgan 189 

Morrow 202 

Muskingum... 157 

Noble — 

Ottawa 2 

Paulding — 

Perry — 

Pickaway 27 

Pike — 

Portage 109 

9 Preble 42 

34 Putnam 24 

444 Richland 132 

75 Ross — 

135 Sandusky 59 

34 Scioto 37 

190 Seneca 132 

03 Shelby 2 

— Stark 231 

39 Summit 215 

191 Trumbull 215 

id Tuscarawas. .. — 

9 Union 45 

22; Van Wert 16 

20 J Vinton 

4 M arren - 

332 Washington .. 109 
104 Wayne 3 

83; Williams 83 

432 Wood 133 

43 Wyandot 31 



"4 
217 

48 

16 
33 

255 

74 

no 

245 
440 
100 



5 
39 

272 
70 
49 

l 3 8 

27 
122 
60 

203 



508 

353 

3 2 5 



— 5 

— 20 

170 



49 
108 



104 

I43l 



30 
Licking 87 i43l T ° tal 78151027I 

The following are the aggregate votes of candi- 
dates for the other State oiliees: 
*J. Supreme Court.W. J. Gilmore,Dem... 237,556 

Luther Day, Kep 221,701 

Gid.T. Stewart, Temp. 7,711 
Gilmore's maj 151855 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



IT 



School Comm.. . . 



\J. Supreme Court.George Rex, Dem. 238,307 

W.W. Johnson, Kep. .221,182 
S. E. Adams, Temp. . . 6,278 

Rex's maj 17,12s 

Clk.Supreme Co urt. Arnold Green, Dem. . 238,089 

Rodney Foos, Rep 221,581 

S. B. Foster, Temp 7,831 

Green's maj 16,508 

C . S . Smart, Dem 237,644 

TUos. W.Harvey, Rep. 221,621 
M. P. Weddell , Temp . 7,714 

Smart's ma} 151423 

Mern.Bd.P. Works. Martin Schilder, Dem.238,106 

S. R. Hosmer, Rep 220,625 

Enoch G.CollinSjTemp. 7,777 

Schilder's maj 17,481 

* Long term. t Short term. 

Lsgtslatube, 1874-5. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Democrats 21 57 78 

Republicans 14 45 59 

Independents 1 3 4 

Democratic maj... 6 9 15 

The following is the vote in the Xllth Con- 
ressional District, for a representative in the 
:LlIId Congress to All the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Hon. Hugh J. Jewett 



Dist. Dem 

XII. Fhuk 

Fairfield 2945 

Franklin 6483 

Perry 2160 

Pickaway 2502 

Total 14090 

Finck's maj., 4789. 



Rep. 

Taylor 

1634 
4624 

1890 
9301 



Temp. 

Thompson 

16 

345 



361 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

S.PuB.lNS.,'74. Gov.,'72. PEES.,'72. 

Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Lib. Adm. 

Pool PurnellMerrinmnCHlilweHtiieel. Grant 

Alamance 1099 921.. 1270 1015.. 850 925 

Alexander 581 92.. 545 389.. 367 313 

Alleghany — 408 78.. 339 184.. 220 142 

Anson 1165 1037.. 1191 1019.. 976 1017 

Ashe 730 350. . 752 761 . . 312 542 

Beaulort 1561 1188.. 1331 1565.. 1019 1459 

Bertie 982 1327.. 949 1514.. 690 1517 

Bladen 1206 1365.. 1208 1448.. 758 1409 

Brunswick 1007 939.. 711 708.. 490 857 

Buncombe 1165 1280.. 1S38 1114.. 1109 970 

Burke 815 407.. 852 683.. 544 565 

Cabarrus 1141 732.. h5i 811.. 945 796 

Caldwell 840 94. . 829 332. . 521 319 

Camden 627 483.. 562 554.. 434 545 

Carteret 828 678.. 1062 739.. 744 052 

Caswell 1162 1468.. 1415 1456.. 1261 1554 

Catawba 1251 194.. 1261 422.. 1252 441 

Chatham 1804 1468.. 1774 1683-. 1300 1586 

Cherokee 396 217.. 486 433.. 284 372 

Chowan 591 761.. 576 742.. 430 767 

Clay 329 73.. 252 142.. 204 125 

Cleveland 1148 294.. 1099 547.. 451 553 

Columbus 1313 708. . 1045 693. . 730 777 

Craven 1146 2322.. 1146 2708.. 954 27S9 

Cumberland... 2165 1968.. 1890 1883.. 1442 1846 

Currituck 745 335.. 763 349. .no retu'n. 

Dare 229 231.. 232 270.. 144 217 

Davidson 1413 1210.. 1384 isi6.. 714 1454 

Davie 838 591.. 826 662.. 510 637 

Duplin 1790 953.. 1750 1035.. 1211 1039 

Edgecombe... 1142 3461.. 1474 3452.. 1221 3436 

Forsyth 1080 1118.. 1033 1115.. 758 1100 

Franklin 1649 1634.. 1475 1560.. 1197 1543 

Gaston 864 370.. 927 688.. 808 640 

Gates 758 412.. 754 512.. 600 465 

Graham 174 17.. New Co. .. 80 37 

Granville 2294 2S75.. 1976 2655.. 1690 2653 

Greene 821 874.. 783 947" 475 920 

Guilford 1603 1505.. 1849 1831.. 1380 1736 

Halifax 1389 3^55. . 1673 3640.. 1485 3794 

Harnett 904 674.. 795 695.. 657 669 

Haywood 771 129.. 749 420.. 668 341 



Pool rnrne : lMerrimonCaldwel!Grpfl.Grant 

Henderson 416 326. . 505 716. . 369 ^36 

829. 

513- 
806. 
86. 
1186. 
664. 



Hertford 873 

Hyde 712 

Iredell 1622 

Jackson 649 

Johnston 1892 

Jones S38 



874 

816 
1738 

554 
1481 1374 



983 
610. 

m- 

100. 



Lenoir 1189 1055., 

Lincoln 906 340. 

Macon 664 42., 

Madison 534 219.. 



559 639. 
944 1270. 



■Pi 
a 55 



700 
641 



Martin 1234 1319.. 1035 1048. 



209. 



706 519. 
2 si 1 2261 



195 

475 
loss 



628. 

653- 
881. 



1284 1293. 



McDowell 729 

Mecklenburg . 2453 1727 

Mitchell 342 239 

Montgomery.. 361 342 

Moore 1078 5*5 

Nash... 1402 1281 

New Hanover. 2S98 3748.. 2261 3614. 

Northampton. 1019 1890.. 1095 1990. 

Onslow 962 345.. 892 492. 

Orange 1825 1261.. 1945 1321. 

Pamlico 537 365.. 446 358. 

Pasquotank... 763 1017. 6s7 1053. 
Perquimans... 67b 803.. 642 910. 

Person 88s 760.. 1101 819. 

Pitt 1936 1799.. 1782 1775. 

Polk 214 234.. 224 342 

Randolph 1227 1078. 

Richmond 1217 1194. 

Robeson 1829 1687. 

Rockingham.. 1564 918. 

Rowan 1557 800. 

Rutherford 734 794. 

Sampson 1880 1313. 

Stanley 435 97. 

Stokes 655 

Surry 1063 

Swain 348 

Transvlvania . 209 

Tyrrel 370 

Union 105s 



735- 

14. 

3°- 

193- 

212. 



1364 1389. 

1016 1304. 

1 631 1583. 

1653 1301 .- 

165s 1118. 

727 1013. 

1697 1464. 

646 366. 

905 830. 



332 
379 
391 
1022 



29. 
203. 

631 



Wake 364b 3640.. 3269 3843. 

Warren "922 2198.. 1107 2380. 

Washington... 546 785.. 492 917. 

Watauga 491 67.. 435 353. 

Wayne 2021 1790.. 1749 3949. 

Wilkes 820 955.. 1034 1294. 

Wilson 1413 1129.. 1319 1152. 



Yadkin 725 

Taney 635 



719. 

IS2. 



759 
503 



6b. 
382. 



5S| 

S28 
1 159 
425 



96; 
420 
980 

338 



809 1368 
375 654 



493 
380 



478 
839 
681 
263 
230 

235 
689 



5i8 
344 



817 

307 



Total 98217 84SQS.. 96731 98630. .70094.94769 

Percent 63.73 i&'.H.A'i . 51 50. 4j. .42 . 52 57.48 

Stephen D. Pool's maj., 13,622; Gov. Cald- 
well's maj. in 1872, 3899; Grant's maj., 24,67s. 
Total vote in 1874, 182,812 ; in August, 3872, 
195,361 ; in November, 1872, 364, 863. 

Representatives in Congress. 
Democratic. 18?4. Reinib lean. 

1 Jesse J. Yeates ... 14073 32500 Clinton L.Cobb. 

2 G. H. Blouut ...31344 
G. H. Yfhitet 3091 

3 Alf. M. Waddell* 35572 

4 Joseph J. Davis.. 34930 

5 Aired M. Scale's. . 30^,29 

6 Thos. S. Ashe ' . . .12483 

7 Win. M. Robbins* 18371 
i RobertB. Vance. 11127 



38176 John A. Hyman. 

1428s Neil McKay. 
33332 James H. Headfn. 

8909 JrV. F. Henderson. 

718s 15. C. Davidson. 

6999 G. L. Cook. 

6887 Plato Durham.! 



Total 109318:88343 

Majority .*.. 20975I 

The names of those elected are printed in 
Italics. 

* Member of the present Congress, 
t Independent candidates. 
Legislature, 1874. Senate 

Democrats 37 

Republicans n 

Independents 2 

Democratic maj 24 46 70 



701 3304 

737 624 



359 
417 



9S9 1291 

448 455 

2202 2181 

64 468 

241 620 

734 733 

1003 1215 

1877 3445 

752 1998 

720 529 

1483 1267 

200 358 

353 1049 

397 892 

934 800 

3429 3734 

99 264 

983 3291 

730 31 85 

3053 3503 

3416 1370 

962 976 

399 9-28 

889 3470 



083 

&5 

887 

35 
3 so 
323 
453 



2407 3705 

3008 2455 

39o 935 

397 187 

13 31 3Q3I 

639 II78 

I0S3 1124 



vise. 


Joint Bal 


82 


119 


3t 


45 


2 


4 



Tfj 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



INDIANA. 

Sec. of State, '74. PiiEs.,'72. 
Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib. 

Nell' Curry Greeley G ant 



Adams 1510 

Allan.. 6067 

BarthT'm'w 2704 

Benton 718 

Blackford.. 658 

Boone 1976 

Brown 1154 

Carroll 2055 



3159 
:-;o47 
2446 
2033 
1 126 
2012 

3311 
2217 



Cass 
(larke... 

Clay 

Clinton... 
Crawford 
Daviess.., 
Dearborn 

Decatur 

DeKalb 2018 

Delaware... 7-17 

Dubois 2148 

Elkhart 3039 

Favette 1160 

Floyd 2777 

Fountain... 2107 
Franklin.... 2062 

Fulton 1452 

Gibson.. ... 2122 

Grant 1131 

Greene 1450 

Hamilton... 1176 
Hancock.... 1600 
Harrison.... 2091 
Hendricks.. 1595 

Henry 1386 

Howard 1377 

Huntington 1908 
Jackson .... 2552 

Jasper 386 

Jav 1269 

Jefferson... 2204 
Jennings... 1679 
Johnson... 

Knox 

Kosciusko 
Lagrange . 

Lak3 

Laporte ... 
Lawrence. 
Madison... 
MariOD . . . 
Marshall.. 

Martin 

Miami 2486 

Monroe 1375 

Montgom'y 2290 

Morgan 1785 

Newton 240 

Noble 228c, 

Ohio 543 

Orange 1403 

Owen 1634 

Parke 1616 

Perry 1734 

Pike 1429 

Porter iso5 

Posey 2183 

Pulaski 1020 

Putnam 2569 

Randolph... 1465 

giplpy =M7 

Rush 2013 

Scott 1017 

Shelby .... 2629 

Spencer 

Stark 466 

Steuben 790 

St. Joseph.. 3095 
Sullivan.... 2o=,8 
Switzerl'nd 1264 
Tippecauoe 3081 
Tipton 132s 



■ tf34 

• 2535 
. 2078 

• 930 
. img 

• 3231 
. 1617 
. 2700 
.10367 
. 2084 

363 



556. 

3424-. 
1903., 

870.. 

324., 

1993 
410. . 
1865.. 

2324.. 

2i2y. . 
2210. . 
1683. 



254 

5179 

2442 

617 

722 

2409 

957 

2223 
2733 
1 727 
1807 
884.. 1032 

1 731. 

1014., 

2060., 

1956. 

21 -,2., 



496 
2002 

1335 
165O 
20l6 
1243 
I323 
I083 
1919. 



6x8 

2702 
1962 
1544 
1449 
1776 

2314 
1009 
2657 
1672 
2608 
1136 

1937 
1054 



1461.. 1640 
2606.. 1462 
1 147.. 1735 
1507.. 2070 
2639. 
2514.. 

200.. II09 

2053.. 1900 

1363.. 2337 
87O.. 460 



1U20 
l6l3 



I352.. 

238r.. 

1664. . 
1300. . 
1889. . 
2408.. 
1676. . 
1418.. 
2324. . 
1742- • 
1075.. 

9914- • 
1548;. 

939-. 
2376. . 

I457- • 
2303- • 
2019.. 

747-. 
2114. . 

554-. 

1052 



1445 
2201 
1 521 
2109 
2527 
1 
83d 

686 
2783 

1513 

74 V) 
17U 
J 084 
21 19 
1359 

j" 3 

456 

I2SI 



1064.. 1509 



2<8l 
I239 

1 89 

970 

2003 

634 

242S 
2005.. 1^07 
1916. . ]Q7.; 
2021 . . [I 1 



2345 
1080. 
1 169. 
1698. 
1272. 
712. 
1969. 



666. 
1900. 
1874. 

358. 
3462. 
2931. 

1294. 

3554. 

1095. 



796 
2664 
1977 
384 
714 
2403 
2119 
1116 
3110 
132? 



723 
3541. 
2015. 

863. 

690. 
2003. 

462. 
1 846. 
2616. 
2368. 
2369. 
1993. 
1027. 
191 5. 
1996. 
2171. 
1861. 

^90. 

1371.. 

1833. 

2014. 

1461 

1269. . 

2063., 

2558.. 

3180. . 

1443- • 
1706. . 
2834.. 

3355» ■ 
2382.. 

2189.. 
1573.. 
948.. 
1732.. 
2748.. 

1774- • 
1700. . 
2005. . 
2683.. 
1863.. 
1417.. 

1833. . 
2274.. 
9566.. 
1771... 
970.. 
2533.. 
1597.. 
2734.. 

2!0G. . 

8x4.. 

2263.. 

591.. 

117=. . 

1359- • 
I377-. 
1685.. 

1698. . 

640.. 
2031 . . 
3336. . 
1939- • 
21.58.. 

681.. 
2147.. 
212;.. 

343-. 
1877.. 
3426. . 
I379-. 
1443- ■ 
41 68. . 
1259.. 



Gov. ,'72. 

Dem. Rep. 

im ; : . Bruwn 

673 

342. 



. 15H 
. 6376 

. 676 
, 789 

1 1 66 
6 

3065 

2376 

2322 
1217 
1952 
3122 
2122 
1918 
1557 
2000 
2903 
1 133 
20 j 1 

2101 
2819 

' 145 
2148 

1821 

2155 

1681 
2016 
217S 
1755 

1730 
1432 
2053 

2423 
561 
1626 
2603 
1585 
2251 
2701 
2218 
1013 
912 
3173 
1680 
3cx>3 
8 4/ 6 
2320 
1 32 2 
2565 
1527 
26 1 3 
1826 
640 
2285 
"i 
1425 
1 701 
1010 
1472 

1554 

1296 
2: to 

955 
2678 
1619 
2245 
1975 

:■' 9 
2862 
2245 

472 

939 
2796 

2517 
1207 
3762 
1509 



2109 
800 
687 

4'-' 7 
1907 
2335 
2375 
2550 
2027 
1092 
1891 
2014 
2284 
i8so 

274; 
573 

2989 

1401 
1S77 
1932 

1449 
1306 

1053 
2532 
2122 
3085 
M75. 
1692 

2S49 
3399 
2396 
2193 
1646 

994 
1737 
2802 
1849 
1729 
1096 
2756 
1854 
1532 
217.8 
1889 
2253 
9135 
1852 

942 
2558 
1089 

2138 

819 

2332 

638 

1 23 1 

1438 

2309 

136 i 

1429 

1681 

1726 

651 

207^ 

2061 

2,84 
688 
2182 
2177 
393 
1834 
3295 
1330 
1 1':3 
4109 
1279 



Union 696 

Yuiid rb'gh 3122 
Vermillion. 973 
Vigo 4478 

AV abash I 795 

Warren 459 

Warrick 1 1 

Washingt u 2059 

M avne 2743 

Wells 1829 

White 1336 

Whitley 1767 

Tc 



Nt-ff Curry Greeley Giant Hnuks. BrowJ 



892.. 632 
3338.. 3372 




"59 

1338. 
1 140. 



btal 182154 164902.163632 180147.189424 1882a 

Percent 52.43 47.51. 46.78 53.i"2. &0.15 49.f| 

John E.Neff"s maj., i-,2^ ; Grant's maj. in 187 
22,515; Gov. Hendrick's maj., 1872,1,148. Tot 
V' >te in 1874, 347,00 ; in 1872, for President, 349,775 
in 1872, for Governor, -77,700. J. B. Stout, th 
Farmers' candidate for Secretary of State, r< 
ceived 16,233 votes, and there were 2,297 scatt^ 
U'g votes. 

The following were the aggregate votes in i3ji 
of the candidates for the other State offices : 

Auditor Ebenezer Henderson, Dem..i8ir 

James A. Wildman, Hep 1652 

T. Z. Truscott, Farmers' 189 

Henderson over Wildinan . 1583 

Treasurer . . .B. C. Shaw, Dem 

,1 ohn B. Glover, Rep i< s 49j| 

N. S. Bennett, Farmers' 190* 

Shaw over Glover } ^4S 

AtPy-Gen Clarence A. Buskirk. Bern.. . jr8t>8g 

James C. Denny, tfep l66 jM 

William A. Feeble, Farmers' 18618 

Buskirk over Denny 12 7m 

'Sup. P. Ins. .James H, Smart, Dem l3lG B 

John M. BI0S8, Rep lb 493 

A. H. Graham, Farmers' ioSw 

Smart over Bloss 161J 

J. Sup'me Ct. Horace P. Biddle, Dem 1986ft 

Andrew L. Osborne, Rep 1732JM 

Biddle's maj 254a 

Legislature, 1875-6. Senate. House. Jt. Ceil. 

Democrats 23 

Republicans 22 

Independents _5 

Democratic maj.. - 20 

Representatives in Congress, 187. 

Di&rietS. Belli. Hep. Ktrr i. raved 



60 


83 


32 

8 


34 
13 



I. Fuile:- Heilinan 

Gibson 2224.. 1775 

Perry 1330. . 1544 

Posey 2038 

Spencer 2283 

Vanderb'rgh 2792 
A', arrick 2188 



1 "-84 
1864 
4469 

1291 

Total 12864.. 12=127 

Benoni S. Fuller's 
maj., 337. 

I I . Williams Ferguson 
Crawford... 1072.. 835 

Daviess 2007.. 1700 

Dubois 2209 . . 372 

Greene 1967.. 1425 

Knox 2883.. 1605 

Martin 1815.. — " 

Orange 1372.. 1015 

Pike 1 420. . 1310 

Sullivan 2659.. 826 

Total 17404. . 9088 

Jame3 D, Williams's 
maj., 8316. B. F. Raw- 
lins, Did., received 467 
votes in Martin County. 
III. Kerr Crave s 

Barthol'm'w 2271.. 236=; 

Brown 892.. 673 

Clarke 2668.. 2489 

Floyd 2293.. 2206 



Wayne 3349. . 37! 

Total... 1330?.. 108: 
William S. Holmajj 
maj., 2467. 

VI. Johns 'P T!obinsi 

Delaware... 691. . 21 

Grant 1124.. 19 

Harrison 1760.. 1911! Hancock 1620.. ir 



Jackson 23J*.. 143 

Washington. 1659! . 15*) 

Total 13891.. 1261(1 

Michael C. Kerrlj 
maj., 1209. 

IV. New Ro'iinsn-j 

Decatur 2233.. 204 j 

Jefferson 2500.. 2W 

Jennings 1750.. 15* I 

Ohio.... 544.. 54J 

Ripley 2213.. i8o| 

RliSh* 2058.. 208 

Scott low. . 6; 

Switzerland. 13 3^.. 12c 

Total.... 13683.. i->3t 
Jeptha D. New's maj 
1300. 

V. H.lmnn Claypn 



Dearborn 
Fayette . . 
Franklin . 
Randolph 
Union 



13: 



1640 
1210. 

2^25. 

I509. . 2"J\ 
763.. % 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



Johnson Kobiason 
■my 1518.. 2413 

1836. . 1296 

idisoi) 2026.. 1657 

. 2000. . igbl 



Raymond Calkina 



fceicy... 

Total . 
lit ton ! 



..12017. .12471 
I. l.lobmsoa*B 
A.V. Pendle- 

:icl.,rec'cl3.S6o votes. 



Lake. 1119. 

Newton 557.. 

Poner . 1485.. 

Pulaski 1015.. 

St. Joseph... 3045... 

Starke aw.. 

White i-i66. . 



1479 

761 

1641 

716 

2Q90 

359 

1261 






VI I. Lu d 

cralrieks... 1722. 

avion 10741. 

[organ 1919- 

totnam 

Total . 

Fr..ud>:li 1 
M.. 566. 
VIII. 

lay 

awrence.. 

onroe 1474 

wen 107,) 

arke 

ermillion . 
igo 

Total... 
Morton 



1 :bnrn 

2700 

10? 



Total 15088.. 14423 

William S. Hayinoua's 
maj., 665. 
XI. 

Cass 

Ful ton 



10977. . 10411 
Lauder's 



Rice Hunter 
2559.. 2347 

10, 



Hamilton., 
Howjard. .. 

Miami 

Tipton 

Wabash.... 



1657 

1527 

1070.. 1250 

i-o8 . 2400 



036.. 1224 
. . 4091. . 3600 

. .13708. .14005 
C. Hunter's 

liii., 207. 

IX. McCliirg Ca-v n 

Baton 723.. 841 

»ne 1948.. 1915 

Baton 2132. 

ouutain 2216.. 1 885 

bntgom'rv 2243.. 2166 
npecanoe . 3023. 
Farreu po. 

Total.... 1 2754. 
fbomas J. Casou's 
iai., 44. C.J.Bowles, 
nd., ree'd 5259 votes. 

X. Haym nd e'alkina 
arroll 2071.. 1846 

sper 760.. 87; 

apoi'te 3209.. 2475 



Cox 

3160. 

i«o. 

1427. 

1052. 
2400. 



Ev«ns 
. 2509 
. 1334 
. 2671 
• 20 45 
■ 2351 
1406.. 1090 
1855.. 2 6o5 



Total 13426.. 14505 

James L. Evans's maj., 

11C0. 
XII. Hamilton Taylor 



Adams 1307. 

Alien 6034. 



627. 
1912. 
1061. 
1661. 
1626. 



35/ 7 

1238 

.13188 



Blackford 
Huntington 

Jay 

Wells 

Whitley.... 

Total . . . 
Allen II. 
maj., 1695. 
XIII. 

De Kalb 2013. 

[Elkhart 3067. 

'Kosciusko .. 2004. 
j Lagrange 
I Marshall, 
i Noble 

Steuben.. 



058 

3735 
821 
2093 
1997 
1326 
1693 



14318. .12623 
Hamilton's 



Kelly 



945. 

2076. 
2378. 
1050. 



Baker 

1912 
2597 
2399 
1622 
1694 
2007 
1440 



58 



Total 13613..13671 

John II. Baker's maj., 



COIiOiSABO TERSITOKY. 

CoNG-r.ass Delegate. 

18?4. IHttf. 1870. 

'ouniies. Dcm. Hep. Bern. Sep. Bern. Hep 
Pft'.terson H • mwell H at Chaffee Miller Chaffee 



482 
23 



179 



Lrapahoe...i465 

'ent 393 

oulder 363 

lear Creek. 518 

oncjos 262 

ostilla 226 

)ouglas 235 

Inert 265 

1 Paso 351 

remont 343 

ilpin 

and 

eenwood 
linsdale . . , 
[uerfano... 

efferson 512 

jake 186 

Liarimer 225- 

Las Animas. 964 

La Plata 20 j 

Park 365 

Pueblo £,32 

3io Grande. 200 
sago ache ... 269 

Summit 78 

Weld 485 

Total 9333 

r cent Mi. 55 

, Patterson's maj 
naj. in 1872, 1336 



1117. 
240. 
389. 
484. 
177. 
185. 
112. 
52. 
414. 
166. 
439- 



85; 
171 

343 
519 
252 

33 

124 



1394- 

70. 

.411. 

400. 



728 
117 

399 

3/1 

87 

05 

199 



1008 
86 
436 
472 
197 
275 
238 



35o 

313 

new county. 

262 43s. . 126 163 

266 188.. 139 aoq 

530 584.. 664 946 

1 . . * new county 

— .. 31 151.. £4 420 

16.. new county. 

216.. 391 307.. 201 192 

374.. 300 361.. 422 327 

87.. 91 86.. 144 147 

283.. 726 557.. 154 144 

591.. 101 173.. 457 409 

122.. new county. 

210.. 154 202.. 62 82 

358.. 561 529. 204 278 

163.. new county. 

254.. 72 123.. 40 70 

82.. 67 115.. 124 116 

629.. 351 653.. 181 155 

7J70.. 6260 7596.. 5058 6450 

43.45.. 48.18 M.S'.* . 4',.;i5 56 05 
,, 2163; Jerome B. Chaffee's 
In 1870, 1392. Total vote in 



1874, 16503 ; in 1872, 13856; in 1870, 1 1 508 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

GOVERIJOP.,'74. GOV. '72. 

Counties. Ind. R. Hep. Lid. Rep. 

Gifivni-hdUiii'iiTouii'n Mo e 



, 2486 
. 2320 
■ 2534 
. 2320 
. 2076 
.H393 
- 1364 
. 1122 
• 1895 
2106 




Abbeville... 

Aiken 

Anderson. .. 
Barnwell ... 

Beaufort 

( harleston . 

Chester 

Chesterfield 
Clarendon . 
Colleton ... 

Darlington 1851 

Edgefield ■ 2000 

Fairfield 1478 

Georgetown.. 753 

Greenville 2288 

Horry i2b8 

Kershaw 1264 

Lancaster 1137 

Laurens • 1815 

Lexington 1562 

Marion 2525 

Marlboro 1322 

Newberry 1476 

Oconee 1238 

Orangeburg... 2014 

Pickens 745 

Richland 1491 

Spartanburg.. 2657 

Sumter 4091 

Union 1993 

Williamsburg. 1243 

York 2067 

Total 68814 80403. .36483 69838. .51537 85071 

Percent. 46.12 63.88.. 34.31 65.b9.1 37.13 02.27 

Daniel H. Chamberlain's maj. 11,589; Franklin 
J. Moses's maj. in 1872, 33,355 : Robert K. Scott's 
maj. iu 1870,33,534. Total vote in 1874, 149,217 ;in 
1872, 106,321 ; in 1870, 136.608. 

The following was the vote for Lieutenant- 
Governor : 

R. H. Gleaves, Rep. (col'd) 80,073 

M. It. Delaney, Ind. Kef. (col'd) . . . .64,268 

Gleaves's maj 1 5,805 

The Legislature is of«the same politics as 
the Governor. 

L. Cass Carpenter* R r o.. was elected to fill the 
the vacancy from the Hid District in the XLIIId 
Congress. 



Representatives in" Cohgeess, 1874. 



Bistti. Ind. Rep. 

I. Lee Raiuey 

Chesterfield... 1079 927 

Darlington — 1803 3731 

Georgetown... 727 182= 

Horry 1196 686 

Marion .-. 2488 2369 

Marlboro 1273 1855 

Sumter 3776 762 

Williamsburg 12 21 2215 

Total 13563 14370 

Joseph H. Rainey's 
maj. 807. 

II. Mactev E 
Charleston... 1 1 278 

Clarendon 1832 750 

Lexington 1582 1091 

Orangeburg ..2050 36.90 

Total... 
E. W. M 
maj. 2538. 

Dem. Fen 

III. McOowan Hoge 

Abbeville 2849 

Anderson 265't 

Laurens 1802 

Newberry 1501 

Oconee 1245 



.16742 14204 
Slacker's 



384 
1633 
2882 
3176 
548 



Mb 



Hoge 



owan 

Pickens 1258 

Richland 1-67 3882 

Total 12873 164^1 

Solomon L. Uoge's 
mil. 3558. 
I\ . Kershaw Wallace 



Chester 1389 

Fairfield 1490 

Greenville 2314 

Kershaw 1409 

Lancaster 1146 

Spartanburg.. .2665 

Union 1992 

York 2050 



2620 
3036 
1857 

1837 
1 169 

1515 
1795 
2623 



Total 14455 16452 

Alexander S. Wal- 
lace's maj. 1997. 

Ind. Hep. 
V. Epp rig bmalls 

Aikapj .......none 2002 

Barnwell 78 3770 

Beaufort 1419 5069 

Colleton 85 3515 

Edgefield 28 79 339 6 

Total 4461 177^2 

Robert Smalls's maj. 
13291 . 



so 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



Counties. 

Can oil 

Adams 3864 

Alex auder — 932 

Bond 727 

Boone none 

Brown 994 

Bureau 10 

Calhoun 707 

Carroll none 

Cass 1051 

Champaign 963 

Christian 2173 

Clark 1 170 

Clay 654 

Clinton «T . . . 1714 

Coles cone 

Cook 28286 

Crawford 1103 

Cumberland 988 

DeKalb 7 

DeWitt 93 

Douglas 2 

Du Page 472 

Edgar 2005 

Edwards 225 

Elfiughaui 1407 

Fayette 1=76 

Ford hone 

Franklin 555 

Fulton 2610 

Gallatin 603 

Greene 2280 

Grundy 743 

Hamilton 940 

Hancock 2399 

Hardin 354' 

Henderson none 

Henry 2 

Iroquois 227 

Jackson 1630 

Jasper 871 

Jefterson 627 

Jersey 1488 

Jo Da vi ess none 

Johnson 409 

Kane "... 801 

Kankakee 1 

Kendall none 

Knox 2 

Lake none 

LaSalle 3365 

Lawren ce 964 

Lee 1 

Livingston 21 

Logan 1917 

Macon 019 

Macoupin 1966 

Madison 3657 

Marion 1470 

Marshall 275 

Mason 1194 

Massac none 

McDoq o ugh 1431 

McHenry 9 

McLean". 17 

Menard 1035 

Mercer 41 

Monroe 1848 

Montgo mery 1594 

Morgaa 2195 

Moultrie 926 

Ogle w 

Peoria • 3673 

Perry 744 

Piatt 183 

Pike 2161 

Pope 253 

Pulaski none 

Putnam none 

Randolph 2064 



Tbeastjreb, 1874. 
Opp. Ref. Rep. 
Gore Rulgway 
120 2582 

none 

329 

184 
62 
3815 
none 

664 

357 
i«73 

181 

505 
724 

3ii 

2090 
888 

129* 
1397 
1164 

555 

416 

306 

47i 



ILLINOIS. 

Stjp. P. Ins. '74. Gov. '72. 
Opp. Rep. Lib. Adm. 
Etter Powell Koernsr Oglesby 



2=3 

867 
788 

773 
742 
19 
169 
102 1 
204 
262 
728 

32=,6 

1463 

6 

235 

1306 

91 

231 



_ 4 

365 
1358 
1210 

587 
3899 
1494 

980 

24 
1292 
2241 
none 
1428 
1371 



467 

170 

368 

867 
14W 
3813 

291 

1071 

6 

1065 

317 

587 

»75 
none 

4 
816 

3 

432 

573 

313 

none 



745. 
900 
1299 

513 
2^98 

359 
1202 

789 
2563 
1723 
1304 
1048 

615 

2017 

20681 

615 

1733 
1316 
3216 
1 161 

1924 

$1 
498 

132 1 

904 

416 

2303 

535 
1230 
1121 

263 
i8 4 g 

172 

944' 



1302 

8 

1228 
2042 

939 

356=; 

1329 
918 
3430 
1415 
3312 
817 
2044 
1974 
2140 
1623 
1728 
33^9 
1359 
1287 



661 
2298 
2094 
4079 

622 
1306 

140 
1330 
2138 

281 
2022 
3764 
1034 

9°3 
1478 

683 

914 

382 



3954 
945 

10S7 
1S3 

1104 

1789 
707 

655 
1421 

2795 
2152 
16^2 

1357 
2016 

2075 

28500 
1151 
1267 
1276 

1481 

1170 

2346 

•531 
1859 
1819 

854 

1321 

3379 
1294 
2318 

909 
1991 
2559 

608 

723 
1271 

1648 
mi 
1870 
1633 
2301 

774 

1330 
1218 

^69 
1895 
1492 
3805 
'986- 
1226 
2235 
1913 
1987 
2293 
3640 
2490 

516 

1349 

820 

2277 

1447 

3997 

1325 

1 107 

1841 

260; 

2513 

1492 

1410 

3 6 5i 

741 

986 

2160 

685 

579 

304 

2037 



2601 

724 

897 

1297 

5°7 

2532 

358 

1209 

824 

2582 

1719 

1320 

1081 

629 

2025 

21228 

821 

628 

1758 

1327 

1216 

1672 

1998 

579 

1336 
903 
416 

2305 
520 

H93 

1119 

22 s 

l8 £ 
169 

947 
2273 

1283 

341 

782 
1242 
2046 

947 
4416 
1334 

937 
3417 
1417 
3948 

816 
2040 
2010 
2127 
1666 
2372 
34!° 
1349 

IHOQ 

992 
646 

23°5 

2106 

3020 

619 

1341 

152 

1351 

2114 

284 

2030 

3665 

i^33 

916 

1482 

675 

909 

388 

1414 



5305 
1080 
ioo3 

263 
1360 
1867 

606 

686 
1263 
2058 
2729 
1797 
1384 
1877 
2488 
21418 
1146 
1225 

667 

1575 
1229 

874 

2317 

420 

1714 

1825 
522 

1143 

3828 

1150 

2256 

75o 

1268 

3584 

487 

904 

1670 

]8i8 

1578 

1121 

1786 

2114 
564 

1728 
976 
399 

1981 
8/5 

4251 

1142 

1374 
2062 
1905 
2441 
3369 
4050 

2379 
1209 
1675 
7i4 
2710 
1104 
34^3 
II 04 
1 163 
1786 
26^6 
2584 
1229 
1347 
4040 
1125 
ico3 
2929 
613 
712 
3^6 



4271 
1224 
1290 
169=; 

830 
3229 

412 
1962 
1137 
3793 
2221 
1706 
1575 
1243 
2645 
28791 
1 173 
1110 
2962 
1738 
1554 
1521 
2288 

871 
1087 
1725 
1206 

960 

35" 

887 
1369 
1 581 

886 

3099 
426 
1204 
3673 
3096 
1857 
917 
1340 
3198 
2639 
1154 
4610 
2562 
3633 
4340 
2226 
5009 

1318 

2687 
3153 

2438 
2724 
3064 

3451 
2038 
3540 
3372 

1004 
2800 

2898 
5842 

939 
3980 

4M 
2206 
2728 

3002 
330S 
3722 
3427 

1443 
2638 

"75 
IO47 
624 

186^ 



Pees. '72. 
Lib. Adm. 
Grceiey Grant 
5 J 77 



1040 

246 
3322 
1820 
580 
614 

394 & 
2033 
3 713 
I3 6 ° 
1749 
243 1 
!8937 
3082 

H5 6 
607 

i5°5 

1124 
697 

2180 

1638 
1731 

490 
107S 
3704 
3129 
2197 

7 l 7 

3383 

3328 
443 
794 
i6=;o 
37S0 
3530 
3065 
1763 
I43 1 
1952 

3606 
936 
369 

1854 
821 

3957 

1089 

3 2^0 
1888 
1814 
2333 
3235 
35°4 
2291 

3 139 
1584 
668 
2600 
3080 
3335 
3349 
3049 
1583 
2538 
2442 

"77 

1247. 
39 6 3 
1033 
923 
2827 

£ 95 
694 

310 

1866 



4343- 
1231. 

1349- 
3692. 

833. 
3233. 

426. 
3968. 
1147- 
3773- 
2240. 

I7I3- 
1568. 

1319. 
2647. 
3 [ 3i6. 
3156. 
1106. 
2969. 

1734. 
1550. 

1679. 
2294. 

871. 
1103. 
3727. 
1243- 

953- 
3502. 

880. 
1371- 
1591- 

875. 
3i4i-. 

427. 
1202. 

3654.. 

3081. 

18^,7. 

937. 

1341- 
1205. 
2702. 
3346. 
4657. . 
2593. 
1633.. 

4315- 
2244. 
5046.. 
3330. 
2702. 
3130. 
2446.. 
2751. 
3081. 
3671. 
2068., 
3524. 
1386 
1037. 
2797. 
2895.. 
5845-. 
935-. 
1984. 

522. 
2238. 
2756. 

995- 
3095. 
3659.. 

1489. 



1045. 

601. 

1880. 



Pees. 
Dem. 
Seymour 

5471 
1098 

773 

306 
1502 

2315 
702 
680 
1403 
2125 
228; 
1906 

1339 
1570 
2247 
19104 
*477 
1344 
890 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



Carroll 

Richland 899 

Rock Island 1086 

Saline 564 

Sangamon 3699 

Schuyler 553 

Scott 956 

Shelby ...2208 

Stark nona 

St. Clair 4104 

Stephenson 1820 

Tazewell 1262 

Union 1577 

Vermillion 419 

Wabash 741 

Warren 80 

Washington 1224 

Wayne 670 

White 1171 

Whiteside 113 

Will ....2213 

Williamson 893 

Winnebago none 

Woodford.. 2 



Gore Ridgvr>iy Etter Powel' Koerner Ogl-sby 



1100 
1956 
1494 
4323 
1448 
1416 
2639 

553 
4076 

1837 
2170 
1 516 
1630 
1202 
1102 

1315 
840 
1862 
1026 
4402 
1406 
1346 
1463 



197 


845. 


004 


1950. 


921 


491. 


718 


3135. 


978 


991. 


364 


372. 


890 


776. 


57i 


779- 


420 


2570- 


17 


igi2. 


912 


1862. 


1 


488. 


1235 


2542. 


463 


254. 


1328 


1609. 


198 


1085. 


1116 


794- 


760 


810. 


9«9 


1980. 


2070 


2363. 


5C4 


695. 


1364 


2642. 


1476 


934. 



Total 128169 

Percent 34.94 



75580 163024.. 197490 
20.61 44 46.. 54 18 




166984. 
45.8-2. 



197084 237774.. 184938 241944. 
45.3a 64.68.. 43.32 66.118. 



I99I43 
44 31 



250303 
56.Cd 



Thomas S. Ridgway over Charles Carroll, for Treasurer, 34,855; over David Gore, 87,444. 
Samuel M. Etter's maj. for Superintendent of Public Instruction, 30,506. Richard J. Oglesby's 
maj.for Governor, in 1872,40,690. Grant's maj. 1872, 57,006; in 1868,51.160. Total vote in 1874, for 
Treasurer, 366,773 ; for Superintendent of Public Instruction, 364,474 ; for Governor, in 1872, 434,858 ; 
for President, in 1872, 426,882 ; for President, in 1868, 449,416. James F. Simpson, Prohibitionist, re- 
ceived 516 votes for Treasurer, and Mrs. Ada F. Potter, Prohibitionist, 68i votes for Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction . 



Congressmen. 

' 18?4. 18?3. 
Dists. Opp. Rep. Lib. Acini. 

I. Caultield femith Otis Rue 
Cook, part. 9194 8577.. 6401 11282 
Du Page...ioi7 1226.. 870 1588 

Total .. .10211 9803.. 7271 12870 

Barney G. Caulneld's maj. 408 : 

John B.Rice's maj. in 1872, 5599. 

II. Harrison Wntd Harr'n Ward 

Cook, part. 9189 9181.. 8873 12182 

Carter II. Plarrison's maj. 
Jasper D. Ward's maj. in 1872, 
3309. 

III. LeMoyne Farw. LeM. Farw 

Cook, part. 6576 6706. . 4067 6448 
Lake 1415 147.1.. 895 2254 



VII. Campbell Corwin Parks Corw. 

Grundy 910 1114. . 752 1588 

Kendall 614 889.. 409 1607 

LaSalle 4549 3437.. 4002 5286 

Will .4235 2465.. 31 30 3923 

Total . ..10308 7905.. 8293 12404 
Alexander Campbell's maj. 

2403; Fianklin Corwin's maj. in 

1872, 411 e. 

VIII. BayDe Fort Ea nes 



Total 7991 8177.. 4962 8702 

Charles B. Farwell's maj. 186; 
in 1872, 3740. 

IV. F.rusworth Hurlb. Brons.Hurlb 



Boone 244 

DeKalb 1573 

Kane 3084 

McHenry ..1596 
Winn'bagoioo6 



1211. 
1358. 
2609. 



279 
680 
1740 



ji8.. 1131 
170. . 1304 



1650 
2943 
4551 
2872 
35i6 



Total 7503 8766.. 5134 15532 

Stephen A. Hurlbut'sinaj. 1263 ; 
in 1872, 10398. 

V. Pinckney Burc'drins.Burc'd 

Carroll 697 1207.. 674 1982 

Jo Daviess ..2323 2060. 2041 2712 

Ogle 1135 2074. .1327 3133 

Stephenson.. 1735 1951..2189 2885 
Whiteside ...1 1 18 1940.. 1307 3324 

Total 7008 9232 . . 7538 14036 

Horatio C. Burchard's maj. 
2224 ; in 1872, 6498. 

VI. Elliott Hend.Truesd Hawl. 

Bureau 1656 2602. . 1882 3252 



Henry 125 

£ee 1135 

Putnam 347 

Rock Isl'd.1883 



2312. 

2180. 

332. 

1963.. 



1674 
1342 

1968 



3680 

2720 

623 

28.18 



Total 6279 0389.. 7215 13123 

Thomas J. Henderson's maj. 

3110; John B. Hawley's maj. in 

1872, 5908. 



1327- 
2084. 
1727. 



571 
1800 

961 
2111 
1059 



Fort 
1266 
3125 

2576 

3J58 
1693 
1583 



3 ,9753- • 83a! 13401 
j.Iort's maj. 2290 ; 



Ford 906 

Iroquois... 1680 
Kankakee. .1208 
Livingston.2147 
Marshall... 343 
Woodford..ii79 1177.. 1862 

Total . . . .7463 
Greenbury L 
in 1872, 5097. 

IX. Ro^WhitgVTorth.Barr'e 

Fulton.... 3598 1815.. 3840 3481 

Knox 2327 2883.. 2029 4331 

Peoria 2938 4346.. 4253 3S78 

Stark 632 711.. 677 

Total — -9495 97*S5-. 10799 12600 
Richard H. Whiting's maj . 260 ; 

Granville Barrere's maj. in 1872, 

1S01. 

Bagbv Kit hie Neece Ray 



Scott Wike's maj. 4100 ; Robert 
M. Knapp's maj. in 1872, 2879. 

XII. Springer Slmp.Rob.Cham. 

Cass 993 

Christian ..1842 



Menard 1023 

Morgan — 2231 
Sangamon. 3574 
Scott y6o 



«7«.. 1140 
2034.. 2723 
593.. 1 189 

1935- ■ 2574 

3280.. 4519 

307.. 1 100 



1302 
22m 

856 
2776 
4167 

959 



598 18. 



ft 



X. 

Hancock... 2 
Henderson 725 
McDono'h.2251 

Mercer 1115 

Schuyler . .1672 
Warren 1423 

Total . . . .9784 8825..11669 13187 
John C. Bagby's maj. 959; 

William H. Ray '8 maj. in 1872, 

1518. 

XI. Wike Peaty Knapp Math 



3620 
928 
2295. . 2799 
1313.. H75 
846.. 
1616., 



1435 
1712 



3116 
1205 
2720 

1097 
1 661 
2488 



Adams 3863 

Brown 960 

Calhoun . . , 704 

Greene 2381 

Jersey 1529 

Pike 2089 

Total ...11529 7429..13818 10939 



2582. 

517.. 

360.. 
1207. . 

I343-. 
1420.., 



5271 
137 1 
597 
2246 
1484 
2S49 



43S0 
824 
430 
13*5 
1191 
2729 



Total ... 10623 9027. .13245 1231 1 
William M. Springer over An- 
drew Simpson, 1596. John B. 
Turner, Iud. Rep., received 2417 
votes. James C. Robinson's 
maj. in 1872, 934. 

XII I. Stevenson McN. Moore MeN". 
DeWitt 1546 1270.. i6c,6 1615 



Logan 1957 

Mason 1382 

McLean ....4040 
Tazewell. ..2210 



2053. 

934- 

3«i2. 

1834. 



1914 
1059 

3403 
2158 



2423 

1403 
5699 
2350 



Total... .11135 9903.. 108 50 13-190 
Adlai E. Stevenson's maj. 1232 ; 

John McNulta's maj. in 1872, 

2640. 

XIV. rickvell Cannon Nels. Can 'n 
Champaign2668 2661.. 2124 3724 

Coles 2083 2006.. 2497 2635 

Douglas.... 1157 1238.. 1317 1410 

Macon 2053 1846.. 24^,3 2701 

Piatt 999 922 . . 1060 1388; 

Vermillion. 1643 2571.. 1954 3304. 

Total ... 10603 11244.. 11405 15162 

Joseph G. Cannon's majj. 641 5 

in 1872, 3757. 

XV. Eden Wilkin Eden 
Clark 1102 1954. . 1843 



Crawford.. 1 105 
Curnberl'd.1002 

Edgar 2110. 

Emngham,.i438 

Jasper 880 

Lawrenee.. 947 
Moultrie... 1228 
Shelby 2272 

Total . . .12084 10789. .146 
John R. Eden's maj. i 

1872,2354. 



867.. 
907.. 
2251. . 

ft:: 

861.. 
600., 
827., 



1242 
1227 

2314 

1690 
1118 

"A 5 

1280 

2784 



Hunt 

J 7i9 
1 16a 
mo 
2288 
mo 
919 

960 

1909 



2 I22C8 

29^ t iO. 



l-T.5 



fc2 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T5. 



XVI. Sparks Martin Bryan Martin, XVIII. Hatsell Clem. Wall. Clem 



Bond 693 

Clay 621 

Clinton 1683 

Fayette.... 1 567 

Marion 1296 

Montgo'ry.1656 
Washing 'n. 1207 



908.. 956 1345 Alexander. 942 

1041.. 1347 1600, Jackson.. ..1050 

651.. 1797 1336 Johnson.... 698 

1318.. 1832 i733,Ma88ac 691 

1555.. 2221 2206'Perry 803 

1309.. 2605 2246'Pope 545 

1150.. 1258 1784! Pulaski.... 581 



Mart hall Ander. Marsh. Raum 



1017 



1102. 
814. 



1 731 
1799 



1616 
1232 



1215 Wayne 736 

1899 White 1210 

«5 ,oHi Total 7^56 8293.. 13297 1 1282 

1177 n$L William - • Maerson, ind. 



Total. ...8723 7932-.I20I6 12 2 5 6 K n °. lph ''f 5 £ 

William A. J. Sparks over Williainsoniise 
James S. Martin, 791. Rolla B. 
Henry, Ind. Rep., received 4023 
votes. James S. Martin's maj. 
in 1872, 240. 



XVII. Morrison Rinak.Morri'n Hay 

Macourin..237i 2693.. 3402 30*5 

Madison.... 3844 3198.. 3761 3728 

Monroe 1880 108.. 1903 288 

St. Clair... 4985 2439.. 4149 4245 



Total ...13086 8438..13215 11316 

William R. Morrison's maj . in 

1874, 4648 ; in 1872, 1899. 



733 
1306 
1050 

770 

*%*" *fi£ T l ?A'l Re P- over Samuel S. Marshall 

So" 707 o?o'"37- Green B. Raum, Reg. Rep. 

i£i" io°6 j^8'jeceived 5482 votes. Samuel S. 

HIV. \%t ^Marshall's maj. in 1872,20:5. 

994.. 1410 1334I Legislature, 1875-C. 

T . tn1 r~^7o^ — ;,-,-,p ,™ n J Senate. House. Joint Bal 

Total ...10866 9280. .11278 12999 r> Pn q ,. _ n .. 

William Hartsell's maj. 1586; !§em 2I 11 &> 

Isaac_Clement's maj. in 1872,1721.] jq^^ * 



XIX. Marshall Ander. Marsh. R*»um 



Edwards. . 237 
Franklin... 4^9 

Gallatin 737 

Hamilton.. 961 

Hardin 368 

Jefferson . . 648 
Richland... 875 

Saline 612 

Wabash ... 713 



327.. 
926.. 

753.. 
1063. . 

260.. 
1328.. 

269.. 

957-. 

494-. 



422 
1167 
1 174 
1283 

488 
1829 

1398 
1104 
902 



950 
822 
876 
422 
1283 
1308 
1071 
803 



_27 _3_o 

Total 51 153 204 

The House is elected bv the 
cumulative vote, three members 
being chosen on this plan from 
each Senate District. The Sen- 
ators are elected for four year-*. 
Of the 25 elected in 1872, and 
holding over, 15 are Republicans 
and 10 Democrats. 






WISCONSIN. 

Congressmen. 

18?4. 18?2. 

Dists. Ref. Rep. Lib. Adm. 

I. Pra'.t Wms. fcloan Wms. 

Kenosha... 1247 1170.. 1230 1410 

Racine 2559 2316.. 2138 2882 

Rock 1537 4164. . 1751 5151 

Walworth. .1550 2658.. 1528 35^ 

WaukeBb a.2639 2260.. 2733 21" 

Total 9532 12368.. 9380 15666 

Charles Q. Williams's maj .3036 ; 
in 1872, 6286. 

II. Cook Caswell Smith Hazelt. 

Columbia.. 2175 2580.. 1854 3103 

Dane 4900 4340-- 4949 5027 

Jefferson.. 292 7 2646.. 3595 2379 

Sauk 1415 21 10. . 1386 2699 

Total ...1 1423 1 1676.. 1 1 784 13408 
Lucien B. Caswell's maj. 2*3: 

Gerry W. Hazelton's maj. in 1872, 

1624. 

III. Thompson Mag*n Wa dn.Barb. 
Crawford.. 1233 1028.. 1177 n 73 



Grant .2 =#3 

Green 1649 

Iowa 1929 

Lafavette..i843 
Richland . .1106 



3198.. 
1926., 

1524.. 



2 359 



2030 
1940 



4278 
2467 
2079 
2076 



William P. Lynde's maj. 2501 ; 
Alexander Mitchell's maj. in 
1872, 6201. 

V. Burchard Barter Eldrid. Baetz 

Dodge 5054 2376.. 5586 3117 

Fond d.Lac4327 3512.. 4393 4376 
Manitowoc3i57 1923 . 2526 2443 
Sheboygan 3246 2078.. 3082 2*71 

Total 



..15784 9889.. 15*87 12507 
Samuel D. Burcnard's maj. 
B95 ; Charles A. Eldridge's maj . 
Ini 872, 3080. 

VI. fcouck Kimball lands. Snwy. 

Brown 2661 2498.. 2322 2*99 

Calumet ..1202 



1247.. 

808.. 
1392.. 

893.. 
1312. , 
1496.. 
1490.- 
359i • • 



1299 



Fulton Rusk Marsteu Rusk' 

Yernon . . . . 6*4 1916. . 443 2567 

Total ...10196 136^.. 8=47 16183 
Jeremiah M. Rusk's maj . 3438 ; 
in 1872, 7636. 

VIII. Cate McDill Cars >n McD. 

A.dams 367 654.. 287 875: 



1027 

916 
1965 
1046 

418 I7IO 
3167 ^4097 



1576 

604 

1566 

1962 



Door 

GreenLakeioSi 
Kewaunee. 825 
Outagamie 2476 
Waupaca. .1*44 
Waushara. 596 
Winn'bago 3922 

Total .. .14641 147^3. .12358 15803 
Alanson M. Kimball's maj. 92 ; 

Philetus Sawyer's maj. in 1872, 

3445- 

VII. Fulton Rusk Maraten Rusk 



Ashland ... 4 

Barron 335 

Bayfield... — 
Burnett ... 4 
Chippewa. 1202 
Douglas... 40 

Dunn 696 

Juneau 1369 

i|Lincoln 19 



1092 1672 Buffalo — 722 
'clark 680 



988? 13745 Eau Cia'ire'.i38 4 



Total ...10343 1 1 535. 

Henry S. Magoon's maj. 1192 ; j Jackson" 26? 

J AUenBarber;8maj.ini8 7 ^^ Lfcro"seV.i7?o 
IV. LyndeLudm. Mi'ch.Wlnkl Af ' 

Milwaukee864i 7231.. 8855 5616 M ° e ' ■ " ■ I4 J§ 

Ozaukee... 882 1386.. 1607 574 pfji in " *,, 

Washlng' n.2523 928..27g 9 93° ^ er r^,iV i %$ 

Total ...12046 9545. .13321 7i2olTrempearu 396 



604.. 


609 


1098 


609. 


174 


894 


1082.. 


8^5 


1381 


6^1.. 


455 


866 


2068. 


1893 


2269 


182 1. 


1464 


2092 


1008. 


377 
634 


1464 


1199. 


1220 


1352 


1160., 


423 


1442 



214.. 

219.. 
IW.. 

146.. 

1014.. 
109.. 

1 1 15.. 
1278.. 

500.. 
538.. 
848.. 

1388." 

235-- 

457-.' 



137 
124 

129 
100 

937 

"'I 
1296 

- 1399 
new Co. 

876 



3 

34 

2 

7 

954 

101 

680 

1119 



929 
400 
1/8 
735 
465 
408 



642 
1098 

649- 
1619 



Marathon.. 1021 
Marquette. 802 

Oconto 866 

Polk 224 

Portage 1062 

Shawano... 790 
Wood 655 

Total 9546 9544.. 7238 10711 

George W. Gate's maj. 2, no* 
including the town of Lincoln 
and ist ward of Grand Rapids, 
which gave McDill 40 maloritv 
Alexander S. McDlll's maj. I 
1872, 3473. 

Legislature, lSt5. 

Senate. House. Joint Bal 

Reps, 17 64 81 

Reformers.. 1 e; 31 46 

Independ'ts i 1 2 

Rep. maj.. 1 32 33 



In 



KHODE ISLAND. 
Governor,^. Gov.'™. Pees. '72. 
Counties. Bern. Rep. Bern. Rep. Lib. Adm. 
PierceHowa t! .ha' eHovardGreeleyGrant 



Bristol 16 

Kent 412 

Newport 21 

Providence... 786 
Washington.. 354 



672.. 140 

729.. 105 

1432.. 351 

7719.. 2624 

1783.. 566 



434. 

969, 
1 132, 
6065. 
1056. 



. 204 

• 387 

• 409 
.3562. 
. 767 



800 
1228 

1549 

8422 
1666 



Total 1589 12335. .3786 9656. .5329 13665 

Percent ...11.41 88.59. .28.16 71.84. .28.06 H.95 

Henry Howard's maj. 10746; in 1873, 5870; 
Grant's maj. 8336. Total vote in 1874, 13,924 ; in 
1873, 13,442 ; in 1872, 18.994. In 1874 there were 177 
scattering votes for Governor. 

The aggregates in 1874 of candidates for the 

other State offices were as follows : 

Lieut, Gov. . .Charles C. Van Zandt, Rep.. . 7710 

Wm.F.Sayles,Dem.&Prohib. 6348 

Van Zandt's maj 1362 



Sec. of State.. Joshua M. Adderaan, Rep 12492 

\v illiam H. Allen, Dem 1438 

Addeman's maj T i°54 

Att.-General.W\U&rdSa.xles, Rep 125*2 

ElishaC.Mowry.Dem 1448 

Sayles's maj 1 1 104 

Treasurer . . .Samuel Clark, Rep 8495 

Henry Goff, Dem ^547 

Clark's maj 2948 

Legislature, 1874. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Republicans 26 *9 85 

Democrats 10 13 23 

Republican maj 16 46 62 

Congress, 1874. 
Benjamin T. Eames and Latimer W. Ballon 
were elected to Congress from the Eastern and 
Western Districts respectively. By an unoffi- 
cial count the former received 2342 against 824 
for William B. Beach, Dem., and the latter 2362 
against 1235 for Daniel Rodman, Dem. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



83 



MINNESOTA. 

CH.JTTST CE,'74. GOV.^73 

Counties. Dem. Bep.Anti-M 

Wi.kinMcMillan burton 

Aitkin 13 39.. none 

Anoka 476 533.. 316 

Becker none =74.. 75 

Beaton 212 "148.. 195 

Big Stone none 29. . no return 

Blue Earth.. 1885 1623.. 1899 1354. 



.73. Gov. 71. 
Rep. Dem. Rep. 



Davis YoungAustin 

50.. new Co. 
288 471 

5 



447- • 
411.. 
134.. 



Brown 674 

Carlton 31 

Oarver 1306 

Cass 35 

Chippewa 69 

Chisago 118 

Clay 4 

Cottonwood. 120 
Crow Wing . . 91 

Dakota 1922 

Dodge 507 

Douglas...... 68 

Faribault ...1363 

Fillmore 1047 

Freeborn 348 

Goodhue 867 

Srant none 

Hennepin ...3346 

Houston 1415 

Isanti 96 

Jackson 78 

Kanabec 18 

Kandiyohi ... 68 



83s 
126. 
582. 

;54- 
203. 
709. 
441. 

4°3- 
155., 

1262. 

856. 
1096.. 
1436. 
2123. 
1724. 
2246., 

186.. 
4070.. 
1572.. 

441.. 

474 • 

587.! 



444 
1229 



479- 
172. 

708. 



none 

1557 

327 

46 

1039 



205 

141 

12 

1563 
848 
189 

873 



8 


47- 


. new 


Co. 


84 


293- 


8 


253 


109 


871. 


. 162 


703 


24 


216. 


2 


62 


50 


255. 


. 28 


188 


90 


321. 


. 122 


161 


2038 


659. 


• 1494 


1279 


349 


753- 


• 43 i 
. 100 


1085 


4° 


443- 


667 


S87 


1291. 


. 438 


1565 


786 


1404. 


. 1240 


2576 


232 


1071. 


. 271 


1204 


83b 


1395- 


. 1044 


2001 


11 


162. 


none 


31 


2041 


1687. 


1690 


2226 


1036 


1206. 


722 


1440 


37 


217. 


12 a 


240 


90 


475- 


48 


477 



142 
Lac QuiParle.none 276.. 3 

Lake none 24 . .none 

Le Seuer 1819 671.. 1411 

Lincoln 10 61. 

Lyons 6 405.. 100 

Martin 191 368. . 287 

fMcLeod 803 639.. 459 

Meeker 878 729.. 419 

Mille Lacs ...in 183.. 131 

Morrison 241 194 . . 247 

Mower 948 1215.. 943 



29. 

517- 
212. 



o 9 *$ 

180 mo 
new Co. 
26. .no return. 
543.. 1207 896 
new County. 



389. 
237-- 
477- • 
839- • 
93-. 

869;! 



15b 
363 
447 
80 
217 
627 



72 

568 

435 
710 
136 
142 
1266 



Murray 35 

Nicollet 705 

Nobles. 93 

Olmsted 1637 

Otter Tail.... 495 

Pine 16 

Polk none 

Pope 38 

Ramsey 3398 

Redwood 164 

Renville 307 

Rice 1368 

Rock 29 

St. Louis 136 

Scott 1387 

Sherburne ...242 

Sibley 1000 

Stearns 1993 

Steele 632 

Stevens 12 

Swift 2 

Todd 148 

Wabasha 1572 

Wadena none 

Waseca 772 

Washington. 1 196 
Watonwan... 198 

Wilkin 41 

Winona 2243 

Wright 1068 

YellowMedicine 



Wil kinMcMill anBartonDavis YoungAustin 



163.. 
964.. 

355-. 
1634.. 
1020. . 

284.. 

211.. 

672.. 
2187.. 

259.. 

757- • 
1436. . 

355- • 

813.. 

IT. 

514.. 

915.. 

1062. . 

103.. 

280.. 

171.. 

1291. . 

27.. 

893.. 

1426. . 

617.. 

123 



692 

IOI 

1444 

164 

s l 

36 

II 
2167 

260 

1745 

15 

46 

1408 

191 

990 

1564 

tf>9 
24 

25 
185 
1250 
I 
621 
1 109 
646 
13 



1859.. 1835 
932.. I 129 
577-. 13 



217 
721.. 

383-. 
1215. . 

963-. 

222.. 

72.. 

287.. 
3130.. 

293- • 
421. . 
1245. 
204. 
628. 
358. 
223. 
356. 
733- 

774- 
82. 

192. 

242. 
1031. 

27. 

787. 
1332. 

998. 

87. 

1532. 

799- 
321. 



9 

522 

1 

1577 

244 

157 



46 

1049 

7i 
1792 
1097 
103 



no return . 
355 



34 

2282 

162 

1378 

none 

185 
1277 

80I 
1728 
494 

*9 

28 

195 

1315 



2237 
614 
561 

1732 
56 
535 
477 
345 
495 
523 

1195 

28 

144 

303 

!3i9 



no return. 
576 839 



594 
167 

23 

i860 

923 



new Co. 



993 
502 
142 

2178 
868 



Total 42m ^1996.. 35242 40761.. 31441 46415 

Percent 44.75 6 6. 25 . . 46.37 53.63.. 40.38 59.62 

S. J. R. McMillan's maj. 9,88=;; Gov. Davis's 
maj. in 1873, 5,519; Gov. Austin's maj. in 1871, 
14,974. Total vote in 1874, 94,107 ; In 1873, 76,003 ; 
in 1871, 77,856. 

Legislature, 1875. Senate. Souse. Jt. Bal. 



Republicans 

Democrats 

Independents 

Republican maj . 



18 



18?4. 18?3. 
Dist. Dem. Rep. Lib.Adm. 

I. W.iiteDun'UWilk'sonDun'l 

Blue Earth .2276 1165.. 1704 1821 



Vote for Representatives in Congress 

Cox St' ait GrahamStrai 

Rice 1343 1404.. 1209 1904 



jCottonwoodi3o 

Dodge 602 

Faribault... 758 
Fillmore... 1 169 
Freeborn ...497 
Houston... 1458 

Jackson 164 

Martin 201 

Mower 959 

Murray 50 

Nobles 105 

Olmsted . . . 1494 

Rock 37 

Steele 689 

Waseca 602 

Watonwan. 259 
Winona 2271 

Total 



04 
382.. "46 
713. • 508 
9°3- • 5°3 
1867.. 1296 
1552.. 322 
1477.. 1065 



379- 

35° • 
1173. 

163.. 

336.. 
1599. 

355- 
960. 

1032. , 
5*40 

1770. 



53 



446 

948 

1596 

2721 

1507 

1730 

S66 

665 

1475 



no return. 

no return. 

1 143 2060 

181 



626 
645 

230 
1945 



1042 
937 
578 

2098 



13721 16716..10841 20371 

Mark H. Dunnell's maj. 2,995; 
in 1872, 9,530. 
II. Cox StvaitGraham Strait 

Brown 773 702.. 384 875 



Carver 1075 

Chippewa... 101 

Dakota 1953 

Goodhue ...878 
Kandiyohi.. 149 
Le Seuer . . 1671 

Lincoln 10 

Lyon 49 

McLeod ....70S 
Nicollet ....8^2 
Redwood... 162 
Renville 397 



806 
150 



998 

44 
1718 

1447 
196 
1154 
1.. no re turn 
398.. no return. 
628. . 456 662 
801.. 566 981 
260. . 62 270 
662.. 241 772 



2190. . 
617.. 
795 



958 

397 
1112 

2586 
992 

957 



Scott 758 

Sibley 1028 

Swift 29 

Wabasha ..1526 

Total. 



1026.. 977 1060 
479 .no return 
253.. 61 228 

1312.. 1319 1503 



Total... 13520 13742.. 10832 15257 
Horace B. Strait's maj. 222 ; in 

1872, 4,425. 

III. Wilson King Becker A verill 



115 



Aitkin 18 24 

Anoka 447 504 

Becker 82 494.. 15 

Benton 200 160.. 161 

Big Stone. . none 29. .none 

Carlton 47 123.. 46 

Cass 37 52.. 12 

Chisago 189 635.. 

Clay 26 415.. 

Crow Wing. 99 151.. 

Douglas.... 293 852.. 

Grant 26 165.. 

Hennepin.. 3389 399F 

Isanti 118 411 

Kanabec 20 75.. 

Lac quiParlei3 260.. 5 23=; 

Lake none 24-.no return. 

Meeker 875 724.. 498 

Mille Lacs.. 135 152.. 80 

Morrison... 208 226.. 241 

Otter Tail. . 621 885.. 272 
Pem bina ... no return . .none 



39 
33i 

)Oo 

IS? 
32 

12 16 
08 777 
62 339 

. 283 401 

. 257 IOO4 

. l8 I78 

. 280I 4162 

no return. 

13 22 



Pine 135 

Polk 25 

Pope 80 

Ramsay . . .3752 

St. Louis 186 

Sherburne.. 327 



172. . 

176., 

630. . 

1721.. 

758.. 
224.. 



127 
12 

2649 



182 

161 

mi 

40 

§9 

81 

619 

2733 
883 
278 



WilsonKingBeckerAvenll 

Stearns. .. .1790 1119.. 2027 1013 

Stevens 38 77.. 96 53 

Todd 80 239.. 218 374 

Wadena 2 27 . . no return. 

Wash 'gton 1343 1254.. 807 1253 

Wilkin 63 101.. 48 52 

Wright — 1148 79s.. 964 1070 

Yell . M'dcine49 527.. 27 303 

Total... 15861 18179.. 12609 19182 
William S. Ki. g's maj. 2.318 ; 

John T. Aver ill's maj. in 1872, 

6,573- 

NEWARK, N. J. 

Charter Election, Oct., 1874. 

Water Com'r. Tax Comb. 

Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. 

O'RourkeboddlrwinLiuchi'. 



Ward 1. 



12. 



13. 

14- 

15. 

Total 



522 
542 
322 
457 
458 
721 

641 
271 

757 
33o 
735 
707 
105 
474 



637. 
599- 
568. 
400. 
908. 
207. 
661. 
626. 
618. 
394- 
373- 
1066. 
336. 
463- 



540 
^48 
34i 
471 
4&3 
729 
750 
665 

293 
772 
338 
746 
716 
108 
484 



583 
634 
580 
562 
396 
897 
201 

614 
606 
39i 
371 
1064 

332 

462 



7783 8444.. 7964 8348 
Dodd over O'Rourke, 661 ; Bu- 
chanan over Irwin, 384. 



84 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



TENNESSEE. 
Governor, '74. Gov. '72. Pres.'72. 

Counties. Bern. Rep. Lib. Acini. Lib.Adm. 
Porter Ala> nai dBi ownFreenianGreeleyG. ant 

Anderson.. 395 475.. 344 661.. 343 638 

Bedford 1770 1096.. 1879 1594.. 1762 1635 

Benton 7m 74.. 757 242.. 749 256 

Bledsoe.... 343 183.. 283 334.. 287 337 

Blount 749 848.. 332 1190. . 570 11S4 

Bradley 380 468.. 575 771.. 580 779 

Campbell.. 231 401.. 141 599.. 142 604 

Cannon 800 138.. 975 297.. 958 310 

Carroll 1352 1274.. 1348 1780.. 1335 1778 

Carter 373 8.j6.. 182 1143-- 165 "74 

Cheatham.. 72s 227.. 743 234.. 703 284 

Claiborne.. 379 43o.. 43** 799- • 425 73° 

Clay 428 43.. 392 168.. 389 168 

Cocke 042 319.. -,32 1040.. 357 943 

Coffee 765 us.. 1031 ii&.. 1027 223 

Cumberland 198 86.. 127 211.. 133 213 

Davidson .. 5435 4253.. 5148 5738.. 5 6 5 6 5^47 

Decatur 505 83.. 544 298 . 528 315 

De Kalb 377 212.. 733 587.. 739 638 

Dickson 958 224.. 956 380.. 917 394 

Dyer 1301 179.. 1355 348.. 1309 351 

Fayette.. . 3103 2284.. 1632 3341.- 1425 334 2 

Fentres9... 138 ui„ 171 240.. 177 256 

1 Franklin... 1395 us.. 1797 22s.. 1747 2 &9 

1 Gibson 2814 756.. 2668 1232.. 2567 1286 

Giles 2572 1333., 2084 2009.. 1924 2039 

Granger... 306 430.. S44 67s.. 540 689 

Greene 1496 803.. 1251 131 i.. 12S9 1358 

Grundy.... 327 40.. 304 79 . 324 62 

Hamblen... 68s 505.. si2 734.. 503 738 

Hamilton.. 1145 1155.. 1161 1602.. 1098 1630 

Hancock... 292 390.. 276 487.. 271 518 

Hardeman. 1890 93s.. 1469 1160.. 1374 1248 

Hardin 820 603.. 705 965.. 695 973 

Hawkins... 1196 776.. 954 1067.. 934 1113 

i Haywood . 1920 1934.. 1410 2912.. 134s 2992 

Henderson. 854 540.. 861 867.. 849 768 

Henry 1830 408.. 2045 615.. 1940 648 

Hickman... 942 78.. 934 220.. 891 235 

Houston... 537 53.. 474 85.. 459 94 

Humphreys 961 141.. 1087 180.. 1011 17s 

Jackson ... 781 5,. 855 48.. 851 58 

James 211 207.. 159 393.. 153 389 

Jefferson... 614 roco.. 463 1407.. 452 1412 

Johnson... 80 630.. 6d 771.. 57 778 

Knox 2374 2338.. 1708 3368.. 1695 3394 

Lake 240 7.. 284 — .. 292 — 

Lauderdale 866 17S.. 1036 592.. 584 603 

Lawrence.. 723 88.. 524 227.. 438 239 

Lewis 116 3.. 140 32.. 133 34 

Lincoln 23=3 306.. 2934 447.. 2718 473 

London ... 468 595.. 379 792.. 363 80S 

Macon 323 43.. .115 414.. 406 429 

Madison ... 2267 815.. 2*60 1469.. 2096 15,47 

Marion 435 398.. 277 si8.. 279 511 

Marshall... 1633 382.. 1620 626.. 1421 020 

Maury 2963 1719.. 2648 2676.. 2438 2763 

McMinn 983 93"-. 967 1276.. 949 1282 

McNairy ... 1049 432.. 581 882.. 563 934 

Meigs 517 141.. 421 283.. 406 280 

Monroe 934 448 . 870 617.. 870 617 

Montgomery2S33 1842.. 2197 2049.. 2156 2064 

Moore 20 none.. new county. 

Morgan 121 108.. 113 207.. 114 224 

Obion isso 244.. 1909 314.. 1933 381 

Overton — 726 s8.. 72s 167.. 711 172 

Perry 479 103.. 392 175.. 591 187 

P°i k 540 207.. 479 374.. 438 377 

Putnam so8 138.. 609 267.. 592 258 

Rhea 475 189.. 442 237.. 435 237 

Roane 002 714. 407 1 1C3. . 385 1167 

Robertson. 1649 632.. 1749 842.. 1=92 887 

Rutherford 2631 2086.. 2717 2314.. 2303 2326 

Scott 13 171.. 7 361.. . 7 361 

Sequatchie. 174 32.. 175O 74 . 166 83 

Sevier 286 688.. 138 1185.. 138 1176 

Shelby 8828 5877.. 6598 8275.. 6356 8445 

Smith 1223 319.. 1378 627.. 1 199 611 

Stewart — 1119 179.. 1647 266.. 990 318 



Sullivan 1603 

Sumner 1902 

Tipton 1126 

Trousdale.. 472 

Union 332 

Van Buren. 202 

Warren 1227 

"Washington 1095 

"Wayne 592 

"Weakley... 1439 

"White 990 

"Williamson 1700 
"Wilson . 2079 

Total 103061 

Percent 64.86 



PorterMaynardBrownFreeman GreeleyGrant I 



330.. 
890.. 
740.. 

93-. 
446.. 

18.. 
323- • 
972.. 

333-. 
295 .. 

560. , 
636.. 



1540 
2162 
1412 

779 
239 
179 
1394 
937 
634 
1447 

1889 
2639 



691. 


1523 


-00 


1131. 


2059 


1141 


1131. 

169. 


1284 


1 186 


703 


178 


392. 


252 
167 


600 


29. 


36 


459- 


1358 


479 

J 138 
740 


1416. 
687. 


613 


664. 
118. 


1675 


-06 


897 


129 


1492. 


1858 
2462 


- T: 4S 


1190. 


1 -'24 



35842.. 97689 84100. .94391 8565a 
36.14.. 53.74 46 26.. 5*43 47.9 

James D. Porter, Jr.'s niaj. 47,219; John Cj 
Brown's maj. in 1872, 13,589 ; Greeley's maj. 8.73S 
Total vote in 1874, for Governor, 158,903 ; in i8t« 

ident, 180,046. 



for Governor, 181,789 ; for Pres: 
Legislature, 1875 6. senate, Jlous'e. 

Democrats 23 70 

Republicans 2 5 

Democratic maj . . 21 65 



Joint Bet 
93 
_7 
86 



Representatives in Congress, 1S74. 

Dist. Bern. Hep. 1 IT. Head 
Mc t a- laud Butler j Clay 439 



Carter 487 

Claiborne 491 

Cocke 721 

Granger 474 

Greene 1563 

Hamblen 777 

Hancock 270 

Hawkins 1136 

Johnson 108 

Sullivan 1620 

Washington. 1136 



761 j Fentress 137 

3261 Jackson 784 

497jMacon 348 

3171 Overton 744 

829 'Putnam 323 

458! Robertson ...1614 

468J Smith 1318 

900 Sumner 1910 



624 
490 
925 



Total 8783 6995 

William McFarland's 
maj. 1,788. 
II. MabryThornb 



Anderson 415 

Blount 758 

Campbell 26s 

Jefferson 680 

Knox 2440 

Loudon 471 

Monroe 902 

Morgan 121 

Roane 597 

Scott 14 

Sevier 347 

Union 328 



476 
829 



Trousdale ... 479 
Wilson 2134 



Total 10430 -j 

John W. Head's maj 

10,430. 

"V. Bright "ft iserje 

Bedford 1731 iro 

Coffee 739 i 

Franklin 1376 j 

,! Lincoln 2203 28 

g 2 gi Marshall 1=13 24 



2234 
381 
482 

133 

7 8i 
191 
636 



Moore 19 

Rutherford. . . 2603 205 

Total 10224 38I 

John M. Bright's maj 



6.303 



Housetlarriid 



maj. 830 

nr. 

Bledsoe 343 

Bradley 511 

Cannon 772 

Cumberland. 200 

De Kalb C49 

Grundy 328 

Hamilton 1147 

James 197 

Marion 434 

McMinn 976 

Meigs 311 

Polk 338 

Rhea 475 

Sequatchie... 174 
Van Buren . . . 205 

Warren 1219 

White 960 



it 
1 8a 
ij 

:-: 
ma. 



Cheatham 718 23 

474 Davidson 5240 49 

Total .7338 8i68g ick8 ° n &47 

JacobM.Thomburgh's «o^on e . . g . . 538 

DibrellNefeon Montgomery .2511 
jg 4 Stewart — .. 1092 

505 Total 11992 

104 John F. House's 

82 4)7 6=. 
155 VII. WhitthorneGirjl 

34 Giles 2^56 $ 

1100 Hickman 884 

195 Lawrence 713 

403 Lewis 118 

881 Maury 3153 

132) Wayne 388 

204 ' Williamson ..1660 

^ Total .9672 

Washington C. Whi 



,,: thorne's maj. 7,890. ■ 
*t 2 W. Blackburn, Ind.'Rec 
23 received 928 votes 



Total 9359 4597I Giles county 

George G. Dibrefl'e VIII. Atkins Me 

maj. 4,962. Wiliiam B.Benton 707 

Stokes, Ind., received Carroll 1322 13 

392 votes. Decatur 508 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



85 



lardin 814 

lenderson... 810 

ienvy 1706 

iadi^on. .. .2083 

ICNairy 1015 

'erry 481 



Total q 146 4789 

JohnD. C.Atkins 'siuaj'. 

fi57- 

IX. CaidwelJN»nn 

)yer 1284 190 

Jibson 2799 744 

laywood — 1883 1955 

ake 241 — 



Atkin6.Muse, Ca'dwellNunn 

627 Lauderdale... 855 177 

646 1 Obion 1536 231 

44SJTipton 1090 744 

990 Weakley 1440 295 

^5 Total 1 1 128 433S 

V> ilii am P. Caldwell's 
maj.6,792. 

X. Yoong Lewis 

Fayette ..... .3095 2287 

Hardeman . . . 1889 935 
Shelby 88 41 5849 

Total 



1382^ 9071 

H.Casey Young's maj. 
4.754- 



TEXAS. 

The following are the detailed returns of the 
rote for Governor in 1873, which have not before 
>een rmbllsbed : 

G0VERN0B,'73. Gov.'6q. PrES. '72. 

Counties. Dem. Sep. Ind. Sep. Lib. Adm. 
Coke .Lavis HainUtonDavis GreelevGrai.t 



A.nder son... 1 135 
Angelina . . . 462 

Aransas 127 

Atascosa — 389 

Austin 913 

Bandera .... 15b 

Bastrop 1090 

Bee 114 

Bell ....1842 

Bexar 1832 

Blanco 202 

Bosque 755 

DBowie S30 

Brazoria 336 

Brazos 1197 

Brown 107 

Burleson 1085 

Burnet 474 



916. 

116.. 
31. • 
31 •• 

902. . 

27.. 

1144.. 

178.. 

1234.. 

64.. 



1092 . . 
816.. 

4- 

108.. 
480.. 
227.. 
221.. 
396.. 

149- • 
527.. 

3-. 
282.. 

1304.. 

314" 

14.. 

It 

336. 



603 803 . 
22=; 72. 
new Co. . 



204 
482 

99- 
524 

43 
411 
S90 

53 
145 
177 

434 
442 
32 
434 
157 
413 
169 
328 



IGaldwell 740 

ICalhoun .... 218 
[Cameron . . . 433 

Cass 863 

Chambers... 208 
Cherokee ...i486 

Clay 77 

Collin 1691 

Colorado... 1000 

Comal 363 

Comanche . . soo 

Cooke 1128 

Coryall 1121 

Dallas 2028 

Davis no return. . 

Delta 396 40.. 

Denton 1249 118.. 

De Witt 545 552.. 

Ellis 1328 123... 

El Paso 447 46. . 

Erath 376 s8.. 

Falls 834 738.. 

Fannin 1531 559. . 

Fayette... .1677 1531.. 
Fort Bend.. 261 1159.. 
J Freestone... 1070 602.. 

Frio 69 13. . 

Galveston. ..249"2 1025.. 

Gillespie 108 34;.. 

Goliad 291 225.. 

Gonzales ...1054 41s.. 

Grayson 2203 495.. 

Gregg 358 154.. 

Grimes 1329 1600.. 

Guadaloupe. 888 8jo.. 328 
Hamilton... 187 6.. 44 

Hardin 136 20.. 58 

Harris 2966 2169.. 908 

Harrison.... 999 2239.. 570 

Hays c,25 152.. 277 

Henderson.. 763 249.. 335 



5 =" 
998.. 

11. . 
781.. 

11. . 

50.. 
929.. 

38.. 

50.. 
264.. 
603. . 
795- • 

385" 
10. 
352.. 
249.. 
220.. 



1092 
3i3 
141 
143 

ii53 
109 

10S4 

43^ 
876 
160 
445 
352 
244 
1019 
12 
671 
181 

595 
188 

236 



910 

120 

36 

32 

947 

21 

941 
none 

154 

682 

36 

39 

309 

1019 

874 

none 

257 
50 
485 
199 
163 



no re 


turn . 


836 


512 


6S 


73- 


134 


69 


909 


247. 


968 


372 


no return . 


no return. 


723 


23. 


667 


176 


728 


117s.. 


1 1 50 


1175 


255 


360.. 


381 


187 


40 


1. 


264 


1 


404 


9- 


387 


32 


259 


none. 


555 


21 


592 


289. 


1097 


403 


K71 


436.. 


no return. 


new 


Co. . 


229 


59 


30s 


367. 


5°3 


Sb 


222 


386 


258 


SOS 


99- 


619 


76 


122 


336. 


rejected. 


IIS 


13. 


246 


16 


594 


362. 


842 


866 


507 


287. 


619 


35i 


527 


"74- 

986. 


1 194 


1 144 


171 


216 


1006 


594 


668. 


821 


603 


no return . 


48 


none 


1112 


IOIO. 


2413 


1252 


78 


277. 


• 215 


183 


130 


172. 


325 


249 


513 


476. 


871 


473 


505 


253. 


711 


320 


new 


Co. . 


no return. 


370 


1664. 


1047 


1510 



510.. 

none., 
none. . 

1427. 
1847.. 

120.. 

193- ■ 



721 
120 

34 
1889 

775 
407 

713 



589 
2 

17 
2iso 

2374 
191 

229 



Hidalgo 60 72. 

Hill 1312 148. 

Hood 773 32. 

Hopkins 1871 103. 

"Houston 1014 ios8. 

Hunt 1469 136. 

Jack in 84. 

Jackson 164 244. 

Jasper 345 121. 

Jeherson . . . 277 71 . 

Johnson 1407 3s. 

Karnes 185 88. 

Kauffman. . .1070 142. 

Kendall 70 200. 

Kerr 143 77. 

Kinney 94 144. 

Lamar 1724 602. 

Lampasas... 375 13. 

Lavaca . 997 400. 

Leon 1103 462. 

Liberty no return . 

Limestone . . 1231 337. 

Live Oak 115 13, 

Llano 108 7. 

McLennan . . 1800 864 . 

Madison 449 177. 

Marion 1018 119s. 

Mason 82 41 . 

Matagorda.. 186 388. 

Maverick... 70 52. 

Medina 76 326. 

Menard 74 54. 

Milam 997 138. 

Montague... 429 51. 

Montgomery 685 714 . 

Nacogdoches 987 395. 

Navarro 1212 462. 

Newton 265 96. 

Nueces 199 314. 

Orange 171 '44. 

Palo Pinto.. 262 3. 

Panola 1117 268. 

Parker 935 184. 

Polk 447 mg. 

Presidio no return . 



Oka Davis HamiHonDavisGrecIeyGrar.t 



Rains 231 

Red River . . 1321 

Refnglo "139 

Robertson ..1162 
Rockwail... 229 

Rusk 1796 

Sabine 340 

SanAue'stine38i 
San Jacinto. 261 
San Patricio. 91 
San Saba.... 291 

S elby 676 

Smith 1585 

Starr 100 

Tarrant 1820 

Titus 170a 

Travis 2167 

Trinity 450 

Tyler 556 

Upshur 1I06 

Uvalde 148 

Van Zandt.. 651 

Victoria 430 

Walker 774 

Waller 433 

Washington 1697 

Webb 01 

Wharton ...no' return 
Williamson. 1127 208 

Wilson 330 

Wise 584 

Wood 681 

Zapata 49 



40. 

939- 
19. 

1000. 

33- 

1302. 

112. 

378. 

441. 

12. 

2. 

402. 

1342. 

97- 

138. 

250. 

1406. 

70. 

13- 
605. 

22. 
244. 

877. 

670. 

2324. 

512. 



60. 

169. 

62. 



Total 99984 52353. 

Percent K5.63 3-1.37. 



49 
173 
289 
609 
478 
5°4 
I0 5 

57 
273 
108 
465 

145 

450 

49 
76 



14 

322. 

1. 

134. 

790. 
1. 

4- 
197. 
13. 
23. 
4. 
3i- 
105. 
122, 
60. 



15 none. 
883 348. 



116 

450 

474 

249 

369 
83 



369. 

255. 
297. 



dl 


I. 

797. 


226 


180. 


3S« 


102 1. 


32 


34- 


27 


402. 


17 


35- 


* 10 


230. 


no return . 


no return . 


102 


2. 


356 


479- 


401 


388. 


no return . 


88 


108. 


143 


231. 


146 


5- 


70 


none. 


609 


63. 


358 


93- 


221 


459- 


IS 


19- 


new 


Co. . 


506 


780. 


32 


72. 


422 


si6. 


new 


Co. . 


7S8 


1059. 


336 


s. 


332 


^ J 57- 


new 


CO. . 


30 


10. 


in 


none. 


201 


248. 


652 


1017. 


82 


14. 


368 


54- 


619 


228. 


798 


593- 


1 S3 


136. 


139 


158. 


SSI 


402. 


29 


8. 


244 


197. 


202 


338. 


431 


1028. 



new Co. 

959 2035 



no 

49 
548 
105 
122 
227 
9 



23. 
577- 

14. 
151. 

213. 
31. 



39055 39838. 
49.50 50.50 



79 S7 
785 152 
442 none. 
59? 161 



806 

495 
100 

115 

316 

127 

921 

173 

635 
68 

129 
55 

887 

161 

800 

928 

268 
1019 

121 

147 
1353 

379 

778 

95 
135 
no 

40 
no return. 
835 182 



757 
74 
lur 
201 
241 

04 
1 

28 

177 

94 

S3 

147 

455 

8 

353 

485 
274 

445 
1 

3 

IIi6 

222 

Tx 

36-5 
94 

1-14 



124 

526 
772 
1123 
157 
373 
82 

137 

893 

463 



320 
761 
176 

1188 



28 
622 
419 

439 

90 

272 

55 

5 

3 

in 

134 

23 

790 

8 

1084 



no return. 

1374 1335 



229 
270 
308 

79 

142 

485 

1228 

574 

740 

1282 

327 
281 
808 
95 
543 
476 

774 

no return. 

1812 23S9 

no return . 

109 728 

495 1 7o 

no "return. 

164 39 

611 233 

-' 38 61 

66546 47468 

5-. 37 41.63 



150 

377 

440 

8 

6 

240 

1302 

149 

115 

227 
1 195 
113 
US 
595 
6 
2 S3 
414 
979 



Richard Coke's maj. 47,631 ; Edmund J.Davis's 
maj. in 1869, 783; Greeley's maj. 19,078. Total 



T3SZZ 



■PWWM 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S75. 



vote for Governor in 1873, 152,337 ; In 1869, 78,893; 
for President in 1872, 114,014. 

Representatives in Congress, 1874- 
At the time The Tribune Almanac was 
printed the official canvass of the vote for Con- 
gressmen had not been made, but the following 



named, all Democrats, have been elected by 
large majorities: I, John H. Reegan ; II, David 
C. Culberson: III, James W. Throckmorton: 
IV, Roger Q. Mills ;* V, John Hancock;* VI, 
Gustave Schleicher. 
* Members of the present House. 



Governor, 1874. 

Counties. Dem. Rep. Proh. 

Chambn.Bagley Carp. 

Alcona 82 221 — . 

Allegan 2390 2630 — . 

Alpena 452 491 2. 

Antrim , 69 279 — . 

Birry 1556 1939 40. 

Bay 1981 1742 10. 

Benzie 8( 414 — . 

Berrien 2998 293s — • 

Branch 1903 2419 — . 

Calhoun 2766 3372 144. 

Ca6s 1948 2049 3b. 

Charlevoix 105 248 1. 

Cheboygan 185 136 — . 

Chippewa 136 172 — . 

Clare 179 223 — . 

Clinton 2149 1868 302. 

Delta 423 548 — . 

Eaton 1916 2460 324. 

Emmet 2*4 51 — . 

Genesee 2867 3338 140. 

G.Traverse 84 568 6. 

Gratiot 969 1140 — . 

Hillsdale 2307 3923 46. 

Houghton 1340 1066 4. 

Huron 620 811 — . 

Ingham 3085 3032 287. 

Ionia 2708 2*35 116. 

Iosco 283 299 — . 

Isabella 519 495 3. 

Jackson 4153 3165 411. 

Kalamazoo 2941 2940 210. 

Kalkaska 52 172 — . 

Kent 4494 4608 265. 

Keeweenau 462 501 — . 

Lake 111 294 — . 

Lapeer 1562 1987 12. 

Leelanaw 86 331 — . 

Lenawee 4866 4834 473. 

Livingston 2364 2263 103. 

Mackinac no 55 — . 

Macomb 2638 1867 167. 

Manistee 785 63s 24. 

Manitou no return. 

Marquette 1517 1400 — . 

Mason 490 425 — . 

Mecosta 362 758 77. 

Menominee 134 440 — . 

Midland 453 817 8. 

Missaukee 11 83 — . 

Monroe 2888 2254 6. 

Montcalm 1495 1699 38. 

Muskegon 1320 1384 5. 

Newaygo 3*4 582 5. 

Oakland 4462 38*8 368. 

Oceana 395 1147 — . 

Ontonagon 243 195 — . 

Osceola 275 568 — . 

Ottawa 1716 2003 11. 

Presquelsle no return. 

Saginaw 3416 2637 6. 

Sanilac 191 1298 10. 

Schoolcrnft "63 43 — . 

Shiawa66ee 2064 2381 66. 

St. Clair 2484 2000 61. 

St. Joseph 2347 2474 25. 

Tuscola 724 1192 — . 

Van Buren 2ms 2652 38. 

Washtenaw 4068 3*03 29. 

"Wayne 10360 9380 50. 

Wexford 172 384 — . 

Total 105550 11 1 519 3937. 

Percent 47.76 50.46 1.78.. 

a i 1 i ■■■ ■ a I,,- 1 sb 



MICHIGAN. 

Gov. ,'72. G0V./70. PRES.,'72. Cons. Am. W. 
Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. For Agst. 
Blair Bagley Comstk.BaldwinGreeley GraiA 



Suffrage. 
For Agst. 



15 

1735 
30b 

7§ 



166. 

3484- 

514. 

282. 



1246 2674. 
1341 1942 



57 
2483 
1192 



3916. 
3489. 



2426 4493 
191 1 2444 



J 3 

185 

5i 

112 

1832 

123 



266. 
236. 

216. 
496. 
438. 



1757 3193- 
139 64. 



2091 
160 
650 

1613 
922 
386 



398S. 

7°3- 

J479- 

1366. 
867 



2353 3462. 
1803 3343, 



I9S 

264 
3602 
2502 



417. 

727. 

4047. 

4014. 

103. 

3236 5893. 

no return. 

20 225. 



1444 
193 

3499 

2042 
103 

231 1 
434 
11 
785 
291 
357 
123 
269 

13 

2263 

8v 

737 

191 



2493- 

*8o6'. 
2329. 

2465. 

783. 

64. 

1857. 

670. 
1 102. 

436. 

730. 

in. 
2669. 
2020. 

1747- 
800. 



3605 4486. 
225 1 1 59. 



176 



239. 
540. 



1 192 2549. 

8 137 

2734 3705- 

411 1335- 



16 

1611 



277. 
2801. 



2283 3302 . 

1922 3199. 

629 1829. 

1872 3569. 

3i97 4174. 

90*0 12581 . 

83 271. 



in 

2038 2610. 

225 365. 

1200 1983. 

noi 1186. 

18 305. 

2918 3114. 

1367 2613. 

2319 3339 



1819. 
81. 

148. 
115. 

216. 



2285 
54 



1002 
42 

27 

1921 

207 
1691 

142 
2276 3469. 

70 4SO- 

764 1080. 
2031 3541. 
no return. 

369 511. 
2483 2864. 
1883 2345 

323 

304 
3397 
1969 



276. 

411. 

3340. 

3616 3841. 
355 294. 

1557 2021! 
7 286. 

3855 4637. 

2323 2047 . 

no return. 

2*74 2382. 

238 493- 

no return. 

959 746. 

170 358. 

WB. 

186. 

391- 



1934. 



241 

80 

223 

2195 

567 993. 

484 846. 

4363 3837- 

261 845. 

215 106. 

71 163. 

1*64 1918. 

no return. 

2491 2882. 

455 9°8 . 

2098. 

2495. 

2076 2433. 

667 1415. 

1908 2360. 

3785 3570 
91 



172 



3 



18 



8568. 
160. 



81880 138968.. 8^491 100176.. 78355 1384*=;.. 39285 124034. 

37.08 "62.92.. 45.46 54.64. . 36.14.. 63.86 24.05 75.95. 



12 


115 


1598 
302 


*S 


70 


284 


1202 


2677 
1948 


1270 


57 


450 



2274 3002 
1 130 3492 



4400 • 
2432. 

264. 
234. 

216. 



2350 
1830 

11 

176 

54 

104 

1734 2505. 

120 439. 

1635 3202. 

139 63. 

1962 3987. 

149 704. 

577 1482. 

1520 4579. 

S72. 
2265 3450. 
1702 3326. 



928 
343 



167 
260 



420. 
718. 



3485 4093. 
2403 4007. 



3 

3089 



103 
,5917 



no return. 

20 222. 

1367 2486. 

184 504- 

3343 5788. 

1912 233*. 

99 73- 

2160 2446. 

424 785. 

75- 
1909. 
679. 
1 103. 
435- 
759. 
8 III. 
2192 2645. 
7*0 2010. 
1772. 



m 

319 
122 

253 



686 
177 



792. 



3326 4490. 

196 11 58. 

161 218. 

1163 2630. 

none 132. 

2653 3674- 

39§ 1335- 



16 

1522 



277. 
2777. 



2234 3322. 

1791 3154. 

575 1820. 

1805 3549. 

3029 4106. 

9289 12186. 

74 277. 



190 26. 

667 3274. 



1082 4064 
808 2764 



647 3033- 

730 36. 

1 134 2446. 

60 17. 



210 850 
1090 4100 



37i6 



1220 4754 
1035 3759 



. 636 2100 

• 89 381 
. 1693 6532 
. 635 3278 

• 2 2 ^ 

. 683 3104 

. 237 846 
.no return. 

. 296 965 

■ 33i 340 



907 5574- 
329 1026. 



no return, 

885 357, 



1383. 



607 291 



1025 
917 

4" 



3058. 
2886. 
1072. 



666 3159- 

1432 4785. 

3232 8727. 

123 265, 



. 176 485 

. 544 2636 
.no return. 

. 2068 3931 

. 263 1202 

6 19 

. 749 3051 

. 912 3427 

. 1187 2982 

. 229 1432 

. 1 160 2989 

. 1348 5010 

. 3419 10408 

. 102 344 



.40077 135957 
29.77 77A3 



ii. -^ j i.- my . . . 



ss: 



Ta>-t.!i- Urv-- ■ «.' - , . j , . ■ ' .n-i a nij j 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



87 



John J. Baglev over Henry- 
Chamberlain (Democratic and 
"Reform" candidate), 5,969; 
I over Chamberlain and George 
\B. Carpenter (Temperance can- 
didate) together, 2,032 ; over 
j Blair in 1872, 57,088. 
J Kenrv P. Baldwin's maj. in 
1870, 16,685. Grant'B maj . in 1872, 
60,100. 

In 1870, Henry Fish, Temp, re-] 
i ceived 2,710 votes. In 1872, Wil- 
{ Ham M. Ferry, the "straight" 
i Democratic candidate for Gov- 
ernor, received 2,728 votes, and 
HenrvFish, Temp., 1,231. 

Total vote for Governor in 
1874, 221,006 : in 1872, exclusive of 
Temp., &c, 220,848; in 1870, 
183,667; for Jh-esident in 1872, 
216,810. 

Majority against the Constitu- 
tional Amendments, 84,749; ma- 
ority against Woman Suffrage, 
95,880 . [For a fall synopsis of the 
proposed amendments to the 
Constitution, which were voted 
down at this election, see Mc- 
pherson's Handbook of Poli- 
tics for 1874, pages 63 to 66.] 
Total vote on the constitutional 
Amendments, 163,319 ; on Woman 
Suffrage, 176,034. ■ 

The following are the aggre- 
gates received in 1874 by candi- 
dates for the other State offices. 
The elected candidates are all 
Republicans : 

LlEUTENANT-GOVEENOB . 

Henry H. Holt, Rep 113232 

Frederick Hall, Dem 96648 

Jerome W. Turner, Ref.*. 7335 
Thomas A. Granger, Temp. 3915 

Holt over Hall. 16584 

Secbetaby of State. 
Eb'r G. D. Holden, i?ep.*.i 13047 
Geo. H. B.ouse,Deni. cfc-fi^/". 104024 
Samuel W. Baker, Temp. , 3066 

Holden over House 9023 

TBEA.SUBEB. 

Wm. B. McCreery, i?ep...i 13733 
Joseph M. Sterling, Dem.*ioz2<£ 
James I. Mead, Temp.* — 3991 
William F. Hewitt, Ref. . . 251 

McCreery over Sterling.. 10475 
Auditob-Genebal. 

Ralph Ely, Rep 113030 

John L. Evans, Dem* — 96059 
Fied'k M. Holloway, Ref.* 7104 
Joseph Newman, Temp.*. 3656 

Ely over Evans 16971 

COMMB. Land Office. 
Leverett A. Clapp, i?ep...ii3i6o 
C.W . Greene, Dem. & Ref. *io?,fyo 
Thomas S. Skinner, Temp.* 3850 

Clapp over Groene 9490 

Attoene y-Geneb al . 
Andrew J. Smith, Rep. . . .112142 
M.V. Montgomery, Dem* 98330 

Charles S . May, Ref 5825 

Albert Williams, Temp — 3962 

Smith over Montgomery. 13812 
Stjpt. of Public Insteuction 

Daniel B. Briggs, Rep 113138 

Duane Doty, Dem. & Ref. 104064 
John Evan's, Temp 3908 

Briggs over Doty 9074 

Mem. ofBoaed of Education. 

Edgar Rexford, Rep 113134 

EdwardW. Andrews, Dem. 97894 
Carroll S . Frazier, Ref — 5063 
John D . Lewis, T.mp 3849 

Rexford over Andrews. . . 15240 



Note.— The above totals in-[ George H. Durand's maj., 
elude several thousands of de-! 1,636; Josiah W. Begole's maj. 
fective votes, which we havei in 1872, 5,492. In 1874, Erastus C. 
added to the vote of the candl-IHarrington, Temp. .received 902 
date for whom they were in- votes, and in 1872, Jesse L. Stout, 
tended. Temp . , received 131 . 



Congressmen. 

1874. 18?3. 

Dists. Dem. Rep. Lib.Adm. 

I. W illiams Field Bagg Field 

Wayne 10848 8802.. 9843 11703 

Alpheus S. Williams's maj., 
1,956. Moses W. Field's maj . in 
1872, 1,860. Brown, Ind. Dem., 
received 195 votes in 1872, and 
Charles P. Russell, Temp., 56 
votes in 1874. 

II. Robinsn.Wldrn.MahonWldrn. 

Hillsdale.... 1290 3904.. 1661 4560 
Lenawee .. .4817 4952. .3431 5873 

Monroe 2736 2404.. 2233 2744 

Washtena w 4232 33 51 ..3197 4250 
Total. .13075 14611. 10522 17427 
Henry Waldron's maj., 1,536; 
in 1872, 6,905. Among the scat- 
tering votes were 979 for John 1 
Robinson, havingbeen intended 
for John J. Robinson, the Demo 
cratic candidate, and which, if 
allowed him, would diminish 
Waldron's maj. to 557. 

III. Live'm.Willrd.Patk.Willrd 
Barry 1451 1999. .1241 



Branch 1823 

Calhoun ...2794 

Eaton 1890 

•Jackson 4210 



2487.. 1 233 
3326.. 2380 

2474.. 1775 
3086. .3646 



3488 
4393 
3199 
4044 

Total ..12174 13372. 10275 17822 
George Willard's maj., 1,198; 
in 1872, 7,547. Daniel P. Sagen- 
dorpn, Temp . , received 041 votes 
in 1874, and C. H. Ellis, Temp., 
336 m 1872. 

IV. PotterBurrowsPotterBurrows 

Berrien 3081 2887.. 2525 3932 

Cass 2002 2011..1932 2444 

Kalamazoo. 3440 2520. .2844 3704 



VII. G odrichCongerRiehd. Conger 

Huron 544 870.. 308 946 

Lapeer 1601 1986.. 1469 2486 

Macomb 2592 1893.. 2314 2487 

Sanilac 381 1223.. 574 1194 

St. Clair.... 2226 3162.. 2337 3321 
Tuscola.. . .. 859 1051.. 788 1603 

Total... 8203 10185..7790 12037 

Omar D. Conger's maj., 1,982 ; 
in 1872,4.247. Henry Fish, Temp., 
received 167 votes in 1874. In 
Sanilac County, 268 votes cast 
for Enos M. Goodrich were not 
given to the Democratic candi- 
date. 

VIII. LewisBradleyWisnerBradley 

Alcona 82 225.. n 159 

Alpena 441 482.. 332 466 

Bay 1928 1789 .1359 1908 

Cheboygan. 179 145.. i 242 

Clair 168 233.. 124 208 

Emmet 191 109.. 139 63 

Gratiot 934 H73.. 665 1477 

Midland 43i x 785.. 359 084 

Montcalm.. 1413 1780.. 853 2027 

Iosco 302 370.. 242 361 

Isabella 478 537.. 290 702 

Presque Isle no ret. . . — 159 

Saginaw — 3432 2630.. 3620 2877 

Total... 9979 10258.. 7995 11333 

Nathan B. Bradley's maj ., 279 ; 
in 1872,3,338. 



IX. 



NobleHubbellElyHubbell 



St.. Joseph.. 2410 
Van Buren.2384 



242 1.. 1983 
2439.-2167 



3150 
3487 



2540.. 1700 
4597.. 3151 
1399.. 714 
2074. .1314 



6067 
1760 
2645 



Total.. 13317 12278. 11451 16717 
AUen Potter's maj v 1.039 ; Juli- 
us C.Burrows's maj. m 1872, 5,266. 

V. WilbeiWilliamsMcR-y. Foster 

Allegan 2156 2760. .1775 3496 

Ionia 2609 

Kent 4459 

Muskegon.. 1301 
Ottawa .1687 

Total.. 12212 13370. .8744 17353 
William B. Williams's maj., 
1,158: Wilder D. Foster's maj. in 
1872, 8,609. In 1873, Mr. Williams 
was elected from this district to 
fill the vacancy caused by the 
death of Mr. Foster, receivin 
6.589 votes to 6,484for Comstock, 
the Dem. candidate. In 1874, 
James A. McKay, Temp., re- 
ceived 360 votes. 

VI. DurandBegoleBaldwinBegole 



Antrim 95 254. 

Benzie 39 405. 

Charlevoix. 30 326. 

Chippewa.. 113 171. 

Delta 223 702. 

G. Traverse 92 566.. 163 700 

Houghton.. 497 1885.. 876 1407 



281 

$ l 2 4 g 

49 179 
117 441 



Kalkaska.. 
Keewenaw.. 284 

Lake - 

Leeianaw.. 
Mackinac. 
Manistee . 
Manitou 



172.. 1 99 
608.. no ret. 

— 302.. 13 221 
20 370.. 197 

— 168.. 103 

— 609.. 461 
no ret. .. — 

Marquette.. 1275 1643.. 1596 1054 

Mason 136 434.. 273 660 

Mecosta — 132 832.. 358 1106 
Menominee. 134 
Missaukee.. 9 
Newaygo... 8 

Oceana — 

Ontonagon. 234 

Osceola — 

Schoolcraft. 



499 
74 

779 

75 



431.. 124 419 

83.. 8 in 

619.. 180 819 

1018.. 241 1171 

204.. 132 255 



573-. 194 542 



I06.. 22£ 



Clinton 2171 

Genesee — 3355 

Ingham 3098 

Livingston. 2335 

Oakland 4577 

Shiawassee. 2222 



1841..1877 
2846.. 2156 
3065. .2429 
2335. 2105 
3764. .3831 
2267. .1596 



2463 

3967 
3468 
2366 
4421 
2801 



Total.. 17758 16122. 13994 19486 



Wexford. ... 87 396.. 86 269 

Total. ..3460 12877. .5546 11951 

Jay A. Hubbell's maj., 9,417; 
in 1872, 6,405. In Mecosta county, 
228 votes were cast for Henry D . 
Noble ; and in Oceana county 
142, which are not counted for 
the Democratic candidate. 

Legislature, 1875-6. 

Senate . Rouse . Joint Bal. 

Reps 18 53 71 

Dems. ..14 47 _6i 

Rep. maj .4 6 10 



5^ 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1575. 



MISSOURI. 

GOTERXOB,';.}. G<_ " 

Counties. Bern. Peop. UK 

Ka din Gent'y VVood'n Hend'n 

1613 
030 1005 



TO.. 1603 
>3&.. 7 



Adair rss 1094. . &05 

Andrew 843 1833.. 1417 

Atchison 610 1193 

Audrain 1 192 

Barry 764 

Bartou 549 

Bates 1760 

Benton 

Bollinger <*7 

Boone 3103 

Buchanan ...3144 2610.. 353I 

Butler 471 73.. 410 

Caldwell 820 

Callaway 2663 

Camden 406 

C. Girardeau. 1201 

Carroll 1764 

Carter 165 

Cass 1551 

Cedar 647 



037.. 614 
353-. 663 
3313 



009 
1786 1314 



416 



"?>■ 



5&J-- 2783 

460 . . 406 

1250.. 1294 

1238.. 1711 

J!" .iiS 
1622.. 2078 

629. . 756 



912 1343 

718 



5* 

1123 

1 455 
24 

ii 
1280 

T94-. 1=1° 970 

902.. I365 II50 

1437.. 2202 1401 

'■•■ 
-:: 

--: 



553- 

P 2 ' 
019. 



Chariton 2063 1290. 

Christian 213 513.. 262 

ClaAc 1330 1123.. 1298 

Clay 2100 236.. 2472 

Clinton it26 

Cole 1318 

Cooper 1538 

Crawford 844 

Dade 421 

Dallas 311 

Daviess 1392 1092.. 1408 

DeKaib 804 87 

Dent 636 3S 

Douglass 25 

Dunklin t?j 

Franklin 1805 

Gasconade .. 108 1030 

Gentry 1270 8n. 

Greene 1604 i860. 

Grundy 637 1273. 

Harrison 1024 715.. 1133 

Henry 1932 1442.. 2131 

Hickory 214 324.. 262 

Holt 761 

Howard 1692 

Howell 434 

Don 685 

Jackson 4274 

Jasper .... 

Jcfrcrson 1284 

Johnson 21*4 i*~- 

Knox 1167 866.. 1179 

Laclede 821 



5 - 

----- 

---- 
1403 



676.. rejec 

36.. 843 in 

1819.. 1763 1715 

321 

1231 



933 



324- 



#06. 



1-43 2d65 

97 1421 

174* 

I 

687 n3i 



2003 



2608.. 4=13 
1686.. 1448 
728.. 1265 



497. 



831 



' 

881 

2299 

846 

5*3 



Lafayette 2^9 1157..2985 1563 



Lawrence ... £12 

Lewis 1600 

Lincoln 1806 

Linn 1^29 

Livingston...ii99 

Macoa 

Madison . . . 

Maries 647 

Marion 22x2 

McDonald.... 504 

Mercer 417 

Miller 

Mississippi... 1041 

Moniteau n-4 

Monroe 2370 

Montgomery. 1264 

! ;a 798 

New Madrid. &41 
Newton 1176 



1179 
1129 



865.. 1 145 

972.. 1735 

757- 

1413.. 1497 ifF 

1600 

1844.. 2324 

so 



:••-: . 



'3 

2i7 



- 5 1705 
100 
623 

m 



894 

211. 



04=;.. 1288 

66;.. 2678 

880.. J341 

565-- 905 

22.. 809 

ttS.. :■-■■- 



N)daway 1400 1367.. 1366 



Oregon 580 

' 1 

- 133 

Pemiscot . . 
Perrv 6ci 



86.. 136 

2.. 478 

912.. C50 



■ 
662 

212 

i:66 
1695 

■■- 

=86 

8 



Got 
Lib. Rep. 

Br wn McCl. 

686 808 

1091 1071 

529 525 

913 467 

368 389 

1022 

454 

134 

1303 667 

2374 1121 



:- ; 






1284 



-:: 



9 

23 



572 



% 



169 

514 
291 ! 

202 298 I 
t? 6 ! 

;::: r__- 

-z :. 

1476 1244 

1392 &co 
211 498 

ft J* 

625 24 



i - 



926 884 



--■--. 
516 

pi - : ? 

833 874 

574 593 



Pettis 1736 

Pheips 

Pike 2304 

Platte 2127 

Pulaski .... 

Pnmam 298 

Kails 1113 

Randoph 

Bay 

Reynolds . . 

Ripley 

Saline 2696 

Schuvler 929 

Scotland 1093 

Scott 1061 

Shannon 356 

Shelby 1254 

St. Charles... 1 720 

St. Clair 831 

St. Francois . 1089 
S. Genevieve 815 
St. Louis... 20761 

Stoddard 8^2 

Stone 68 

sullivan 1098 

Taney 241 

iexas 770 

YernoD 1329 

Warren 550 

Washington. . 1 124 

WavLe 666 

Webster 927 

Worth' ms 

Wright 515 



Bmtt aGentry Wood'n Hend'n Bivwn Mc'l. 



tact 



1614.. 
723-. 

1101. 



1224.. 

82.. 

71.. 
1112.. 

ft:: 

20*;.. 

Jt: 

2124.. 
882.. 
3=ii.. 

5-t3-. 

1&696.. 

242.. 

980.. 

317- • 
377-. 

533- ■ 

116=;.. 

--_ 

337 • 
644.. 

464.. 



1687 

703. 

1819. 



2432 


943. 


..2; 


110s. 


- 


326. 


561 


I2"0. 


1229 
2272 


£: 


2318 


1183. 


406 


126. 


2841 


98. 
1293. 


812 


874. 


1166 


838 


403. 


242 


20. 


1318 
1698 


\*&. 


1200 


1025. 


1057 
730 


-:: 


9212 


"o: 


787 


345- 


140 


343- 


1150 


1121. 


215 


334- 


BSl 


477- 


[4SI 


602. 


600 


1014. 


914 


644. 


DOS 


352. 


833 


757- 


318 


534- 


-:-- 


547- 



413 


19 


IQ44 


5^2 


779 


283 




683 


: 2 : : 


12.12 


602 


961 


703 


I3=>4 


: -- ■ 


921 


JI 5 


y=4 


402 


«I5 


1048 


6^3 


165 


"7 


---■■ 


175 ' 


-•". 


JS 


1758 


199 i 






1570 I 170 

598 649 

°&3 430 

mi 848 

430 622 
1433 
1 141 

1338 1688 I 

1410 nil 

" 9°7 
34 

380 82 
1337 

191 I 

1065 



4«> 



i9o 



874 5" 



363 

174 



■ 

2S4 
1 120 



200 



--■- 



Total 149^66 112104.136714. 121272. 104374 63335 

Peroeut 57.16 42. >4. M21 43.b-3.6i.S4 37.75 

Charles H. Hardin's maj. ^7.462 ; Silas Wood- 
son's maj. in ::-:. 55.4 2: B. Gratz Brown's maj- 
:, 41,039. Total vote in 1874,201,670; in 1672, 

The following are the aggregates received by 
candidates for the other state offices : 

Lieut.-Got Norman J. Colman. Dem. 149,090 

Sam. W. Headlee, Peop. ..111,414 

Colman's maj 37.676 

Sec. of Slate ...Mich'IK. McGrath. Dem.. 150^93 
William R. Leflet, Peop. . .109410 

McGrathsmaj 

Auditor Thomss H'dladay, Dem ..iw.749 

Ewen C. Hale, Peop 109,864 

Holladay'e maj 

Treasurer Joseph w. Mercer. Dem.: 

John H. Fisse, Feop 110,293 

Mercer 'a maj 40,291 

Attorney- Gen.. John A. Hockadav, Dem.ivD^So3 
DanielS. Twitchell, Peop. 110.135 

Hock3dav's maj 40^73 

Reg. of Lands. .George M. biegel, Dem. . . 1 

Colby T. Quisenberrv, P. .110,117 

Di^gel'emaj 

Supt. of Schools. Richard D. Shannon, Dem.: 

John Mon eith, Peop 

Shannon's maj 

"J. Sup. Court.. Warwick Uongh. Dem... 140.07; 
Samuel Ensworth, Peop.. 102,728 

HoaL'h's mai 47.2J7 

+-/. 8up. Court.. William B. Napton, Dem.- 

Peter E. Blana. Peop 101^627 

T -n's maj 

• Long term . t Short term . 
At the general election in November. :. 
was taken on the oropoMtion to call ;i < lonstitu- 
tional ' onvention. and the decision was in thi 
affirmative by a small majority , in a vote of more 
than 22s 

LEGiBLATrr.z. 1875-6. 8auUe. Eou^e. Jt.Ball. ' 

Democrats . ci 119 « 

Republicans 6 46 

Democratic maj.. 22" 77 "73 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR IffJB. 



89 



REPRESENTATIVES IX 

DM. Bemoeratic 18?4. 

i &}>/:ardC\K(:hr..<£--- 

2 Ertutua Wells* . . .35:7 4120 

3 William H.Stone*-i:- 

4 Robt.A.Hatcfier+ioocj '— 

5 i? -hi. Poland* 11350 8529 

6 Chas.H.Morgani2HOQ 10040 

7 John F. Phillip*. imfc 1831 

8 Benj.J.Franklitui^6\ 3595 



Congress. 

Republican. 
EdwinO.Stanard.* 
Daniel D. Fisher. 
Robt . F .Wingate. 
No opposition. 
Andrew J. Sear. 
Ch as. W. Thrasher. 
James H. Lay. 
Jes.P.Alexander.+ 
W. H. Powell. 



9 David Rea 11953 1039 s Phil .A.Thompson. 

:o R. A. De Bolt... 11727 11510 IrajB. Hyde.* 

11 J. B. Clark.jr* 193+1 — No opposition. 

12 John M. Glover*i22o6 8867 Hen. S7 Lipscomb. 

13 Ayl.H.Buckne r*i--;it 5491 Francis Keckel. 

Total 103*39 73^63 

Majority 84046 

* Members of the present Congress. + Inde- 
pendent candidate. The names of those elected 
are printed in Italic. 



GEORGIA. 

Congressmen. 

1874. 18*3. 

Dern. JEUp. Lib. Adm. 
Hartridge Bryaat Rawb Sloan 



Cook Brown Cook Crown f - Y: -zzZ'z-?- 

Webeter 377 380. . 347 290 Gordon. 833 566. . 675 192 

Wilcox 310 62.. 154 47 Haralson .. . 137 iq., 

Murray.. ... 407 160.. 



68.. 153 
817.. 200 

43-. 56« 
999..1051 



* 



3:-: 

--_ 

328 

& 
200 



34-. 291 

33-- 47 

552.. 272 

189.. 348 

■^4.. 243 

383.. 23S 

68.. 127 

157.. 1S0 

213 

174.. 133 

126.. 143 



414 
147 



Appling 357 

Br -an 275 

Bullock 856 

Burke 1200 

Camden 226 

Charlton 172 

Chatham 3418 136=;. .3101 2426 

Tlinch 350 34.. 291 28 

Echols 105 

Etiiugham . 
Emaoael... 

Ilynn 
Labertv 

tfclntoeh.. 

Pierce 33^ 

Screven 7^5 

Tattnall 590 

tTare 278 

iVayne 376 

Total... 112^2 6714..^ 
Julian Hartridge's maj.. 4=3^: 
Jbrgan Rawls's maj. in 1872. 
340 In 1S74, John Wimberley, 
hd . Rep . , received 974 votes . 

IT. Smith Wbtiv.WrigitWhtly. 

262 

4 
-:: 

"35 

43- 



Total....S677 4199. .6147 44QO vJtfiH^ '•• 497 
Philip Cook'-s m!?., 44% ■ m ^ dmg - g| 



Ham's 



Dan£aBthaa 

-••584 537 
-•• 957 
-.. 402 
-..1427 
-.. 171 
-..::•;; 
-. . 612 
-.. 421 
-. .1131 



4:5 
312 

-fff 



Polk. 

Walker... 

Whitfield. 






1-.-. 



m *% 



n6 



: iV: 1057 

Campbell ... 392 

Carroll 1010 

■Chattah'che. 200 

Coweta 1244 

Douglass 511 

Harris 997 

Heard 172 

Marion 397 

Meriwether.iiog 
Muscozee. 

TalbotT 684 

Troup 1074 

Total 02^5 — .10319 8466 ; Greene 7=»none 

Henry R. Harris's maj., 9236 : Hancock — <»3 10 

in 1872, 1S53. Hart 34S none 

V r r J . n ai«r\t;iirf;i« n nV~. m . n ! Jefferson... 577 none 



I=-2 

346 
419 

454 
532 



112 
120 
160 
531 
5a 



7505, 7587.-8067 4443 
Felton (Independ- 



Total....- 
William H 
_ ent candidate) over William H 
180 Dabnev. fe. N. P. Harben. Rep., 
1211 received 197 votes. Pierce M. 
327 B. Young's maj. in 1872,3624. 
jFS Dem. Sep. Dem. Rep. 

*gi TUI. Stephs.Harrian.W;igiiCUT C . 

- ££' Columbia... 147 none.. 296 "15 

ni £^ bert 292none..397 130 

- J Glascock 



.1336 



i«> 



292 



'-':- 



^3 : - ~-y? 



iaker 541 

Jerrien 798 

Jrooks 1082 

.'alhoun 426 

lay ^66 

.'olquitt 108 

)ec.ttur 1380 1673 

)oughertv.. 4^2 724 

]arly 023 

/owndes 815 

liller 386 

litchell 7;^ 

>uitman ... 383 
Randolph... 791 

"errell • 

'nomas 1514 1531. 

Vortb 508 172. 



401.. 636 

11.. 444 

612.. 794 

667. 



409.. 
23.. 



641 
£.13.. 458 
:■::.. -- 
58.. 218 
.-3 .. 33- 
219.. 331 

9^3.. 02| 

" c.3 : 
2-3 



3- 

96 v> 
809 1439 



Clayton ^68 

Crawford... 512 

De Kalb 1117 

Fayette =;u 

Fulton 2820 

Henry 062 

Houston 1218 

Milton 531 

Monroe 1327 

Pike 967 

Spalding 104^ 

Lpson 872 



■- .-_ - -- '■'..'.'-■ y.-z7.:.Z- -r^::. - 



16 
1267 

45j9 
264 
321 



:--■ • 3:- 
213.. 570 

-3--- :---- 



35: 



517- 

917- 

14. 

-;:. 
804. 
"--■ 
-:. 



.220 

;-= 

212 

ISS2 

=:= 

891 
922 



1 144 
304 

Ka 

« 

119 



Total.. .1200S 07S9..9530 9616 
William E. Smith's niaj., 2^00 ; 
Schard H. Whitelev's maj. in 



"2. ;: . 



Ook Brown Cook Brown 
. . 56 II 



150 
305 
127 
SCO 

60=. 



HI. 

offee 293 2 

Mge 355 54 

TOoly 1187 358 

rwin 329 • 33 

ee 322 64-j 

lacon 769 _ 460 

Uontgomr'y "39 none.. 196 

ulaski 883 32.. 715 

chley 36^ ;-: 

tewart 1009 278 

umpter iiqo 1320 

avlor <;67 28^ 

elfair 370 7 



Total... 124W 627^.1063110910 

Milton A Candler's m.y., 6177: 

James C. Freeman's maj. in 1S72, 

279- 

VI. B!onntG-?veBl-.>antAjide'3n. 

Baldwin 862 180.. 934 323 

Bibb 2^48 12SI..2776 - 

Butts 739 none . 428 

Jasper w 122.. 516 

Jones 803 331.. 816 

Laurens wi none. . 630 

Newton 713 

Putnam =?5 

Rockdale... 509 

Twiggs 402 

Walton 026 

Wilkinson... -02 

Total _ 



Johnson 104 none. 

_. Lincoln 82 none. 

7 : McDuffie.... 287 1. 

5S Oglethorpe. 329 none. 

2 -- Richmond... 922 none. 

cg2 Taliaferro. . 819 none. 

2^j Warren 331 none. 

X^ Washington 754 none. 
gjl Wilkes — . . 331 non e. . 586 

810 Total 6822 12. .0697 6230 

i2ii Alexander H. Stephens's maj., 
"5 53:: : A. R. Wright's maj. in 1872, 
34^". 
IX 



. 332 

■ :-:-- 
. 458 

■ --5; 

:S 

.1254 



6 
415 

29 
4:1 

45- 
141 



2 -: 

3 2i 

^6 
321 



535- • 749 

99- • 5 6 5 

;5-- ^- 

::-.. 342 

: . . r-: 2 

2:.. :m 



Banks 270 

Clarke 894 

Dawson 2S5 

Fannin 144 

Forsyth 417 

Franklin 440 

Gilmer i>3 

Gwinnett.. . 949 
Habersham. 90^ 

Hall 692 

Jackson 672 

^' Lumpkin 213 

:*X Madison 290 

^Z. Morgan 466 

-"•^ Pickens 89 

Rabun 28s 



>::"•::::*-:■■>.- ir^iiDtBRi 



49.. 252 

1.. 109^ 

104.. 196 

180.. 188 

122. 



S: 

103. 
177. 
191. 
224.. 227 
:; 25: 



;:: 
4"; 

2 90 

871 

200 
-5 



3" 
181.. 



409 
004 

2^1 

^3: 

936 1530 
060 372 
234 1 



10007 2~^6. .0903 6196 Towns 192 

James H. Blount's maj., 7251: White 301 

1111872,3797. Union 217 

Dem . Did . Dem . Rep. Total . .77-377 . . : : . . -T^ 
II. DabneyFeitonYynnsDevtrr Garrett McMillan's maj 



I 



523 

210 

181 



54 

1 189 

2:: 



37 
77 

320 

7 

131 

157 

=;i 






289 



Bartow 340 

Catoosa - 

Chattooga.. 664 
Cherokee ... 216 

Cobb -00 

Dad? 322 

Floyd 1376 



22: 



::2. 
:.r.. 414 
664.. 611 

IH2..114S 

... :- 
:::■:..:-:. 



I.ram P. BelTs maj. in 1872,3112. 

LEGISLATrEK, 1S74-J;. 

Senate. H*e.Jt. Bal. 

^(Democrats 40 160 200 

-_ Republicans 4 15 19 

900' Democratic maj. 36 145 181 



CALIFORNIA. 

There was no election in this State in 1874. A 
oyernor and Congressman will be elected hi 
aptember. 1S-5. 



Mississippi. 

There was no election in this State in 1874. 
Members of Congress will be chosen in -Novem- 
ber, i3;;. 



KANSAS. 

Gov., V4. Gov., '72. Gov '70 
Counties. Ind.Bef.Bep. Lib.Adm. Dem. Bep. 

Cusey 08unrnWalk«rOBbo>nSha>pHiirvey 

Allen 736 541 •• 546 II54-. 334 913 

Anderson 400 528.. 335 010.. 150 721 

Atchison 1294 1594- • 1430 1857.. 911 1292 

Barbour 80 98.. new county. 

Barton 170 304.. 53 162.. new co. 

Bourbon 1241 1117.. 1398 1979. . 784 1251 

Brown 628 717.. 391 1122.. 191 612' 

Butler ^298 607.. 529 1444.- 228 925 

Chase 513 201.. 221 463.. 50 194 

Cherokte 878 682.. 1220 903.. 1272 385 

Clay 304 771.. 200 732.. 30 438 

Cloud 180 875.. 273 920.. 80 311 

Coffey 56s 722.. 482 1043.. 301 824 

Cowley 494 1000.. 543 1233.. new co. 

Crawford 689 3^0.. 1087 594.. 884 346 

Davis 328 452.. 453 539- 259 5 2 ° 

Dickinson 269 712.. 234 852.. 180 327 

Doniphan 978 I457-- "io I737-- °74 1339 

Douglas 1618 1446.. 1361 3024.. 733 2705 

Edwards 1 71.. new county. 

Ellis 19 230.. 119 166.. 312 109 

Ellsworth 9 317- • 236 242.. 48 182 

Ford 1 135.. new county. 

Franklin 1117 798.. 7°3 1648.. 343 «°5 

Greenwood... 4S9 646.. 366 856.. 101 320 

Harvev 5,7 *!»•• l 9& 574- • newco. 

Howard 719 1881.. 926 1744.. no 505 

Jackson 497 °33-- 495 895.. 329 576 

Jefferson 1004 869.. 974 1674.. 862 1338 

Jewell 289 753.. 117 688.. none 123 

Johnson 1528 1012.. 1216 1832.. 749 1472 

Kingman 19 113.. new county. 

Labette 730 1228.. 1013 1788.. 650 1027 

Leavenworth . 1247 3076. . 2357 3143. . 2076 2625 

Lincoln 134 35 6 -- 124 328.. 5 150 

Liun 950 702.. 750 1640.. 291 1291 

Lyon 635 880.. 447 1630.. 272 1284 

Marion 228 548.. 157 661.. 89 88 

Marshall 528 134,8.. 658 1360.. 384 1028 

McPher6on 321 601.. 37 452.. none 197 

Miami 1318 85^.." 910 1489.. 562 1058 

Mitchell 375 635.. 197 710.. 20 120 

Montgomery.. 1106 1255-. 1431 1804.. 6S8 868 

Morris 41s 548.. 382 540.. 1 243 

Nemaha 573 794.. 486 1080.. 410 679 

Neosho .... 1178 557.. 1340 1433. . 1292 709 

Norton 19 107.. none 34.. newco. 

Osage 752 «72.. 562 1816.. 317 1608 

Osborne 42 283.. "37 A28.. newco. 

Ottawa 26 731.. 133 60=,.. 2 395 

Pawnee 64 no.. new county. 

Piiillips 193 145- • 32 153- • newco. 

Pottawattomie 692 863.. 743 1271.. 521 632 

Pratt 43 39.. new county. 

Reno 54 657.. 90 265.. newco. 

Republic 20 1012.. 25 1060.. no return. 

Rice 93 162.. 38 190.. newco. 

Riley 521 692.. 351 1048.. 146 693 

Rooks 21 92.. new county. 

Russell none 257.. 15 148.. newco. 

Saline 28^ 795.. 379 1078.. 189 819 

Sedgwick 508 923.. 391 1070.. 208 377 

. hawnee 950 1602.. 1144 2345.. 440 1689 

8mith 130 300.. 74 367.. newco. 

Sumner 439 480.. 420 717.. newco. 

Wabaunsee... 242 536.. 218 600.. 57 461 

Wallace none '77.. 44 56.. newco. 

Washington... 532 743.. 472 987.. 152 882 

Wilson 820 592.. 549 1374.. 390 942 

Woodson 411 274.. 273 781.. 190 459 

Wyandotte 1181 706.. 1193 1277.. 760 964 

Total 35308 48824. .34698 66715. .20033 40061 

Percent 4. .97 58.03. .34.il 65.79. .33.34 66.56 

Thomas A. Osborn's raaj., 13.S16 ; in 1872, 32,017 ; 
James M. Harvey's maj. in 1870, 20,028. Total 
vote in 1874, 84,132 ; in 1872, 101,413; in 1870, 60,094. 
In 1874 W. K. Marshall, Temperance candidate, 
received 2,277 votes. 



The following are the aggregate votes re- 
ceived by candidates for the other State offices : 

Lieut. Gov...M. J.Salter, Rep 52,655 

E. Harrington, lnd. Ref. 32,898 

L. Brown, Temp 1,207 

Salter over Harrington. . . 19,759 
Sec. of State. .Thomas H. Cavanagh, Rep.. 52,572 

Nelson Abbott, lnd. Ref 31,977 

W. H. Robinson, T»mp 1,546 

Cavanagh over Abbott . . . 20,595 

Auditor D. W. Wilder, Rep 53,075 

G. P. Smith, lnd. Ref 32,327 

D. C. Beach, Temp... 1,230 

Wilder over Smith 20,748 

Treasurer Samuel Lappiu, Rep 47,238 

James E. Watson, liid. Ref. . 38,147 
William Fairchild, Temp. . . 1,530 

Lappin over W atson 9,091 

Atty. Genl A. M. F. Randolph, Rep 52,881 

J. R. Hallowell, lnd. Ref.. . . 33,057 

Randolph's maj 19,824 

Supdt. Inst... . John Fraser, Rep 52,709 

W. H. Christopher, lnd. Ret. 32,860 

Mrs. M. J. Sharon 1 ,558 

Fraser over Christopher. . 19,849 

Associate J.,) D. M . Valentine, Rep 53*293 

Ct. ) W. P. D.->uthitt, lnd. Ref 34,164 

Valentine's maj 19,125 



Sup. 



Legislature, 1S75-6. Senate. House. Joint Bal 

Republicans 21 78 99 

Reformers 9 12 21 

Democrats 3 10 13 

Independents — 3 3 

Tie — 1 i 



Republican maj 9 



52 



Opposition. * 18T4. Bepubllcan. 
1 Marcus J.Parrottii223|2ooS7 Wm. A. Phillips.* 
Neb. Green, lnd.. 2074 



14240 Stephen A. Cobb.* 
14538 Wm. B. Brown. 



JohnB. Ooodin.. 14065 
J.K. Hudson..... 9893 

Total 38155^- 

Majority 10710. 

The names of the elected are printedin Ballc 
* Member of the present Congress. 



NEVADA. 

Goveknob,'/4. Cong. '74. Pees. '72J 
Counties. Dem. Bep. Bern. Bep. Lib. AdmJ 
Bradley Hazlett Ellis Woodb. Greeley Giant 



Churchill 43 

Douglas 293 

Elko .884 

Esmeralda.... 381 

Eureka 794 

Humboldt 580 

Land r 368 

Lincoln 888 

Lyon 373 

Nye 577 

Ormsby 498 

Storey 3433 

Washoe 687 

White Pine.„ 540 

Total 10339 

Percent 57.14 



246.. 
434-. 
188.. 
777-. 
296.. 

439- • 
472.. 
39i- • 

401.. 
661.. 
2508. . 
409.. 
520. . 

7754- 
42. 86. 



43 
219 
744 
285 
798 
507 
406 
658 
346 
484 
426 
2^82 
570 
499 
. 8567 9317. 
47.91 52.09. 



12. 
296. 

571- 

271. 
768. 
365. 

399- 

405. 
486. 
721. 

3275- 
505., 

553- 



53 41 

105 23J 

^;8 6rf 

207 267 

new Co/a 

3^8 39% 

918 975 

1045 



294 
310 

1471 
284 
452 

6236 

42.67 



457 
339 

2603 



L. R. Bradley's maj. for Governor, 2,585 ; Wil- 
liam Woodburh'sniaj. for Congress, 7 =;o; Grant's 
mai. 2,177. Total vote in 1S74, for Governor, 
18,093 ; for Congress, 17,880 ; for President in 1872, 
14,649. 



Legislature, i87;-6. Seriate 

Republicans . .". 17 

Democrats 7 

Independents 1 

Republican maj... 9 



House- Joint Edl 
31 48 I 

16 23 



as 






THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



91 



KENTUCKY. 

Cl/EKK CT. APP.,'74. PBES.,'72. GOT.,'7I. 

Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib.Adm. Bern. Hep. 
J TtesCochranGreeleyGrantLeslieHarlan 



Adair 688 402.. 697 

Allen 861 360.. 442 

Anderson 718 235.. 721 

Ballard 1503 96.. 1221 

! Barren 1579 408.. 1106 

Bath 1127 773.. 7 21 

Bell 172 278.. 147 

Boone 1429 89.. 1234 

Bourbon 1810 797.. 1438 

Boyd 1014 560.. 396 

Boyle 1131 379.. 967 

Bracken 1752 57.. 953 

Breathitt 528 167.. 5=13 

Breckenridgc.1127 942.. 7^2 

Bullitt 398 106 . 512 

Butler 375 281.. 421 

Caldwell 928 127. . 720 

Calloway 1265 73.. 1133 

Campbell 1045 559.. 1821 

Carroll 900 127.. 899 

Carter 695 326.. 396 

Casey. 387 176.. 476 

Christian 2038 2243.. 1500 

Clark 1327 1037.. 803 

Clay 345 261.. 430 

Clinton 117 109.. 186 

Crittenden 629 362.. 644 

Cumberland.... 273 74.. 208 

Daviess 2807 398.. 2035 

Edmonson 288 238.. 255 

Elliott... 473 105.. 382 

Estill 930 819.. 522 

Fayette 3121 1697.. 2299 

Fleming 1380 1208.. 967 

Floyd 715 162.. 693 

Franklin 1368 511.. 1283 

Fulton 895 28.. 624 

Gallatin 362 120 . . 507 

Garrard 1019 1088.. 808 

Grant 935 78.. 752 

Graves 1933 442.. 1652 

Grayson 645 194.. 538 

Green 901 710.. 455 

Greenup £07 754.. 490 

Hancock 774 155.. 591 

Hardin 1578 486.. 1207 

Harlan 194 263.. 97 

Harrison 1452 «u8.. 1379 

Hart 971 656.. 730 

Henderson 1764 244.. 1642 

Henry 1505 632.. 1235 

Hickman 1113 232.. 777 

Hopkins 1556 323.. 917 

Jackson 129 148.. 146 

Jefferson 8921 6822.. 9810 

Jessamine 1114 30.. 783 

Johnson 317 351.. 300 

Kenton 3123 548.. 2969 

Knox 520 23.. 446 

Larue 325 173.. 497 

Laurel". 268 360.. 371 

LawreDce 828 409.. 435 

Congressmen. 
i8?4. isrs. 

Dist. Dem. I.Dem.Lib. Ind. 
I. Boon TurnerCrossl.Trabne 

Ballard... 484 
Caldwell ..551 
Calloway.. 503 
Crittenden 390 

Fulton 384 

Graves... 1119 
Hickman... 485 
Livingston.283 

Lyon 332 

Marshall... 253 
McCracken633 

Trigg .46; 

Total ...5882 



513. 
359- 
279. 

1092. 
787. 
455- 
390. 

1547- 
648. 
996 
666. 

234- 
1049. 

279. 

679. 

688. 

198. 
1470. 



1040 
862 
916 
1506 
1808 
1172 

239 
1320 

1861 

736 
1131 
1114 

485 

1237 
803 
665 
984 
1389 
1714 
904 



57L. 
470.. 
2470. . 
883.. 
710. . 

856.. 

569.. 
1086. . 

398.. 

124.. 

584.. 
3106.. 
1053.. 

227. . 883 
1059. .^1701 

«7.. 747 
226.. 
1071 



686 
2261 
1046 

434 

370 

911 

623 
2748 

419 

124 

773 
2800 
1275 ic 



861 
607 

423 
126 

1286 
933 
337 
354 

1522 
640 

1044 

474 
320 

1 150 
306 
822 
691 
88 

1579 
151 
723 
582 

2410 

937 
817 
513 
933 
607 
896 
415 



641. , 

777. 
666. 

763. 
902. 
288. 
819., 
464. 

995- 
861., 

1308. 
787. 
401. 



586 

1042 

1006 

1956 

904 

784 

899 

744 

1520 

106 

1615 

1 136 

1795 

1424 

1089 



499-- 
6915. . 
1068. . 

506.. 
1886. . 

770.. 

340.. 

618.. 

414.. 



1373 

191 

10195 

1072 
424 

2315 
570 

774 
472 



236 

1 144 

72 

186 

1 102 

640 

578 

701 

748 

855 

324 

1003 

475 
1033 
1012 
1287 
792 
222 

715 
608 
5532 
1097 

713 
1711 
890 
3 6 7 
654 
546 



Lee 247 159.. 

Letcher 175 85.. 

Lewis... ioiq 1008.. 

Lincoln 1278 878 . . 

Livingston 633 146 . . 

Logan i8bo 4^5.. 

Lyon 485 364.. 

Madison 2140 1939.. 

Magoffin 351 357.. 

Marion 1143 721.. 

Marshall 916 112.. 

Martin 09 134.. 

Mason 1801 1352.. 

McCracken 1174 116.. 

McLean 528 92.. 

Meade 694 149.. 

Menifee 243 55.. 

Mercer 1322 569.. 

Metcalfe 476 217.. 

Monroe 415 265.. 

Montgomery... 900 714.. 

Morgan 674 243.. 

Muhlenburg . . . 796 349.. 

Nelson 1113 736.. 

Nicholas 1083 683. . 

Ohio 960 593. . 

Oldham 989 239.. 

Owen 1842 179.. 

Owsley 233 165.. 

Pendleton 1297 319.. 

Perry ... . 117 266.. 

Pike 607 221.. 

Powell 294 223.. 

Pulaski 963 1224.. 

Robertson 663 61.. 

Rockcastle 361 497.. 

Romon 221 270.. 

Russell 549 318.. 

Scott 1251 114.. 

Shelby 1512 1087.. 

Simpson 698 172 . 

Spencer 587 351.. 

Taylor 424 165.. 

Todd 777 337-- 

Trie.: 1251 652.. 

Trimble 1075 5.. 

Union no return. . 

Warren 1901 403.. 

Washington 879 601.. 

Wayne no return.. 

Webster 573 66.. 

Whitley 143 477- • 

Wolfe 286 136. . 

Woodford 1138 3 6 -- 



JonesCochranGreeleyGrantLealieHarlim 



270 
269 
644 

1064 
752 

1 143 
415 

m49 

3i5 
869 
903 
28 
1608 
986 
622 

735 
207 

1 193 
233 
236 
876 
648 
606 
925 
943 
987 
673 

1843 
*5i 



483 
225 
817 
49J 
576 
149 
393 
1347 
1408 

857 
542 
477 
623 

977 
657 
1437 
1632 
766 
639 
771 
303 
352 
1045 



290.. 
316.. 

QW. . 

»47-- 

252.. 
1492.. 

496.. 
1792.. 

328.. 

80=;.. 

245.. 

176.. 
1410.. 

839- • 

376.. 

262. . 

63.. 

1079. . 

519.. 

630.. 

755-. 

254-. 

93°.- 

786.. 

701.. 
1171.. 

435-. 

296.. 

433.. 

968.. 

380.. 

304.. 

204.. 
I5I3-. 

323.. 

S70.. 

285.. 

395-. 
1118. . 

1135- • 

620.. 

243.. 

450.. 
IIOO. . 

928.. 

124.. 

1803.".* 
1029. . 

607.. 

506.. 

733-- 

35" 

1064.. 



280 
305 
897 
1206 
897 
1883 

2069 
350 
1177 
998 
58 
1829 
1009 

745 
1078 
274 

5S8 

893 

759 

1222 

1510 

1202 

1379 

789 

2389 

112 

969 

273 

573 

251 

959 

600 

688 

187 

1536 
1644 
ii39 
587 
630 
1 163 

1243 
841 
1878 
2296 
1098 
696 
839 

2p 

383 
1246 



288 
251 

1061 
921 
207 

1451 
410 

1822 
418 
921 
126 

183 
1046 
700 
413 
303 
69 

IJ35 
657 
862 
742 

314 

1074 
86^ 

745 

1 194 

338 

288 

489 

701 

34i 

273 

200 

1642 

252 

659 

289 

529 

12=17 

1079 

547 

212 

1065 
675 

34 

665 

1867 

1 162 

767 

459 

746 

216 

1026 



746. 


IIOO 


125 


457. 
873. 
181. 
105. 


73i 
.1093 
. 687 

• ^°5 


241 

22 

731 

3 


735- 
201. 


.1578 
. 761 


I2S 
338 


227. 


• 749 


19^ 


673. 
n3. 


. 444 
. 884 
. 601 


229 
100 

6 


914. 


.1043 


3»9 



5801 . 10276 2510 



Total 114348 535°4.. 99995 88766.126447 89294 

Percent 68.12 '31. *8.. 52. 97 47.03. 58.6141.39 

T. C. Jones's maj. for Clerk of the Court of 
Appeals, 60,844 ; Greeley's maj., 11,220 ; Gov. Les- 
lie's mai. in 1871, 37.153. Total vote in 1874, 
167,852 ; in 1872, 188,761 ; in 1871, 215,741. 
Legislature, 1874-5. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Democrats ". .. 31 80 in 

Republicans j _2o 27 

Democratic maj. 24 60 84 

A.R. Boon's maj. 81 ; Edward 
' In 



Crossland's maj. in 1872, 7,766 
1874, Thos. J. Pickett, Ind. Rep., 
reeeived 1,2^5 votes. In 1872, H. 
H. Houston'ind., received 1,796, 
and John Martin, senior, 1,473. 

Dem. Rep. Lib. Ind. 

If. BrownSmithBrownLaiig;!. 



Christian. .987 
Daviess ...1340 
Hancock... 146 
Henders'ni228 
Hopkins. . .865 
» cLean ...S41 
Muhlenb'g 600 

Ohio 308 

Union 853 



464. 
543-. 

36.. 
579- 
193. 

63. 
867. 

"3- 



,1514 198 



547 
16S8 



728 
642 
918 
1232 



BrownSmithBrownLangl . 

Webster.. . 513 178.. 790 80 

Total... 7381 3864.10908 457 
John Young Brown's maj. 
3,517; in 1872, 10,451. In 1874, Ed- 
ward R. Weir, Ind. Rep. candi- 
date, received 797 votes. 

Dem. Ind. Lib. Ind. 
III. MilHkenGorenMm'nGol day 



Allen . . . .421 

Barren 834 

Butler 321 

Clinton i6d 

CumberPd.443 
Edmonson 236 

Logan 1108 

Metcalfe... 315 



30- 
431- 

94- 
102. 
129. 

47- 
104. 

131. 



601 
.1223 
. 519 

• T 53 
. 226 
. 361 
.1178 
. 242 



262 

5i3 
3/8 
158 
461 

304 
1360 
225 



92 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



MlllikenG..rinMill'nGorday 

Monroe 316 137.. 295 27 

Simpson ...#99 19. .1397 128 

Todd 683 381.. 839 86 1 

Warren.. .1134 ; 481. .1762 156 

Total . . .6875 2086. ."8796 48=3 

Charles w. Milliken's m&). 

4,789 ; in 1872, 3,943. W. H. Butler, 

colored, received 471 votes in 



Jones Iiogan ArtUurMyers' 
302 53.. 7CO 104 ! 



Co krillWhite Adams Wood 



1874. 

1Y\ Knott Hill UeadHobson 

Breckinr'ge83i 491.. 735 — 

Bullitt 269 136.. 638 — 

Grayson 639 257.. 589 — 

Green 557 343-. 459 548 

Hardiu 889 304.. 907 — 

Hart 867 308.. 744 — 

Larue 441 171.. 600 — 

Marion 051 1069.. 818 — 

Meade 643 52.. 741 — 

Nelson 908 602.. 888 — 

Spencer 550 85 . . 505 — 

Wasuingtono28 723.. 597 — 

Total 8182 4601^.8221 ^48 

J. Proctor Knott's maj. 3,581 ; 

"William L\ Read s maj. in 1872, 

7.673. 

V. FarsonsGrayStandefd. Boone 
Jefferson 4004 784.. 10464 4757 
OldLam.. 296 75.. 715 296 

Total.. 4300 859. 11179 5053 

Edward G. Parsons's am 

3.441 ; Elisha I). Standeford's 

maj. in 1872,6,126. L. A. Wood, 

Inch, received 313 votes in 1874. 

VI, Jones HogBB Arthur 34 yers 

Boone 795 196. . 1290 383 

Campbellii39 631.. 1725 1469 

Carroll ...028 153.. 914 173 

Gallatin ..-451 105.. m 1 199 

Grant 344 404,. 812 620 

Harrison.. 961 733. . 1417 980 

Kenton.. 2227 1336.. 2977 1766 

Peudletons-'i 470.. 1078 870 



Trimble 
Total. ..7268 4141. .11424 6^64 
Thomas S. Jones's maj. 3,127; 
William E. Arthur's maj. in 1872, 
4,860. In 1874, t.harles Eginton, 
the Rep. candidate, received 
3,452 votes. 

Dem. Ind. Lib. Adm. 
VII. Blackb.MarshallBeckTrabue 



399 

k 

124 



n6 

555 
191 



247 395 

uo return. 
466 612 



Bourbon.. 1114 197.. 1488 28 

,Clark 779 392.. 868 701 

Fayette... 1867 953.. 2403 719 

Franklin.. io";8 679.. 1237 1158 

Henry 978 394. .1242 688 

jessamine. 663 305.. 822 514 

Owen 1568 259..1961 400 

Scott 9« 150.. 1379 652 

Shelby 1 139 679.. 1505 1078 

WoodfordnBo 1037.. 1073 378 

Total.. 11298 6.04^.13978 6322 

J . C. s. Blackburn's inaj. 6,253 ; 

James B. Beck's maj. in 1872, 

7,6=,6. 

VII I. DurhamMcM'tryDurh.Bradl. 

Adair 557 34.. 783 774 

Anderson.. 448 3.. 760 346 

Boyle. 847 — .. 1068 951 

Casey 485 11.. 569 445 

Garrard ...664 57.. 895 1046 

Lincoln 880 — .. 1142 790 

.Madison.. 1291 227.. 1646 1784 

Mercer 835 — .. 1245 1064 

Pulaski 731 — . . 925 1519 1 

Russell 3=7 — .. 412 380 

Taylor 427 8.. 572 401 

Wayne &73 42.. 719 563 

Total...8ic5 382.. 10736 10063 

Milton J.Durham's niaj 7,813; 
In 1872, 673. 

Dem. Hep. Lib. Adm. 
IX. CocknllWhile Adams Wo d 

Breathitt. .476 161.. 588 213 

(Jlay 390 8S9.. 5,67 639 



Elliott.... 3(54 

Estill 666 

rioyd 535 

Harlan 124 

Jackson .. 80 
Josh Bell. 130 
Knox ... .416 

Laurel 324 

Lee 288 

Letcher... 189 
Magoffin.. 285 
Menifee... 274 
Montgm'y&79 
Morgan... 736 
Owsley ...161 

Perry 162 

Pike 600 

Powell.... 280 
Rockc'stle229 
Whitley ..282 
Wolfe .275 

Total . .sTk 8774.. 9684 8199 
John D. White's maj. 629 ; Geo. 
M. Adams's maj. in 1872, 1,485. 
X. Cla ke Means Young Burns 



69.. 
555- 
I33-- 
4«3" 
480.. 
401.. 
788 
S?5 



261.. 

49- 
675.. 

231- 
495- 
454- 
142.. 
219.. 



174- 



302 
323 
327 
260 
910 
700 
195 



232 
643 

406 



286 

286 

325 

51 

752 

234 
410 

355 
249 
201 

608 
180 



Bath 

Boyd 600 

Bracken. 1081 

Carter 318 

Fleming. 1123 
Greenup.. 649 
Johusou ..220 
Lawrence. 532 

Lewis 621 

Martin 24 

Mason... 1582 
Nicholas.. 979 
Robert8on533 
Rowan ... 160 



534- 
654. 
317- 
568. 

749- 

409. 
222. 

651. 
82. 

975- 

5 M- 
218. 

185. 



. 875 


£& 


• 414 


975 
427 


=,00 


. 104 1 


084 


• 525 


8664 


• 3M 


490 


• 437 


427 


. 709 


$ 


• 27 


. 1663 


1338 

1 


• 974 


53° 


• 104 


272 



Total. . 9324 6326. . 9075 8885 
John B. Clarke's maj . 2,998 ; 

John D. Young's maj. in 1872, 

100. 



M WISE. 

Governor, '74 . Gov. '73. Gov. '72. 

Counties. Dem. Hep. Dem. ltep. Derm.Bep. 

TitcombDintrley I itcctnbDing eyKimb. t erh . 

Androscougin 1912 2669.. 1534 2649.. 2921 4^1 

2303.. 1204 

6163. 3938 

1803.. 12S0 

277*.. H32 

5212.. 2225 

2500. 2172 

2081.. 14^9 

3380.. 2419 

6095.. 3823 

1391 . . 732 

1196.. 598 

3393- 23-8 

3107.. 1930 

3038.. 1282 

6022.. 4210 



Aroostook 1478 

Cumberland .. 5689 

Franklin 1369 

Hancock 2099 

KenneDec 3242 

Knox 2695 

Lincoln 1607 

Oxford 2806 

Penobscot . . . 4499 
Piscataquis... 863 

Sagadahoc 647 

Somerset 2790 

Waldo 2521 

Washington . . 2421 
York 5096 



1999. 
5129. 

1717. 
2122. 
390-1- 
2157. 
18S5 



1938 
7694 
1703 
2850 
4197 
3162 
2370 
2985- • 35OT 
5350.. 59J8 
1247.. 1176 
1175.. 1340 

2923.- 3351 
2409.. 3243 
2ai8.. 3=36 
5035" 5705 



2482 
8441 
2372 

3558 
7432 

32 =,2 
2664 

4191 

9'77 
1951 
2346 

4114 
3978 

4515 
6899 



Total 41734 53131.. 32316 4S674.. 54701 71917 

Percent 43.09 66.01.. 41.44 68.56.. 43 .0 66.60 

Nelson Dingley. jr.'s, maj. 11397 : in 1873, 133^,8. 
Sidney Perham's maj. in 1872, 17216. Total vote 
in 1874, 9486^; in 1873. 77000; in 1872, 126618. In 
1874 there were 275 scatteiing votes. In T873, 
Joseph If. Williams, lnd.. received ano votes. 

The other State officers arc elected by the 
Legislature. 

Representatives in Congress. 
Dist. Democratic. is?4. Republican. 

1 Bion Bradbury... 10805 12275 John. H. Burleigh. 

2 Philo Clark 6673 9088 William P. Frye. 

3 Edwd.K. O'Brien. 8094 n =,24 James O. Blaine. 

4 Gorh'mL.Bovnton6;o5 96S8 Samuel F. Her sey. 

5 Chas.A.epofford. 1-226 i<_o 5 Eugene Hale. 

Total 41103U3240 

Majority 12137 



Republican majorities: Burleigh's, 1470; Frye's, 
2415: Blame's, 2830; llersey's, 2953; Hale's, 2469. 
Total, 12137. 

Liberal. 1873. Administration 



15485 John H. Burleigh. 
i35=,o Mil iam P. Frye. 
15084 James G. Blaine. 
13814 Samuel F.Hersey. 
14 181 Eugene Bale. 

721 14 



1 Wm. H.Clifford.. 13216 

2 Alonzo Garcelon 945s 

3 ThomasS. Lang. .115,16 

4 Marcellus Emery 8706 

5 Fred'k A. Pike... :091s 

Total 53811 ,_ 

Majority 18303 

Administration majorities: Burleigh's, 2269; 
Frye's, 409=,; Blaine's, 3568; Hersey's, 5108; Hale's, 
3263. Total, 18303. 

Legislature, 1875. S nate. House. Joint Bal. 

Republicans 28 95 123 

Democrats 3 51 54 

Independents — 5 5 

Republican maj... "25 39 64 



NEBRASKA. 

At an election held in this State on the 13th of 
October, the Republicans elected Silas Garber, 
their candidate for Governor, and the other State 
otiicers, carried the Legislature, and re-elected 
Lorenzo Crounse to the U. S. House of Repre- 
sentatives. An application to the Secretary of 
State for the official returns for publication in 
this Almanac was refused, that officer profess- 
ing to be under obligations to keep the returns 
sacredly secret untilafter thev havebeen passed 
upon by the State Legislature, which assembles 
in January. Should we succeed in obtaining 
them, we will publish the returns in the Alma- 
naO for 1876. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



93 



ALAB17IA. 

Governor, '74. Got. '72. Pees. '72. 

Counties. Bern. Rep. Lib. Adm. Lib. Adm. 

Houston Lewis Hernd. Lewis Greeley Giarit 

Autauga 778 1648. . 674 1600. . 669 1593 

Baker 894 243.. 472 221.. 475 

818.. 573 690.. 549 

2671 . . 2340 2762 . . 2320 

449.. 810 

254. • 575 
2503.. 1265 
1469. . 1 512 

477.. 1819 
1540.. 1812 

133- • 1260 



Baldwin.. 769 

Barbour 2771 

Bibb 1089 

Blount 1693 

Bullock 1^84 

Butler 2191 

Calhoun 2291 

Chambers 2186 

Cherokee 1909 

Choctaw 1421 

Clarke 1399 

Clay 1210 

Cleburne 948 

Coffee 1128 

Colbert 1558 

Conecuh 1086 

Coosa 1322 

Covington... . . . 1067 

Crenshaw 1610 

Dale 1501 

Dallas 1853 

De Kalb 946 

Elmore 1=157 

Escambia 925 

Etowah 1404 

Fayette 900 

Franklin 884 

Geneva 479 

Greene 864 

Hale 1 185 

Henry 2021 

Jackson 2815 

Jefferson 2228 

Lauderdale 1927 

Lawrence 1802 

Lee 3812 

Limestone 1715 

Lowndes 1197 

Macon 1223 

Madison 3422 

Marengo 1808 

Marion , 889 

Marshall 1364 

Mobile 6491 

Monroe 1320 

Montgomery.. .3291 

Morgan 1635 

Perry 1428 

Pickens 1938 

Pike 2377 

Randolph 1300 

Russell i . . 1964 

Sanford, 1037 

Shelby 1609 

St. Clair 1073 

Sumter 1690 

Talladega 1877 

Tallapoosa 2964 

Tuscaloosa 2239 

Walker 871 

Washington 579 

Wilcox 1508 

Winston 293 



986.. 1 177 
1304.. 1463 
312. 



221. , 

690., 
2762 . , 

41&.. 

271., 
3101.. 

HOC)., 

397.. 

1317- • 

221.. 
644.. 
IO93.. 



84.. 
1020. . 
1000. . 

9 6 ?:: 
382.. 

j 63 - • 
0819.. 

^90.. 

1481 . . 

316.. 

315.. 

320. . 

349-'. 

12.. 

3*39. • 
3489.. 

73°- • 
779- • 
860.. 

1160.. 

1618.. 

1120.. 

1511.. 

415°-. 

2076.. 

3348.. 

3432.. 
150. . 
259.. 

4764- • 
986.. 

6210. . 

1113. 



947 
544 
760 
1049 
928 

1034 
627 
1066 



576 

745 
529 

262 
1231 
816 
1912 
1&82 

1245 

1358 
1224 

2251 

849 

932 

968 

2471 

1707 

272 

623 

6576 
1448 

3025 
1013 



3834.. 1400 



1177.. 
727.. 

1000.. 
2625., 

258.. 

621.. 

3305 . . 

2137.. 
918.. 

1577- • 
506.. 

3 6 34-. 
386.. 



1510 
1905 

915 
1717 

631 
1112 

814 
!733 
1566 
2142 
1715 

441 

495 
1299 

"7 



412. . 
• 103.. 

815.. 

9^3-. 

894.. 
70.. 

309.. 

374-. 
7065.. 

586.. 
1451.. 

216.. 

295.. 

334.. 

4I3-- 

2508. . 
3658.. 

396.. 

681.. 
1024.. 

921.. 
1499.. 
23^6.. 

892.. 
3958.. 
2068.. 
302;.. 
1608.. 

275.. 

293.. 
5938.. 

482.. 
7096. . 
1015. . 
4141.. 

44L. 

553-. 

968.. 

2513.. 
261. . 

893.. 

489.. 

2449.. 

1935. • 
716., 

1350. 

446. 

79- 

3956. 
410. 



549 
1225 
1 488 
1764 

1774 
1225 
1 1 51 
1447 
934 
512 

741 

1007 

902 

1028 

600 

1019 

ion 

1934 

576 

1309 

599 

708 

507 

446 

201 

1 195 
802 

1873 
l6l2 
1204 

1339 
1 201 
2l62 
826 
905 

2466 

1656 

247 

614 

6522 

1439 
2970 
IOOO 

1384 
I482 
I84I 

86l 
l57I 

581 
I069 

80O 
165O 
1552 
2101 
165I 

420 

1266 
105 



237 

707 

2756 

433 

276 

3101 

HOI 
400 
I3l8 



645 
IO95 
40I 
416 
98 
856 

951 

89O 

fo 

309 

322 

7081 

1564 

216 

288 

345 
425 

55 
2516 
3605 

398 

675 
1053 

936 
1463 
2369 

893 
3959 
2073 
2991 
1620 

286 

298 
5946 

481 
7096 
1018 

4 T 43 
440 

553 
978 
2531 
278 
897 
501 
2491 
1943 

1363 
450 

79 

3958 

433 



Total 107118 93928. .81371 89868. .79444 90272 

Percent 53.28 46.72.. 47.52 62.48.. 4~6.hl 63.19 

George S. Houston's maj. 13,190; David P. 
Lewis's maj. .in 1872,8,497; Grant's maj. 10,828. 
Total vote in 1874, 201,046 ; in 1872, for Governor, 
171,239 ; for President, 169,716. 

The following are the aggregates received in 
1874 by candidates for the other State offices : 

Lieut. Gov.... Robert F.Ligon, Dem •. 107,079 

Alex. McKinstry, I\ep 93,532 

Ligon'smaj 13,547 

Sec. of State. .Rulus K. Boyd, Dem 106,882 

Neander H. Rice, Rep 93,612 

Boyd's maj. 13,270 



Att. Gen John W. A. Sanford, Dem. 106,923 

George Turner, Rep 93,493 

Turner's maj 13,430 

Treasurer Daniel Crawford, Dem 106,929 

Arthur Biugham, Rep 93,493 

Bingham's maj 13,436 

S. Pub. Inst.. .John M. McKleroy, Dem.. . 106,957 

John T.Foster, Rep 93,5'9 

McKleroy's maj 13,438 

Legislature, 1874-5. Senate. House. Joint JJal. 

Democrats 20 60 80 

Republicans 13 40 53 

Democratic maj.... 7 20 27 

Of the Republicans, 6 Senators and 29 Repre- 
sentatives are of the colored race. 5 

Congressman at Laege. 
Democratic. 1874. Republican. 
Wm. H. Forney.. 106,080 190,398 Alexander White. 
Burioell £. Lewisio6,o22iUg,qog Chris. C. Sheets. 

Representatives in Congress. 

1874. 1878. 1870. 

Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. 

T. Crombeio'Haral.suiiIir..mb.TuinerCun)mi , gTiir. 



Baldwin 947 813. 

Clarke. 1387 1286.. 1456 

Conecuh 1816 1148.. 1168 

Covington 1067 61 . . 591 

Dallas 1842 6819.. 1928 

Mobile • — 6497 4753.. 6561 

Monroe 1319 976.. 1445 

Washington.. 570 65.. 491 

Wilcox 1508 3630.. 1276 



514. 
204 



7050. 

4818. 

423. 



16: 



556 
1 141 

m 

2095 
4627 
1360 

553 
1409 



532 



7372 
4629 

-i 
3676 

Total 16953 19551.. 15607 13174.. 13466 18226 

Jeremiah Haralson's maj., 2598 ; Frederick G. 
Bromberg'smaj.in 1872,2433 ; Benjamin S. Tur- 
ner's maj. in 1870, 4760. In 1872 Joseph, Ind.Rep., 
received 7024 votes. The vote of Escambia 
County is included with tbaf of Conecuh. 

Oatea RiipitrWelbomBley 
2349 2742.. 2210 3473 



II. 



VVi.liamsRaiiier 



Barbour 2791 

Bullock 1588 

Butler 2189 

Coffee 1382 

Crenshaw 1615 

Dale 1734 

Henry 2020 

Lowndes 1189 

Montgomery.. 3295 
Pike 2377 



2638. 



2497. 


. 1263 


1470. 


1518 


72. 


94? 


382. 


1026 


260. 


1 194 


736. 


2022 


4158. 


949 


6184. 


3051 


727. 


1900 



3100. 
1097., 

77" 

309.. 

266., 

281.. 
3926.. 
7047.. 

552.. 



1548 
1828 
708 

1173 
1171 
1629 
1 192 
2M9 
1823 



2912 
691 
216 
130 
466 
374 
3554 
7330 
495 



Total 20180 19124. .16221 19397. .1^831 19647 

Jeremiah N. William's maj., 1056; James T. 
Rapier's maj. in 1872, 3176 ; C. W. Buckley's maj. 
in 1870, 3816. Geneva County voted with Dale. 

II I. CradtnrdbettsHandieyPelhaniHanrllr-yNoiris 



1539.. 
302.. 

943-. 

148T.. 
1126.. 
2058.. 

968.. 
2625.. 
2119 . 

9i5.. 



1813 
960 

1043 
135° 
2244 
965 
929 
1340 
1574 
2147 



1315.. 1601 



898.. 
1448. . 
2359- • 
2069. . 

950.. 
28S8.. 
1924.. 

717.. 



1943 
1240 
682 



1267 

173 
616 

1333 
1687 
1701 
625 



Chambers 2181 

Clay 1219 

Coosa 1312 

Elmore 1556 

Lee 3807 

Macon 1227 

Randolph 1299 

Russell 1969 

Talladega 1891 

Tallapoosa.... 2 963 

Total 19424 14076.. 14371 14957.. 12710 9568 

Taul Bradford's maj., 5348; C. Pelham'smaj. 
in 1872, 586 ; W. A. Handley's maj. in 1870, 3142. 
IY. Jnf8 Hayes i-niith Hayes Harris Haye 



no ret. 
1620 1 751 
2283 415 



Autauga 1177 

Bibb 1352 

Choctaw 1421 

Fayette 1519 

Greene S60 

Hale 1182 

Marengo 1816 

Perry 1428 

Pickens 1935 

Shelby 1786 

Sumter 1690 

Tuscaloosa . . . 2212 



1703.. 866 
451.. 886 
984.. 1174 
519.. 980 

3145.. 1220 

3488. 

2729.. 

3834-. 
1180. 

995- 



33°5- 
1567. 



814 
1707 

1399 
1441 
1204 
1725 

1705 



1679.. 

412. 

643. 

478. 
2517. 
3662. 
1608.. 
4139- 

441. 

959 • 



907 
969 
1078 
969 
1825 
1195 
1448 

1355 
1705 



1578 

283 

1038 

289 

1790 

3i99 

3244 

3902 

230 

617 



2446.. 2055 1437 
1349.. 1862 ■ 766 



Total 18378 23900.. 15121 20333.. 16540 l8 373 



94 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



Charles Hays's maj., 5^2; in 1872, 5212; in ' 
1870, 1833. Baker Countv voted with Autaugaaud 
Shelby, and Sanford with Fayette. I 

V. C«ldw«U8h«ffl«W ftidw.C:.uipV>ellDox?tandlfer 1 



Garland WUshireHynes 



Caihonn 2339 438.. 

Cherokee 25,22 442.. 

< 1,-burne 934 442.. 

DeKaln 1024 707.. 

Etowah • * .. 

Jackson 2044 1020.. 

Madison 2703 3948.. 

Marshall 34° 1217.. 

St. Clair 1099 755.. 



1815 
1816 



119 
1555 

2550 
6 =,9 

847 



331.. 1907 
406.. 1455 

"'• 
576. 
62. 
785. 
2949. 
280. 
493- 



335 
233 

S20 320 
698 541 

no return. 

1637 452 

2990 2052 

703 100 

779 490 



Grant....: 631 

Hot Spring 5§9 

Johnson 1264 

Montgomery 594 

Perry 323 

Pike 490 

Polk 467 

Pulaski 3054 

Saline i°i9 none 

Sarber... ."...... 1192 18: 

Sebastian 1742 

Sevier 689 

Scott 1083 



51.. 
110., 

99.. 

24., 
113.. 
134.. 

49-. 
2135. 



Total 13011 8969. .10544 6293. 10689 45 2 3 1 Yell H3P 

John H. Caldwell's maj., 4042; in 1872,42=1 ; 
Peter M. Dox's maj. in 1870, 6166. * Vote includ- 
ed uith thai of t herokee and St. Clair. 

\ 1 11 wiit SIom SlossParrinhSios-'Mast-rson 

516.. 620 7.. 672 108 

1147.. 1398 124.. new Co. 
348.. 486 414.. 1512 444 
856.. 1 197 084. 
1076 



152 

33 

122 

• 196 

20 

3038 

4 

91 

566 

99 
147 
221 

Total 21630 5303.. 21748.. 11733 6328 

William W. Wilshire's maj., 5405. 



6ol! 
80. 



3& 



628.. 

521.. 
1343.. 

55°-. 

325-. 

3f9.. 

462.. 
3051.. 

995- • 
1194.. 

1795- • 
691.. 
1071.. 
1534.. 



261 

345 
299 
201 
181 

157 
199 
2363 
678 
684 
684 
383 
593 
834 



Ga landGunt*rLander 



1127.. 
1561. . 
1512.. 

2^9.. 
U39-- 

364.. 

363.. 



1035 
1302 
879 

C.20 

I28l 

447 

114 



107.. 



206. 




Blount 1426 

Colbert 1413 

Franklin 797 

Jefferson 2194 

Lauderdale.... 1879 

Lawrence 1781 

Limestone 1 7-7 

Marion 1218 

Morgan 15,89 

Walker 799 

"Winston 225 

Total 1S048 9172.. 9288 4593.. 9221 

Goldsmith W. Hewitt's maj., 5870; Joseph H. 
Sloss's maj. in 1872, 4695 j In 1870, 5153. In 1874 
Congressman Sloss ran as an Independent. 

ARKANSAS. 

Constitution,^. Gov.,'74. Cong. '74. 
I>i$t. For. Agst.Cons. Cons. Rep. 

I. Garland Gaiis>; Rogers 

430.. 1046.. 834 524 
954.. 421.. 109 295 
220.. 703.. 433 141 
802.. 443.. 192 305 
349.. 2023.. 1246 

45 



45- • 

B:: 

6.. 



34I 6 :: 



s66.. 
1918.. 
1330. . 

784.. 

734-. 

881.. 

845.. 

529.. 

943- • 



278 
766 

45 A 
398 
130 

514 



106 
16 
48 
11 
93 



36.. 121 
3.. «5i 



III. 

19. 

157. 



28.. 

46.. 



1058.. 

68=,.. 

385.. 
1304. . 
1239. . 

399-. 
9=,o.. 

971. • 



i=,i none 
31 none 
215 1 ] 
464 none 
386 none 
277 107 



227 
117 



Arkansas 1211 

Crittenden 426 

Croei 701 

Desha 425 

Independence 2023 

Jackson 1743 

Lee 1760 

Lonoke iwo 

Mississippi 93° 

Monroe 985 

Phillips 1958 

Poinsett 329 

Prairie 911 

St. Francis 1102 

Stone 655 

Woodruff 1260 



940 
436 
970 



138 



322 
332 

15 
46b 

Total 1792c, 7090.. 16686.. 921 1 5183 

Lucien C Cause's maj., 4028. 



744-. 
2184.. 

368*! ! 

478. 

7. 

395. 



2023. . 
1732.. 
1607.. 
1400. . 

90c. .no return 
979.. 710 633 
707 

610 
8 19 



1214.. 

318.. 

902.. 
1100.. 

648.. 
1248.. 



vy- 



IV. 

Baxter 569 

Benton 1954 

Boone 1374 

Carroll ion 

Clayton 746 

Conway 888 

Craighead 838 

Fulton sssnone.. 

Greene 9=3 none.. 

Izard 1229 

Lawrence 117° 

Madison 1143 

Marion 683 

Newton 4 02 

Pope 1317 25 

Randolph 1246 none 

Searey 318 104. 

Sharp 945 

Van Buren 97" 

Washington 2200 

White J2377 

Total 23100 1374.. 22365.. 7828 791- 

Tnomas M. Gunters maj. 7,037. 
In the whole State: Total lor Constitution, 
78,697 ; Against, 24,807 ; majority For, 53,890. 
Total for Gov. Garland, 76,453. The entire Con- 
servative State ticket was also elected without 
opposition. 
Legislature, 1875-6. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Democrats 29 

Republicans 2 

Liberals — 



234.. 2073.. 
58.. 2394.. 



8 
33 

703 29= 
256 19 

38 none' 
202 none \ 
166 44J 

1071 ioAj 
987 5&v 



II. 

Ashlcv 1147 

I'.r:nll> y 762 

Calhoun c.94 

Chicot 417 

Columbia 1376 

Dorsey 920 

Drew i2>3 

Hen pstead 1676 

Howard 798 

Jefferson 1052 

I.:it'i\ ette 1070 

Lincoln 886 

Little River 470 

Nevada 1198 

Ouachita 1101 

Di ton 1322 



320. 

6s.. 
11. . 
13"-- 
369.. 
210. . 
661.. 
677.. 

2805!! 
1045.. 

948.. 

423.. 

211.. 

925.. 

744-- 



GarlandSIem. Clayton 



'ft. 

510.. 
396. . 
1361.. 
924.. 

1231.. 
1420. . 
,793-. 

I02J. , 
IO46. , 

883. 

463- 
1202. 
I083. 
1321 . 



609 
670 

425 
271 
1237 

734 

948 

I2C.0 
66l 

767 

555 
279 
837 
912 
1204 



432 
170 

769 
624 

193 

536 
1076 

126 
2750 

935 

5 £ 3 

382 

198 
913 

724 



83 

9 



HendersonPurman Alachua 756 



Total... 16042 11040.. 15654.. 12166 10485 

AMlllam F. Slemmous's maj., if" 



III. 

Clark 1438 

Crawford 1144 

Dallas 682 

Faulkner 1216 

Franklin 1377 

Garland 1040 



Uarlnnd WilshiraHyes 
662. . 1428. . 1030 "748 
209.. 1423.. 

195.. 675.. 

65.. I22C... 
I8l.. 1395.. 

82.. IO53.. 520 343 



211 

761 

520 



I9S 

124 

100 



Dem.maj 27 71 9 

FLORIDA. 

Representatives in Congress, 1874. 

DiSt. Dan. Bep.\ II. Finlev Walls., 

1567 

134 

189 

102 

7M 

12 

1375 
231 
1308 
1072 
665 
51 

208 
3g 



Calhoun 134 

Escambia 1121 

Franklin 160 

Gadsden 640 

Hernando.... 300 

Hillsboro 417 

Holmes 253 

Jackson 897 

Jefferson 600 

Lafayette 216 

Leon 496 

Levy 386 

Liberty 132 

Manatee 249 



Monroe 

Polk 338 

Santa Rosa... 7^9 

Sumter 364 

Taylor 168 

Wakulla 259 

Walton 4"^ 

Washington.. 304 



980 

87 

1160 

153 

142 

8 

1256 

2020 

53 
2395 

139 
76 

657 

5 

342 

l % 

144 
45 
90 



Baker 234 

Brevard 83 

Bradford ^09 

Clay 200 

Columbia 676 

Dade 23 

Duval 910 

Hamilton 5=,o 

Madison 839 

Marion 608 

Nassau =,35 

Orange 604 

Putnam 491 

St. Johns 439 

Suwanee 437 

Volusia 284 



Total 0377 I0 °5 : 

William J. Purman's 
maj. 675. 



Total 8178 855T 

Josiah T. Walls's maj. 

3 

Legislature, 1875-6." 

Sen.HsUse.Jt.B 1 
Dems.. 12 28 4c 

Reps . . 12 2j_ 3( 

Dem.maj.- 4 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1875. 



95 



Popular Vote for President from 1854 to 1872. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina.. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Tennessee , 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 



Total. 



1858. 



Scott, 
Whig. 



15038 
7404 

35407 

30357 
6293 
2875 

16660 

64934 
80901 
IS856 
S7068 
17255 
32543 
35066 
52683 
33859 



17548 
29984 
16147 

234882 
39058 
152526 



I79I74 

7626 

58898 

4995 
22173 
58572 
22240 



1386578 



Pierce, 
Dem. 



26881 
12173 
40626 

33249 

6318 

4318 

34705 

80597 

9534° 
17763 
S3806 
18647 
41609 
40020 
44569 
41842 



26876 

38353 
29997 

44305 
262083 

39744 
169220 



873 
5701. 
13552 
13044 
73858 
33658 



Hale. 
F. Soil 



100 

3160 

62 



9966 
6929 
1604 



8030 

28023 
7237 



6691; 

350 

25329 



8S25 
644 



8621 
8814 



16014741155825 



1856. 



Frem't, Buch'D, Flmre 
R>p. Dem. Amen 



20691 

42715 

308 



96189 

94375 

43954 

314 

67379 

281 

108190 

71762 



3834 

2833: 

276007 

187497 



147510 
11467 



3956i 

291 

66090 



1341264 



46739 
21910 
53365 
34995 
8004 

63S| 

565-8 
105348 
1 18670 
36170 
74642 
22104 
39080 
39i 15 
39240 
52136 



3544° 
58164 

32789 
46943 

195878 
48246 

170874 



230710 
6680 
73638 
31169 
10569 
89706 
52843 



1838169 



28^52 
10787 
36165 
261=; 
6175 
4833 
42228 

37444 
22386 
9180 
67416 
20709 

3325 
47460 
19626 

1660 



Lincoln 
Rep. 



24195 
48524 
422 
241 15 
124604 
36886 
28126 



82175 

167 
661 f 
15639 

A* 45 
OC310 

579 



874534 



1860. 



Dougr'ss 
Dem. 



39173 
43692 

3815 



172161 

139033 

70409 

1364 

6281 1 

2294 

I06533 



22069 

17028 

37519 

S8324 

362646 

231610 

5270 

268030 

12244 



33808 

1929 

86110 



1866352 



13651 

5227 

3»5l6 

15522 

1023 

367 

U590 

1602 1 5 

I I 5509 

55111 

25651 

7625 

26693 

5966 

34372 

65057 

1 1920 

3283 

S&801 

25881 

62801 

312510 

2701 

187232 

39! 
1671 

7707 
11350 



16290 
65021 



Breck. 
Dem. 



I375I57 845763 



48831 
28732 

34334 
14641 

7347 

8S43 
5188^ 

2404 
12295 

1048 
53143 
22681 

6368 
42482 

5939 
80 

74i 

40797 

31317 

2112 



48339 

1 1405 

3006 

1 78871 

6470; 

4754' 

218 

7432: 



Bel', 
Union 

2782s 

20094 

6817 

3291 

3864 

42886 

3913 

5306 

1763 

66058 

20204 

2046 

41760 

22331 
405 

62 

2S040 

58372 
441 



44990 

12194 

183 

12776 

69274 

15438 

1969 

74081 
161 

589581 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georeia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

iOwa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts.. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 

Wisconsin 

Total 



1864. 



McOll. 
J em. 



43841 

4228s 
8767 



158730 
I30 2 33 

49596 
3691 

64301 

4421 1 
32739 
48745 
74604 

17375 



31678 

6594 

32871 

68024 

361986 

20S568 

8457 

276316 

8470 



1 332 1 



1043L 
65884 



Lincln. 



62134 

44691 

8155 



1 50422 
80075 
16441 
27786 

61803 

40153 
126742 

91521 
25060 



Dem . 
maj. 



612 



72750 

9826 

36400 

60723 

368735 

26SIS4 

9888 

296391 

13692 



42419 



1808725 



2216067 



36515 



7301 



44428 



Rep. 
maj. 



18293 
2406 



30766 
20189 

39479 
12750 



I759 2 

7414 

77997 

16917 

7685 



41072 

3232 

3529 

6749 

59586 
1431 

20075 
5222 



29098 



12714 
17574 



451770 
Gi 



1868. 



Seymr. 
Dem. 



72088 
19078 
54077 
47952 
10980 



102722 
I99H3 



74040 
13090 
I I 5890 
80225 
42460 
62357 
59408 
97069 
28075 



65628 

5439 

5218 

31224 

83001 



84601 



11125 

313382 

6548 

45237 

26129 



12045 



32122 



30554 
1814 
2864 

18520 

849021 
Lincoln's maj. over McClellan,'407342 ^Grant's' over Seymour,' 305458 ; Grant's over Greeley, 762991. 



20306 

84707 

2709613 



Grant, 
Rep. 



76366 
22II2 

54583 

50995 

7623 



57134 

250303 

176548 

120399 

3io4 i 

39S66 
33263 
70493 
30438 
136477 
128C50 
43545 



86860 

9729 

6480 

38191 

80131 

419883 
96769 

280223 
30961 

342280 
12993 
62301 
56628 



44167 



3015071 



Dem. 

maj. 



3357 
45588 



76324 

46962 

3I9I9 



2870 
1 0000 



164 



217184 



51160 
9568 

46359 
17058 



28033 

77069 
31481 
15470, 



12168 
41617 



6445 
17064 
30499 



24150 



522642 



18?3. 



Gieeley 
Liberal 



79444 
37927 
40718 



10206 
15427 
76356 
184938 
163632 
71 196 
32970 

99995 
57029 
29087 
67687 
59260 
78355 
34423 
47288 

1 5M34 
7812 
6236 

76456 
387281 

70094 

244321 

7730 

212041 

5329 
22703 

94391 
66soo 



10927 

91654 

29451 

_86477 

2834079 



Grant, 
Adm. 



90272 

41373 

54020 

50638 

IIIIS 

17763 

62 s 50 

241944 

186147 

131 566 

67048 

88766 

71663 

61422 

66760 

133472 

138455 

55117 

821 75 

119196 

18329 

8413 
37168 
916^6 

440736 
94769 

281852 
11819 

349589 
13665 
72290 
85655 
47406 
41481 
93468 
3231^ 

104997 



3597070 



Lib. 
maj. 



11229 



927 



3223* 



8736 
19094 



86030 



Adm. 
maj. 

10828 
3446 

13302 

4758 

909 

2336 

S7006 
22515 
60370 
34078 

14634 
3 2 335 

74212 
60100 
20694 
34887 

10517 
2177 

5744 
15200 

53455 
24675 

37531 

4089 

137548 

8336 

49587 




THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18TS. 









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* SCALES 




THE 



SCALES MANUFACTURED WEEKLY. 

The BEST and CHEAPEST. 
EVERY SCALE WARRANTED. 

N. B. — The Courts have decided that Fairbanks' 
Scales are the standard in deciding suits arising 
from inaccuracy in weights. 

Manufacturers : 

E. & T. FAIRBANKS, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

^Principal Warehouses : 

FAIRBANKS & CO. . FAIRBANKS, BROWN & CO. 

311 Broadway, N.Y. 2 Milk St., Boston. 



C. Gr. Guntlier's Sons 

FUR DEALERS 



A^rr> 



FURRIERS, 

502 & 504 Broadway 

Near Broome Street, 

NEWT YORK. I 



■£• ■»- 



LADIES' FURS, GENTS' FURS 

Fur Rones and Skins. 



i 



♦' ■» •» » 



Importers, Manufacturers and Shippers 



OF 



RAW FURS. 



'+~~ 





bF GMstian G. 




99 








HOLD 



firmly to the great principle, that in sickness Nature should be assisted not prostrated. It is be- 
cause Tarrant's Effervescent Seltzer Aperient refreshes and invigorates the system, while it 
removes, without pain, all obstructive matter from the bowels, that it has become a standard 
alterative, and is 

FAST 

superseding all the stereotyped purgatives which have heretofore racked, and scourged, and weak- 
ened the human frame. The tonic, cathartic, and anti-bilious ingredients so happily blended in 
the waters of the celebrated Seltzer Spring, as well as the ebullience peculiar to that natural cor- 
rective and febrifuge, impart 

TO 

this chemical counterpart of the German Spa a purifying, renovating, and regulating influence, 
which does not exist in any other medicinal preparation in use. It quiets the disturbed stomach, 
promotes perspiration, quickens the action of the kidneys, and superinduces 

THAT 

delightful tranquility of the nervous system which is hailed by every invalid as a certain indica- 
tion of convalescence. The 'saline elements of the Seltzer Aperient, being taken up by the ab- 
sorbents, have also a salubrious effect upon the secretions and the blood. This is the preparation 

WHICH IS 

now being prescribed by physicians everywhere as a superior cathartic nervine tonic, and blood 
depurent. Violent drugs have had their day. The faculty and the sick alike discard them, and 
having proved the excellence of the APERIENT, are determined to " 7iold/ast to that which is 

GOOD." 

The preparation will keep for a length of time, and all that is necessary to convert the powder 
into a sparkling, foaming, thirst-quenching, and delicious draught, is the addition of a little cold 
water. Thus may every invalid have a duplicate of the Seltzer Spa at his elbow, although the 
natural fountain bubbles from the earth in Prussia, four thousand miles away. 

Sold, by all Drag-gists. 



100 DR. RAD WAY'S 

SARSAPARILLIAN RESOLVENT, 

The Great Blood Purifier. 

FOR THE CURE OF ALL CHRONIC DISEASES, 

Scrofula, Syphilitic, Hereditary or Contagious. 
Also, Kidney and Bladder Complaints. 

JBe it Seated, in. the 

Lungs or Stomach, Skin or Bones, Flesh or Nerves, 

CORRUPTING THE SOLIDS OR VITIATING THE FLUIDS. 

Chronic Rheumatism, Scrofula, Glandular Swelling, Hacking Dry Cough, 
Cancerous Affections, Syphilitic Complaints, Bleeding of the Lungs, Dyspepsia, 
Water Brash, Tic Doloreux, White Swellings, Tumors, Ulcers, Skin and Hip 
Diseases, Mercurial Diseases, Female Complaints, Gout, Dropsy, Rickets, Salt 
Rheum, Bronchitis, Consumption, Kidney, Bladder, Liver Complaints, etc. 
Price, $1.00 per bottle. 



RADWAY'S READY RELIEF i 






The Cheapest and Best Medicine for Family Use in the world. 

One Fifty Cent Bottle will cure more Complaints and prevent 
the System against Sudden Attacks of Epidemics and Contagious 
Diseases than One Hundred Dollars expended for other medicines 
or medical attendance. 

The moment Radway's Ready Relief is applied externally — 
or taken internally according to directions — pain, from whatever 
cause, ceases to exist. 

In all cases where pain or discomfort is experienced, or if seized with Influ- 
enza, Diphtheria, Sore Throat, Bad Coughs, Hoarseness, Bilious Colic, Inflam- 
mation of the Bowels, Stomach, Lungs, Liver, Kidneys, or with Croup, Quinsy, 
Fever and Ague, or with Neuralgia, Headache, Tic Doloreux, Toothache, Ear- 
ache, or with Lumbago, Pain in the Back, or Rheumatism, or with Diarrhoea, 
Cholera Morbus, or Dysentery, or with Burns, Scalds, or Bruises, or with 
Strains, Cramps, or Spasms, the application of RADWAY'S READY RELIEF 
will cure you of the worst of these complaints in a few hours. 



DR. RADWAY'S REGULATING PILLS, 

Perfectly tasteless, elegantly coated, for the cure of all disorders of the stomach, 
liver, bowels, kidneys, bladder, nervous diseases, headache, constipation, costive- ■ 
ness, indigestion, dyspepsia, biliousness, bilious fever, inflammation of the j 
boweH piles, and all derangements of the internal viscera. Warranted to ' 



- 



effect a positive cure. Price, 25 cents per box. Sold by Druggists. 

I^rRead "FALSE AJNTD TRUE. 

Send one letter stamp to RAI>WAV & CO., No, 32 Warren I 

St., New \ork. Information worth' -thousands will be sent'you. 



10/ 

THE OLD, RELIABLE ARTICLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1858. 



DOOLEY'S 

YEAST POWDER 



IS THE 



STANDARD BAKING POWDER, 

AIVX> THE 

BEST & CHEAPEST ARTICLE PREPARED 

FOR MAKING ELEGANT 
I3iscn.it, Cakes, 

Rolls?, Dumplings, 

Bread., Pastry, etc. 

In £, £, 1 and 5 lb. Cans Actual Net Weight. 

To those who have never used this Yeast or Bak- 
ing Powder, we ask a trial, feeling confident that its 
purity, strength, economy, and consequent superiority, 
will be proven and established. 

SOLD BY GROCERS AND DEALERS. 



DOOLEY & BROTHER, 

MANUFACTURERS, NEW YORK. 



The Remington Works, 




Fire Arms, Agricultural Implements. 

REMINGTON 

No. 1 Machine 

For Family use, in the 
third year of its eansi~ 
ence, has met with a 
more rapid increase 
of ratio of sales than 
any machine on the 
market. 

REMINGTON 

No. 2 Machine 

For manufacturing k 
family use (ready for 
delivery only sinoeJune, 
1874), for range, per- 
fection, and variety of 
work, is without a rival 
in family or workshop. 

AGRICULTURAL I MPLEMENTS.— improved Mo Ing Machines, 8teel Plows, steel Hoes, Cul- 
tlTators, Road Scrapers, Patent rxcMators, Hay Tedders, Cotton tilns, Iron Bridges, etc. 

GOOD AGLMS WANTED. Send for Circulars. 



REMINGTON' Sewing Machines 



THE REMINGTON 
SEWING MACHINE 
has sprung rapidly into 
favor as possessing the 
hest COMBINATION of 
good qualities, namely : 

Light running, 
Smooth, 
Noiseless, 
Rapid, 

Durable, 
With perfect Lock 
Sutch. 

It Is a Shuttle Ma- 
chine, with Automatic 
Drop Feed. 

Design beautiful and 
construction the very 
best. 







The REMINGTON WORKS also man- 
ufacture the new Double - Barrelled 
Breech-Loading Shot-Gun, snap and pos- 
itive action, with patent joint check, 
a marvel of beauty, finish and cheap- 
ness— and the Celebrated REMINGTON 
RIFLES— adopted by Nine dlftV < -iit Governments— and renowned throughout the world for 
Military. Hunting and Tirget purposes; all kinds of Pistols, Rifle Canes Metallic Cartridges, Ac. 
The highest score at the great International match at Creedmoor, September 26th, 1374, was 



made with a Remington Rifle. 

(PRINCIPAL OFFICES.) 
E. REMINGTON & SONS, 
REMINGTON SEWING M. CO., 
REMINGTON AG'L CO., 



102 



(BRANCH OFFICES.) 
281 A 288 Broadway, New York, Arms. 
Madison Square, New York, Sewing Machines. 
Chicago, 287 State Street, Sewing Machines and Arms. 
Boston, 832 Washington Street, Sewing Machines. 
Cincinnati, 181 West 4th Street, Sewin? Machines. 
Utica, 129 Genesee Street, Sewing Machines. 
Atlanta, Ga., DeGive's Opera House, Marietta St.. S'g Mach. 
Washington, D. 0., 521 Seventh St., Sewing Machines. 
Philadelphia, Pa., 810 Chestnut St., Sewing Machines. 



103 



PHELPS, DODGE & GO. 

CLIFF STREET, 



Bet. John & Fulton, 



New York. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 




OF ALL SIZES AND KINDS. 

PIG TIN, RUSSIA SHEET IRON, 

Charcoal and Common Sheet Iron, 

LEAD, SHEET ZINC, COPPER, 

Spelter, Solder, Antimony, etc. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Copper, Brass and Wire* 



104 L. Smith Hobart, 

Pretidtnt. 



J. C. Moss, 

Superintendent. 



D. 1. Carson, 

General Agent. 




Relief Plates 



In Hard Type Metal, for Newspaper, Book and Catalogue Illustrations, 
AT PRICES MUCH LESS THAN WOOD CUTS. 

Our Plates are guaranteed to print sharp and clean on wet or dry paper, and on any press 
where wood cut* or electrotypes can be so printed. Stereotypes and electrotypes can be made 
from them in the usual way. 

All kinds of Prints, Engravings, Drawings, and Photographs, serve as " copy." 

Our Plates are used by the prominent publishers and manufacturers all over the country. 

Send Stamp for Illustrated Circular. Address 

»SOf 0»Slt«a£rtrfSta €0. 

62 Courtlandt Street, New York. 

THE SAFE DEPOSIT GO. OF NEW TOM, 

140, 142 & 146 BROADWAY, 

FRANCIS H. JENKS, President, 

THE FIRST ESTABLISHED IN THE WORLD, 

RenU Safes at from $15 to $200 a year in its Burglar-Proof Vaults ; also receives for safe- 
keeping Coupon Bonds at $1 per $1000, and Registered Bonds, without coupons, as well as Cer- 
tificates of Stock, at 50 cents per $1000 a year ■ Wills, $1 a year, or $5 for life ; Mortgages (with 
the Bond), Deeds, and Savings Bank Books, $1 a year each. Family Plate, Jewelry, Coin, etc., 
received for a day or year. • 

At the Company's special request, it* charter confines its business solely to the Safe-keeping 
of Valuables. 

Booms for Ladles with every convenience, separate desks, etc., are provided. Very many 
ladies are Renters or Depositors. 

WATERS' NEW SCALE PIANOS 

Are the best made. The touch elastic, and the tone powerful, 
pure and even. 

WATERS' CONCERTO ORGANS 

Cannot be excelled in tone or beauty; they defy competition. The Concerto 
Stop is a fine Imitation of the Human Voice. 

PRICKS EXTRE11ELY LOW for cash during the Holidays. 
II on ih I >' Instalments received. Pianos and Organs to let and rent money 
applied ir purchased. Second-band Instruments at great bargains. Traveling 
and Local AGENTS WANTED. A liberal discount to Teachers, Ministers, 
Churches, Schools, Lodges, etc. Special Inducements to tbe Trade. Illus- 
trated Catalogues mailed. 



HORACE 

P. O. Boob SS67. 



WATERS & SON, 

481 BROAD WAT, NEW YORK. 



BARTHOUG'S 

MOTHERS' RELIEF. 

A PAMPHLET ACCOMPANIES EACH BOTTLE. 

Ask your Druggist to procure one or more bottles/or you, price, $2 per bottle, 3 bottles for 

five dollars. 

"Mothers' Relief" will so prepare the system that the mother will be enabled to pass 
through the process of giving birth to her offspring with but a small portion of the pain to which 
she would be subjected were she not thus prepared ; and that she need fear none of those danger- 
ous accidents which frequently attend during and subsequent to the labor. 

We are fully aware of the great responsibility resting on us in reference to the effects of 
the "Mothers 1 Relief" on the constitution of the mother and the health of the infant; and we 
here declare, upon the known effects of the medicine, and upon our own observation, as well as 
upon the opinion of many practitioners of medicine, that the most delicate constitution cannot 
In the least be injured (but to them it is most particularly recommended), nor will it affect the 
offspring of the mother. 

We guarantee that this medicine contains no deleterious drugs ; and positively assert that in 
no instance has the " Mothers' Relief " had an injurious effect^ either on the mother or child. 
We say this in order to quiet any fears that may arise in the minds of any one, disposed to try 
this really meritorious remedy, as to its effects. 

DIRECTIOlSrS. 

To prepare the system for the process of parturition, the woman Should follow the directions 
as given on the wrapper accompanying each bottle, commencing to take it three weeks before 
confinement. She should be particular to keep the bowels moderately loose, by taking small 
doses of castor oil or cream of tartar, and when she feels the premonitory symptoms of labor, 
she should not fail to relieve the bowels by a full dose of castor oil. The diet should b e small in 
quantity, but nutritious in quality. Gentle exercise should be taken daily, and, if practicable, 
riding in the open air. 

Send for a pamphlet to McKesson & Robbins, wholesale agents, 91 Fulton Street, New York, 
and state that you saw the advertisement in the Tribune Almanac. 

NULL'S PECTORAL HONEY OF LIVERWORT. 

A VALUABLE AND EFFICACIOUS EEMEDY FOR 

Coughs, Colds, Influenza, Croup, Whooping Cough, 
Asthma, Spitting of Blood, 

AND ALL AFFECTIONS OF THE LUNGS, LEADING TO CONSUMPTION. 

Warranted to be Composed of Vegetable Substances Only, 

BOTTLE, 35 CENTS. 

McKESSON & ROBBINS, Sole- Agents. 

^fctl^HdTCMCljr. For jnstantaneonsiy removing INK, 
gaE^^ejeTWC pAf « WRITING FLUID, IRON RUST, and 
all similar Stains from the Fingers 
or Skin in general, WHITE Cotton, 
Linen, or Woolen Stuffs of every 
1/'B , E , your fln 8 ers free fro* 1 Ink Stains. kind, Wood, Ivory, Bone, Engrav- 
IvtEai your linen free from Ink Spots. ings, Printed Books and Unsized 
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106 



FREDERICK BROWN, 

Importing, Manufacturing and Dispensing 
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ESTABLISHED, 1822. PHILADELPHIA. 




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108 

PURE AIR, PURE BLOOD. 

The more pure the air we breathe, the more surely does it take out the 
refuse from the bowels aDd the circulation. Thus the blood and the body are 
made sound. There are elevated portions of our country, where the air is so 
pure, and so rich in mysterious ozone, that medicine is little needed in those 
favored regions. No health can exist but by the absence of impurities from the 
body; all°the tonics, all the blood remedies, in fact every kind of physic is 
only valuable according as it takes out the morbid and refuse materials from the 
bowels and circulation. 

BRANDRETH'S PILLS secure these indications ; the use by the world for 

One Hundred and Twenty-Four Tears 

has established this character beyoud all doubt. Their reputation is still grow- 
ing. This Great Physic never hurts even the most delicate ; simply removes 
impediments to health ; being equally adapted to Diarrhoea and Costiveness. 
In the one case removing sources of irritation, and in the other assisting 
nature's expulsive efforts. 

Usually we have more to fear from disease generated in our own body, than 
from all the sewers or dirty streets in the world. In Diphtheria, Small Pox, 
Scarlet Fever, Cholera, and Yellow Fever, the effects produced by BRAND- 
RETH'S PILLS seem to establish that purging with them, in these diseases, 
immediately induce a healthy disposition of body, and recoveries often take 
place, which under the old medical treatment would keep the patient in bed for 
weeks, if it did not kill him outright. 

But Diphtheria, Cholera, Yellow Fever, and even in most fevers and blood 
diseases, I am satisfied they mostly proceed from a Vegetable fungus; in one 
case depositing on the throat, and in the others upon the organs of the stomach 
and bowels. BRANDRETH'S PILLS usually, in these cases, bring away dis- 
charges like to mushroom spawn. A few doses remove the fungus and effectu- 1 
ally stop the fungus growth. 

Some persons have administered this medicine to their cattle and poultry j 
when they have been affected with Choleraic^ symptoms, which affect man and I 
animal alike ; and while their near neighbors have had great losses, they have ■*, 
lost none. Their use removes fungus from the surface of the bowels and the j 
interior organs, as well as any poisonous or morbid matters in the blood, and ; 
cleanses the body very effectually. They do more, they give off a vapor which ' 
permeates every fibre of the body, and which jvr a long time acts as a preventive I 
against infection. 

Yet this wonderful physic is composed of simple herbs and essences, whose j 
use prevents measurably the inroad of time and disease upon the constitution. | 
General Paez used them for forty-four years ; Nathaniel Hyatt for over fifty 
years, living to the age of ninety-two. Joseph Golden took them for over 
seventy years, and lived to 101 years. Read testimonials from Mr. Ayles, who 
has known BRANDRETH'S PILLS for over fifty ysars. 

The little four-footed creature that kills the poisoning snake, if bitten her- 
self, finds an herb powerful enough to quell that poison, though stronger and 
quicker of operation than any mortal malady. 

And in BRANDRETH'S PILLS man finds a remedy whose qualities be- 
gin to be developed as soon as swallowed, and that saves and cures by occasion- 
ing all matters disease producing, to be expelled from the body. 



109 

Fifty Years' Knowledge. 

Mount Pleasant, Westchester Co., N. Y., Jan. 2, 1874. 
Hod. B. Brandreth, 

My dear Doctor : — I have known and used your pills for the last fifty years, 
and, from my personal experience and that of my family and friends, can safely 
say that, as a family medicine, they are unrivaled. I have used them for colds, 
coughs, rheumatism, indigestion, and neuralgia, with wonderful results, while 
the children and females of my family, in all their complaints, have found 
Brandreth's Pills invaluable. I cheerfully give my testimony in their favor, for 
time has fully tested their merits. 

Yours truly, STEPHEN AYLES, 

Also of the Village of Sing Sing. 



What Brandreth's Pills are Doing.— Cure of 
Gastric Tertigo. 

April, 1874. 
To Dr. B. Brandreth. 

Dear Sir : — Impelled by a strong sense of duty in the cause of humanity, 
and with heart-felt gratitude to you personally, as being the dispenser and pro- 
prietor of so valuable an agent in the cure of disease, I write you this letter. 

In the summer of 1867 (having up to that period from a child enjoyed the 
best of health) I was prostrated with an illness of a very peculiar and marked 
character; a fearful dizziness, accompanied with a terrible sickness at the 
stomach ; the attack alternating, at first, in periods of from three to four 
months, and then becoming more frequent, until in the early part of the year 
1871, when the symptoms assumed a chronic form, prostrating entirely the 
nervous system ; rendering me unfit for the enjoyment of life, and an anxiety to 
my family and friends. 

During the four years of the continuance of my illness, the very highest 
order of medical skill was engaged in the investigation of the difficulty ; and in 
consultation and examination the disease was pronounced to be Dyspeptic or 
G&atric Vertigo. 

In crossing the river, on my way to New York, in the month of May, 1872, 
a gentleman, in conversing with me upon the phenomena of my illness not 
yielding to the very powerful remedies employed in its subjugation, related to 
me the history of Mr. Archibald Bliss, of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, E. D., who in 
the years past of his life had been afflicted, as he stated to me, in much the 
same way as myself, and who had received much and permanent benefit by the 
free and persistent use of the very simple remedy — " Brandreth's Pills," and 
strongly advised me to try their effect upon my own trouble. 

Acting upon the advice of my friend, I commenced the same night with 
four pills, alternating for one week four pills every other night. Then the 
next week reducing 1-he number to two pills, and finally to one pill every 
other night, which practice I continued for one whole year, and with this 
great result: A perfect restoration to health and spirits. 

My opinion, if it is of value to humanity, is fixed and unalterable in rela- 
tion to the positive remedial qualities of Brandreth's Pills, and their beautiful 
action upon the circulation and purification of the blood. So, as this is written 
in the interest of the afflicted and suffering, by one of the many thousands 
whose health has been restored by the use of this marvelous agent, is it wise 
for any household in. our republic to be without Brandreth's Pills ? . 

In gratitude and justice, yours, DAN'L GODWIN. 

No. 13 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn. 



110 66 East Chicago Avenue. Chicago, III., Dec. 2, 1874. 

Dr. Brajidreth. 

Dear Sir :— I have been thinking that it is my duty to my fellow-man to 
alleviate his sufferings in time of sickness by directing him to a cure. I have 
used your pills for over twenty vears, and have found them true, sure to do the 
work, namely, to cleanse the -body and purify the blood. This being ac- 
complished, your health is safe. In the last twenty years I have never been 
without a box of Brandreth's Pills. I take, when I need them, from two to four 
at ni^ht on retiring; this seems, from my experience, to be the best time to 
t:ike them. Since I haue used this medicine it has cost me nothing for doctors. 
There ore many persons who pay from twenty to one hundred dollars a year for 
doctors' bills; if these would use your pills they would enjoy more health, and 
for about one per cent, of the money they pay their doctors. 

You do not push your Pills a6 you ought ; they should be advertised every- 
where until all the world are made fully aware of their virtues. When one feels 
a cold approaching, known by chills and creeping of cold all over you, take four 
of Brandreth's Pills, and for a neglected cold do the same. They cure you like 
magic ; taking away a load of impurities from the bowels and blood, relieving 
and restoring the health in a wonderful manner. Your Pills never injure, ex. 
cept say Quacks and Doctors generally. 

I once prevailed upon an old lady, years ago, to take two of your pills when 
she was given up to die ; by persevering she soon recovered her health and she 
is now in her eighty-seventh year. Would that men and womon could be 
brought to comprehend the great value of Brandreth's Pills in sickness ! I 
thank God for the gifts he has given you, and more especially for such a remedy 
as Brandreth's Pills. Believe me dear sir, yours very truly 

MICHAEL CROSBY 

I ask especial attention to this. 

Let us inquire how a state of sickness comes to exist ? Because the natural 
powers of the body have not enough strength to get rid of decayed or waste portions 
of used-up body. For instance, we have a cold ; the pores are said to be 
closed ; there is checked respiration; we have chills ; the matters which should 
have passed by the pores are thrown back upon blood ; the blood immediately 
causes these matters to be returned to the bowels, which, if aroused to activity, 
all soon becomes well. Should, however, costiveness prevail at such times, 
then affairs become serious, for these terrible impurities are again reabsorbed 
into the blood, and must be at once removed by appropriate means, or fever, 
erysipelas, coughs, pleurisies, scarlet fever, small pox, and a host of evils con- 
sequent upon a bad state of the blood, are sure to exist. Costiveness alone may 
be the cause of similar evils, because reabsorption takes place into the blood 
from the bowels. This cause is the most fertile of all others in giving rise to 
blood diseases. By the administration of BRANDRETH'S PILLS, these dis- 
eases have speedily been removed. Besides, these Pills are strictly anti-spas- 
modic. I have often known complete relief to be obtained before the medicine 
had operated. In fact, the patients thought opium had been a part of the Pills. 
We must not regulate their use by weight and measure, but by effect. Here is 
shown the importance in possessing a medicine that may be used ad libitum to 
procure action on the bowels. The directions from " two to twenty," on Brand- 
reth Pill Box, has more significance than was originally supposed it possessed. 

If you wish the advice of a physician, secure the services of an Eclectic. 
Brandreth House, [New York. B. BRANDRETH, M. D. 

~^ B *%4?L 1 £ RETH ' S FILLS are sold at 294 CANAL ST.. 
BRANDRETH HOUSE, New York, and by medicine 
dealers in every important town in the United States and 
the world. See name in Government Stamps. 



ALLCOCK'S 

PORO US PLA STER. 

DISTRESSING COUGH CURED. 

Letter from the Rev. Dr. Beattie. 

Scotchtows, Orange Co., N. Y., October 20, 1869. 

Thomas Alloock k Co., Sing Sing: Your Porous Plasters are a great blessing. My daughter, 
Isabella, had whooping cough some twelve months since; when the severity of the disease 
abated, she still for six months had a distressing cough, and became very weak and thin. Find- 
ing internal remedies of no avail an Allcock's Porous Plaster was applied to her chest. The 
cough was relieved from the day it was put on, and in one month was entirely cured. 

I am yours truly, 1). BEATTIE. 

Allgock's Porous Plasters. — In water on the chest they are a perfect cure. They appear 
to have a peculiar effect upon the nerves, allaying irritability while supplying warmth. They 
seem to accumulate electricity, and aid the circulation of the blood through the part where 
applied, by which healthy actions are induced. 

NERVOUS AFFECTION OF THE HEAD CURED. 

For two years I have been a great sufferer from neuralgia in the head, and found only tem- 
porary relief from all the various remedies that I have tried, until I applied one of Allcock's 
Porous Plasters. I cut it into three strips, placing one under each shoulder blade and the other 
over the small of the back; and for the past three months I have had scarcely a twinge of the 
old pain. 

I advise all who suffer from nervous diseases to lose no time in making a trial of the wonder- 
ful Porous Plaster. 

New York, June 8, 1868. A. F. STERLING, Sec'y Singer Mfg. Co. 

Letter from J. R. Decatur, Esq. 

Water Street, New York, August 7, 1872. 
Thomas Aixcock & Co.: 

For many years I have suffered from lame and weak back, it being so weak I could not raise 
a ten-pound weight from the floor. It was painful for me to stand five minutes without leaning 
on something for support, and it was necessary for me to be very careful in walking, for the least 
misstep or jar caused me intense pain. The ALLCOCK POROUS PLASTER was often recom- 
mended, but my prejudices were so strong that it was a long time before I concluded to try them. 
Suffering so much, I was prevailed upon to give one plaster a trial. Wonderful to relate, it gave 
me immediate relief, and now I have, as it were, a new back ; have no difficulty in standing, 
walking or lifting. I send you this evidence for the benefit of my fellow men. I feel that I 
would like every person to know of the value of ALLCOCK'S POROUS PLASTERS for weak 
backs. I have recommended them to many of my friends, who have sincerely thanked me for 
the good they have done them. 

Yours respectfully, J. B. DECATUR, 

197 Water St., New York. 

RELAXATION OF THE ABDOMINAL BELTS— RUPTURE OF THE 

NAVEL, WEAKNESS ABOUT THE LIVER. 

Wearing one or more of Allcock's Plasters across the bowels, over the navel, has often cured 
these difficulties. But worn when weakness is first felt in these parts, the weakness is cured and 
the greater evils prevented. 

BLISTERS. 

These plasters produce all the local relief of a blister, and without pain or inconvenience, 
and never affect the kidneys. Therefore, when a blister is ordered for infants or young children, 
they should be used instead. 

POROUS PLASTERS PREPARED BY THE 



OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE, 294 CANAL STREET, 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. NEW YORK. 



112 



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MANUFACTURERS OF FINE 



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APPLETONS^JOURNAL, 

A magazine of Popular Literature. 



New and interesting features will be added to Appletons' Journal during 
the ensuing year, and strenuous efforts will be made to give the American 
public a periodical of a high, and, at the same time, popular class— combining 
instructive material with picturesque statement, superior fiction, with critical 
and descriptive essays. 

A NEW NOVEL by Rhoda Broughton, author of "Red as a Rose is 
She," " Good-bye, Sweetheart,'' etc., will be begun in an early number. 

" SOUTHERN BY-WAYS" (Illustrated), by Christian Reid, will be a 
feature of the ensuing volume. 

ILLUSTRATED PAPERS ON THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS will afford an 
interesting and valuable department. 

TRAVEL, ADVENTURE, EXPLORATION, NATURAL niSTORY, 
SOCIAL THEMES, THE ARTS, FICTION, LITERARY REVIEWS, CUR- 
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Published weekly. Price 10 cents per number ; $4.00 per annum, with post- 
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY 

(Established May, 1872.) 

Conducted by Prof. E. L. YOUMANS. 

The Popular Science Monthly was started to promote the diffusion of 
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The great feature of the magazine is, that its contents are not what science 
was ten or more years since, but what it is to-day, fresh from the study, the 
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The Popular Science Monthly is published in a large octavo, handsomely 
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number contains 128 pages. 

Terms: $5 per Annum, postage free, or 50 cents per Number. 

Appletons' Journal and The Popular Science Monthly, together, for $8.00 
por annum, postage prepaid by the publishers. 

D. APPLE TON & CO., Publishers, 

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The Ne w Nation al Series. 

MESSRS. A. S. BARNES & CO. have the satisfaction to announce the completion of their 
new or supplementary Series of Text-Books, embracing the choicest recent works on every sub- 
ject pursued in our schools. 

They are the only publishers in this country, and, it is believed, in the world, who can offer 
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The NEW SERIES finds its raison d'etre largely in the demand for "brief" text-books 
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Independent Heading Series. 

Bv Prof. J. M. WATSON. 

(Completed 1874.) • 

Independent First Reader, 80 pp. 
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Independent Spelling Book. 

SCRIPT SPELLERS 
Independent Child's Speller. 

Independent Youth's Speller. 
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Brief Conrse in Arithmetic. 

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Manual of Practical Arithmetic. 
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United States History. 

BARNES' BRIEF HISTORY. 
(Published 1871.) 



Independent Conrse in Geography. 

BY Pkof. JAMES MONTEITH. 

(Completed 1874.) 

Elementary Geography. 

Comprehensive Geography. 

English Grammar by Diagrams. 

Bv Prof. S. W. CLARK, 

(Completed 1874.) 

Clark's Easy Lessons in Language. 
Clark's Brief Grammar. 

For Advanced Classes. 
Clark's Normal Grammar 

14 Weeks in each Natnral Science. 

By Prof. J. D. STEELE. 
(Completed 1873.) 
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Steele's 14 Weeks in Philosophy. 
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Steele's 14 Weeks in Geology. 
Steele's 14 Weeks in Physiology. 



It will be observed that although several of the writers named have heretofore obtained some 
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Any of these works will be sent for examination (to teachers only) on receipt of the examina- 
tion prices. gW Send for Catalogue with further details. 

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115 



113 & 115 STATE ST., 

CHICAGO. 



THE TRIBUNE 

For 18*75. 

During the year 1874 the position of Thb Tribune as [the "leading American newspaper " 
has come to be generally recognized. It has won the position, and it means to hold it by the 
employment of the best ability, by the most watchful, conscientious attention, and by the most 
lavish expenditure of money to procure whatever ,'money will buy, in its readers' ^service. Its 
expenditures in this way during the past year were over 0»e Million and a Half of Dollars. For 
the result of this outlay it asks from each single subscriber to the Weekly, Two Dollars; from 
each subscriber in a Club of thirty or more, One Dollar ; and it pays the postage itself. 

The events of 1874 have vindicated The Tribune's political course, as well as its newspaper 
superiority. Maintaining, with all its eld fervor, those Republican principles of equality and 
justice with which, under its illustrious founder, it was for thirty years identified, it nevertheless 
warned the country that the party in power had, in a long course of prosperity, grown reckless 
and corrupt. The people were slow to believe, and some, for a time, resented the warning. At 
last it was seen that The Tribune, as usual, was merely a few years in advance of its time. The 
people have come up to it. They recognize that the new conditions of the country have brought 
new needs and new duties ; that parties cannot live forever on their past, no matter how glori- 
ous ; and that the men to be trusted with the Government should be men who have shown an 
understanding of the popular wants, rather than men who have understood how to pack caucuses 
and manage conventions. 

The Tribune can never be a neutral in politics ; but it maintains its independence of any 
partisan dictation. It believes that the mere organ of politicians can never be a good newspaper 
or deserve the popular trust. It aims to judge every act of whatever party solely on its indi- 
vidual merits ; commends the President where it thinks him right as heartily as it condemns him 
where it thinks him wrong ; waits on no caucus for its opinions ; suffers no partisan need to color 
its news or warp its utterance, and maintains the liberty of candid and impartial criticism of 
their rulers in the interest of its readers. It endeavors to combine the utmost frankness and inde- 
pendence with judicial fairness; keeps its columns free from all low abuse and personal wrang- 
ling, has no quarrels with other papers, and never replies to or even notices their attacks. 

From those who believe such a journal a desirable visitor in their families, The Tribune 
solicits a continuance of the popular favor it has so conspicuously enjoyed in the past, and never 
more conspicuously than during the hard times of 1874. It has reduced its rates thirty cents on 
eich weekly (by prepaying postage, 20 cent?, and waiving the old charge for separate addresses 
to club subscribers, 10 cents), and it asks those who think well of it to reciprocate by kindly efforts 
to increase its circulation. 

The Weekly Tribune has been for the space of a generation the Farmer's favorite paper. 
Besides a complete condensation of the news, literary and miscellaneous reading, and best 
editorials from the Daily, it contains in every number a greater amount of agricultural matter 
than is furnished by any distinctively agricultural paper. This is prepared expressly for its col- 
umns by the best agricultural writers and practical farmers in the United States ; and as its con- 
tributors are in every part of the country, it will be found equally valuable in New England, in 
the South, on the Pacific Slope, or in the Mississippi Valley. Great attention is paid to all 
subjects connected with the Farm, the Garden, and the Household, and some of the original 
articles every week are illustrated with wood cuts. The market quotations of farm produce, 
cattle, provisions, breadstuffs, dry goods, and all kinds of merchandise are exceedingiy full and 
scrupulously accurate. The utmost care is bestowed upon the typographical arrangement of the 
paper, and the print is always clear and legible, and generally larger than that of any other New 
l or k paper. 

TERMS OF THE TRIBUNE. 

Daily (by mail) 1 year $10 00 

Suu Weekly, 1 year 3 00 

Five copies, 1 year 12 50 



Ten copies (and one extra), 1 year. 25 00 



Weekly, 1 year $2 00 

Five copies, 1 year 7 50 

Ten copies, 1 year 12 50 

Twenty copies, 1 year 22 00 

Thirty copies, 1 year 30 00 

Fach person procuring a club of ten or more subscribers is entitled to one extra Weekly, 
and of fifty or more to a Semi-Wkekly. 

I^T* Specimen copies of either edition of The Tribune, and circulars giving full details of 
the contents or the great series of Tribune Extras sent free to any address in the United States 
. * *TV AU remiltiin c<3 at sender's risk, unless by draft on New York, postal order, or in reg- 
istered letter. ' s 

Address simply, THE TRIBUNE, New York. 




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Used in New York and Vicinity, for Thirty Tears. 

Madame ZADOC PORTER'S 

Curative Cough Balsam 

The Best, Cheapest, and most effectual Remedy for 

COUGHS, COLDS, ice, the World has ever produced. 

gay PURELY VEGETABLE. _^ 

Contains no Mineral or Deleterious Drugs. 

The CURATIVE BALSAM Is Warranted, If used according to 
directions, to Cure or Relieve in all cases, Cough*, Colds, 
Croup, Whooping -Cough, Asthma, and all local Affec- 
tions of the Throat and Lungs tending to Consumption. 

Madame Zadoc Porter's Balsam is a purely Vegetable Expector- 
ant, prepared with great care and scientific skill 

It is cot a violent remedy, but emollient, warming, searching and 
effective : can be taken by the oldest person or youngest child, AND 
IS VERY AGREEABLE TO THE TASTE. 

If you have a Cold, (however slight), do not fall to give the Balsam 
a trial. The very low price at which it is sold brings it within the 
reach of every one. The timely use of a 25 cent bottle will often 
prove it to be worth a hundred times its cost, and therefore it 
should be kept on hand conveniently for use. 

PRICE, 25, 50, and 75 Cents per Bottle. 

The 1T> cent bottle U more profitable to the consumer \ at it contains four time* the 
quantity contained in the email bottle 




-»•♦ i» 



DR. ZADOC PORTER'S 

MEDICATED STOMACH BITTERS, 

For all Bilious and Nervous Affections, Dyspepsia, Jaundice, 
Bowel Complaints, Ague Chills, and General Debility. This Med- 
icine corrects the Stomach, relieves Nervous Affections of all 
Jklnds, and Strengthens the System In an extraordinary manner, 
it is of the highest value In cases of General Debility. They pre- 
vent Ague Chills, if freely used previous to an expected attack. 

Put up in Bottles at 25 and 50 cents. 

DR. PORTER'S 

Curative Sugar Coated 



For LIVER COMPLAINTS, BILIOUS DISORDERS and CONST!- 

An 2Z; Tb of® PUiM h * Te no M e r cu»y ^ them. Sold in boxes 
of 50 Pills, at 25 cenU each Box. 

These Remedies are Sold by all 
Druggists and Country Merchants, 




119 



TRADE DIRECTORY. 

Principal Houses represented in The Tribune Almanac for 1875. 

Note. — For the full advertisement see the page referred to. 



BANKS AND BANKERS.— Brown 
Brothers & Co., 59 Wall Street. Branch offi- 
ces in Philadelphia aud Boston. Page 14-3. 

Morton, Buss k Co., 8 Broad Street. Page 
143. 

Durcan, Sherman &Co.. Ill Nassau Street. 
Page 143. 

John Munrok & Co., 8 Wall Street. Boston 
office No. 41 State Street. Page 143. 

Gazzam Collection Agency, 419 Broadway. 
Branch offices and correspondents in all im- 
portant cities of the United States. Page 139. 
Levi Wing & Co., 57 Dearborn Street, Chica- 
go. Page 137. 

BILLIARD TABLES.— H. W. Col- 
lender, 738 Broadway. Successor to Phelan 
& Collender. Manufacturer of the Standard. 
American Table. Page 107. 

BOOKS AND PERIODICALS.— 
D. Appleton & Co., 549 and 551 Broadway, 
publishers of standard educational and scien- 
tific works. Page 114. 

Munn & Co., Publishers of the Scientific 
American and Solicitors of Patents. Branch 
office at Washington. Page 117. 

A. S. Barnes & Co., Ill and 118 William St., 
New York, and 118 and 115 State Street, Chi- 
cago. Extensive publishers of school text- 
books. Page 115. 

Nelson & Phillips, 805 Broadway, Publish- 
ers of the Christian Advocate, official organ 
of the Methodist Church, the Sunday School 
Journal, and the Normal-Class. Page 133. 

New York Ledger, Robert Bonner, publisher, 
corner of William and Spruce Streets, New 
York. $3 per annum. Postage free to sub- 
scribers. Page 148. 

New York Firrsidb Companion, George Mun- 
ro. Publisher. $3 per year ; postage free. Six 
engravings a year to every subscriber. Page 147. 
New York Weekly, Street & Smith, Pub- 
lishers, 25-31 Rose Street, New York. $3 per 
annum ; postage free. Cover. 

Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Co., 138 k 140 
Grand Street, New York, Publishers of School 
Books, and American Agents for the Spencerian 
Pens. Page 113. 

CUTLERY.— Meriden Cutlery Co., 49 
Chambers Street, Manufacturers of Fine Table 
Cutlery. Page 145. 

Cutting <Sc Threading Machines 
— Chase Manufacturing Company, 120 Front 
Street. Cuts and threads steam and gas pipes 
cheaper and faster than any other machine in- 
vented. Page 132. 

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.— Tar- 
rant k Co., 278 Greenwich Street, New York. 
Proprietors of "Tarrant's Seltzer Aperient. 
Approved by the medical faculty. Page 99. 

McKesson k Bobbins, 91 Fulton Street, 
wholesale agents for Bartholic's Mothers' Re- 
lief, Nowill's Pectoral Honey of Liverwort and 
Btoede's Erasing Pencil. Dealers in all kinds of 
Drugs and Medicinal Preparations. Page 105. 

Dr. Radway, 32 Warren Street, Proprietor of 
Sarsaparilla Resolvent, Ready Relief and other 
long-tested and efficient remedies. Page 100. 



Dr. B. Brandreth, Proprietor of Brandreth'a 
Pills. Endorsed by citizens of highest character. 
Also proprietor of Allcock's Porous Plasters. 

Pages 108-111. 

F. Brown, Philadelphia, corner of Fifth and 
Chestnut Streets. Sole manufacturer of Brown's 
Jamaica Ginger and other standard prepara- 
tions, Page 106. 

Dundas Dick, 110 Reade Street, N. Y., Manu- 
facturer and Proprietor of " Tasteless Medi- 
cines " in soft capsules. Page 146. 

Pond's Extract Co., 98 Maiden Lane, N. Y., 
sole proprietors and manufacturers of " Pond's 
Extract of Witch Hazel, or Hamamelis." 

W. H. Schieffelin & Co., Agents for Moller's 
Cod Liver Oil. Highest prize at the Vienna 
Exhibition. Page 127. 

Ruck el k Hendel, 58 Barclay Street, New 
York, proprietors of Porter's Cough Balsam, 
Bitters and Pills. Standard remedies for over 
forty years. Page I IS. 

DYEING -Barrett, Nephews & Co., 5& 7 
John Street and 1142 Broadway. Branch offices 
in Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Baltimore. 
Page 139. 

FIRE ARMS.— E. Remington & Sons., 
2S1 and 283 Broadway, N. Y. Works at Dion, 
New York. Manufacturers of the Remington 
Rifle, adopted by nine Governments. The 
largest ptivate manufacturers of fire arms 
in the world. Page 102. 

FURNACES.— SimondsMfg. Co., 50 Cliff 
Street, New York. Furnaces in many of 
the best public and private buildings in New 
York and Brooklyn. Page 135. 

FURS.— C.G. Gunther's Sons, 502 and 504 
Broadway. Oldest and largest house in the 
Pur trade in New York. Its character is suf- 
ficiently well known, and needs no further 
commendation. Page 98. 

GUANO.— R. Baloazar, 58 Beaver Street, 
accredited agent of the Peruvian Government. 
Agency in successful operation for more than 
a year, supplying consumers only a pure article. 
Page 126. 

MOTELS.— Hoffman House, C. H. Read, 
Proprietor. Broadway, Fifth Avenue and 
Madison Square. " Said to be the best hotel 
in the world." Page 140. 

St. Denis Hotel, Broadway, opposite Stew- 
art's retail store. Favorite family hotel. Page 187. 

Hotel Brunswick. Mitchell k Kinzler, 
Proprietors. European Plan. Junction of 
Fifth Avenue and Twenty-sixth Street, front- 
ing on Madison Square. Page 13S. 

Sturtevant House, 1186 Broadway. One of 
the " Leland" hotels. Page 120. 

Irving House. George P. Harlow, Proprietor. 
49 Twelfth Street. Page 138. 

Metropolitan Hotel, Breslin, Purcell k Co., 
Proprietors. Betweeu Prince and Spring Sta. 
All city stages pass the house. Page 125. 

Gilset House, Breslin, Gardner & Co.. Propri- 
etors, Broadway, corner, of Twenty-ninth Street. 
European Plan. Page 125. 

INK..— W. D. Wilson k Co., Franklin 
Square, Harpers' Building, N. Y. Page 136. 



INSURANCE.-Niaoara Firk Iksorancb 
Co., 201 Broadway. Cash assets $1,400,000. 
Represented In the principal Insurance 
Agencies In the United States. Page 139. 

German- American Firk Insurance Company. 
Cash assets January 1, 1874, $1,750,000. Agen- 
cies in all principal cities. Page 138. 

Manhattan Firb Insurance Company, 63 
Wall Street. Assets $700,965.55. Page 139. 

Bar* Dkposit Company, 140, 142 and 146 
Broadway, N. Y. Fire and Burglar proof 
vaults. Page 104. 

LVNDS.- Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany. O. F. Davis, Commissioner. Umaha, Ne- 
braska. Nebraska lands at from $2 to $10 per 
acre, on from five to ten years' credit. Page 
141. 

Illinois Central Railroad Company. P. 
Baggy, Commissioner, 58 Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago, Illinois. Page 140. 

Ill K AT liXTKACT.-R. Daitnhbim, 100 
Chambers Street, N. Y., General Agent for the 
San Antonio Liebig's Meat Extract. Medal of 
merit at Vienna, 1873. Silver medal American 
Institute, 1874. Page 121. 

HI KT A LS.— Phklps, Dodge & Co., Cliff St., 
between John and Fulton, N. Y., Importers and 
dealers In Tin, Copper, Zinc and all kinds of 
metals. Largest dealers in the United states. 
Page 108. 

MUSICAL BOXES.— M.J. Paillard 
ft Co., 6S0 Broadway, Importers of Musical 
Boxes from the principal makers in Europe, 
and from their own manufactory in Switzerland. 
Page 128. 

OPI ICIANS.-James W. Quern ft Co., 
601 Broadway, and 924 Chestnut Street, Phila- 
delphia. Page 145. 

PAINTS,— Prince's Met allio Paint Co., 
16 Cedar Street, New York. Best and cheapest 
paint In the world for iron, tin or wood. Page 

isa 

PIANOS.— M Bradbury " Pianos. Frbb- 
born G. Smith, Manufacturer, 14 East Four- 
teenth Street, N. Y. Approved by many lead- 
ing musicians, from whom testimonials are 
published. Page 129—182. 

IIoracr Waters ft Son, 481 Broadway, Man- 
ufacturers of New Scale Pianos and of Waters' 
Concerto Organ. Page 104. 

RAILWAYS. — Chicago and North- 
western Railway. Manages over 2000 miles 
of road, in six different States and Territories. 
One of the most popular routes of travel be- 
tween the Atlantic and Pacific. Page 142. 

SA \VS.— R. Hob k Co., 81 Gold Street. 
Page 107. 

SCALES.— Fairbanks ft Co., 811 Broad- 
way. Works at St. Johnsbury, Vt. Largest 
Scale manufacturers in the world. Highest 
prixes nt Paris in 1867 and at Vienna in 1873 
Page 97. 



SEEDS.— Henry A. Drebr, 714 Chestnut 
Street, Philadelphia. Page 145. 

SEWING MACHINES.— Remington 
Sewing Machine Company, 281 and 2*8 Broad- 
way. Manufactory at Ilion, New York. Ma- 
chines combine greatest number of good qualities 
and sales increasing more rapidly than any 
other. Page 102. 

SHUTTERS.— Clark & Co., 218 West 
Twenty-sixth Street, New York. Revolving 
8hutters in Steel, Iron and Wood. Contractors 
with the English, Austrian, French and Egyp- 
tian Governments. The windows in the new 
Tribune building are fitted with Clark ft Co.'s 
shutters. Page 125. 

SILVER-PLATED WARE.— 
Reed <fc Barton, 2 Maiden Lane. Manufactory 
at Taunton, Mass. Every article guaranteed of 
the finest quality. Page 112. 

Meriden Britannia Company, 550 Broad- 
way, N. Y. All work of this Company bears 
the trade-mark "1847, Rogers Brothers. Xli." 
Page 145. 

STATIONERS. —Francis ft Loutrbl, 
45 Maiden Lane, New Yoru, manufacturers of 
Patent Safety Checks and Patent Copyable 
Writing Ink. Page 113 

STEAM ROIL ERS.— Asa Farr, 136 
Chambers Street, New York, General Agent for 
the Renshaw Boiler. Simple, cheap and effect- 
ive. Page 124. 

STEAM ENGINES Tdxly ft Wildr, 

18 Piatt Street, New York, General Agents for 
the Shapley Engine; awarded highest premi- 
ums at State and National Fairs as the best 
portable engine. Page Vi'Z. 

TEAS. — Original American Tea Company* 
Robert Wells, President. 48 Vesey Street, New 
York. Teas delivered in any part of the United 
States free. Page 140. 

TRUSSES.— Dr. E. Marsh, 2 Vesey St 
Established forty years. Page 132. 

TYPES AND ELECTROTYPES 

—George Brucb's Sons, 13 Chambers Street, N. 
Y. Pa<re 128. 

Vanderburg, Wells ft Co., corner of Fulton 
and Dutch Streets, N. Y., Engravers' Boxwood, 
Types, Cases, Presses, and outfits for printing 
offices. Page 107. 

Charles Craskb, 23 Rose Street. Stereotyper 
for The Tribune. Page 127. 

Photo-Engraving Company, 62 Cortlandt St, 
Sole manufacturers of Relief Plates in hard type 
metal. Page 104. 

Watches, Diamonds 6c Jewelry 
— T. B. Bynner, 527 Broadway, near St. Nich- 
olas Hotel. Page 127. 

YEAST POWDER. —Dooley Broth- 
ers, Manufacturers of the Standard U^kjng 
Powder. Established in 1858. Page 101. 



STURTEVANT HODSE, New York, 

DKLAVAN HOUSE, Albany, 

CLARENDON HOTEL, Saratoga 'Sprines 

LELAND HOTEL, Sprinjrfield, His . 

OCEAN HOTEL, Long Branch * 

EUTAW HOUSE, Baltimore, Md., ' 

PALACE HO I EL, San Francisco,' Cal.,' (will open Sept. 1S75,) . 



Lewis ft Geo. S. Leland 

Chas. E. Leland ft Co. 

Chas. E. Leland 

. H. S. Leland ft Co. 

Chas. ft Warren Leland 

. W. W. Leland | 
. Warren Leland I 



MISFIT CARPETS & OIL CLOTHS VERY CHEAP. 

118 FULTON STREET. NEW YORK. 




Medal of Merit at the Vienna 
Exposition, 1873. 



GRAND SILVER MEDAL 

AT THS 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE FAIR, 1874. 




SAN ANTONIO LIEBIG'S BAT EXTRACT 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

San Antonio Meat Extract Factory, 

SAN ANTONIO, TE XAS. 
CHEAPEST and BEST in the MARKET. 

This Extract having been analysed by onr most eminent American and 
European Chemists, is pronounced by them to be superior to any in the market. 

It is a pure Extract of Beef, free from fat and gelatine, each pound of 
j which contains the soluble, nutritive constituents of 34 to 36 pounds of the 
finest beef, exclusive of bones, corresponding to about 45 pounds of good 
butcher's meat. 

It will keep unchanged for years in any climate, even if not tightly closed. 

The Extract of Meat is of a great service in the preparation of soups and 
a variety of dishes ; it can be added to weak soups, vegetables, sauces, etc., to 
which it imparts all the nutritive properties of the best fresh beef; it is recom- 
mended to all households as well as to restaurants' and hotels. At sea and on 
the road it is an excellent substitute for fresh beef. 

Its low price, small bulk and keeping properties have led to its adoption in 
the U. S. Army, in the Navy, in Hospitals and other public institutions. 

For the sick, invalid, convalescent, also for persons or children of weak 
constitution, nothing is more strengthening than the juice of fresh beef. 

I would further say that the results of the analyses are in favor of the 
SAN ANTONIO MEAT EXTRACT FACTORY'S product in almost every 
particular. Very respectfully yours, C. F. CHANDLER, Ph. D., 

Professor of Analytical and Applied Chemistry. 

School op Mines, Columbia College, New York. 

The SAN ANTONIO MEAT EXTRACT answers perfectly all demands 
made on good Meat Extract in regard to taste and flavor. 

Wiesbaden. Dr. R. FRESENIUS. 

I have examined the SAN ANTONIO MEAT EXTRACT, and regard it 
useful as a tonic and as an article of diet in Health and Sickness when properly 
prepared. WLLLARD PARKER, M. D., 

41 E. 12th St., New York. Professor Surgery, &c. 

CA UTION.— None genuine without the signature of Pbof. 0. P. Chakdleb of Columbia College. 

R DANNHEIM, General Agent, 

100 Chambers Street, New York. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS AND GROCERS. 



I 



THE SHAPLEY 

The BestS Cheapest 

COMPACT ! 

Dl K ABLE ! 

ECONOMICAL! 

Awarded the highest oremiumB at New 
York SUte Pair. Albany, 187*, American 
Institute Pair, New York, November,1874, 
Franklin Institute Fair, Philadelphia, 
November, 1874 

These Engines and Boilers have been 
thoroughly examined and inspected by 
the best mechanics, engineers and ex- 
perts, all of whom pronounce it to be the 
best Po'tuble Engine ever presented to 
the public. 

The Engine is not attached to the Boiler, 
but is on the same base, making the whole 

COMPACT AND STRONG. 

It allows the adjusting of all its parte, 
whenever steam is on, if necessary, 
thereby avoiding the many delays and 
repairs so common to other portable 
c gines. 

Any kind of fuel can be used in this 
Boiler. 



ENGINE. 





nSADY FOB. USE. 

The great objection which farmers, planters 
and many others have against the use of steam 
power is, viz.: the danger from sparks. This 
is overcome in the Shapley. 

Parties desirous of putting in a compact, 
chenp and economical p^wer are invited to call 
and examine these Knglnes, as we believe they 
are not surpassed by any in the market. 

Send for Circulars with Price Lists, Testi- 
monials, etc. 

TULLY & WILDE, 

GENERAL AGENTS- 



Hot Rolled Shafting, Hangers, Pul- 
leys, Couplings, Etc., Stationary En- 
gines and Boilers, Portable Boilers 
from 5 to 40 Horse Power. 

Pumps, Saw and Grist Mills, Iron 
and Wood Working Machinery, Ma- 
chinists' Supplies, Cotton and Woolen 
Machinery. 

TULLY&WILDE, 



18 Platt Street, 

NEW YORK. 



SECTIONAL VIEW OF THE SHAFLEY BOILER. 






122 



M. J.PAILLARD & 00. 

680 Broadway, 

Near Great Jones Street, NEW YORK, 

Manufacturers and Importers. 

Grand Headquarters for Musical Boxes ! 

ALL STYLES, ALL SIZES, AT EXTREMELY LOW PRICES ! 




PLAYTNG from 1 to 108 Tunes 

With all the Recently Introduced Improvements and various Accompani- 
ments of the most pleasing and Popular Music. 

Musical Work Boxes, Musical Albums, etc., etc., In Great Yariety! 

Musical Boxes With Bells, Drums, Castanets, Celestial Voices, etc., etc., 
with several Cylinders to Change, and thus Secure a Great Variety of 
Tunes! Inlaid, Rosewood and Ornamental Carved Cases. SINGING 
BIRDS in a variety of Rich Cases. 

We also offer at Retail at Wholesale Prices a well selected and recently imported Stock of 

COMPRISING 

Basts, Statuetts, Groups, Card Receivers, Bouquet Holders, 
Jardinieres, Handkerchief and Glove Boxes, Jewel 

Caskets, French Clocks, Etc. 



-• m • 



A Visit to our Establishment, No. 680 Broadway, will prove a gratifying 
oasfime to all in search of Elegant Holiday Presents. Our rooms are ad- 
m^raMy adapted for the display of goods, and the convenience of buyers. 



-•-•-♦ 



MUSICAL BOXES CAREFULLY REPAIRED. 

Send Postage Stamps for Circular. 123 



The Renshaw Boiler No. 1. 




IT EXCELS: 

1st In form of Furnace, which is reverberatory with drop flues. 

2d. In Generating the steam from or near the top, consequently priming or lift- 
ing of the water is impossible. 

3d. The m ost perfect circulation yet attained. 

4th. In safety, as the sections hare perfect freedom to expand. 

6th. No joint is exposed to the fire. 

6th. Any section may be removed without disturbing those next it. 

Its commercial value is guaranteed to be an evaporation of 11$ lbs. of water 

to the pound of coal in daily use. 

For Circulars and further information apply to 

ASA FARM, Agent, 

138 Chambers Street, New York 



= 



CLARK'S PATENT 



125 



SELF-COILING STEEL SHUTTERS 

FIRE AND BURGLAR - PROOF. 

THEY REQUIRE 

No Machinery or Balance Weights 

AFFORD ABSOLUTE SECURITY, 

Are Easily Worked and 

Cannot Get Out of Order, 

Can be Applied 

TO 

ANY WINDOW 

Best and Cheapest Shut- 
ters In the world. 

218 wfiST 26TH STREET, NEW YORK. 

0*^L.SI. Gr. X^IIiSOKT, Manager. 





ETR 



L 



NEW YORK. 

BRESLIN, PURCELL & CO., Proprietors. 
$4 Per Day. 

Corner Broadway and 29th Street. 

On the European Plan* 

BRESLIN, GARDNER & CO., Proprietors. 



GEWUIIME 

Peruvian Guano. 



New York, Sept. 1st, 1874. 

I have the pleasure to inform the agricultural community that the Special 
Agency established for the sale of Genuine Peruvian Guano, in small or large j 
lots, at the same price at which it may be sold by Messrs. Hobson, Hurtado & 
Co., the sole agents of the Peruvian Government in this country, has met with J 
great success so far. 

Verbal reports and numerous letters received daily at this Agency, subject | 
to the perusal of those interested, express entire satisfaction with the Guano sold 
by me last spring. 

Farmers and country dealers are finding out that the Guano imported now 
is as good as it was until adulterated by unscrupulous jobbers, in such a manner 
that many consumers were obliged to abandon its use. As, however, the 
knowledge of this Agency has spread, they are availing themselves of this 
opportunity to obtain again the genuine article. 

By instructions of the Peruvian Government their agents here have ad. 
vanced the price of Guano from this date to sixty -two dollars and fifty cents 
($62.50) gold, per ton of 2240 lbs. gross, establishing at the same time a new 
scale of discounts, the lowest being of 50 cents on parcels from 50 to 100 tons, 
and the highest $4 on 500 tons and over. As usual, they will not sell in lots of 
less than 10 tona 

Under this new arrangement I am enabled to fill orders for lots of ten tons 
and upwards at less price than the agents of the Peruvian Government. I will, 
as heretofore, supply quantities under ten tons at the same rate as charged by 
them. 

Full particulars given in Circular, mailed free on application. 

R. BALCAZAR, 
No. S3 :Qo«,-\ror street, 

P.O.BC129. NEW YORK. 

REFERENCES BY PERMISSION. 

Messrs. Hobson, Hurtado & Co., Financial Agents of the Peruvian Govern- 
ment, 63 Pine Street, New York. 

Moses Taylor, Prest. National City Bank, 52 Wall Street, New York. 
J. C, Tracy. Esq., Peruvian Consul, 39 Broadway, New York. 



= 



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ixi'Mir 



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IMPORTER OP 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, 



And Fine Jewelry, 




KEY AND STEM WINDING, 
INTO. S27 JBI^.O^LID'W-A.Tr, 

Cos. Spring Street, (St. Nicholas Block,) JS £* Vvf YORKi 

CHAS. CRASKE, 

ELEGTROTYPER & STEREOTYPER 

21 & 23 Rose St., New York. 

Electrotyping in his line of business from the smallest wood cut to the largest 
jncwspaper, done in the best manner, and at prices in accordance with the 
! times. 

BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 






AT THE 

VIENNA EXHIBITION 

was awarded the only 

HIGHEST PRIZE 

out of fifty-seven competitors. It is pronounced by distinguished European and American 
physicians to be the 

Voiry Best in -tlxo ^World. 

Dr. J. Marion Sims says : " For some years I had given up the use of Cod-Liver Oil 
altogether; but since my attention was called by Dr. Sayre to M oiler's Oil, I have prescribed it 
almost daily, and have every reason to be perfectly satisfied with it. 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS. AGENTS, 

W. H. Schieffelin & Co., New York. 






1MAIG .aaHOTAW 




/i^yi- 








• s 










/f& ,Jw4<tew-iJ /U-dfrw^y /fay/ /i4&J4<e4 , 










FREEBORN G. SMITH, 

Successor to and Manufacturer of 

BRADBURY PIANO FORTES. 

TRIUMPHANT SUCCESS! 

SEVEN FIRST PREMIUMS received within four weeks— Two Gold^ 
Medal*, Onk Silver Medal, and Diplomas, making in all Seven First Premi- 
ums, from State Fairs, for the Bradbury New Scale Piano-Fortes, within the 
brief space of four weeks. 

The Two Gold Medals are from the Fair of the American Institute, held 1 
at the Academy of Music, New York, " For the Best Piano-Forte," and from the 
" New Jersey State Fair." 

Never in the history of the trade were so many First Premiums known to 
be given within so short a space of four weeks' time. 



ai 



MANUFACTORY, J' 

tfos. 123, 125, 127, 129, 131, 133, 135 Raymond Street, 

BROOKLYN. 

THE BRADBURY PIANOS 

Are now called the most RELIABLE, the BEST, the 
STANDARD PIANOS of the present day. 

The manufacturer believes that the American public are ever ready and 
billing to pay a fair price for a superior article. He is, therefore, not afraid 
;oadd real improvements, even if they enhance the cost of the instrument to 
;he purchaser, because his patrons are willing to reimburse him. Purchasers 
[night never to lose sight of the fact that when a maker constantly aims to 
heapen his u;anufactures, the buyer loses double in quality what he gains in 
heapness. The manufacturer has therefore proceeded upon the principle that 
he very best possible instrument is really the cheapest, and the result has been 
in increase in the sale of Pianos of 210 per cent, in the past two years, as per 
[nternal Revenue Returns, and this in the face of general business depression, 
^paralleled in the records of Piano-forte manufacture in this country. It is 
jasily accounted for when the above facts are taken into consideration, together 
vith the fact that the BRADBURY PIANO has become the favorite instru- 
nent of all our great artists, and is used in public by them. 

STRONG INDORSEMENT.— The musical profession in the city of 
Jew York have, with most unprecedented unanimity awarded to the Bradbury, 
he highest meed of praise, for their new and beautiful Piano-Fortes. They 
,tate among other high complimentary notices, that they have examined with 
nuch care, The Bradbury new Scale Piano-Fortes, and it is their opinion that, 
n power, purity, richness, equality of tone, and thorough workmanship, The 
Bradbury instruments cannot be excelled. 

Wm. Mason, S. B, Mills, Geo. W. Morgan, Theo. Thomas, W. 
3erg, John N. Pattison, Charles Fradel, Robert Heller, Chas. Grobe, 
Jtrakosh, Clare W. Beamis, Max Maretzek, Carl Anschutz, E. M. 
Harrington, Harry Sanderson, Chas. Wells, Geo. F. Bristow, A. Bag- 
ola, Gustave R. Eckhardt, Geo. Curtis, H. E. Matthews, Theo. 
Hagen, Editor New York " Musical Review," John Zundel, Organist 
n Henry "Ward Beecher's Church. 



IW HAVE MOW IN USE MORE THAN 14,000! 

BBADBURY PIANO FORTES. 

ESTABLISHED 1854. 

14 East Fourteenth Street, New York. 

Factory Corner Raymond and Willoughby Streets, Brooklyn. 



Mre"utive Mansion, Washington, D. C , March, 3, 1874. 
Mr. F. G. SMITH : Dear Sir— The Bradbury Piano, for which I sent my Square Grand 
whickering in part pay and now enclose you my check for the balance, gives entire satisfaction. 
Mrs. Grant wishes me also to say that the Square Grand Bradbury Piano, for which she exchanged 



182 «• c*;n <rivesthe greatest satisfaction to her and her 

. flv, vears ago her Steinway Piano, still gnes ^8™ Mansion, and having such 

in part pay fl ™ /^J* upo n it in the parlors of the Executive .1 , ^ 

Mr F G SMITH: D**n S.K-Eoclosed please find my ^ eta* ^ are botb very muc i 
.-rand Viano "promptly sent us on my <**£*%, Ely, and to say it is the sweetest toned 

- Very truly your, ^^^^^ 

Mr F G SMITH: Dear Sir— Mrs. Uowaraanu j from your justly celebrated Bra 

l&'5S%^^J^ is & A a Bradbury Plano *"" be w eve " 

hooSl 1 am very truly yours, Q Q H0WARD _ Brig . Gen . U. S. Army. 

Dr T De Wit, Ta,ma g e , " M«l 8 mith is a Methodist, but his piauo, are a» orttado 

vou ought to hear mine talk and sing ! £ a Mmore, Md. , Jan. . 1874. 

" e ^r^ Haven sa^l" 'Cnradbury Piauo continues to grow hotter every day, aud my 

ESTABLISHED 40 TEARS. 

2 Vesey sZT(Astor House), 

NEW YORK. 

The only Effectual and Speedy Cure for 

HERNIA, OR RUPTURBi, 

Thousands have been cured by it. Those tfjj 
have experimented with the miserable applicati« 
which have been hawked around the country an< 

S ^ LADY APA RTMENT WITH LADY ATTENDANT. ^ 

"" chads'" 

Pipe Cutting and Threading Machiij 

This important tool is designed to fill a want long felt t 
STEAM AND GAS FITTERS and MACHINIST?, for cuttifl 
and threading pipes rapidly and cheaply ^n a pprento| 
boy, with one of these, can do more work- than two m« 
with old applianc s, under the old system. NO VUt 
SPLITTING! NO BEVEL INSIDE OR OUT! It <» 
threads and makes nipple for all sizes of P»P e "; J 1 ' ™* 
to 2 inches. Weighs only 100 lbs. Stronger than * 
machine made. A set of collars and lengths for matt 
ninnies goes with the machine. Address j . 

PP THE CHASE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 
t^~ Send for Circular. 120 Front St New YJ 

For Sale by Morris, Tasker <fc Co., Philadelphia, Botf j 
and New York. 





WQ>w, 



ESI; 



WBffil 






Z>ose. — .For a grown person, one tea-spoonful; 
for a child 10 to 12 years old, half a tea-spoonful ; 
and for a child 2 to 5 years old, 15 to 20 drops. 

To be given in Sugar and Water. 



Established 1822. 



BEWARE OE WORTHLESS IMITATIONS. 
BROWN'S 

OF 






PREPARED ONLY BY 

FREDERICK BROWN, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



THIS RELIABLE PREPARATION, one of the old- 
est of American Pharmaceutical Products, still main- 
tains its enviable reputation, and finds a steadily 
increasing sale without advertising, and in spite of 
piracy. 

Brown's Essence of Jamaica Ginger is EXTENSIVELY IMITATED. 

Its high reputation has tempted the cupidity of parties 
whose only excuse for their unfair simulations exists 
in the great popularity of the original, and accidental, 
similarity of their name. 

BROWN'S ESSENCE OF JAMAICA GINGER 

is protected by the private Proprietary Stamp of the 
manufacturer, which is incorporated with the steel 
plate label. (See other side.) 



The attention of Druggists and the Trade generally, is called to the 

Price List of 



Which will be mailed on application. 

FREDERICK BROWN, 

IMPORTING, MANUFACTURING AND DISPENSING CHEMiST, 

N. E. Cor. Fifth & Chestnut 8 ts., Philadelphia. 



The Christian Advocate 

FOR 1875. 

The great merit of The Christian Advocate is universally conceded. The interest and 
utility of the information which it furnishes are attested by its increasing circulation in all 
sections of the country and in every branch of the Church. Notwithstanding the great compe- 
tition on every side its patronage is increasing at home, and extends into every Christian 
country. It is not only the oldest and most widely circulated weekly Methodist journal in the 
i world, but also has the largest subscription list of any one of the great denominational weeklies. 

MAGNIFICENT PREMIUM ENGRAVING HI 

The Publishers have arranged to favor every subscriber to The Christian Advocate for 1875 
with the most meritorious and valuable Premium ever offered by any religious weekly to all its 
subscribers without additional charge For this purpose they have purchased of that eminent 
artist, Mr. A. H. Ritchie, his new, original, and magnificent steel engraving, "MERCY KNOCK- 
ING AT THE WICKET GATE," (single copies of which sell at $5 each,) and will send a copy 
free of charge to every subscriber for 1875, old and new. 

The subscription for 1875 is $2.50; postage for one year, twenty cents ; total for paper and 
, postage, $2.70. 

REMEMBER THE PRICE, $2.70 a year, post-paid, including New 

Premium Engraving. 

Advertisers who have used its columns recommend it highly as a first-class medium, and 
show their faith in it by their constant patronage. 

Rates for Advertising. — Ordinary advertisements, per nonpareil line, each insertion, 40 
cents ; Special Notices, 60 cents ; Financial Notices, 75 cents; Reading Notices, $1. Special dis- 
counts made for continuous advertising. All inquiries promptly answered. 

THE SUND AY - SCH OOL JOURNAL. 

CIRCULATION, 115,000 COPIES MONTHLY. 
IMMENSELY POPULAR. 



THE BEST JOURNAL OF ITS KIND PUBLISHED. 



In constant use as a text-book. k ' The Bekkan Lessons," now so celebrated, are prepared 
especially for it. It is used by pastors, superintendents, and teachers in the Sunday-schools of 
every evangelical denomination. 

Each number contains Condensed Notes, Illustrations, References, and Blackboard Exercises 
for every lesson for the month of the International Series. No teacher should be without it. 

A single subscription costs only 60 cents a year, or a club of six subscriptions to one address, 
50 cents each. 

Specimen copy sent free to any address in the United States. 

A- NEW SUNDAY - SCHOOL MAGAZINE, 

For Pastors, Superintendents, Normal-Class Teachers, Etc., Etc. 

(Not to interfere with the Sunday-School Journal.) 
BEGINS JANUARY, 1875. 

Tlie ]>J"c>:r:m.£*,l - Class : 

J. H. VINCENT, Editor. 

A. MONTHLY 3Sd:-A-C3--AuZIlSrB- 

48 pages, 12mo. Price, $1.50 a year. 
For the discussion of all Sunday-school topics ; the publication of Normal-Class Outlines ; Nor- 
nal-Class Text-Papers ; Descriptions of Sunday-schools ; Institute, Convention, and Sunday- 
.chool Programmes ; Sunday-school News ; Notes from all parts of the world ; Valuable papers on 
Teaching; Sunday-school History, Administration, etc., etc. 

Address NELSON & PHILLIPS, Publishers, 

805 BROADWAY, New York. 133 



MORFORD'S T 

Short-Trip Guide to Europe. 

NEW AND REVISED EDITION, FOR 1875, 
WILL BE READY ABOUT 15th APRIL, 



WITH 



MANY NEW ROUTES IN THE SOUTH OF EUROPE, 

New Routes in Ireland, 



AND 



IMPORTANT CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Best and Moat Reliable cf all the Guides, for Americans; and costing only 
$2.00, instead of $6.00 or $7.00. 

FOR SALE BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



MORFORD'S 

Short-Trip Guide to America. 



NEW AND REVISED EDITION, FOR 1875, 
WILL BE READY ABOUT 1st MAY, 

WITH 

IMPORTANT CORRECTIONS and ADDITIONS, 

AND ESPECIALLY 

New Southern Routes of Great Value, 



All America, intelligently pointed out, for only $1.50, instead of three or 

four times the amount. 

FOR SALE BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



Te 





»iii Go. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



CULVER'S AMD SIMONDS' 

SAND JOINT GAS-TIGHT 




FOR HEATING 



Dwellings, Churches, Schools, &c, &c. 

These Furnaces are perfectly Ga§-Tight, have more radiating' 
Surface, a greater heating capacity, are more durable and give better satis- 
faction than any other in use. 

We call special attention to our 

HOT AIR AND HOT WATER 

Combination furnace. 

A better apparatus than Steam, at One-half the cost. 

ALSO, 

ELEVATED AND JLOW OVEN 

Ranges, Registers, Ventilators, &c. 

p$T- Send for Catalogue and Price List. Jgfl 

I the simonos wn CO. 

ISTABL.SHED,) • 50 CLIFF STREET, 

"845- f /. WWW 1GBS. 



< a >* Us< " , *a 





tinting Jfntt 




'^UFaCTUB^' 



Franklin Square, 



Harpers' Building, 



New York. 



Factory; LONG ISLAND CITY. 




BROADWAY AND ELEVENTH STREET, N. T. 

Location unsurpassed ; opposite Grace Church and the Methodist Book Concern, and near 
A. T. Stewart's Dry Goods Emporium. First-class Restaurant and Ladies' Lunch Room connected 
with it. Parties visiting the city for shopping purposes will find this a very convenient stopping 
place. Favorable terms made with families for the winter. Rooms from $1.00 upwards for tran- 
sient guests. 



On the European Plan. 



GEO. W. HUNT, Manager. 



Jjevi Wing. 



H. I\ Caldwell. 



REAL ESTATE BANE OF 



LEVI WING &CO., 

57 DEARBORN ST., CHICAGO. 







Etc., 3Eto. 



INTEREST ALLOWED ON TIME DEPOSITS. 

Taxes Paid, Titles Examined, Estates Managed. 

"We make a specialty of Loans on Chicago Real Estate for parties wishing 

investments for a term of years. Ten per cent, interest, undoubted Security, and 

without cost to lender. Correspondence solicited with parties wishing to invest 

ftinds in this market. 

REFER TO 

First National Bank, Boston, Third National Bank, CmoAao, 

And other Banks and Business Houses of Chicago. 



GERMAN AMERICAN INSURANCE CO. 

OF NEW YORK. 
OFFICE, - - - 179 BROADWAY* 

C&8M €a&iFd&, $2 tQQQtQQQ. 

Invested in U. S. Government Bonds. 

Cash Assets, January 1, 1874, $1,750,000. 

AGENCIES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES AND TOWNS IN U. S. 



EUGENE CAIiY, Manager Western Dep% Chicago, 111. 

IMVN, Manager Central Dep't, Philadelphia, Pa. 



HENRY W. BROW 




Embraces the entire Block of Fifth Avenue, overlooking Madison Square from Twenty-sixth to 
Twenty-seventh Street. The house is kept upon the European Plan. 

J AS, L. MITCHELL. )„ . tnrm 

_ FRANCIS KINGSLEY. \ Proprietors. 



HOUS3E 



European Plan, 

Broadway and Twelfth Street, New York ; Entranee 49 Twelfth Street (2 blocks below 
Union Square). A First-Class Hotel, with moderate prices. 

GEORGE P. HARLOW, Proprietor. 



HIGHEST PREMIUM AWARDED by the AMERICAN INSTITUTE FAIR. 



Established 1858. 




TRADE MARK, PATENTED. 



The best and cheapest Paint In the 
world for Iron, Tin or Wood. For Sale 
by the trade everywhere. 

PRINCE'S METALLIC PAINT CO., 

[Manufacturers, 96 Cedar Street, New York. 

CAUTION.— All genuine PRINCE'S 

METALLIC PAINT will bear our name 

and trade-mark on each and every package. 

Send for a circular. 138 



NI-AG-ARA ♦ 139 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

OF 3>TEW YORK. 

Cash Assets, 1,500,000 DoUars. 

OFFICE:, 1VO. 301 BROA-D W.A.Y. 

P. NOTMAN, Vice Prest. and Sec'y. H. A. HOWE, Prest. 

Represented in the principal INSURANCE AGENCIES in the United States. 



Cincinnati, O., SNIDER & LINDSEY, 

Chicago, 111., BEVERIDGE & HARRIS, V Associate Managers, 

Detroit, Mich., L. R. MORRIS, 



lj 

M.A.:iNrH:_A_TT^isr 

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF NEW YORK CITY; 

PFFICE, ]S"o. 68 "^AI^L jSTREET. 

Capital, - $250,000.00 

Swrplus over, - . - - - - - • - 450,965.55 

Asset*, $700,965.55 

ANDREW J. SMITH, President. JOHN H. BEDELL, Secretary. 

""'"*"" STATEN ISIL. A.2STID 

DYEING ESTABLISHMENT 

BARRETT NEPHEWS & CO., 

Office, 5 and 7 JOHN STREET, and 114-2 BROADWAY, 

Near Twenty-Sixth St., New York. 279 Fulton St., cor. Tillary, Brooklyn. 
; 47 North Eighth St., Philadelphia. 110 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore. 

All kinds of Dress Goods, either in the piece or in Garments, Dyed, Cleaned, and Refinished. 
The largest and best appointed establishment in the country for this specialty. 

GAZZAM COLLECTION AGENCY 

COLLECTS 
Claims of all kinds in all parts of the Country and in Canada, at rates which are 
Uniform and Moderate. Special Contracts with nearly three thousand lawyers 
enables this Agency to offer to the public advantages unequaled by any Collec- 
tion or Commercial Agency in the country. These attorneys are invariably ap- 
pointed by the Governing Committee of the Agency upon the recommendation of 
the Correspondent by a Bank officer or Postmaster at the place of his residence, 
and with approval of one of the judges before whom the correspondent practices. 

Principal Office, 419 BROADWAY, Cor. Canal St., New York City. 



no 




HOFFMAN HOUSE 

AND RESTAURANT, 

BROADWAY, FIFTH AVENUE, AND MADISON SQUARE. 

Said by all Travelers to be the Be st Hotel in the World. 

C H. R,B^lX>, Proprietor. 



Railroad 

LANDS 



THE 



Central 1. 1 Co, 

Offer for sale a large quantity of good 
farming and fruit lands, in tracts to suit 
purchasers, and at very low prices. For 
full particulars, send for a " Land 
Guide," or address 

P. DAGGY, 

Land Commissioner, 

No. 58 Michigan Avenue, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



TEAS! TEAS ! ! 

We will deliver our Teas direct to you in any 
part of the United States free of all charge. 
Established 1840. 
THE ORIGINAL 
AMERICAN TEA COMPANY. 

PRICK LIST OF TEAS, 
OOLONG, Black, 40, 50, 60, best 70c. pr. lb. 
MIXED, Green & Black, 40. 50, 60, best 70c. " 
JAPAN, Uncolored, 60, 70, 80. 90, best $1.00 " 
IMPERIAL, Green, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, $1.00, 

best $1.05 per lb. 
GUNPOWDER, Green, $1.10, best $1.30 pr. lb. 
ENGLISH BREAKFAST, Black, 60, 70, 80, 90, 
best $1.00 per lb. 

N. B. — We have a specialty of Garden Growth 
YOUNG HYSON and IMPERIAL, at $1.20, and 
OOLONG, Extra Choice, $1.00. 

Our Teas are put up in One Pound Packages, 
with the land and price printed on each. 

AGENTS WANTED to get up clubs to sell our 
Teas to families, hotels, boarding houses, and 
others. In writing for terms or sending orders, 
be particular to address the President of the 
Oompauy, thus : ROBERT WELLS, 
P. O. Box 1287. No. 48 Vesey St, New York. 

We are compelled to request this, as other 
par ties^ have imitated our firm name. 

l^ - We will send you one, two or three 
pounds of the above as sample per U. S. mail 
without any extra charge. The money most ac- 
company the ordor. 



HAMAMELIS. 



k STANDARD REMEDY 

FOR THE CURE OF 

KFLAMMATOBY ™* HEMORRHAGIC DISEASES. 



•» * * &k» 



This Remedy has been thorotighly tested by the Profession for 

Thirty J"ear$, 

Lnd is unusually popular. 



< <>3>> » ~« 

TE PROPRIETORS, FROM THE TIME OF PLACING IT ON THE MARKET, 
ADOPTED THE PLAN OF MAKING KNOWN TO THE PROFESSION 

ITS COMPOSITION, 

S WELL AS ITS USES, AND THEREBY RENDERED INCALCULABLE SERVICE. 

IT IS USED IN THE 

.QeB&tals ef tftls ©@®&teF.aadl lire®]©© 

"WITH EMINENT SUCCESS, AND HAS RECEIVED 

THE HIGHEST TESTIMONIALS 

FROM PROMINENT PHYSICIANS IN ALL SCHOOLS- 



> <'<ttil' i 



NOTICE ! ! 

very living individual who has ever been prominently identified with 

'his, THE OLDEST AND BEST preparation from WITCH-HAZEL, is 

now permanently connected with the Pond's Extract Company, its 

sole and exclusive proprietors and manufacturers. 

1 «'«»)> i 

toy «*ii i>nuaaisTs. 



POND'S EXTRACT 

OF 

is, @ff Witch- 



-♦♦*- 



a 



pond'l Extract of Witch-Hazel-Is a Standard Remedy for the cure of In-i 
flammatory Rheumatism and Sore Throat j and invaluable for Hemorrhage«| 
from the Nose, Gums, Lungs and Bowels. 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is a Remedy which dealers can confidently^ 
recommend to their patrons. It has been thoroughly tested by the Profession for thirty 
years, and Is used with renowned success in the Hospitals of this country and Europe 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Its great demand proves it to be used as 
Universal Remedy. It is by no means a "Cure all;" yet it is the only Remedy that is us 
with success in curing Neuralgia, Toothache, Headache, Asthma, Hoarseness, 
Catarrh, Lameness, Burns, Boils, Ulcers, Soreness, Sprains, Bruises, Colic, 
Diarrhoea, all Hemorrhages, and the worst forms of Piles. 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is convenient of application and safe for 
all ; being incapable of producing any injurious effects. It may be used freely internally of 
externally without the slightest danger. It is not known to affect or to be affected by the 
action of other remedies ; it almost constitutes in itself a complete Family Medicine Chest. • 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Has stood the test of time; the demand 
for it is baaed upon personal experience, and the merited commendation of many emt 
nent Physicians of all Schools, who have proved its adaptability to tho diseases for which 
it is recommended above. It is daily prescribed by Allopathic, Homoeopathic, Eclectic and 
Botanic Physicians in their practice. 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is put up in bottles of three sizes, whicl 
retail respectively at 50c., 11.00 and $1.75 each. Experimenters try the " Small," but after' 
wards regularly use one or the other of the larger sizes. 

CAUTION. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits 1 Many persons are in t 
habit of calling for WITCH-HAZEL, or HAMAMEL1S, when 1h 
desire POND'S EXTRACT. Such persons, in order to be secure of t 
genuine, old, reliable article, should see that the words POND'S EX' 
TRACT are blown in the bottle, and that our Trade Mark is on th 
surrounding wrapper. A pamphlet on the HISTORY and USES 4 
I^OI^T^D'SI EZXLTJFL.A.OT will be mailed free on ap 
plication. 

FOR SALE BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE, : 

AND TO JOBBERS BY 

THE POND'S EXTRACT COMPANY 1 

98 MAIDEN LANE, NEW Y0BK* 



li'Ti ■■mini Mil 



HAMAMELIS. 

k STANDARD REMEDY 

FOR THE CURE OF 

VUIUTOIIT - HEMORRHAGIC DISEASES. 



♦ < <^ S »»>-*- 



This JRemedy has been thoroughly tested by the Profession for 

Thirty IPears, 

ND IS UNUSUALLY POPULAR. 



IE PROPRIETORS, FROM THE TIME OF PLACING IT ON THE MARKET, 
ADOPTED THE PLAN OF MAKING KNOWN TO THE PROFESSION 

ITS COMPOSITION, 

S WELL AS ITS USES, AND THEREBY RENDERED INCALCULABLE SERVICE. 

IT IS USED IN THE 

WITH EMINENT SUCCESS, AND HAS RECEIVED 

THE HIGHEST TESTIMONIALS 

PKOM PROMINENT PHYSICIANS IN ALL SCHOOLS- 



I C>il t 



NOTICE S ! 

very living individual who has ever been prominently identified with 

\his, THE OLDEST AND BEST preparation from WITCH-HAZEL, is 

now permanently connected with the Pond's Extract Company, its 

sole and exclusive proprietors and manufacturers. 

i \y*S b \\ » — ! 

SOIjD toy «,11 :DIEt.TXG-G-ISTS. 



— ■ 



POND'S EXTEACT 



ow 



HamameMij or Witcb-ffiazel. 



Pond'§ Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is a Standard Remedy for the cure of I: 
flammntory Rheumatism and Sore Throat $ and invaluable for Hemorrhage! 
from the Nose, Gums, L.unjrsand Bowels. 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is a Remedy which dealers can confldentl 
recommend to their patrons. It has been thoroughly tested by the Profession for thirt; 
years, and is used with renowned success in the Hospitals of this country and Europe. 

I*Ond'8 Extract of Witch-Hazel— Its great demand proves it to be used as d 
I'niversal Remedy. It Is by no means a "Cure all; " yetit is the only Remedy that is used'i 
with success in curing Neuralgia, Toothache, Headache, Asthma, Hoarseness, 
Catarrh, Lameness, Burns, Boils, Ulcers, Soreness, Sprains, Bruises, Colic* 
Diarrhoea, all Hemorrhages, and the worst forms of Piles. 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is convenient of application and safe for 
all; being Incapable of producing any injurious effects. It may be used freely internally or 
externally without the slightest danger. It is not known to affect or to be affected by the 
action of other remedies ; it almost constitutes in itself a complete Family Medicine Chest. I 

Pond'8 Extract of Witch-Hazcl-Has stood the test of time; the demand 
for it is based upon personal experience, and the merited commendation of many emi 
ncnt Physicians of all Schools, who have proved its adaptability to the diseases for whicl 
It is recommended above. It is daily prescribed by Allopathic, Homoeopathic, Eclectic ant 
Botanic Physicians in their practice. 

Pond's Extract of Witch-Hazel— Is put up in bottles of three sizes, which 
retail respectively at 50c, fl.00 and $1.75 each. Experimenters try the "Small," but after* 
wards regularly ust one or the other of the larger sizes. 

CAUTION. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits ! Many persons are in thk 
habit of calling for WITCH-HAZEL, or HAMAMEL1S, when Uid 
desire POND'S EXTRACT. SticJi persons, in order to be secure of ffti 
genuine, old, reliable article, should see that the words POND'S EX' 
TRACT are blown in the bottle, and that our Trade Mark is on th< 
surrounding wrapper. A pamphlet on the HISTORY and USES oj 
FOPiJCS EJiTHLilCT will be mailed free on ap 
plication. 

FOR SALE BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE, 

AND TO JOBBEBS BY 

THE POND'S EXTRACT COM PAN I. 

98 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK* 1 



141 



RICH FARMING LANDS 

FOR SALE VERY CHEAP BY THE 

Dm Pacific Ruumi Cmnir. 

Millions of Acres in the State of Nebraska, 
At Prices ranging from 

$2.00 to $10.00 rEK, ACRE, 

FIVE and TEN Years' Credit Given, with Interest at 
SIX PER CENT. 



CONVENIENT TO MARKETS EAST AND WEST. 



The Lands of the Union Pacific Railroad Company are the odd-numbered 
Sections for twenty miles on each side of the road. They are located in the 
valley of the Platte and its tributaries — a region widely celebrated for its 
beautiful scenery, rich productive soil, and mild and healthful climate. The 
winters are short, and the atmosphere dry and invigorating. Epidemic diseases 
are unknown. The surface is undulating, covered with nutritious grasses, and 
watered with numerous clear running streams. All the productions of the 
Eastern and Middle States are grown with success. Wheat and Corn are the 
staples, and it is well adapted to the cultivation of Fruit. For stock-raising, in 
all its branches, these lands are unsurpassed. The Union Pacific and its branch 
railroads furnish market facilities unequaled. Education is free. One-eighteenth 
part of the entire area forms a permanent endowment of the Public Schools. 
I Good society, Schools, Churches, Post Offices, Mills, Stores, and other advan- 
tages of civilization, are enjoyed. 

The liberal provisions made for Education, the freedom from State debt, 
the rapidity with which this section is settling, the numerous towns and villages 
springing up, offering inducements to the merchant, farmer and mechanic, 
render this tract a most desirable location for the industrious man of limited 
means to secure a comfortable home, and acquire competence, independence, and 
position. 

These lands are granted directly to the Railroad Company. The title given 
to the purchaser is absolute, in fee simple, free from incumbrances. 

They are sold in tracts of forty acres and upwards, giving the man of 
small means an equal chance with the capitalist to make a safe and profitable 
investment, one which cannot be destroyed by fire or. flood, a provision for 
future support, not affected by revulsions, or liable to the fluctuations of stocks. 

Full information in reference to particular localities will be furnished, good 
lands selected, and sales made, free of charge, for persons not desiring to incur 
the expense of coming to examine the land in person ; also 

THE PIONEER, 

A handsome Illustrated Paper, with Maps, etc., and containing the Homestead 
Law, mailed free to all applicants, by addressing 

O. F. DAVIS, 

Land Commissioner U. P. R. R. Co., OMAHA, Neb. 



THE CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Embraces under one management the Great Trunk Railway lines of the "West and 

Northwest, and, with its numerous branches and connections, forms the 

Shortest and Quickest Route between CUIl AG O ami all point* in Illinois, 

Wisconsist, JTorthern Michigan, .Want sola, lotra, JYebraska, 

€ .iL,II<'OI£.VIA, and the Western Territories, 



San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Ogden 

Salt Lake City 

Cheyenne 



Denver Minneapolis Winona Ishpeming Stevens Point 

Omaha Cedar Rapids St. Paul Negaunee Oshkosh 

Council Bluffs Dubuque Duluth Escanaba Madison 

Yankton La Crosse Marquette Green Bay Milwau- 

Sioux City Pra. du Chien L'Anse Menasha kee 

Are all on the line of this Great Road, or are reached by this Route with less 
changes of cars than by any other. 
On the arrival of the trains from the East or South, the trains of the Chicago and North- 
western Railway LEAVE CHICAGO AS FOLLOWS: 
For Council Bluffs, Omaha and Cal- For Dubuque, via Freeport. Two 



ifornia. Two through trains daily, with 
Pullman Palace Drawing Room and Sleeping 
Cars, through to Council Bluffs. 

For St. Paul and Minneapolis. Two 
through trains daily, with Pullman Palace 
Cars attached on both trains. 

For Green Bay and Lake Superior. 
Two trains daily, with Pullman Palace Cars 
attached, and running through to Marquette. 

For Milwaukee. Four through trains 
dally. Pullman Cars on the night trains. 

For Winona and points in Minne- 
sota. One through train daily. 



through trains daily, with Pullman Cars on 

night' train. 
For Dubuque and La Crosse, via 
m Clinton. Two through trains daily, with 
" Pullman Cars on night train. 

For Sioux City and Yankton. Two 

trains daily. Pullman Cars to Missouri Val- 
ley Junction . 

For Lake Geneva. Four trains daily. 
For Kockford, Kenosha, Sterling, 
Janesville, and other points, you 

can have from two to ten trains daily. 



PWJLLiJTMAJr PALACE SLEEPIJVG CARS run over all the lines of the 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company, between CHICAGO and Omaha, Cedar 
Rapids, Dubuque, Freeport, JfMilwaukee, St. Paul, Fond du MjOC, Green 
Bay, and Jflarquette. They connect at O. II. 151 A with 

THROUGH SLEEPING CARS FOR SAN FRANCISCO. 

This great corporation now operates over two thousand (2,000) miles of its own road, and has 
" running arrangements " over nearly eight hundred miles of road owned by other companies. 
Taking CHICAGO as its starting point, the various lines owned by this Company radiate north, 
northwest, and west, like the fingers on the human hand. With one line it reaches MILWAUKEE, 
FOND DU LAC, GREEN BAY, and MARQUETTE. With another it runs through MADISON (the 
capital of Wisconsin), ELROY, and to ST. PAUL and MINNEAPOLIS. Another of its lines 
stretches far across Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and terminates in Central Dakota. Still an- 
other runs from Chicago, through ELGIN and ROCKFORD to FREEPORT, and with connections 
there for Galena, Dubuque, etc. Still another xline of this corporation runs northwardly through 
JANESVILLE, FORT ATKINSON,WATERTOWN, to Fond du Lac, and beyond. However, the great- 
est and most important of the roads of this Company is their Omaha and California Line, or, as it is 
called, " THE TRANS-CONTINENTAL ROUTE." This is the pioneer line between Chicago and 
the Pacific Coast, and was the first to connect with the great Pacific roads, and form the OVER- 
LAND ROUTE. This line is the shortest rail line between Chicago and Omaha ; the track is of the 
best steel rail, and is well ballasted, and as free from dust as a road can be made ; the bridges 
are strong and durable ; and all the appointments are first-class in every respect. The trains that 
run over this line are made up of elegant new Pullman Palace Drawing Room and Sleeping 
Coaches, built expressly for this line, luxurious, well lighted and well ventilated Day Coaches, 
and pleasant lounging and smoking cars— all built by this Company in their own shops. The 
cars are all equipped with the celebrated Miller Safety Platform, and Patent Buffers and Coup- 
lings, Westinghouse Safety Air Brakes, and every other appliance that has been devised for the 
safety of passenger trains. All trains are run by telegraph. In a word, this GREAT CALIFOR- 
NIA LINE has the best and smoothest track, and the most elegant and comfortable equipment of 
any road in the West, and has no competitor in the country. It is eminently the favorite route 
with Chicagoans traveling west, and is acknowledged by the traveling public to be the popular 
i o°, r . al1 P° ints Ln Western Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Neva- 
da, California, and the Pacific Slope. All Ticket Agents sell Tickets by this route. 

MARVIN HUGHITT, 



Gen. Snp*t, Chicago. 



W. H. STENNETT, 

142 Gen. Pass. Ag 9 t, Chicago. 



grown Brothers & (}o. 

59 Wall Street, New York, 

211 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, 

66 State Street, Boston, 

Issue, against cash deposited, or satisfactory 
guarantee of repayment, 

CIRCULAR CREDITS 

FOR TRAVELERS, 

In Dollars, for use in the United States and 

adjacent countries, and 
In Pounds Sterling, for use in any part 

of the world. 

These credits, bearing the signature of the 
holder, afford a ready means of identification, 
and the amounts for which they are issued can 
be availed of from time to time, wherever he 
may be, in sums to meet the requirements of 
the traveler. 

Application for credits maybe made to either 
of the above houses direct, or through any re- 
spectable bank or banker in the country. 

They also issue COMMERCIAL CREDITS, 
make CABLE TRANSFERS OF MONEY be- 
tween this country and England, and DRAW 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE on Great Britain and 
Ireland. 



143 



MITM, buss tea. 

3 Broad St., New York, 

ISSUE \ 

CIRCULAR NOTES 

AND 

LETTERS OF CREDIT 

For Travelers, available in all parts 
of Europe ; also 

Commercial Credits, 

AND DRAW EXCHANGE ON: 

MORTON, ROSE & CO., London, 
HOLTENGIER & CO., Paris, 
HOPE & CO., Amsterdam. 



Circular Notes 

AND 

Letters of Credit 

FOR TRAVELERS, 

Available in all parts of the 
World, 

ISSUED BY 

DUNCAN, 
SHERMAN 

& CO- 

Telegraphic Transfers of 
Money "to EUROPE, SAX 
FRANCISCO, HAVAMA, 

MEXICO, etc. 

Interest allowed on De- 
posit Accounts. 





EtCO. 

BANKERS, 

8 Wall St., New York, 

Issue Circular Letters of Credit on 

M UN ROE & CO., 

7 Rue Scribe, Paris, 

AND ON 

The Consolidated Bank, 

IiONBON. 

Cable Transfers on PARIS, and Bills of Exchange 
and Cheques on LONDON, PARIS, BER- 
LIN, FLORENCE, AMSTERDAM, 
GENEVA, &c, &c. 

Office in Boston, No. 41 State St. 



REPRESENTED BY 



Messrs. A. T. & F. A. HALL 



SPIRITUALISM AND REFORM. 



THE 



BANNER OF LIGHT : 

A Popular Family Paper and Exponent I 

OF THE 

MM Pliloso* of i let 






ISSUED EVERY SATURDAY, BY 

COLBY & RICH, No. 9 Montgomery Place, BOSTON, Mass. 



THE BANNER OF LIGHT is a first-class eight-page Family Newspaper, containing FORTY 
COLUMNS OF INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE READING, classed as follows : 
LITERARY DEPARTMENT.— Original Novelettes of reformatory tendencies, and, occasionally, 

translations from French and German authors. 
REPORTS OF SPIRITUAL LECTURES.— By able Trance and Normal Speakers. 
ORIGINAL ESSAYS upon Spiritual, Philosophical, and Scientific subjects. 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT.— Subjects of General Interest, the Spiritual Philosophy, its Phenom- 
ena, &c, Current Events, Entertaining Miscellany, Notices of New Publications, &c. 

MESSAGE DEPARTMENT.— Spirit Messages from the departed to their friends in earth-life, given 
through the mediumship of Mrs. J. H. Conant, which demonstrate direct Intercourse between 
the Mundane and Super-Mundane Worlds. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION, IN ADVANCE : 
PER YEAR, $3.00. SIX MONTHS, $1.50. THREE MONTHS, 75 Cts. 

Postage 15 cents per year, which must accompany the subscription. 



GOLBT & RICH, Publishers & Booksellers, 

No. 9 MONTGOMERY PLACE, BOSTON, 

KEEP FOR SALE THE WORKS OF 

Andrew Jackson Davis, Miss Lizzie Doten, Moses Hull, 

Judge J. W. Edmonds, . J. M. Peebles, Dr. A. B. Child, 

Mrs. Emma Hardinge, Mrs. J. S. Adams, Mrs. Maria M. King, 

William Howitt, Prof. S. B. Brittan, P. B. Randolph, 

Hon. Robert Dale Owen, Hudson and Emma Tuttle, Warren S Barlow, 

D. D. Home, Henry C. Wright, Daniel W. Hull, 

William Denton, Warren Chase, George Stearnsf 

SPIRITUAL, PROGRESSIVE & REFORM PUBLICATIONS. 

Catalogues sent FREE, of all the Publications for sale by them. 



sMBPIH 






115 
And every requisite for the Vegetable 
and Flower Garden. Grass and Field 
Seeds, Roses, Dahlias,Verbenas, Gladiolus, 
and Bedding Plants, Grape Vines, Small 
Fruits, Asparagus Roots, Potatoes, Onion 
Sets, Books, Implements, etc. NEW 
SEEDS and PLANTS of merit are sent out, 
when thoroughly tested, on our sample grounds. The Amateur, Market Gardener, and 

Dealer may rely on the representation of all articles offered, as no stock of doubtful character 
is permitted to leave our establishment. DREER'S GARDEN CALENDAR, issued January 
1st, and Bulb Catalogue, September 1st, of every year, will be mailed to all applicants free. 

HENRY A. DREER, 

No, 714 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GREAT YALUE OF PATENTED IMPROVEMENT IN 



SPOONS ANO FORKS. 

More than two hundred per cent, saved in Economy and Durability as com- 
pared with those of any other manufacture. Silver deposited by this method 
the requisite thickness on the parts most exposed to wear. Spoons and Forks 
plated by this mode bear the trade-mark, 1847 Rogers Bros., XII, and are 
manufactured by the MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., 

No. 550 BROADWAY, N. TT. 
Manufacturers of an unrivaled variety of Fine Nickel Silver and White Metal plated ware. 

miiwuMiiii ii h i w i m ■ ■ 1 ■ h 111 ii w 1 in ■!■■ 1 mail i ■ iiimiim h ■■ «i 

TABLE KNIVES and FORKS of A! I If IMRS 

AND EXCLUSIVE MAKERS OP AUJU Hilli/M 




And the " Patent Ivory " or Celluloid Knife. These handles never get loose, are not affect- 
ed by hot water, aud are the most durable knives known. Always call for the " Trade- 
Mark," " MERIDEN CUTLERY COMPANY," on the blade. Warranted and sold by all 
dealers in Cutlery and by the MERIDEN CUTLERY COMAPANY, 49 Chambers St., New York. 

JAMES W. QUEEN & CO., 

OPTICIANS, 

601 Broadway, N. Y. 924 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

Spectacles, Opera Glasses, Microscopes, Mathematical Instru- 
ments, and all kinds of Scientific Apparatus. 
Send 10 cents for fully Illustrated Catalogue. Mention Tribune Almanac, 



146 

REMARKABLE STATEMENT. 



[From Hall's Journal of Health for October.] 
It is evident that medicine will be taken just 
as long as our worn-out bodies demand remedial 
agents. That the sick will forever fly to the doc- 
tor and the druggist for relief from all the ills 
that flesh is heir to, is clear; and it is equally- 
apparent that it is the duty of the medical man 
not only to refine and purify and concentrate 
the drugs employed, but also to eliminate from 
them the nauseating and unpleasant conditions 
by which the use of the larger part of medical 
preparations is attended. We hail with pleasure 
all intelligent efforts which we observe in this 
direction, and shall rejoice most heartily in any 
discovery which will deprive the medicines ex- 
hibited of their offensive flavor. To this end it 
has been common of late years to coat the sur- 
face of pills with a sugar compound by the aid of 
which they are swallowed without exciting 
emotions of disgust. But only solid substances 
can be readily formed into pills. There are many 
fluid medicines of great therapeutic value, but 
unpleasant to the taste, and these must either 
be swallowed in their natural form — to the infi- 
nite annoyance of the palate — or must be par- 
tially disguised by the addition of some more 
palatable substance, or must be conveyed into 
the stomach by the means of some tasteles ve- 
hicle. Against the use of a large class of unpro- 
tected fluid medicines the sense of taste utters its 
strong protest ; so strong, indeed, that the stom- 
ach is very apt to join with it in condemning the 
aggression. This is the most serious obstacle 
met with by physicians — the reluctance of the 
stomach to receive and retain the medicines 
swallowed. If the sense of taste could be shorn 
of its power during the administration of reme- 
dial agents, " irritable stomachs " would be far 
less common, and the best effects of the medi- 
cines employed would be more frequently 
secured. We should be rejoiced if the use of all 
drugs could cease at once and forever. It would 
delight us to know that in the future all diseases 
were to be successfully treated without medi- 
cines. But that happy millennium has not yet 
reached us. We must still swallow our unpleas- 
ant potions, and fight fire with fire. Let us, then, 
seek to render the means which we believe it to 
be our duty to employ as endurable as possible. 
An expert chemist, Ddndas Dick, of this city, is 
accomplishing great good in this direction. His 
method of administering unpleasant fluids is to 
put them up in little bottles for the use of physi- 
cians and the public, and to cause the patient to 
swallow bottle and all! Our readers may think 
this a singular statement, but it is strictly true 
The only explanation requisite to a clear under- 
standing of the case is as to the nature of the 
bottle. The fact is, the bottle is made of pure 
gelatine— such as jellies are made of— and while 
it affords a perfect protection to the confined 
medicine, it is almost instantly dissolved in the 
stomach. The full effect of the medicine is thus 
secured without unpleasantness, while the ve- 
hiele or vessel used simply acts as demulcent 
and useful food. Dr.BiCK confines within these 
small gelatinous cells several kinds of medicines 
which are largely employed, and which are diffi- 
cult of administration in their naked condition. 
These are castor oil, cod liver oil, oil of sandal 



wood, the balsams, etc., and the protection thus 
afforded the palate is securing for these potent 
drugs a very large sale. Of course it would be a 
very easy thing for a chemist who lacked con- 
science and was devoid of principle to deceive 
the consumers of his articles. It is known that 
very impure and wretched drugs have been put 
up in this form by the unprincipled, and that 
the use of the capsule covering has thus been 
brought into great disrepute. To heighten the 
reputation of this admirable vehicle is the work 
of Dr. Dick, and he accomplishes it by the strict- 
est fidelity in the preparation of his goods. He 
secures only pure articles, regardless of cost, and 
puts them up with scrupulous care. His prices 
are necessarily higher than those of the cheap 
and obscure vendor, but they leave for him only 
a small margin of profit, because of the superior 
excellence of his goods. In nothing is more care 
necessary than in the selection of the articles 
swallowed. If this is true in the matter of food 
used by the healthy, how much more important 
is this caution in that of the medicines taken by 
the sick ! The reputation of the remedies of 
which we have spoken rests entirely upon their 
purity, and leading physicians testify to their 
trustworthy qualities. So apparent is this to 
medical men in large practice that they are care- 
ful to prescribe no capsules except these, for the 
purity of the contents of which they can person- 
ally vouch, So far as we have been able to 
loam, Dr. Dick's products stand at the head of 
all articles in his line. That they are precisely 
what they purport to be is, we believe, univer- 
sally admitted. It is curious to observe the 
manufacture of these tasteless preparations. 
Every capsule passes through not less than twenty 
hands, and is subjected to not less than five crit- 
ical examinations. They are then carefully 
wrapped in tinfoil and neatly boxed for trans- 
portation. The industry is a rapidly growing 
one, and new articles of recognized merit are 
being thus protected by the film of harmless gel- 
atine. The articles thus put up are solely such 
as are employed by the educated medical man, 
and no quack compounds or secret preparations 
are found in his catalogues. The vehicle of gel- 
atine is employed, not for purposes of conceal- 
ment or disguise, but simply to secure for the 
remedies an easy passage to the stomach. Each 
article used has its place in medical science, and 
none has more rapidly attained to a position of 
prominence than the oil of sandal wood, which 
is found to be superior in the diseases to which it 
is adapted to all other remedies. Castor oil, 
generally so unpleasant to the taste, is readily 
swallowed in its delicate envelope, and its effects 
are in no degree impaired. We are convinced 
we are doing a real service to those who imagine 
themselves compelled .to swallow nauseating 
medicines when we call their attention to these 
elegant preparations of Dr. Dick. If we were 
able to convince them that they could get along 
without drugs in many cases in which they 
deem them of the first importance, we should 
most heartily congratulate them and ourselves. 
Hut, since this cannot be, let us urge them not to 
unnecessarily offend the palate, with which the 
stomach is so sure to sympathize. These taste* 
less medicines are sold by all good druggists. 



A LARGE ENGRAVING GIVEN EVERY TWO MONTHS, OR SIX 
ENGRAVINGS A YEAR TO EVERY SUBSCRIBER OF 

THE NEW YORK 

FIRESIDE COMPANION. 

PROSPECTUS FOR 1875. 

THE NEW YORK FIRESIDE COMPANION stands at the head of all the weekly papers 
published in the United States. Its circulation is equal to that of the most widely circulated 
journals in the world. 

The great feature of The New York Fireside Companion is Good Continued Stories. 
It contains the sweetest and purest love stories. It has the largest list of popular story writers, and 
constantly offers better stories than any other paper. Our readers will bear witness to our un- 
wearied efforts in securing the best writers. During 1875 we hope to furnish a greater number of 
good stories and a greater amount of good matter of all descriptions, than has ever been given be- 
fore. As a Family Paper, The New York Fireside Comjtanion is without a peer. At 
least Six Continued Stories will be published constantly, and a new story will be 
commenced about every second week, so that new readers will be able to get the beginning of a 
story of the newsdealers, or of us, no matter at what time they may subscribe. Back numbers 
can always be had, containing the commencement of every story. 

The following is a partial list of our Contributors for 1875. 
OLIVER OPTIC, Dr. JOHN B. WILLIAMS, TONY PASTOR, PETROLEUM V. NASBY, CLARA 
PERCY, LUCY RANDALL COMFORT, Mrs. SUMNER HAYDEN. J. W. MACKEY, P. HAM- 
ILTON MYERS, LESLIE THORNE, FRANK COREY, AGILE PENNE, Prof. JAMES 
DE MILLE, Capt. CARLETON, MARY GRACE HALPINE, SHIRLEY BROWNE, 
BRICKTOP, MARY J. WINES, S. W. PEARCE. G. L. AIKEN, G. G. SMALL, 
ALBERT W. AIKEN, JOHN ELDERKIN, ALLAN DEANE. 

No effort is spared to add to the interest and variety of the contents of the paper. Beautiful 
engravings are distributed to subscribers free as supplements. Early in 1875 we shall publish 
A New Story by Mrs. Sumner BEayden. A New Story by Agile Penne. 

A New Story by Oliver Optic, Author of "True to his Aim," etc., etc. 
A New Story by Tony Pastor, Author of "Old Sleuth, the Detective;" "The Shadow 

Detective ; " " The Lightning Detective," etc. 
A Netv Story by Prof. James Be Mille, Author of " The Babes in the Wood ; " " The 

Dodge Club;" "Cryptogram;" " Cord and Cresse," etc. 
A New Story by Dr. Oohn B. Williams, Author of "Deadly Foes;" "Fighting for a 

Fortune;" " Maurice Flint ; " " Under a Mask," etc. 
A New Story by Mrs. Lucy Randall Comfort, Author of "Little Gay, or Disinherited," etc. 
Humorous Articles by Petroleum V. Nasby. 
A Netv Story by Frank Corey, Author of " Sweetheart and Wife," etc. 

The paper will have the best Short Stories, Sketches, Poetry, Biography, Fash- 
ion Articles, Humor, Gossip, and Notices to Correspondents. 

No effort or pains are spared to make the CORRESPONDENTS' COLUMN most attractive and 
;useful to our readers. This department is edited by a gentleman of wide experience and sound 
judgment, and a vast amount of information is given : answers to questions relating to love and 
etiquette; legal and medical questions; information for the kitchen and household ; in fact, an- 
swers to all questions that turn up in life, can be found in this column. 

HEADING FOR LITTLE FOLKS.— This is and will continue to be one. of the 
prominent features of the paper. The contributions to this department are by the very foremost 
writers for children in the country. This alone makes the FIRESIDE COMPANION invaluable to 
every household where there are children. We know of instances where the little ones insist upon 
having these articles read over and over again to them before the paper of the following week is issued 

MMRO'S GIRLsIlXD BOYS OF AMERICA. 

The largest and most select popular weekly for young folks. It is the only paper which con- 
tains the kind of stories which mothers want to read aloud to little ones, and which every father may 
unhesitatingly place in the hands of his children. It contains a larger amount and variety of good 
reading for girls and boys than can be had in any other weekly or monthly periodical. 

TERMS FOR 1876— NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE. 

MUNRO'S GIRLS' AND BOYS OF AMERICA and THE NEW YORK FIRESIDE 
COMPANION: One copy of Munro's Girls and Boys of America will be sent for one year 
to any subscriber in the United States on receipt of $2.50; two copies for $4; or, nine copies for 
$16. The New York Fireside Companion will be sent for one year on receipt of $3 ; two copies 
for $5; or, nine copies for $20. Getters up of Clubs can afterwards add single copies at $2.50 each. 
We will be responsible for remittances sent in Registered Letters, or by Post Office Money Orders. 
JBoth papers sent to one address for $4.50. Postage free. Specimen copies, with pictures, sent free. 

GEORGE MUNRO, Publisher, 84 Beekman Street, New York. 

P. O. BOX, 5657. f 147 



148 POSTAG-B FREE. 



The New York Ledger 

FOE THE NEW YEAR 1875. 



THE GREA T FAMI LY PAPER. 

IT PAYS THE HIGHEST AND GETS THE BEST. 

Our best and most popular old writers — whose places could not, in our 
opinion, be supplied by any others on the American Continent — will continue to 
write, most of them exclusively, for the Ledger. 

In addition to the old favorites, we have made arrangements with eminent 
new writers, whose names will be announced hereafter. 

We do not hesitate at any price necessary to obtain the contributions of the 
first authors of the day. 

We believe that hundreds of thousands of young men and women, through 
the attractive and entertaining matter in the Ledger, have formed a taste for read- 
ing which has now become fixed, and will remain with them, a source of happi- 
ness and improvement, through life. 

As we said on a former occasion, one great and guiding principle with us is 
to inculcate the sentiments of self-respect and self-reliance, and thus to strengthen 
and render more manly the characters which are just assuming form, to endure 
through all their days. 

The Ledger advocates the strictest fidelity in all the relations of life, and the 
inviolability of the marriage contract. 

Our old readers will all bear us witness that the Ledger has always been bet- 
ter at performing than at promising. Every year it has furnished much more than 
•was promised at the beginning. 

The Ledger is always full of life and spirit ; and a person once accustomed to 
reading it finds it too pleasant a companion to willingly part with it. 

It contains the purest, sweetest and most delightful stories, striking narra- 
tives, and instructive biographical and historical sketches. 

It has the most popular and carefully prepared collection of scientific facts. 

We shall continue to reply to questions on all interesting subjects as hereto- 
fore. Not onty are these questions genuine, coming directly from .the people, but 
we receive thousands more than we have space to answer. 

After the first of January, 1875, our subscribers will have no postage to pay. 
We shall prepay the postage on every paper that we mail. Notwithstanding this, 
there will be no increase in the price of the Ledger. As will be seen by the fol- 
lowing, our rates remain unchanged: 

OUR TERMS FOR 1875. 

Single copies, $8 per annum ; four copies, $10, which is $2.50 a copy ; eight copies, $20, 
postage free. The party who sends us *20 for a club of eight copies (all sent at one time), will be 
entitled to a copy free. Postmasters and others who get up clubs, in th«ir respective towns, can 
afterward add single copies at $2.50. No subscriptions taken for a less period than one year. When 
a draft or money order can conveniently be sent, it will be preferred, as it will prevent the possi- 
bility of the loss of money by mall. Remember that the postage on the Ledger to all parts of the 
country will be paid by us, so that our subscribers will have no postage to pay. 
~ We employ no traveling agents. Address all communications to 



ROBERT BONNER, Publisher, 

Corner of William and Spruce Sts., New York. 



MMNMMMm 



NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE 

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Best Story and Sketch Paper Published. 

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And you will receive, for one year, POSTAGE FREE, the most popular 
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34 COMPLETE SERIAL STORIES. 
150 SHORT SKETCHES OF LOVE AND ADVENTURE. 
250 POEMS. 

500 PLEASANT PARAGRAPHS. 
50 SUGGESTIVE ESSAYS. 
52 TOSH BILLINGS' ARTICLES. 
300 SPICE-BOX CONTRIBUTIONS. 

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ing the young_how to act at Weddings, Parties, &c. 
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v * <v 

CONTENTS. 

I b or alphabetical Index, see next page of this cove-.. ! 

Astronomical data, Calendar, &c 

Trade and Commerce - 

Statistics or Iron Manufactures 

Cotton Statistics, 

American and British Shipping 

Tonnage of Canals and Railroads 

'United States Revenue and Expenditure 

The Foreign Markets for our Breadstuffs 

The Public Debt of the United States 

\bstract of Public Laws passed at the Second Session of the 
Forty-Third Congress 

Appropriations by Congress 

Currency Contraction 

United States Government— The Cabinet, Judiciary, and Min- 
isters to Foreign Courts 

Forty-Fourth Congress— Senate and House of Representatives 
Politically Classified 

Monthly Range of the Gold Premium from 1862 to 1875 

Population of the Chief Cities of the State of New York 

Election Returns by Towns, Counties, Congressional Dis- 
tricts and States 

Electoral Vote for President from 1824 to 1872 

Popular Vote for President from 1824 to 1872 

States of the Union, Population, Square miles, Representation 
• in Congress, Govemors^Time for Holding Electjoas, &c. 
Advertisers' Directory... 




PAGE 

1 — 8 

9— x 4 
15-18 
IS— 19 



2 3 
24-25 

26 — 28 
28 

28 

30 

31—34 
34 
34 

35-8S 

86 

86—87 



&* 




THE TRIBUNE 
NEW 




AND POLITICAL 



■^ASSOCIATION. 
YORK 




CH/LVS SC 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Astronomical. 

PAGE 

Calendar 3-8 

Church Days and Cycles of 
Time 2 



Executive Government of 1 Election Returns. 

the State of New York.. 291 Alabama 84 

Exports of Produce and Arkansas 85 

Manufactures. 10 California 63 



Conjunction of Planets, &c. 2 Foreign Trade of the U. S. 

Eclipses 11 forsyears 10 

Evening and Morning Stars 1 Foreign Trade of Great Bri- 



Places of the Planets 1 

Planets Brightest 1 

The Four Seasons 1 

Political, Financial 
and Statistical. 

American and British Ship- 
ping 20 Imports and Exports of the 

Appropriations by Con- United States 9 

gress for 1875 and 1876... 28 imports in 1873 and 1874— 



Colorado Ter 69 

Connecticut 36 

i Delaware 58;, 

Florida 85 •: 



tain 

Georgia 79 

Gold Premium, range of, {Illinois 70. 

for 14 years 34 i nd iana 68 

Governors of the States 88 Iowa 61 

Imports and Exports of j Kansas 80 

Great Britain 9 Kentucky 81 

: Maine 82 

Maryland 72 

Massachusetts 35 

Michigan 76 



Bessemer Steel, Production 
of, in the United States.. 17 

Breadstuffs, Foreign Mar- 
ket for 23 

Canada, Foreign Trade of. . 14 

Canals and Trunk Rail- 
roads, Tonnage ot 21 

C apitals of the several , 
J. I United States 15 New York, by counties 38 

Judges of the Supreme 

Court 30 

oun- 



value of 12 Minnesota 

Imports of Merchandise ^Mississippi 66 

into Great Britain 1873 [Missouri 78 

and 1874— value of ... . 13 Nebraska 83 

Internal Revenue Laws Nevada 80 

Amended 27 New* Hampshire 54 

Iron Manufactures of the New Jersey 58 



Cities and Towns of N. Y., 

Population of r>± m . 

Civil Rights Act 26 Ministers to Foreign C 

Colorado may become a 

State 28 

Cotton Exported from 1867 

to 1874 19 

Cotton Imported into Great 



by towns 39 1 

Congressmen . . 47 j 

Senators 49 1 

Assembly men. 50J 
City 52 

.67 
.64 



tries 30 

Officers of the State and | 

Counties of N. Y 23 North Carolina . 

Public Debt of the United Ohio 

States 24 Oregon : 54 

■o- t , ~~ Representatives in Con- Pennsylvania 57 

Cotton, Production of,' from| greSS > Members of V R hode Island 56 ' 

o .„ „ „ Revenue and Expenditures South Carolina 69 

1021 to 1074-5 J 8 

County Clerks (State of ! of the United States 22 Tennessee 74 J 

N y ) Senate of the United States, Texas 75 

Currency Contraction '.'.'.'.'.'2 J^^f "'' 3I J?"? . nt 35 

Elections, when held g8 Sheriffs of New \ ork 29 Virginia H 

Electoral Vote for Pr^i , S R. ecie , Payments, an Act West Virginia 56 

Electoral vote tor Fresi- for the Resumption of. ...26 Wisconsin »l 

dent, 1824 to 1872 86 o,to r 1* u Wisconsin 53 

Executive Government of TTey nfet*^ when g8 lp °P^ Vote for President 

the United States 30'states, area of 88 1 X ** 4 t0 ^ 



TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



ECLIPSES. 

There will be four Eclipses this year : 

I. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, March 10. Visible throughout the United States. 
Size of Eclipse = 3.58 digits. 



PLACE. 


Begins. 


Middle. 


End. 


PLACE. 


Begins. 


Middle. 


End. 


New York . . . 
Washington . 
Charleston .. 


H. M. 

25 morn. 
9 13 morn. 
1 morn. 
11 3iev-9th. 


H. M. 

i 25 morn. 
1 13 morn. 
1 1 morn. 
31 morn. 


U.M. 

2 25 morn.j 
2 13 morn. 
2 1 morn. 
1 31 morn. 


Boston 

Philadelphia. 
St. Louis 
Buffalo 


H M. 

37 morn. 
021 morn. 
11 2oev.9th. 
6 morn. 


H.M. 

i 37 morn. 
1 21 morn. 

20 morn. 

1 6 morn. 


H M. 

2 37 morn. 
2 21 morn. 

1 20 morn. 

2 06 morn. 



II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, March 25, in the afternoon. Visible throughout the ! 
United States as a Partial Eclipse, being annular in the Northwestern region of British 
America. . 



PLACE 



Portland, Me 

Boston 

Montpelier 

New xork 

Albany 

Rochester 

Buffalo 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Detroit A 

Chicago 

Charleston 



Begins. 


Ends. 


Size. 


P.. M. 


P. M. 


Digits. 


4 15 


5 45 


4-7 


4 12 


5 49 


4-5 


4 3 


5 36 


5-0 


3 30 


458 


4.0 


3 58 


5 29 


4-7 


3 33 


5 9 


5.0 


3 3i 


I A 


5-o 


3 55 


3-8 




5 

4 54 
4 38 


5-o 


3 13 


4.6 


3 » 


3-6 


3 9 


' 4 47 


4.2 


2 46 


4 20 
4 48 


4.8 


3 48 


1.2 



PLA< E. 



Washington. . . . 

Baltimore 

Raleigh 

Richmond 

Savanfi»h 

Nashville 

Frankfort 

New Orleans... 
Springfield, 111. 

St Louis 

Madison, Wis.. 
Lawrence, Ran 
Little Rock 



Begins. 


Ends. 


' P M. 


P. M. 


3 40 


5 9 


3 52 


5 12 


3 5i 


4 54 


3 50 


5 3 


3 49 
2 56 


4 39 


4 « 


3 10 


4 38 


2 54 


3 38 


2 35 


4 17 


2 35 


4 13 


2 35 


4 23 


1 57 


3 57 




4 I 

• 





Size. 



Digits. 
2.5 
3-0 
1.8 



2.4 
0.6 
2.9 
3-3 
1.0 
4.0 

3 -2 
5.0 

4.2 
3.0 



III. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, September 3. Invisible in North America, 

IV. A Total Eclipse of the Sun, September 17. Invisible in America.' ■ 



Morning Stars 

Venus, after July 14. 

Mars, after August 12. 

Jupiter, until Feb. 19. and after Dec. 4. 

Saturn, from February 17 to Mav 28. 



Evening Stars. 

Venus, until July 14. 

Mars, until August 12. 

Jupiter, from February 19 to to Dec. 4. 

Saturn, until Feb. 17, and after May 28. 



PLACES OF THE PLANETS. 



TIME. 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June 


July. 


Aug. 


, Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Fi/st Sunday- 


? 


« 


w 


X 


T 


n 


n 


n 


n 


' Tt 


© 


m 


=2= 


Second " 


& 


£? 


X 


T 


T 


8 


n 


n 


© 


ft 


«? 


w 


~!± 


Third " 


71 


^b 


m 


TH 


m 


r£= 


s£= 


c£t 


£- 




m 


m 


tn 


Fourth • 


2 


\3 


#? 






£? 


/toy 


Z£ 


or 


J+H 








Fifth 


Hi 


© 






© 






© 






© 




© 



THE FOUR SEASONS. 

Winter begins, 1875, December 22, o 8 mo., and lasts 89 o 54 

Spring " 1876, March 20, 1 2 mo., " 9220 21 

Summer " 1876, June 20, 9 23 eve., " 03 14 10 

Autumn " 187b, Sept. 22, n 33 mo., " 8918 13 

Winter " 1876, December 21, 5 46 mo. Tropical year, 36? 5 38 

PLANETS BRIGHTEST 

Mercury, January 25, May 18, and September 15, setting then soon after the Sun ; also 
March 13, July 11, and October 31, rising then before the Sun Venus, June 7, and August 
ao. Mars, not this year. Jupiter, May 17. Saturn, August 27 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



CHURCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME. 



Septuagesima Sunday.. Feb. 13 
Sexagesima " .. " 20 

Quinquage8ima " .. " 27 

Ash Wednesday Mar. 1 

Quadragesima Sunday.. " 5 

Mid-Lent " 26 

Palm Sunday Apr. 9 

Good Friday " 14 



Easter Sunday Apr. 16 

Low " " 23 

Rogation " May 21 

Ascension Day " 25 

Whit Sunday June 4 

Tri ity " " n 

Corpus Christ! " 15 

Advent Sunday Dec. 3 



Dominical Letters B A 

Epact '■ 4 

Golden Number 15 

Solar Cycle 9 

Roman Indiction 4 

Julian Period 6589 

Dionysian Period 205 

Jewish Lunar Cycle 12 



The year 1876 is leap-year, and until July 4th, is the one-hundreth year of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States. 

CONJUNCTION OF PLANETS, AND OTHER PHENOMENA. 



Month 


.Aspect. 


Wash'n time 


Distance apart. 


Month 


Afpect. 

i 


| Wash'n time 


Distance apart. 






D. H. M. 


Deg.M. 




| 


D. H. M. 




Deg. M. 


Jan.. 


' near $ 


22 27 e. 
2*5 32 e. 


& 


035 N. 


July. 


© apogee 


1 13 m. 








© perigee 








© near 11 


2 4Iim. 


K 


5 3i N. 




? near 9 


17 3 10 m. 


9 


021 8. 


44 


2 near 3 


5 6 34 e. 


fi 


4 28 N. 


1 . 


© near Tf. 


20 n 28 e. 


■u 


s 22 N. 




8 gr. e on. W. 


8 7 40 e. 


8 


20 59 W. 




O near ^ 


27 10 15 e. 

28 o 35 e. 


? 


141N. 


44 


© near ^ 


10 8 38 e. 


} 


34 s. 




8 gr. elon.E. 


8 


18 9 E. 


44 


H stationary. 


19 3 








© near 2 


29 20 m. 


$ 


26 N. 


44 


© near 2 


20 s 34 m. 


9 


10 43 S. 




© near $ 


31 n 18 m. 


« 


1 10 S. 


44 


O near $ 


21 10 44 m. 


* 


2 35 S. 


Feb.. 


© near 11 


17 744 m. 


u 


5 44S; 




© near 11 


29 9 58 m. 


n 


5 36 N. 




14. u Sun 


19 10 ^3 e. 


u 


90 W. 


i Aug.. $ stationary 


i 5 

6 11 32 e. 








© near ^ 


24 1154 m. 


2 


1 23 N. 


1 ;; 


© near ^ 


T> 


38 s. 




© near 9 


28 3 9 m. 


9 


153S. 




11 n Sun 


15 3 1 e. 


U 


90 E. 




© near g 


29 5 58 m. 


ft 


2 42 S. 


44 


© near 2 


16 3 e. 


2 


10 38 S. 


Mar.. 


8 gr. elon. W. 


10 8 37 m. 


8 


2731 w. 


;; 


© near $ 


19 3 om. 


} 


1 12 S. 




© near %. 


IS 6 41 e. 


n 


5 ^5 N. 




? gr.brilli'cy 


20 








IX stationary 


17 4 < 








© near 11 


25 9 7 c 


K 


5 42 N. 




O near ? 


23 2 46 m. 


i 


1 5 S. 


44 


\ 8 Sun 


27 11 53 m. 


^> 


180 E. 




© near 9 


28 957 e. 


9 


234S. 


Sept. 


© near $ 


ik 3 42*m. 
16 757 c 


9 


6 43 S. 




© near $ 


28 10 32 e. 


s 


342S. 




© near $ 


t 


31 N. 


April 


© near t 


29 3 50 e. 


9 


1 9 S . 




8 gr. elon. E. 


17 11 t;2 e. 


8 


26 27 E . 


© near 71 


12 1 4 m. 


u 


5 53 N. 




© near i[ 


22 42 e. 


U 


5 43 N. 
^8 8 W. 


44 


© near ^ 


19 524 c 


2 


042N. 


44 


2 gr. elon. W. 


23 613 m. 


9 




© near $ 


26 1 44 e. 


a 


4 7§. 




© near h 


30 6 22 m. 


\ 


18 S. 


May. 


© near $ 


27 921m. 
4 6 8 e. ' 


5 


159S. 


i Oct.. © near 2 


13 2 46 e. 


9 


1 16 S. 


? gr. elon. E. 


9 


4532E. 




© near $ 


15 1 12 e. 


it 


2 22 N. 




O near 21 


9 3 2 m. 


U 


5 43N. 


44 


© near 21 


20 6 ^6 m. 


T 


5 <o N. 




O near \ 


17 626 m. 


2 


13 N. 


44 


© near ^ 


27 1 18 e. 

28 3 >;8 e. 


^ 


17 S. 




% 8 Sun 


17 1 31 e. 1 








8 gr. elon. W. 


8 


18 37 W. 




8 gr. elon. E. 


21 752 m. 


8 


2234E. 


i Nov.. ^ stationary 


3 18 








© near $ 


2s 4 25 m. 


* 


4 2S. 


14 


© near 2 


12 1 14 e. 

13 6 18 m. 


9 


4 8 N. 


„ 


© near 9 


25 11 30 no. 


9 


143S. 




© near $ 


a 


4 N. 


June 


^ D Sun 
© near 11 
S gr. brilli'cy 


28 2 47 e. 
5 252 m. 

7 ! 


7 


90 vv. 

533N. 


44 


© nea 11 
*> d Sun 
© near ^ 


17 2 9 m. 
23 925 m. 
23 10 33 e. 


n 


5 35 N. 
90 E. 
31 S. , 


11 
„ 


© near ^ 

^ stationary ! 

2 stationary , 


13 3 12 e. ! 

17 4 

21 II 


2 


015 s. 


Dec. 
" i 


S near 2 
© near $ 
© near 2 


28 1 50 m. 

11 11 4 e. 

12 3 22 e. 


9 
2 

9 


1 15 N. 

5 8 N. 

6 40 N. 




© near $ 


22 7 16 e. 1 


i 


331s. 




© near 11 


14 83s e. 


?r 


5 30 N. 






23 2 14 e. ! 


9 


4 40 S. 


11 


© near ^ 
© perigee 


21 9 15 m. 
31 52 e. 


* 


55 s. • 



Explanation of the above Table. 



In the table above it is to be understood 
that the word "war" and the character 6 
(conjunction) are synonymous, and mean 
that the two bodies are nearest each other at 
the time expressed, and that they are then 
on a line running from the North Pole 
through both bodies, and have the same 
right ascension. Gr. elon. means great- 
est elongation, or greatest apparent angular 
distance from the Sun. Stationary means 
that the planet is then without apparent mo- 
tion east or west with respect to the Stars 
and is about to move^in a direction contrary- 



to that it last had. The character 8 indi- 
cates that the planet is opposite the Sun, or 
180 deg., or a half circle, east of it, and rises 
when the Sun sets, and sets when he rises. 
When a planet is a quarter of a circle, or 90 
deg. from the Sun, east or west, it is known 
by n. 

Planetary Characters. — 8 Mercury, 
9 Venus, 3 Mars, n Jupiter, ^ Saturn, Jtf 
Uranus, rfc Neptune, © Moon. 

The above table enables us to find the 
planets throughout the year. 



JANUARY AND FEBRUARY, 1876. 

MOON'S CHANGES-MERIDIAN OF NEW YORK. 



January. 

First Quarter 4th day, ioh. 28m. morn. 

Full Moon 10th day, ih. 27m. morn. 

Third Quarter 18th day, 3h. 55m. morn. 

New Moon 26th day, 8h. 46m. morn. 



February. 

First Quarter 2d day, 8h. 57m. aftern. 

Full Moon 9th day, oh. 51m. aftern. 

Third Quarter 16th day, i2h. om, aftern. 

New Moon 25th day^ ih. 24m. aftern. 



Note.— To ascertain time of Moon's changes for the meridian of Boston, add 12 minutes ; frr 
Washington, subtract 12 ; for Charleston, S.Q., subtract 24 : for Chicago, subtract 54, and generally 
four minutes for each degree of west longitude. 



o 

01 

Q 

Sa 

8 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

A 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

N 

M 

Tu, 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

8 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

■ 

M 

291TU 



a 
o 

o . 

9 
CO _ 



Boston, X. Fn- 
Blnnd, X. Y.j 
Ntate, Mich., 
Wis., Iowa <fc, 
Oregon. 

Sun iSun ,MoonJH. w. 
r se Ret. J sets. | Bost. 

H.M. H M. H. If. H. M. 



X. 'York City, 
I'hila., Conn.,; 
X. J., Penu'a. 
Ohio, lml. «fc 
Illinois. 



Washin'11, 1 Charleston, X . 
Md., Va.J Carolina ,Ten* 
Ky., Mo., 1 1 nessee, Gco'a, 
and Cali- J Ala., Mi*&. «fc 
fornia. Louisiana. 




3Si;'7i4 5 14 

3 5$ 7*3 5*5 

4 5' .7 «|5 *° 
4 11 17 io|s I 8 



5 19 
8J5 20 
7,5 22 
6 523 
5525 
4;5 26 
2 527 
1 15 29 
o 530 



4 16:7 
420I7 
424 7 

4 28^ 

429 ,7 

4 30 ( ;7 

429:17 

4281:7 - 

4 26 ;6 58,5 31 

423 ;6 57:5 33 

420 ,655:534 

416 654 5 35 
4 n;6 52 536 
4 6:1651538 
4 0:650539 
3 53 J648 5 4i 
3 45,16 47 5 42 
3 37: [6 45 5 43 
329 ,644(54=; 
3 20: 6425 46 
310 640:547 
2 59 638:548 
2 4»,:6 37 549 
2 37: 6 36,5 50 



11 59 
mo. 

1 12 

2 29 

3 47 

4 16 



Sun I Sun 
ir.se. J set. 

jH.M.]H,M. 

7 244 44 
724 445 
7 24 446 

724 447 

724 448 

724 4 49 
724 450 

724 451 
724 4 52 
7 2414 53 
723 4 54 
723 4 5 

:7 23 4 5' 
7 22 4 57 

:722.45s 
7 22 4 59 

7 21 5 O 

7 21 5 
17 20,5 
17 ig 5 

7i8'5 
,7 185 

:7i7 5 

:7 16 5 
7 15 5io 
715 511 

,714 512 
7 135 13 
712 515 
7 12 5 16 

ft II 517 



Sun ISun ,Moon; Sun Sun |»00B H. w. 

rise. set. sets. rise. (*set.j sets, jthln 

|H.M I H.M. H. M. I H.M. H M. ill. M. H. -M. 



3 14 

3 59 

4 54! 

5 571 



26 

5 57 9 37 1 

6 41 10 38; 
rise. 11 30J 

6 45 mo. 

7 54| o 14 
9 3i o 59 

1 381 

2 17 

2 56 

3 38 

4 25 



7 10 5 1 

7 9 5 19 
7 5 20 
6 522 
5 523 
4 5 24 
3 525 
5 26 
5 28 
5 29 
5 3o 



10 10 

11 17 
mo. 

24! 

1 261 

2 341 

3 34! 

4 26; 

5 « 

5 43 . 

6 13 10 6 ( 

6 38; 10 53 : 
sets, n 30 

7 29'e. 10: 

8 41! o 47 

9 52 1 25 
11 3! 2 6, 



£ 17 
6 19 



9 16 



658 531 
6 57 5 32 
656 533 
654 5 34 
6 53 5 36 
65i!537i 
650 538 
640 540, 
648 541: 
646 543 
6 45 5 44 
6 43 5 45, 
642 547: 
640 548 
638 549: 
6 37 5 5o, 
6 35 5 5M 
634 55 2 , 




I 11 33ir6 33 



8 

4 5 9 
4 5 10 
4:5 11 
45 12 
4 5 I2 
4 5 13 
45M 
4 5 IS 
3 516 

3 l\l 

5 19 
5 20 
521 
5 22 
523 
524 

526 

6 59 5 27 
6 50 5 28 
6 18 5 29 
6.58.5 30, 
657 531 
6 5°:5 32| 

656,532 
65*^533; 
6 54 ! 5 34 1 

!6 53:5 35| 
652536! 
6 51 537i 
6 5o'5 38| 
6 49,5 39 
648:540 
6 47,5 41 
6 46 142 

6 46: 5 43 
6 45:5 44 
6 44(5 45 
6 43!5 46 
6 42 ! 5 46 
64i;547| 
640,1481 
6 39 5 49[ 
638:550; 
6 37 5 5o 
636,551: 
6 35 5 52 
6.34 5 53 
6 32;5 54 
6 31 '5 54 
630 5 55 
6 29 ,5 16 
628:557 



9 47 

10 46 

11 46 
mo. 

46 

1 53 

3 2 

4 14 

5 29 

6 37 
rise. 

7 3 

8 11 

9 16 

10 16 

11 14 
mo. 

13 



10 21 

11 3 
11 47 
e. 23 

1 25 

2 22 

3 25 

4 34 

6 48 

7 44 
837 
9 26 

10 12 

10 54 

11 36 
ino. 

o 20 I 



1 10 1 8 



6 35 
sets. 

6 41; 

7 42; 

8 40: 

9 37 
10 41 



6 31 

7 18 

l& 

8 38 

9 17 

9 55 
10 34 



11 43 11 14 
mo. 11 59 

52 e. 14 

1 59, * 

3 12; 3 

4 19: 4 



57 



rise. 

6 56 



26 
37 
3« 
30 
14 
S 8 8 50 

8 59 ! 9 38 

9 59 IO 17. 

10 19 10 36 

11 58-11 38 
mo. mo. 



o 57 
2 o 

2 16; 

3 48 1 

4 36 

5 13 

5 49, 

6 21 
sets. ! 

iSi 

9 3» 9 
10 44 10 



2^ 
17 
19 



3 

4 20 

5 l6 

6 6 

6 53 

7 30 

8 10 
847 

i 



MARCH AND APRIL, 1876. 



MOON'S CHANGES-MERIDIAN OF NEW YORK. 



March. 

First Quarter 3d day, 

Full Moon 10th day. 

Third Quarter 17th day, 

New Moon 25th day, 



4h. 52m. morn, 
ih. 16m. morn. 
8h. 28m. aftern. 
3I1. i6in. aftern. 



April. 

First Quarter 1st day, 

Full Moon 8th day, 

Third Quarter... .16th day, 

New Moon 24th day, 

First Quarter 30th day, 



ih. 16m. morn. 
2h. 43m. aftern. 
3I1. 41m. aftern. 
2h. 7m. morn, 
^h. 31m. aftern.i 



MARCH. 



APRIL 



J= 


M 


c 



a 


<d 


. 









Vm 


u. 1 


«* 


O 





c ^ 


>> 

at 


fr 


3 
en 


Q 


Q 


H. H S 


1 


W 


12 12 25 


2 


Tb 


12 12 12 


3 


Fr 


, I 2 1 1 S9 


4 


Sa 


12 11 46 





M 


12 1132 


M 


'l2 II 17 


7 


Tu 


12 U 3 


8 


W 


12 IO47 


Q 


Th 


12 IO H2 


10 


Kr 


12 10 l6 


11 


Sa 


12 9 60 


12 


g 


12 9 43 


H 


M ! 


12 9 20 


14 


Tu 


12 £ » 

ir2 e 52 


\l 


W 


Th 


12 63s 


z 


Fr 


il2 817: 


Sa 


12 759 


19 


8 1 


|I2 74I| 


20 


Al 


12 723! 


21 


Tu 


12 7 5 


22 


W 


12 647| 


2S 


Th 


12 629 


24 


Fr 


12 6 IO 


2S 


Sa 


,12 5 52: 


20 


s 


12 5 34; 


27 


M 


I12 5 15I 


28 


Tu 


12 4 571 


2Q 


W 


|i2 4 39; 


HO 


Th 


12 4 20, 


3' 


Fr, 


12 4 2 


I 


Sa 


12 344) 

12 3 26 


2 


H 


3 


M 


12 3 8! 


4 


Tu 


12 250 


5 


W 


12 233! 


6 


lh 


12 2 is 


7 


Fr 


12 1 58, 


8 


Sa 


12 141 


9 


« 


12 I 2S 


10 


Al | 


12 I 8 


11 


Tu 


12 O 52 


12 


vv 


12 O35 


•3 


Th 


12 21 


'4 


Fr 


12 6 


a 


Sa 


II 59 5°' 


* 1 


II 59 36 


3 


Al 


II 59 28 


Tu 


11 59 8 


iq 


VV 1 


11 5855I 


20 


Th 


11 S842! 


21 


Fr 


11 5830. 


22 


k»a 


11 58 18 


23 


s 


11 58 7! 


24 


M 


11 57 56; 


»s 


Tu 


11 5746 


26 


VV 


11 5736 


27 


lh 


11 57 26 : 


28 


Fr 


11 57i7i 


29 


£ a i 


11 57 9- 


30 


« 1 


11 57 I, 



Boston, X. En- 
glnnd, K". Y. 
Male, Mich., 
Wis., Iowa <fe 
Oresron. 



Sun Sun Moon|H. w. 
r se { Ret. ; gets. Bost. 

H-M.JH M H. M. H. M. 



6 36 , s 50 mo. 

634 551 j o 16 

633 552 I 36 

63i;5 54 2 48 

629555 3 48 
628 . s 561 4 37 
626 5 s8j 5 16 

6 25 5 59 
623 

1 rise. 

2, 7 50 

3 

4 
6 



59| 5 47 
o 6 14 



8 58 

10 5 

11 11 
mo. 

o 18 



6216 
6 19 6 
6 176 
6 16 6 
6 14 6 
6 12 6 
6 10 6 
6 9 6 9 1 21 
6 7,6 10, 2 17 
6 s 6 1 1 1 3 4 
636 121 3 42 
26 14! 4 13 
6 o;6is 441 
559616 5 3 
5 57 617] 5 24 
5 55 6 19 sets. 
5 53 620, 7 37 
5 S2 621! 8 si 
5 5o 622 9 57 
548 623 11 24 

1 5 46 6 24 mo. 

5544.625 o 41 



2 49i 

3 4o| 

4 40] 

lA\ 

9 20' 

10 21 1 

11 6 

11 46 
mo. I 

23! 

1 1 

1 41 

2 20 



3 3 

3 5i 

4 45 

IS 

It 

9 34 

10 18 
1059 

11 37 
e. 16 

S9 

1 44 

2 35 1 

3 33 



5 43 6 26 
5 42 6 28 
540)6*9 

5 38 6 30 
5 36 631 
5 34 632 
5 32 633 
5 3i 634 
S 29 63s 
5 27 636 
5 26 6 37 
5 24 6 38 
523 640 
521 641 
S 19 642 
5 i 8 6 43 
516 644 
514 645 
5 13 6 47 
511 648 
5 10 6 49 
5 8 6 so 
5 6 6 si 
556 S2 
5 3 6 53 
5 2654 
5 165s 
4 S9 6 s6 
4 tf 6 58 
4 56 6 59! 



1 45 

2 39 

3 17 

3 50 

4 16 
4 39 



4 39 

5 52, 

I 4 

8 10 

9 5 
. 9 53 

5 o 10 36 
rise. '11 15 

7 47 11 52, 

8 56 mo. I 

10 1 o 29 

11 10: I 10 

mo. 1 42 
o 81 2 37 

59 3 26 

1 40; 4 18 

2 11 



BT. Xork City, 
Phi la., Conn., 
N. «!., JPenu'a. 
Ohio, lad. «fc 
Illinois. 



Sun I Sun Moon 
rise, set.! sets. 

H.M. |H.M. |h. M. 

mo. 

14 

1 29 

2 40 

3 4i 

4 30 

5 11 

5 44 

6 11 
rise. 

7 49 

8 55 

10 1 

11 6 
mo. 

14 

1 14 

2 9 

2 57 

3 3 s ; 

4 8 

4 37 

5 1 

S 22 

6ets. 

7 35 

847 

9 5i 
11 17 
mo. 

o 35 



N.Y. 



6341552 
6 32 i 5 53 

63i'554 
6205555 
628(556 
6275557 
625^59 
6 24 6 o 
622 6 1 
6206 2 
6186 3 
6166 4 
6156 5 
6 136 6 
6126 7 
6io ; 6 8 
6 96 9 
6 76 10 
6. 56 11 
6 3 6 12 
6 26 13 
6 16 14 
6 06 is 
S 58 616 
5 56 6 17 
S 54 6 18 
5 53619 
5 52 6 20 
5 50 621 
5 48 622 
546 623 



Washin'n, 
Md, \ r a., 
I£y., Mo., 
and C'ali- 
fornia. 



Sun jSun Moon 

rise. set. sets. 

H.M. H.M. H. M. I 



Charleston, ~S.i 

t aro!in;i,'l>n- 
nessce, Geo'a, 
Ala., Miss. «fe 
l-oniszana. 

Sun Sun .Moon h. w. 
rise. set. sets. ;C'h'lD 

H.M. HM.'H. M. H. M. 



mo. 5633 

26 1631 

1 271:630 

2 38jj£*8 

3 53|j627 

5 9|j626 

6 I3i 624 

'623 



7 7| 623 
748' 621 

8 29;;6iq 



61 
616 



29 
9 10 

9 47 .,, 

10 23 615 

11 3 613 
11 48 6 12 



6 10 
6 9 



6 11 



2 41 

3 4 7 8 
3 37 8 1 

3 48 ( 8 S2 

4 45 9 39 

5 32 10 42 
sets. 11 7 

9 4 11 52 

10 24 e. 39 

11 35 1 33 
mo. 2 31 

c 34 3 31 
1 18! 4 36, 



5 45 
544 
5 42 
5 40 
5 38 
5 36 
5 34 
5 33 
5 31 
5 29 
528 
526 
5 2S 
5 24 
522 
521 
5 19 

5 16 
5 14 
513 

5 11 
5 10 
5 9 



6 24 
626 
627 
628 
629 
630 
631 



1 37 

2 32 

3 11 

3 46 

4 14 
4 37 
5 



632 rise. 
6 33 7 44 
634! 8 si 

6 351 9 55 
636,11 3 
63 

63 



e. 37 

1 32 

2 33 6 

3 33! |6 5 

4 34i|6 3 

5 30! i6 2 

6 20 6 1 

7 46 o 

7 42) 5 58 

8 19 5 56 

9 "j 5 55 
94v 554 

10 28 5 53 

11 17 |5 Si 
mo. ]|5 49 

o 19; 5 47 



S ^3 mo. 
554' o 8 
5 SS 1 22 
5 5 6 j 2 32 
5 57 3 33 
5 58 4 24 

5 59, 5 6 

6 oj 5 40 
169 
2 rise. 
3; 7 48 

4 852 

5 9 57 

6 11 1 
7'ino. 

8 o 5 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

u 

6 10 
611 
6 12 
6 13 
6 14 
61 



2 50 

3 29J 

4 3 
4 33| 

* X |l 4 5§ i 
6 161 5 21 

6 17 sets. 

6 181 7 32I 

6 19J 8 43! 

620; 9 47; 

6 20 11 11 

621 mo. I 

622 o 26 



6 28 S S8 
6 27 5 58 
6 26 s 59 
62s 6 o 
6 24 6 1 
6 23 6 1 
6 22 6 2 
6 21 6 3 
6 20 6 3 
6 19 6 
6176 
616 6 
6 14 6 
6136 
611 6 
6 10 6 
6 



11 51 10 40, 
mo. in 40 

1 2 e. 4c 

2 10 1 52 
11 

4 
5o 
29 



3 

P 

6 2 

7 ( 

7 4C 



6 39 
640 
641 
642 
644 

6 45 
646 

* 4 

64 



1 26, 

2 38 

3 49 

4 54 

5 5o. 

6 39 ! 

7 21! 

Z571 

9 16 

9 56 

10 36 

on 19 

mo. le. ii 



51 

1 33 1 

2 6 

2 36 

3 1 
3 3S 

3 48 

4 46 

5 34 
6 49 ! sets. 
6 50, 8 58 , 
6 51 10 1710 i_ 
6 52 11 2711 14 
6 S3 mo. I mo. 
6 54j o 27 o 17 
655I 1 ill 1 23 



2 57, 

3 53 

4 46 

iS 

726 

7 49 

8 35, 
9 



546623 

5 45 624 
! 5 43 6 2s 
541 6 20 
5 40 6 27 
,538628 
1 5 36 6 29 
15 356 30 
533 631 
5 31 632 
530 633 
528 634 

J527 635 
;526 636 
15 24 637 
523638 

522 6 39 
5 20 6 40 
1519 641 
517 642 
516 643 
514 644 
5 13 6 45 
512 646 

: 5 10 6 46 

5 8 6 48. 

5 6649 

,5 5 650 

S 3 6 Si 



6 

7 
8 

6? 

6 10 
6,6 n 
s 6 n 
3 6 12 
2 6 13 
1 614 
5 59 6 14 
5 s8 6 is 
5 56 6 18 
5 5S 6 16 
554 617 
5 53 6i8 
5 52 6 18 
550 619 



1 29; 

2 2s! 

3 6 

3 41 

4 11 1 
4 36j 

rise, j 
7 40; 
846; 
9 29 

10 56. 

11 52: 

mo. I 

43 

1 26 

2 o 
2 32! 

2 58 

3 33 

3 47 

4 47 

5 36 
sets. 

852 
10 10 
n 19 
mo. 

20 

1 5 



3 
4 
4 
"i 

6 3 
rise. 

7 43 
844 

9 45 

10 4S IO 2C 

11 45'n ; 
mo. 1 11 51 

45|mo. 

1 39I o 4; 

2 28! 1 4; 



9 
9 4' 



5 49 
548 
5 46 
5 45 
544 
5 42 
5 4i 
5 39 
5 38 
5 37 
5 35 
5 34 
5 33 
5 32 
5 3i 
5 30 

5 2 2 
528 

527 
525 
524 
523 
5-22 
521 
520 

51 2 
516 
515 
5U 



6 20 
6 21 
6 21 
6 22 
623 
623 
6 24 
6 25 
62s 
626 
627 



3 9 

4 47 
4 21 

4 49 

5 17 
sets. 

7 26 

8 32 

9 3i 
10 51 
md. 

o 4 



3 29 

4 2 

4 32 

5 1 
rise. 

7 30 

8 32 

. , 9 3i 
627 10 35 
6 28 11 30 
6 29 mo. 
o 21 



630 
630 
631 
632 
632 
6 33 
634 
6 35 
6 35 
636 _ 
6 37j 8 34 
637! 9 49 
6 38 10 57 
639 11 S9 
639 mo. 
640: 1 47 



1 7 

1 42 

2 17 

2 47 

3 27 

3 45 

4 50 

sets 



2 S! 

3 4S 

4 4' 

6 ii 

6 st 

7 3; 

8 ii 

8 s< 

9 4- 

10 3; 

11 3! 



e. 3< 

1 S 

3 • 

4 11 

5 

6 31 

7 1 

l\ 
9 I 
94 

10 3 

11 2 
mo 



1 1 

2 1 
3 

4 
4 ! 

II 

7 
l\ 

V. 



6 



MAY AND JUNE, 1876. 



MOON'S CHANGES-MERIDIAN OF NEW YORK. 



May. 

?ull Moon 8th day, 4I1. 57m. morn. 

Third Quarter. ... 16th day, 8h. 31m. morn. 

•Jew Moon 23d day, xoh. 29m. morn. 

Thst Quarter 30th day, oh. 52m. morn. 



June. 

Full Moon 6th day, 7I1. 41m. aftern. 

Third Quarter 14th day, ioh. 18m. aftern. 

New Moon 21st day, 5*1. 21m. aftern. 

First Quarter. 28th day, ioh. 18m. morn. 



3 M] 

C 4) 

Si* 

Q'Q 

1 M 

2 Tu 

3 w 

4 Th 

5 Fr 

6 Sa. 

7 «• 

8 M 

9 Tu 
10 W i 
n Th 

12 Fr 

13 Sa 

14 H J 

15 M ! 
18 Tu 

17 W 

18 Th 

19 Fr 

20 Sa 

21 s I 

22 M ! 

23 Tu 
24. W 

25 Th 

26 Fr 

27 Sa 

28 , .** 1 

29 ; M 

30 Tu 

31 W 



a 
o 
o . 

-S 

3 

CO 



Boston, X. En- 
gland, ST. X. 
State, Mich., 
Wis., Iowa cfc 
Ore«ron. 



|-l v 



Sun iSun Moon h. w. 
r se set. ! sets. I Boat. 

H.M.;H.M.:H. M. H. M. 



I Th 


l T 


2 Fr 




3 Sa 




4 S ill 


5 M 1 


6 Tu 1 


7 £ 1 


8 Th 1 


9 Fr 1 


10 Sa 1 


II S 1 


12 M 1 


13 Tu 1 


14 W 1 


15 Th 1 

16 Fr 1 


17 Sa 1 


18 * 1 


19 M 1 


20 Tu 1 


21 W 1 


22 Th 1 


23 Fr 1 


24 Sa 1 


251S 1 


26 M 1 


27 Tu 1 

28 : W 1 


29 Th 1 


3oiFr 





16 54 4 55 
56 47i4 53 
5640 14 52 
56 35; |4 50 
56 29: 4 4Q 
S62S 4 48 
S6 19! 4 47 
56 174 46 
5 6l 4! 4 45 
56 i?l[4 44 
56 1014 43 

l6 Qi !4 42 

56 8 [4 41 
56 8 ! 44° 
56 8 '439 
\6 9 '4 30 

56 13 U38 
"56 17I438 
5620 435 
5623 ;4 34 
5*028 433 
s6 33 4 32 
5638 ,4 32 
56 44 '4 31 
5651 14 3° 



1 52 

1 2 22 



5 39 

6 43 

7 40 
832 
9 18 

9 5i 
10 44 



IT. York City,! 
Phi la., Conn., 1 
N. «!., Pena'a. 
Ohio, Intl. «fc 
Illinois. 



2 43 

3 3 5 

4 3 25 
5j 3 45 
6 i 4 7, 

, 7 rise. j 1 1 22 
7 8; 8 s6imo. 
7 9l 9 56 
7 10.19 52 

7 rtjll 37 
7 12 mo. 

7 13 o 10 
7 14 o 42 

1 id 1 6 

7 18; 1 29 

7 17 1 49 



46 

1 29 

2 16 

3 1 

3 49 

4 39' 

6 23 



5658 
57 5 
57 13 
57 19 



429 
i4 29 
|4 28 
I427 



57 30 4 26 



7 18 2 9 7 16 
7 19! 2 32 8 8 
7 20 2 57! 8 59 
721 3 27; 9 50 
7 22 sets. 10 43 
7 23 9 15 11 35 
7 24 10 21 e. 30 
725 11 iii 1 38 
7 26 1 1 52 j 2 46 
7 27 mo. | 3 23 

7 28, O 2S 4 19 

7 28 o 49 5 13 
729 1 11 6 8 



57 39 

57 4» 

31 

S819 
"1829 

58 40 
S852 

59 3 
59 15 
v) 27 
59 39 
59 52 

o 5 
o 18 
031 
o 43' 

57 

1 10 
1 23 
1 p 

1 49 

2 2 
2 15 
2 27 
2 40 

2 52 

3 5 

328' 



426 7 

4 25; 7 

4 25I7 
424 7 

4 2 4;7 
4 237 
423 7 
4 23|7 
422 7 
422 7 
422I7 

4 22'7 
4227 

4 227 
4 227 
422 7 
4 22J7 
4 22 7 
4 22,7 
4227 
4 237 
4 237 
4 237 
4 23 7 
4 237 
4 237 
4 24(7 
4 247 
4 247 
4 25! 7 



1 3i 

1 5i 

2 ii 

2 37 

3 4 



33 rise. 

34 8 47 

35 9 34 

35 10 17 

36 10 43 

36 10 59 

37 " 32 

37 " 53 

38 mo. 

38 o 12 
38; o 33 

39 ° 54 
3Pl x 23 
39 1 <;6 
39 2 39 
39 sets. 

39 9 1 

40 9 45 
40 10 21 
40 10 50 
40 11 14 
40 11 35 
40 11 55 
401110. 
40; o 18 



7 1 

7 52 

8 42 

9 29 

10 13 

11 o 
11 42 
mo. 

o 26 
111 

2 46 

3 18 

4 o 
4 45, 

S 34 
27 

7 23 
825 
9 25 

10 27 

11 27 

0. 23 



4 596S6 

4 57 f 57 
4 5,6658 

4 54 6 59 
4 53 7 o 
4 52,7 1 
4 5i|7 2 
4507 3 

4 49 7 4 

4 487 5 

4 4717 6 

4467 7 

4 457 8 

4 44l7 9 
4437 10 

4 42:7 11 
4 42|7 11 
44i;7 12 
440 7 13 
4 4°7 14 
4 397 15 
4 3 8| 7 16 
4 37i7 17 
4 37:7 18 
4 .6 7 JO 

43*1 1$ 
4 357 20 
4 34;7 2i 
4 34 7 22 
4 33 7 23 
4 327 23 



Sun Sun MoontH.w. 
rise.! set. ! sets. \ .Y. 

H.H |H.M, Ih. M. H.M. 
2 _ 28| 

3 29 

4 25 J 

5I7| 

6 4: 

6 471 

7 28 

8 t,\ 

8 4 8| 

9 32 1 



Washin'n, 
Md„ Va, 
Ky, Mo., 
and Call, 
fornla. 



Sun 
rise. 

R.M. 



Sun 1 Moon 
set. I sets. 
h.m.'h. m. 



2 19 

2 42 

3 5| 
3 28; 

3 47j 

4 11 
rise . j 

8 sol 

9 491 

10 44! 10 

11 30 la c,8 
mo. in 46 

o 4ie. y 

37 

1 3 
1 27 

1 49 

2 9 4 53 

2 33 k 4 i 

3 o 6 36 
3 31 7 27 

sets. 8 17 
9 8 9 17 

10 14 10 13 

11 5 1 1 i 9 
11 47 mo. 
mo. o 8 

O 2l| I 6 

47; I 59 

1 IO: 2 54 



5 2( k 

5 16 
506 

4 ^8 6 
4 57 6 
4 56,6 
4 55 6 
4 54 6 
4 537 
4 527 
45IJ7 
4 507 
4 497 
4 48J7 
447 7 
4467 
4467 
4 457 
4 44 7 
4 44 7 
4 437 
4 43 7 
4 427 
4 427 
441.7 
4 40,7 
4 40,7 
4 39 7 
4 39.7 
4387 
4 377 



1 43 

2 16 

2 40 

3 5 
3 27 

3 50 

4 15 
59 rise. 

oj 843 
1 1 9 42 

2; 10 36 

3 11 23 
4,n 58 
5jmo. 
5j o 31 
7 o 59 
71 I 24 

«j 147 
929 
10 2 35 

10 3 3 

11 3 36 

12 sets. 
13! 9 o 
14] 10 7 

15 10 59 
ioin 42 

16 mo. 
o 18 

45 

1 9 



4 32 
4 3i 
4 3i 

4 30 

:4 3o 
|4 29 

429 
•» 2 9 

1428 
4 28 

|4 28 
1 28 
I428 
I428 
428 
4 28 
J4 28 
i4 28 
428 

4 29 
4 29 

429 
14 29 
4 29 
4 29 
4 30 
4 30 
4 30 
I431 



3 36, 

4 371 

6 15 



7 24| 1 31 

7 25 1 53 

7 26, 2 15! 

7 ?6; .2 41 

7 27 3 10 

7 27 rise.! 
7 28 8 39 
7 29 9 27-1 
7 29 10 18; 
7 30 10 42ilo 36 
7 30 10 56 n '18 
7 31 i 1 1 29 ! e. 3 



13 



731" 5i 

7 32 mo 

7 32 1 o ] 



47 

1 32 

2 20 

3 13 

4 « 

5 10 

6 11 

7 12 

8 10 
9 



7 32; o 34 
7 331 o 56 
7 33 1 26 
7 33 2 1 
7 331 2 45 
7 34 sets. 
7 34J 8 54 
7 34! 9 3:) 10 6 
734:10 17 10 54 
7 34 10 48 n 45 
7 35 11 13 mo. 
7 35 11 35] o 33 
7 35 11 57 1 28. 
7 35 mo. 2 12 
7 35 1 o 20] 3 5 



4 37 
4 37 
436 
436 
436 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 34 
434 
|4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
14 34 
|4 34 
14 34 
14 34 
|4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 36 
4 36 
4 36' 
4 37: 



7 19J 1 32 

7 19 1 1 55 
7 20 2 19 
7 20, 2 46 
7 21 3 16 
7 21 rise. 
7 22! 8 31 

7 23! 9 19 
72310 4 
7 24 10 32 
7 24 10 51 

7 25.11 26 
725 II 49 

7 26 mo. 
7 26 on 
" ' o 34 

59 

1 30 

2 7 
2 52 

sets. 



7 26! 
727! 
727: 
7271 
727 

7 2? 



7 28 8 47 
7 28 9 34 
7 28 10 13 
7 29 10 43 
7 29 n 12 
7 29 11 36 
729 n 58; 
7 29 mo. ! 
7 29' o 23 



Charleston, ~N. 
Carolina, "Ten- 
nessee, Geo'a, 
Ala.., Miss. «fe 
Louisiana. 



Sun Sun; Moon h. w. 
rise. ! set.! sets. ICn'ln 
h.mJhm.Ih. m.'h. m. 



5 13 641 
5 12 6 42 
5 11 643 
5 10 6 44 
5 10 645 

5 Veil 

6647 
5648, 
5649, 
4 649; 
3650 
26 51; 
2651! 
1 16 52 
- ^653 

5 °6 53 

5 06^4 
4 59 6 55 
4 5 8 ;6 55 
4 58;6 56 
4 57 657 
4 57:6 57 
4 56:658 
456 6 58 
4 55j 6 59 
4 55 7 o 
4 557 o 
4 34 7 1 
4 547 1 



4 54 7 
4 537 
4 53 
4 53 
4 53 
4 52 
4 52 
4 52 
4 52 
4 52 
4 52 
4 52 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 52 7 
4 53 7 
4 53 7 
4 53 7 
4 53 7 
4 53 7 
4 53 7 
4 54 7 
4 54 7 
4 54 7 
4 557 



2 1 36 



9 44 
10 46 



o 37 



JULY A] 


ND 

:s-i 


AUGUST, 1876. 


i - 

MOON' 


3 CHANGE 


MERIDIAN OF 


NEW YORK. 

August. 


July. 




Full Moon 6th day, ioh. 42m. morn. 

Third Quarter 14th day, Qh. om. morn. 




Third Quarter 12th day, 5I1. 3m. aftern. 


New Aloon . 
, First Quart* 


20th c 


ay, nh. 50m. aftern. 
ay, ioh. 23m. aftern. 


New M 
First Q 




1 day, 7h. 30m. morn. 
1 day, ih. 22m. aftern. 




uarter 26L 


I 


A 


.si 


c i 

. 


Boston, X. En- X. Yorlc City, 


Washin'n, j Charleston, X. : 


1 




gland, ST. X. 


I'hlla., Conn., 


lid, Vii., 


l aroliua, r JTeii- 


I 





u 


' £*u 


.*»tnte, Mich., 


ST. J. JPeun'a, 


KLy., Mo., 


| nessee, Oeo'a, 






* 


.-. rt 


Wis., Iowa. «fc 


Ohio, Iud. «fc 


1 and Cali- 


Ala., Mi»s. «fc 


1 
; 


O 




dp 

r 


Oregon. 


llllnoiM. 


{ fornia. 


Louisiana. 


Sun jSun Moon 


H. W. 


Sun Sun 


Moon u. w. 


Sun iSun Moon 


|Sun Sun .Moon h. w. 




co 


r se I set. ! sets. 


Bost. 


[rise. 


set. 


sets. 


N.Y. 


(rise. set. Bete. 


rise.! set. sets. ( h'in 




D 


P 


H. M 8. 


H.M. SI M H. M. 


H. M. 


jH.M. 


H.M. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


H.M. H.M. H. M. 


H.M. HM.H. M. H. mT3 


JULY. 


1 


Sa 


12 3 40 


4 2j 7 40; 40 


7 10 


431734 


44 


358 


4 37 7 29 48 


4 55 7 11 1 1 3 10 


2 


M 


12 351 


4 26 7 40 1 6 


» 7|U32734 


1 10 4 51 


4 37 729; 1 171(4 55 7« 1 33 4 7 
4 33 7 29' 1 46; 4 56 7" 2 6 5 Oi 


3 


M 


12 4 1 


427740 1 32 


9 4 33 7 34 


1 39 5 45 


1 


4 


Tu 


12 4 13 


427739 2 19 


9 51:14 33.7 33 


2 24 6 37 


438 728 2 33 456 711 2 S3 551] 


7 


w 


12 423 


428 739 3 4 


10 40 4 347 33 


3 13 7 24 

rise.' 8 12 

8 39 8 53 


4 39 7 28 3 19(4 57 7 11 342 640 


Th 
Fr 


12 433 

12 442 


4 29 7 39 rise . 
4 29; 7 39 8 45 
4 3° 7 3° 9 1? 


11 25 
mo. 


14 35 7 33 
14 357 33 


4 40 7 28 rise.! 4 57 7 11 nse.; 7 25 , 
440728 833: 418711 8 16 8 8' 


1 


8 


Sa 


12 4 51 


8 


14 36 7 32 


9 8 9 33 


441 727 9 3 | 458 710 8 49 8 47 ! 


i 


9 


IS 


12 5 


4 3i 7 38 9 36 


• 47 


4 37 7 32 


9 33 10 11 


442727. 9 30 '4 59 7 10. 9 19 927. 


10 


>r 


12 5 8 


4-2 738 9 56 


1 27 


'4 37 7 32 


9 54 10 48 


442 727; 9 52 


5 7 10 9 4; 10 6. 


t 


11 


Tu 


12 S 16 


4 33 7 37 10 16 


2 6 


438 731 


10 is 11 26 


4 43 7 26 10 is 
4 44 7 26 10 38 


(5 07 10 10 12 10 44 


; 


12 


\v 


12 S 24 


4 33 7 37 10 37 


2 44 


!4 39;7 3i 


10 38 e. 8 


5 17 9 10 40 11 23 


_ 


13 


Th 


12 53I 


4 34 7 36 10 56 


3 23 


4401730 


10 58- 51 


445725 11 


5 1 7 9 11 6 mo. 




14 


Fr 


12 5 37 


4 357 36 11 21 


4 41 l4 4°7 3o 


11 21 1 1 40 


445725 " 27 
446 724 12 


5 27 11 38 
5378 mo. 


4 




3 


Sa 


12 5 43 


4 3& 7 35 11 51 


4 53 4 417 29 


11 57| 2 35; 


53 




s 


12 549 


4 37 7 34 mo. 


5 49 

6 50 


442 7 29 mo. | 3 36 


4 47 724 mo. 
448723 41 


5 3 7 8; 14 


1 49 




17 


M 


12 5 54 


4 37 7 34 29 


443728 


33 4 46 


15 47 810 


2 so 




18 


Tn 


12 559 


4 38 7 33 1 15 


8 1 


4 44 ! 7 28 


1 22 5 59 


(4 49 7 2 3i 1 30 


5 4 7 7 1 51 


4 I 1 




19 


w 


12 6 3 
12 6 5 


4 39 7 32 2 17 


9 13 


4 457 27 


2 25! 7 6 


4 50 7 22| 2 32 


5 5 7 7| 2 55 


V 3 

6 20 




20 


lb 


4 40 7 32 sets. 


10 20 


4 4517 26 


sets.! 8 2 


4 w 7 21 sets. 


5 57 6 sets. 
5 67 6 ! 7 52 




21 


Fr 


12 6 9 


441 7 3 1 8 16 


11 22 


1446726 


8 n| 8 58 


4 51 7 2ij 8 6 


III 




33 


Sa 


12 611 


4 42 7 30 8 48 e. 12 


|447 725 


8 45 9 47 


4 52 7 20j 8 42 


5 7 7 5 831 




23 


M 


12 6 r^ 


4 43 7 29 9 15 


1 3 


4 48i7 24 


9 1310 31 


(4 53 7 J 9: 9 n 


5 7 7 5 9 6 


9 3 




24 


M 


12 614 


4 44 7 28: 9 37 


I 47 


!4 49i7 23 


9 37 11 13 


4 53 7 J 8 9 37 


5 8 7 4 9 36 


9 47 




-5 


Tu 


12 6 it; 


4 45 727 9 58 


2 30 


4 5°j7 22 


10 11 57 


4 54 7 J 7 10 1 


! 5 8 ;7 3 10 5 


10 30 


1 


2b 


VT 


12 615 


4 4*3 7 20 10 24 


3 12 


4 5 I !7 2i 


10 30 mo. 


4 55 7 1 7'io 32 


5 97 3iio 40 


II 12 




27 


Th 


12 6 14 


4 47 7 25 10 40 


3 55 


4 52 7 20 


10 43 41 


4567 16 10 47 


5107 2 10 59 


11 55 




28 


Fr 


12 5 13 


4 48 7 24 11 8 


4 43 


4 52 7 19 


n 13: 1 30 


4567 15(11 19 


5 11 7 1 11 34 


e. 43 




29 


Sa 


12 b :i 


4 49 7 23 11 39 


S 36 


4 53:7 18 


11 45i 2 22 


4 57 7*4 11 52 


5 11 7 mo. 


1 36 




30 


1 


12 6 9 


4 50 7 22 mo. 


6 36 


|4- 5-4 7 18 


mo. 3 22 


4 58 7 14 mo. 


5 127 10 


2 36 




31 


M 


12 6 5 


45 1 7 « 15 


7 36 


455 717 

1 


22! 4 21 


4 59 7 13! 29 


5 13 6 59 50 


3 36 


AN. 


I 


Tu 


12 6 2 


4 52 7201 1 


8 34 


4 56 ( 7 16 


1 8 5 19 


5 vH * x * 


5 146 e;8 i 38 


4 34 


2 


W 


12 5 57 


4 53 7 19J 1 55 


9 29 


4 57)7 15 

4«7 14 


206 15 


k 1(7 ii' 2 9 


S^f^ 2 31 


5 29 




3 


"1 h 


12 5 =,2 


4 547 m 2 55 


10 19 


3 l 17 5; 


! 5 J (7 IO 3 8 


515656, 3 28 


6 19 




4 


Fr 


12 5 47 


4 55 7 10 4 1 


n 5 


|4 59!7 12 


4 7 7 48 


5 27 9 4 12 
537 8 rise. 


5 16 6 55I 4 29 


7 5 




8a 


12 541 


4 56 7 15 rise. 


11 46 


15 07 11 


rise. 8 271 


5 16 6 54 rise. 


7 46 

8 21 | 






*; 


12 s 26 


4 57 7 14 8 2 
4 58 7 13 8 23 


mo. 


5 * 


7 10 


8097 


5 47 7i 7 57 


5 i7 653I 7 50 
(518652 8 17 




7 


M 


21 


15 2 


7 9 


8 22 9 44 


5 5>6 8 21 
15 87 4 8 41 


9 




8 


Tu 


12 5 i 9| 


4 59 7 11 8 41 


1 


5 3 


7 I 


8 41 10 19 


5 18 651 8 42 


9 34 




9 


\Y 


12 5 10: 


5 7 10 9 1 


1 34 


5 4 


7 6 


9 2 11 2 


5 7.7 3 9 4 
5 87 2 9 20 


5 19 6 50 9 8 10 10 




10 in 


12 5 1 


5 17 9 9 24 
5 27 8, 9 50 


2 10 


\$ 5 


7 5 


9 26 11 32 


5 20 649 9 38 10 48 




11 Fr 


12 4 51 


2 48 


5 6 


7 4 


9 54C 18 


5 9 7 9 58 


5 21 6 4810 11 


11 32 




12 Sa 


12 441 


5 3 7 7 10 24 


3 32 


lli 


7 3 


10 29, 1 10 


5 10 6 59 10 35 


5 ax §47 10 42 


mo. 




13 *, 


12 431 


5 47 5 11 6 


4 23 


7 1 


11 13! 2 12 


5 11 6 58 11 20 


5 22 6 46 1 1 1 no 


23 

1 26 




14 M 


12 4 10 
12 4 8 


5 5 7 4 11 59 
5 07 2 mo. 


ii 


5 9 


I ° 


mo. ) 3 24 


5 12 6 17 mo. 


5 23 641 mo. 




15 'l'u 


5 10 


658 


7 4 39 


513655 14 


"523644 


37 


2 38 


. 


16 W 

17 Th 

18 Fr 


12 356 


5 7 7 0; 1 8 
5 8 6 s,g 2 29 
5 9 6 57 3 48 


7 54' 5 n 


656 


1 *5 5 52 


5 14 6 531 1 22 


524 643 


1 44 


3 54 




12 3 43 


9 7 


5 12 


6 55 


2 35 6 57: 


515652! 2 42 
S 16.6 50 3 s8 


525 642 


3 10 


$ 7 




12 330 


10 11 


5 I3I&53 


3 53 ; 7 50 1 


525 641 


4 12 


6 11 




19 Sa 


12 3 16 


5 10 6 55 sets. 


11 7 


5 14 6 u sets.i 8 36 


5 17 6 49 sets. 
5 18 6 48 7 36 


5 26 640 sets. 


7 7 




20 s 

21 M 


12 3 2 


5 " 65-. 7 38 
5 12 6 ^2 8 


11 53 


5 15 6 51 


7 37 J 9 22 

8 010 1 


5 27 639 


PI 


7 53 




12 247 


e. 3<; 


:5 16640 


5 19 6 461 8 1 


527 638 


8 35 




22 Tu 

23 \J 

24 Th 

2s Fr 


12 2 32 


5 14 6 51 8 21 


ij 


5 i7|6 48 

15 18 6 47 


8 23; 10 38 


5 20 645 1 8 25 


!5 286 37 


831 


9 5 




12 2 16, 


5 15 6 50 8 44 


8 47 11 19 


52^644 8 si 


( 5 29 6 36 


9 1 


9 56 


1 


12 2 


5 16 6 48 9 8 


2 37 


|5 19645 


9 13 mo. 


5 216 42 


9 17 


(5 29 635 


9 32 


10 36 




12 1 44 


5 17 6 47 9 39 


3 20 


5 20 6 44 


9 41 5 


(5 22 6 41 


9 50 


5 301634 


10 8 


11 20 




20 


sa 


12 1 27 


5 18' 6 45 10 11 


4 7 


|5 21 642 


10 18 


O 54 


5 23 6 40 10 26 


5 31633 


10 45 


e. 7 




2 


s 
M 
Tu 
W 


12 1 10 


5 19 6 4V 10 H3 


u 


iS 32 641 


n 1 


I 49 


,5 24(638 11 8 


531 632 


11 31 


1 2 




12 052 


5 20 6 42 1 1 45 


5 231639 


11 53 


2 50 


5 2s 6 3712 


532 631 


mo. 


3 6 




ag 


12 035 


5 axjti 40 mo. 


! 5 24 


638 mo. 


3 5i 


5 26 6 36^0. 


(5 33,6 20 
533628 


23 




30 


12 16; 


5 22'6 39 53 


'5 25 


6 36; 54 


4 52 


5 27 634! 57 


1 19 


4 4 


-„ JK -...-.I. 


31 in. 11 59 57 523 37 1 50! 9 3 


15 26 635I 1 56 5 48 


1528:633! 2 2 |s 3416 26 


2 20 


5 3 



SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER, 1876. 



MOON'S CHANGES-MERIDIAN OF NEW YORK. 



September. 

Full Moon 3d day, 4I1. 17m. aftern. 

Third Quarter. ... 10th day, nh, 25m. aftern. 

New Moon 17th day, 4I1. 58m. aftern. 

First Quarter. 25th day, 7I1. 7m. morn. 



October. 

Full Moon 3d day, 6h. om. morn. 

Third Quarter 10th day, 5I1. 24m. morn. 

New Moon 17th day, 5I1. im. morn. 

First Quarter.... 25th day, 2h. 58m. morn. 





A 


*1 


c 



Boston, X. En- 


If. York City, 


Washin'n, 


Charleston, X. 




c 


V I 


. 


gTliind, X. Y. 


Phila., Conn., 


Md, Ta, 


Carolina ,'JTen- 







4) 


fc-w 


State, Mich., 


X. J., Penu'a. 


Ky., Mo., 


nessee, Geo'a, 




2 


•4-> Cl 


Wis., Iowa. <fe 


Ohio, Ind. cfe 


and Cali- 


Ala., Miss. tSz, 




O 


O 




Oregon. 


Illinois. 


fornia. 


Louisiana. 




Sun 


Sun Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 1 Sun 


Moon 


H.W. 


Sun Sun | Moon 


Sun Sun 


Moon h. vr. 




a 

1 


fl! 

Fr 


C/D 


rise. 

H.M. 


set. 

H.M. 


sets. 

H. M. 


Boat. 

H. M. 

9 52 


rise. set. 

H.M. H.M. 

5 27! 6 33 


sets. 

H. M. 


N.Y. 

H. M. 


rise 

H.M 


set seta. 


rise 

H.M 


set 

H.M 


sets. 

H. M. 

3 IS 


Ch'ln 




H. M. S. 
"59 38 


H.M 


H. M. 

3 5 


H. M. 


!PT 


5 24 6 35 
5261633 


2 55 


3 


638 


529J631 


5 35 6 25 


5 52 

6 35 


iii* 


2 


Sa 


II 59 II 


4 


io35 


5281631 4 4 
529 630 rise. 


7 20 


5 30,6 29 


4 7 


535;624 


4 18 

rise. 




3 


8 


II 58 59 


527)632 rise. 


11 15 


7 57 

8 33 


5 31 j6 28 rise. 


5 30 622 


7 15 




4 


M 


II 584O 


528 630 


6 48 


11 50 


530628 


6 48 


5321626 


647 


5375621 


646 


7 50 




I 


Tu 


II 582O 


529628 


7 6 mo. 


531 6 26 


7 8 


9 13 


5 33 6 24 


7 9 


5 37 620 


7 12 


8 24 




W 


" 57 59 


530 626 


7 28 


24 


532 624 


7 3i 


9 47 


5 34:623 


VI 


5 38 619 


7 4i 


9 1 




7 


Th 


"57 39 


53i 625 


I 54 


1 1 


5 33'6 23 


7 58 

8 29 


10 24 


5 35'6 2i 


538618 


8 14 


9 40 




8* 


Fr 


11 57 19 
11 56 58 


5 32 623 


8 24 


1 40 


5 34,6 21 


11 7 


5 3516 20 


835 


5 39 


616 


851 


10 24 




9 


Sa 


533j6 2i 


9 4 


2 24 


535;6i9 
536;6i7 


9 *l 


" 57 


5 36i6i8 


9 17 


540 


6l5 


9 37 


,11 12 




10 


8 


11 5637 


5 35,6 19 9 51 


3 12 


9 58 


e. 56 


5 37,6 16 


10 6 


540 


6 14 


10 28 


mo. 




11 


2? 


11 56 16 


53616 17 10 52 


4 9 


5 37,616 
538,614 


ii- 


2 3 


538615 


11 7 


5 41 


6 12 


" 30 


9 




12 


Tu 


ir 55 55 


537,615 mo. 


5 17 


mo. 


3 18 


5 39 6 13 mo. 


5 42 


611 


mo. 


1 17 




13 


W 


11 55 34 


5 38 


6 14 


6 


6 33 


5 39 613 


12 


4 35 


5 4° 6 12 


29 


5 42 6 9 
5 43 6 8 


40 


2 33 




14 


Th 


11 55 13 


5 39 


612 


1 25 


7 SO 

8 57 


540J611 
541,6 9 


1 30 


I 42 


541 6 10 


1 36 


1 52 


3 5o 




ij 


Fr 


11 54 52 


540 


6 10 


2 43 


2 47 


39 


54i|6 9 


2 51 


5 43 6 7 


3 4 


t% 




16 


Sa 


11 54 31 


5 4i 


6 8 


3 58 


IO 3 


542,6 7 


4 


7 26 


5 42j6 7 


4 3 


5 44 6 6 


4 10 




17 


8 


11 54 10 


542 


6 6 sets. 


IO 42 


5 43 '6 5 sets. 


8 7 


5 436 5 


sets. 


5 45j6 5 


sets. 


6 42 




18 


M 


11 53 49 
11 5328 


5 43 


f 5 


6 22 


II 24 


5446 4 


6 22 


848 


544|6 4 


6 24 


5 45 6 4 


6 28 


7 24 




19 


£? 


5 44 


6 3 


6 39 


e. 3 


5 44,6 2 


6 41 


9 39 


5 44J6 2 


6 44 


5 46 6 3 


6 52 


8 3 




20 


W 


"53 7 


5 45 


6 1 


7 9 


43 


5 45;6 


7 13 


10 10 


5 45J6 
5 46 5 59 


7 17 


547,6 1 


7 30 


8 43 




21 


l h 


11 52 46 


546 


6 


11 


1 24 


5 4015 59 


7 42 


10 49 


7 47 
825 


5476 


8 3 


9 24 




22 


Fr 


11 52 25 


5 48 


S5 5 


2 7 


54 Z 55 £ 


8 19 


" 37 


5 47 5 57 


5 48|5 59 


8 43 


10 7 




23 


Sa 


11 52 5 


5 56 


8 48 


2 50 


548I556 


8 54 


mo. 


5 48|5 56 


9 2 


5 48,5 57 


9 24 


10 50 




24 


8 


11 5144 


5 5° 


5 551 9 37 


3 39 


549 554 


9 45 


25 


5 49 


5 54 


9 52 


5 49 5 55 


10 is 


" 39 




25 


M 


11 51 24 


5 5i 


5 53 10 32 


4 35 


550 553 


10 39 


1 22 


5 50 


5 53 


10 47 


5 50 5 54 


11 8 


e. 35 




26 


Tu 


11 51 3 


5 52 


551JH 36 


1$ 


551 5' 51 


11 42 


2 19 


5 5i 


5 5i 


11 59 


5 50 


5 53 


mo. 


1 35 




3 


W 


11 50 43 


5 53 


549 mo. 


552 549 


mo. 


3 22 


5 52 


5 49 


mo. 


5 51 


5 51 


8 


2 30 




Th 


11 so 23 


5 54 5 471 41 


7 34 


553 548 


46 


4 19 


5 53 


548 


52 


5 52 


5 50 


1 8 


3 34 




29 


Fr 


11 50 4 


5 55 


5 4° 1 48 


827 


554 546 


1 52 


5 I2 


5 5415 46 


1 56 


5 52 


5 48 


2 8 


4 27 




3° 


Sa 


11 49 44 


556 


5 44 2 51 


9 14 


555 545 


2 54 


6 


5 55 5 45 


2 17 


5*53 


5 47 


3 5 


5 14 


nro 


1 


8 


11 49 25 
11 40 6 


55 2 


5 42 3 56 


9 57 


5 56] 5 43 


3 57 


6 43 


5 56,5 43 


3 59 


554 


5 45 


4 4 


5 57 


vl. 


2 


M 


5 58 5 4oj 5 3 


10 30 


5 57 

in 


5 4i 


5 3 


7 24! 

8 


5 5JJ5 4I 


5 3 


5 55 


5 43 


5 4 






3 


Tu 


11 4848 


5 59 


5 39 rise. 


11 18 


540 


rise. 


5581540 


rise. 


5 55 


5 42 


rise. 


7 18 




4 


W 


11 48 30 


6 1 


5 37 


5 57 " 56 


5 38 


6 1 


8 39 


559I538 


636* 


5 56 


5 4i 


6 is 


7 56 




i 


Th 


11 48 12 


6 2 


5 36 


6 26 


mo. 


6 1 


5 37 


6 31 


9 20 





5 37 


5 57 


540 


6 50 


8 34 




Fr 


"47 55 


6 3 


534 


7 4 


34 


6 2 


5 35 


7 10 


10 6 


6 1 


5 35 


v\ 


5 57 


5 39 


1% 


9 20 




7 


Sa 


" 47 3» 


6 4 


5 32 


HI 


1 20 


6 3 


5 33 


Hi 


10 52 


6 2 


5 34 


5 58 


5 37 


10 10 




8 


8 


11 47 21 


u 


5 31 


2 IO 


6 4 532 


11 50 


6 3 


5 32 


9 2 


5 59 


536 


9 24 


" 3 




9 


M 


"47 5 


529 


9 54 


3 3 


6 51530 10 1 


e. 54 


6 4 


5 31 


10 8 


5 59 5 35 


10 29 


mo. 




10 


Tu 


11 46 50 


6 8 


5 27 


11 12 


4 7 


6 6 528 11 18 


2 2 


6 5 


529 


11 24 


6 0534 


11 42 


7 




11 


W 


" 46 34 


6 9 


5 26 


mo. 


5 16 


6 7527 
6 8525 


mo. 


3 13 


6 6 


528 


mo. 


6 15 33 


mo. 


1 16 




12 


Th 


11 46 20 


610 


5 24 


28 


6 27 


32 


4 20 


II 


5 26 


38 


6 i|53i 


51 


2 27 




"3 


Fr 


11 46 6 


611 


522 


i 44 


7 35 


6 9J5 2 4 


1 47 


5 18! 


5 25 


1 5° 


6 2530 


1 59 


3 35 




14 


Sa 


" 45 52 


612 


521 


2 55 


8 33 


6 10 


5 22 


2 57 


6 10 


6 9 


523 


258 


6 3529 


3 3 


4 33 1 




3 


8 


11 4s 40 


613 


519 


4 7 


9 24 


611 


521 


4 7 


6 56 


6 10 


5 22 


4 7 


6 3528 


4 8 


5 24 




M 


" 45 2 7 


614 


5 17 


5 17 


10 10 


6 12 


5 19 


5 15 


111 


611 


5 20 


5 14 


6 41526 


5 10 


6 10 




3 


Tu 


11 45 16 


615 


51.5 


sets. 


10 53 


613 


5 17 sets. 


6 12 


5 19 


sets. 


\ ll 525 
6 6524 


sets. 


6 53 




W 


11 45 4 


6 17 


514 


5 35 


" 32 


615 


516 


5 40 

6 13 


858 


6 13 


5i8 


5 45 


5 59 


7 32 




'9 


Th 


"44 54 


618 


512 


6 7 e. 12 


616 


514 


9 42 


6 14 


5i6 


6 19 


6 7 5 23, 


6 37 


8 12 




20 


Fr 


11 4444 


6 19 


5" 


6 41 


56 


6 17 


513 


6 49 


10 23! 


615 
616 


5 15 


6 55 


6 8522 


7 16 


8 56 




21 


Sa 


"44 35 


620 


5 8 


7 27 

8 21 


1 39 


618 


512 


7 35 


II iol 


5 14 


Z 4 5 


6 8521 


8 5 


9 39 




22 


8 


11 44 26 


621 


5 § 


2 27 


6 19 


5" 


8 28 


12 


%H 


5 13 


836 


6 9 5 20 


858 


10 27 


. 


2 3 


M 


" 44 19 


622 


5 6 


9 3i 


3 15 


620 


5 9 


9 37 


mo. 


6 18 5 11 


9 44 


6 10 


5 IQ 


10 5 


" 15 




24 


Tu 


11 44 11 


623 


5 5 


10 27 


4 5 


621 


5 §|io 33 


52 


6 19,5 10 


10 39! 


611 


518 


10 56 


e. 5 




25 


W 


11 44 5 


625 


5 3 " 33 


4 So 


6 22 


5 6 11 37 


1 47 


620*5 9 


11 42 


6 12 


5 17 


11 56 


50 




26 


Th 


" 43 59 


626 


5 2irrio. 


6 48* 


623 


5 5'mo. 


2 40 


6215 8 


mo. 1 


613 


516 


mo. 


1 54 


1 


3 


Fr 


"43 54 


627 
626 


5 ° 


37 


6 24 


5 3 40 


3 34 


6225 6 


43 


6i4i5i5 


54 


2 48 




Sa 


" 43 5° 


4 59 


1 40 


7 40 

8 29 


625 


5 -21 1 42 


4 25 


6235 5 


1 44 


6 is 5 14 


1 5i 


3 40 




29 


8 


11 4346 


629457 


2 44 


626 


5 oJ 2 45 


5 14 


6245 3 


2 45 


616 513 


2 48 


4 29 


30 


M 11 43 44 


630455 


3 5i 


9 15 


627 


4 59 3 5i 


6 1 


625I5 2 3 50 


6 16 5 12 


3 48 


5 15 


1 


3i 


Tu; 


" 43 42 


632I 


4 54 


4 57 


9 59 


629 


4 58| 


4 55 


6 45 


626 


5 i| 


4 53 


617I 


5" 


4 47 


5 59 



NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 1876. 



MOON'S CHANGES-MERIDIAN OF NEW YORK. 



November. 

Full Moon 1st day, 6h. 35m. aftern. 

Third Quarter 8th day, oh. 21m. aftern. 

New Moon 15th day, 7I1. 52m. aftern. 

First Quarter 23d day, nh. 30m. aftern. 



December. 

Full Moon 1st day, 6h. 8m. morn. 

Third Quarter 7th day, 9I1. 27m. aftern. 

New Moon 15th day, ih. 18m. aftern. 

First Quarter 23d day, 6h. 45m. aftern. 

Full Moon 30th day, 5I1. 3m. aftern. 



X) 




c 



r, 


0> 


. 




2 




55 -a 


I* 


v- 1 


"2 


O 


O 


c^ 1 






3 
C/) 


Q 


Q 


H. M. 8 


1 
2 


W 
Th 


ti 43 40 
H43 40 



Boston, X. En- iX. York City, 



eland, S_ Y 
state, Mich., 
Wis., Iowa A* 

Oregon. 



3 Fr 

4 Sa 
s » 

6 M I 

7 Tu ' 

8\w 1 

9 Th 

10 Fr 
n Sa 

12 -s i 

13 !M j 

14 'Pu 

15 w ; 

1 5 Th 

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18 Sa 

19 8 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

H 

M 

Tu 

30 Th 



Fr 
Sa 

a 

M 

Tu 
AV 
Th 

I T 
Sa 

a 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

Fr 

Sa 

a 

M 

Tu 
W 
Th 
Fr 
Sa 
8 



11 43 40 
11 4342 
"43 44 
11 4347 
H43 5° 
"43^ 
11 44 I 
"44 7 
11 44 U 
11 44 22 

1144 3° 
11 44 41 
11 44 52 

11 45 
11 45 1 
11 45 29 
"45 43 
"45 5** 
1 1 46 44 
11 4630 
114647 

"47 5 
n 47 24 

"47 43 
11 48 3 
1 1 48 24 
" 48 45 
11 49 7 



"49 3° 
"49 54 
1 1 50 18 
1 1 50 42 
11 51 7 
11 51 33 
11 51 59 
1 1 52 26 

"52 53 
" 5320 
"53 48 
11 54 17 
11 5446 
" 5515 
" 5544 
115813 
"5°43 
" 57 13 
"57 43 

11 58 13 

" 5843 
" 59 13 
"59 43 

12 o 13 
12 042 
12 i 13 
12 1 42 
12 2 12 

I* 2 41 

iv. 3 10 
12 338! 



Sun Sun Moon 
rise I set. J rises. 
h.m.'h.m. |h. m. 

rise. 
5 2 
544 
37 
7 45 
9 2 

10 19 

11 13 
mo. 

46 

1 56 

3 4 

4 12 

5 23 
sets. 



°33 4 53 
6 34 4 52 
63514 5i 
03614 50 

638:449 
'639 447 

; 6 40 ' 4 46 

|642|445 

6 4314 44 
i644|443 
J646 442 

i647 441 
1648 440 
I650439 
1651 438 
1652437 

16 53 4 36; 
1654435 

65S 434 
i6 574 34! 

658 433; 
1659 432 

7 °43i 

17 2 j4 3i 

3 4 3° 

4 4 3»| 

6429 
8 4 2o ; 
9,428, 



Bost. 

H. M. 



10 46 

11 31 
mo. 

17! 

1 10! 



Fhila., Conn., 
Ji. «J., J*enn'a. 
Ohio, Ind. «fc 

Illinois. 



Sun j Sun Moon h.w. 
rise. 1 set. rises. N.Y. 

H.M. H.M. H. M. H. M. 



2 7! 

3 3 

4 3i 

u 7J 
7 5 

ii 
938; 

10 23! 

4 39,'" 5, 

5 21 j 11 50 

6 ioe. 34' 

7 9l 1 19' 

8 14J 2 6 

9 19 

10 22 

11 25 
mo. 

28 

1 32 

2 37 

458 

6 15 



2 49 

3 35 

4 21 
5 

°47 
7 39 
831 
9 23 



7 10I428 rise. |n 13 
7 11:4281 5 28;mo. 
8 



5 2B 
7 12.4 28 j 6 41 

7134281 8 5 

7 I 4j4 28 922 

715428I1037 

7 164 28:11 49 

7 17 4 28 mo. 

718 428 
719428 
720:428 
7 21 j 4 28 
7 22 4 28 
723428 



° 57 

2 5 

3 13 

4 21 
528 
638 



1 3 

2 1 

2 54 

3 47 

4 4° 

oil 
7 22 
815 
9 I 
9 5' 



724 4 29 seta. 10 47 
( 7 3 4 : 4 29i 5 o 11 32 

725429 5 

725 429 7 

726 430 8 1 

726 4 3o| 9 1 

727 431 io 1 

727 431 11 19 

728 4 32 mo. 
1728432 o 21 



7 28 4 33 
7 29 4 33 
7 2 9 434 
729 4 34 
729 435 
i4 36 



7 3o; 

7 3°4 37 rise. 



1 27 

2 34 

3 48 

5 5 

6 21 

7 3° 



«. 15 

59 

1 40 

2 20 

3 oj 

3 39 

4 22J 

'5 7i 

IS 

7 53 

8 57| 

9 57 

II 2 

II 58, 



6 3°!4 57 
631J456 

632 4 55 
6 33:4 54 
6 344 53 
635:451 
636:4 c,o 

638449 
6 39 4 4» 
640 447 
642I446 

6 43'4 45 
644 ! 444 
6 46!4 43 
647J442 
6 48 4 41 

6 49J4 4° 
6 501440 
6511439 
652 438 
6 53i4 38 
6 54J4 37 
6551436 
6 574 36 
6 58 4 35 

6 59 4 35 

7 ° 435 
7 14 35 
7 34 35 
7 4i434 



rise. 

5 8 

6 45 

7 52 



7 3° 

8 14 

9 3 
9 5° 

10 41 



Washin'n, 

Md, Va, 
Ky., Mo., 
and Cali- 
fornia. 



9 8|n 48 



10 24 

11 36 
mo. 

48 

1 57 

3 4 

4 12 

sets. 
448 
28 



e. 50: 

i53j 

2 50, 

3 5°: 
443; 

z-a 

lA 

833! 

5 28 9 21: 

6 19 10 5! 

7 10 10 48! 

8 20;II 33 J 

9 24 mo. I 



7 £ 4: 
7 64: 



34 
34 

7 7434 
7 8433 
7 9 4 33 
7 l0 4 33 
7 Il! 4 33 
7 I2 4 33 
7 I 3|4 33 
7*4 4 33 
7 : 5i4 33 
7i6j 4 33 

7 l6 4 33 
7 X 7!4 33 
7 J 8 434 
7 I 8: 4 34 
7*9 4 34 
7 X 9 4 34 

720 435 

720435 
7 21 [4 36 

721 436 
732437 

722 4 37 
7 32 438 

7 2 3 4 38 

723 4 39 
7 23 4 39 
7 23 4 4° 

724 4 41 
724:442 



10 26 

11 27 
mo. 

30 

1 32 

2 36; 

3 43 

6 5 9 4 



21 

1 8: 

2 5 

2 42! 

3 33| 

4 2 4 

5 10! 

6 9 

7 4 



rise. 7 55 

5 35 8 53 

6 51 9 49 

8 iojio 43 

9 26;n 38 
io 39 6. 33 
11 50 
mo. 

o 57 

2 3 

3 10 

4 16 

5 23 



Sun I Sun Moon 
rise, set.! rises. 

H.M. H.M. H. M. 

'6275 o rise. 
i»4» 5 13 
|6 29:4 5» 5 57 
!6so;4 57 653 
16311456 8 o 

|63 2 455 9 15 
633 4 54|i°29 

;6 35.4 53 " 40 
636 4 52 mo. 
637.451! o CO 

i6 39:4 5<> 1 57 

|6 4°!4 49 3 3 
641 448 4 
642447I 5 

; 6 43 446 sets. 

if44 4 45 

.645444 

646:444 
6 47 4 43 

648 442 

649 442 
6 504 41 

if 5 1 14 4i 11 30 
652441 mo 
6 53 4 4° o 31 
6 54 4 40 
6 55 4 40 
656,44° 
6 5814 40 

6"59!4 39 



Charleston, 3T. 
Carolina .Ten- 
nessee, Geo'a, 
Ala., Miss. «fc 
Louisiana. 



4 52 

£ 35 
6 27 



9 29 
10 29 



°4 39 

1 4 39 

2 4 39 

3 4 39 

4 4 38 
§:4 38 
6438 

Z 43 f 
8438 

94 38 



1 32 

2 34 

3 4° 



6 21 
sets. 

5 7 9 

6 9 945 

7 14 10 24 
16 11 3 

11 44 



9 17 

10 18 

11 19 
mo. 

21 

1 24 

2 31 

3 43 

4 59 
6 14 
721 

rise. 



1 27 

2 20 

3 14 

4 7,,. 

4 59 7io:4 38 

5 52 |7" 438 

6 42 :7ii , 438 

7 31] 712:438 

8 I5|]7 13 439 
7 13 4 39 
714440 
714(440 
7 15:4 41 



rise. 

658 
815 

9 3° 

10 42 

11 50 
mo. 

o 56 
2 2 
3 
4 



Sun Sun 
rise. set. 

H.M. H M. 

618 Tio 

6i9l5 9 
6205 8 



Moon 
rises 



14 1715 4 41 
.1 7 15:4 42 
!, 7l6i4 42 

7 16 4 43 
716443 

717444 
7i7i444 
! 717 4 45 
ii7i8J4 45 
45 17 18446 
45 7I8J447 
43. i 7 19: 4 48 



mo 

2 

1 9! 

2 3 
242, 

3 36! 

4 38 
42 



7 
13 

5 17 

6 24 

sets. 



I J 9 

8 21 

9 20 

10 20 

11 20 
mo. 

20 

1 22 

2 27 

3 38 

VI 

1 I5 

rise. 



6 21 
6 22| 5 
623^5 
624 5 

6275 

6 2 8 :5 2 
6 29 5 1 
6305 o 
6315 o 
632 4 59 
632458 
f33:4 58 
634457 

Pi* 5 * 

6 36 4 56 

636455 
° 37;4 55 
638455 
f 39 ; 4 54 
6 40 4 54 
6404 54 
f4i!4 54 
6 42 4 54 
6 43 4 54 
64*14 54 



rise. 

6 18 

I 1S 

8 21 

9 33 

10 44 

11 50 
mo. 

56 

1 59 

3 o 

4 3 

sets. 

5 H 

558 

6 49 

7 44 

8 45 

9 44 
10 41 

" 37 
mo. 

35 

1 32 

2 30 

3 3i 

4 37 

5 47 



H. W. 

Ch'ln 

H. M. 

"6^6 

2?7 
9 10 
10 7 

" 3 
mo. 

3 



644*4 54 rise. 
6 45 4 54 6 5 

831 
9 42 
10 49 
" 53 



646454 
6 47;4 54 
6 47'4 54 
648:454 
649)454 
6 504 54jmo. 



I 5° 

8 34 

9 19 
10 6 
10 49 

" 35 
e. 21 



III 



650,454 
6511454 
652-455 
6 53J4 55 
6 54 4 55 

656456 
6 56 4 56 
6 57,4 56 
6 57 4 56, . 

6 58 4 57 8 33 
658457; 9 29 
659 4 58; 10 25 
6594 58 11 21 

7 0:4 59 mo 
o 4 59 
Ol5 



9 3 

10 1 

10 54 

11 47 
mo. «• 

40 

1 34 



sets. 

5 36 

6 35 

7 35 



it 

2 i5 
2 5 

35 



° l l 

1 IS 

2 17 

3 23 

4 34 

I 45 
6 53 



4 


t? 


5 


7 


5. 


5b 


6 


47 


7 32 


8 


IS 


8 


5Q 


9 40 


10 


20 


11 


3 


11 


39 


e. 


22 


1 


7 



3 
4, 
5 rise. 



_____ 



_— __H_a_fi_M 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



9 



TRADE AND 

Note. — In the following tables it will beun- 
derstood that the fiscal year of the United 
States and that of the Dominion of Canada, 
end toith the ZOth of June. That of Great 
Britain ends with the Z\st of December. The 
imports of the United States are rated at 
\their coin value in the ports from which they 
are shipped. The imports of Great Britain 
are rated at the/rvalue, exclusive of duty \ 
in the British ports where they are entered, 
.including freights andprofits of the importer. 
The values of the foreign trade of Great 
Britain are uniformly given in pounds ster- 
ling, the value of which is $4 86 and 65-100<A« 
cents in our gold coin. 

The following statistical summaries of the 
foreign commerce of the United States, Great 
Britain and the Dominion of Canada, illustrate 



No. i.— Gold Value of the Total Imports 
and Exports of Merchandise into and 
fbom the United States foe Twenty- 
one Years. 



Year. 



i855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
i860. 
1861 . 
1862., 
1863. 
1864 . , 
1861., 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 



1870. , 
1871.. 
1872., 
1873.. 
1874.. 
187s.. 



Totl 
Import*. 

257.7-'3,i48 
310,432,310 
348,428,342 
263,338,654 
331.333,341 
353,616,119 
289,310,542 
189,356,677 

243.335.815 
316,447,283 
238,745.580 
434,812,066 
395,763,100 
357.436,440 
417,506,379 
435,9 =,8,408 
520,223,684 
626,595,077 
642,136.210 
567,406,342 
533,005,436 



Total 
Exports. 



o $ 
218,909,503 

281,219423 

293.823,76a 

272,011,274 

292,901,051 

333.576,057 

219,553.833 
190,670,101 
203,964,997 
I5§,887,9fc8 
162,013,500 
348,859,522 
297,303,653 
281,952,899 
286,117,697 
392,771.768 
442,820,178 
444,177,586 
522,479,317 
580,283,040 
513.441,711 



Domestic 
Export*. 

$ 

102,751,135 
266,438,051 
278,906,713 
251,351,033 
278,392,080 
316,242,423 
204,899,616 
179,644,024 
186,003,912 
143,504.027 
132,473.969 
337, 118,102 
282,584,3:1 
269,389,900 
275,166,697 
376,616,473 
428,398,008 
428,487,131 
5 5.033,439 
569,433,421 
499,284,100 



Foreign 
Expor ts. 

v~ 

26,158,368 
14,701,372 
14,917,047 
20,660,241 
14.509,971 
1 7, 333 ,634 
14.65i.217 
11,026,477 
17.960,535 
15,383,961 

29,539^31 
11,341420 
14,719,332 
12, 562,999 
10,951,000 
16, 1 ^5,295 
1^421,270 

15,690,455 
17,446483 
16,849,619 
14,157,611 



No. 3.— Table showing for the United 
States the Balance of Merchandise 
Imported and Exported, and of the 
Specie Movement for Twenty Years. 





Merchan- 


Merch n- 


Specie, Ex- Specie, 


Year. 


dise, Excess 


dise, Excess 


cess of Excess of 




of Imported 


of Exported 


Exported. Imported 




$ 


$ 


f I ' 
52,587,531 


1811 


38,813,645 





1816 


29,212,887 





4«, 537,853 


1857 


54.604,582 





56,671,123 


1858 





8,672,620 


35,358,651: 


1819 


38432,290 
20,040,062 





56,413,622 


i860 





57,996,104 


1861 


69,756,709 





16,548,531 


1862 





1,313,824 


19,972, "38 


1863 


39,370,818 





56,571.956 


1864 


157,559,295 
76,732,082 

85,952,544 





92,280,929 


1865 





57,833,154 


1866 





75,343,979 

38,797,897; 


1867 
1868 


98,459,447 





75,483,541 





79,595.734! 


l86g 


131,388,682 





37,330,504 

31,736486 


1870 


43,186,640 





1871 


77403,506 





77,171,964 

66,133,845 


1872 


182417,491 





1873 


119,656,288 





63,127,637, 

38,i75,499j 


1874 


— — 


18,876,698 


»875 


19,563,725 





71,231425! 



COMMERCE. 

the transition from a period of great activity to 
one of extreme depression* The last commercial 
crisis which was common to Europe and America, 
previous to the one of two years ago, was in 1857. 
That was followed, in the case both of England 
and the United States, by a heavy decline in the 
imports and exports, which lasted until 1860. 
The crisis of 1873 has been followed by similar 
effects, and so was the panic of 1866, the conse- 
quences of which were mainly confined to Great 
Britain. At the present time (November, 1875) 
the appearances are that the effects of the panic 
and the general commercial depression will con- 
tinue to the end of the current fiscal year. 

By comparing the five years with each other, 
it will be found that the imports and consump- 
tion of tea, coffee, sugar and molasses are niain- 
{Continued on p. 12.) 



No. 2.— Value of the Total Imports and 
Exports of Merchandise into and from 
the United Kingdom for Twenty-one 
Years. 



Year. 



1854. 

1855., 
1856.. 

'§57.. 



[860.. 
[861.. 
[862., 
1863.. 
[864.. 
1861.. 



1870.. 
1871., 
1872., 
1873. 
1874.. 



Total 
{ Imports. 

I * 

152,389,053 
143,542.850 
172,544,154 
187,844441 
164,583,832 
179,182,355 
210,530,873 
217,485,024 
225,716,976 
240,919,020 

: 274,952,172 
271,072,285 
295,290,274 
275,183,137 
294,693,608 
1 295460,214 

, 303.257.493 
331,015480 
354,693,624 
371,287,372 
370,082,701 



To al 
Exj orts. 

£ 

111,821,092 
116,691,300 
139,220,353 
146,174,301 
139,782,779 

155,692,975 
164,521,351 

159,632,498 
166,168,134 
196,902409 
212,619,014 
218,831,176 
238,905,682 
225,802,529 

227,778454 
237,015,052 
244,080,177 

283,574,7°° 
314,188,834 
310.994,765 
297,650464 



British 
Produce. 

£ 

97,184,726 
95,688,085 
115,826,948 
122,066,107 
116,608,756 
130,41 1,129 
135,891,227 
125,102,814 
123,992,264 
146,602,342 
160449,013 
165,835,725 
188,917,536 
180,961,923 
179,677.812 
189,953.957 
199,586,822 
223,066,162 
256,217,347 
25s.164.603 
239,558,121 



Foreign & 
Colonial. 

£ 

18,636,366 
21,003,215 

23.393,405 
24,108,194 
23,174,023 
25,281446 
28,630,124 
34,529,684 
42,175,870 
50,300,067 
52,170,561 
52,991,851 
49,988,146 
44,840,606 
48,100,642 
47,061,095 

44,493,755 
60,508,138 
18,331487 
51,830,162 
18,092,343 



No. 4.— Table showing- for the United 
Kingdom the Balance of Merchandise 
Imported, and of the Specie Movement 
for Twenty Year9. 




10 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



No. 5.— Foreign Trade of the United States for Five Years. 

T 4BIS t —imports— Quantities of the Leading Articles.— (Years end Juno 30.) 

Vrticles 1870-1. 1871-2. 18-72-3. 1873-4. 1874-5. 

Coal * tons. 443,955 490,631 456,015 498,028 440,508 

India' rubber and guttapercha, crude, cwts. 98,499 105,3^8 129,794 126,708 107,461 

PiiHron tons. 178,139 247,^9 215,496 92,042 53,748 

Uariron tons. 90,850 105,560 74,"4 34,389 23,707 

Rails (Iron and steel) tons. 458,056 53i,537 357,631 148,920 42/582 

Scrap iron tons. 155,805 230,763 204,078 51,366. 32,409 

Tin plates tons. 79,900 87,733 85,931 75,589 85,154 

Lcarl, pies, bars -nd old tons. 43,141 37,324 31,862 19,425 13,235 

Leather, tanned, of all kinds cwts. 79,263 101,153 92,390 83,747 79,000 

(Moves of kid and leather doz. pairs. 604,031 746,004 555,919 524,434 583.632 

Sugar, unrefined cwts. 10,617,464 13,011,561 12,983.253 14,234,878 15,141,263 

Molasses galls. 44,401,359 45,214.403 43,533.909 47.189,837 49,113,19c 

Tea cwts. 458,615 569.741 5/8.707 49»,3i8 579.97* 

Coffee cwts. 2,839,305 2,667,910 2,618,699 2,546,174 2,874,740 

Wine in casks galls. 9.553.156 9,484,157 9.836,442 7.839.837 6,731,586 

Wool, raw and fleece cwts. 607,661 1,091,576 763,358 383.389 490,211 

(a) Cotton goods thousand yds. 71,300 84,762 68,194 5i,9 6 3 43,714 

ib) Woolen goods thousand yds. 7=1,362 72,080 65,121 72,354 71,299 

Tadle II.— IMPORTS.— Values in Gold of the Leading Classes of Articles. 

Total value of merchandise $520,223,684 $626,595,077 $042,136,210 $567,406,342 $533,005,436 

Coin and bullion 21,270,024 13,743,669 2i„>8o,937 38,454,906 20,900,717 

Coal 1,155,760 1,291,206 1,539,663 1,950,425 1,798,689 

Coffee 30,992,869 37,942,225 44,108,878 55,048,967 50,591,488 

Cotton, all manufactures of 29,876,640 35,307,447 35,201,324 28,193,869 27,657,981 

Flax, all manufactures of 18,061,095 21.J20.496 20,428,391 17,472,755 16,602,277 

Iron and steel, and manufactures of 43,425,975 55,54o,i88 59,308,452 33,793,546 18476,250 

Lead, and manufactures of. 3,72^,545 3.39^090 3.247,153 2,165,788 1,440,976 

Hides and skins, other than furs 14,892,987 12,973,904 17,398,611 16444,877 18,536,884 



Leather, tanned, of all kinds 5,994,255 7,642,978 6,766,202 6,138,528 5,942,238 

Gloves, of kid and leather 3,700,206 4,657,041 3,570,911 3,319,293 3,535,075 

Silk, all manufactures of 32,341,001 36,448,618 29,890,015 23,996,782 24,380,916 



Sugar, unrefined 61,249,621 79,129,059 77,952,660 77,459,968 70,025,970 

Molasses 10,192,384 10,627,511 9,901,051 10,947,824 11,685,313 

Tea 17,254,617 22,943,575 24,466,170 21,112,234 22,673,703 

Tin and manufactures of, and tin plates... 12,757,221 15,809,703 18,356,653 16,245,471 15,365,565 

Wines, spirits aud cordials 8,638,441 8,582,223 9,258,469 8,636,469 7,759,464 

Wool, raw and fleece 9,780,443 27,206,073 20,433,938 8,250,306 11,069,701 

Wool, ? 11 manufactures of. 43,8^0,640 52,408,471 ^1^57^492 46,883,188 44,^90,039 

Table III.— EXPORTS.— Quantities, Produce and Manufactures of the TJ. States. 

Coal tons. 267.951 400,878 584,633 763,402 519,345 

Cotton, raw cwt3. 13,861,857 8,335,15,5 10,714,853 12,130,378 11,253,740 

(0) Leather, tanned cwts. 16,965 108,0=4 i=.3,944 139,538 215,602 

Wheat bushels. 34,304,906 26423,080 39,264,285 71,039,928 53,047,175 

Wheat flour bbls. 3,654,841 2,514,535 2,562,086 4,094,094 3,951,086 

Indian corn bushels. 9,826,309 34,491,650 38,^41,930 34,434,606 28,85,8,420 

Petroleum, naphtha, mineral oils... galls. 149,677,585 134,233,397 187,034,113 245,978,685 219,166,604 

Bacon, hams and beef cwts. 1,029,706 2436,2*3 3,812,383 3,413,^88 2,665,39s 

Butter and cheese cwts. 604,151 660,270 7^7,905 848,027 958,671 

£ ard cwts. 714,619 1,782,604 2,058,341 1,824,353 1,489,814 

4,°, r . K • cwts. 350,453 510,442 572,745 629,307 501,359 

7 all ° w v cwts. 302,315 679,922 706,880 908,533 584,479 

Leaf tobacco lbs. 215,667,604 234,936,892 213,995,176 318,097,804 223,901,993 

Taele IV.— EXPORTS.— Values in CURRENCY of the Leading Classes of Articles. 

Gold value of merchandise $428,398,908 $428,487,131 $505,033,439. $569,433,421 $499,284,100 

Coin and bullion 84,403,359 72,798,240 73,905,546 59,699,686 83,857,129 

S, oa J 1,369,236 1,901,606 2,914,075 3,823,750 2,620,569 

Cotton, raw 218,327,109 180,684, =,95 227,243,069 211,223,580 190,638,625 

(c) Leather, tanned 480,143 2,864,800 4.36V74 3,940,450 6,286,397 

W boat and wheat flour 69,236,608 ^6,870,7.14 70,8^3,918 130,679,553 83,317,937 

Indian corn and meal 8,410,827 25,190,364 25,269,521 26,299,350 2^,747,470 

Petroleum, naphtha and mineral oils.... 36.857.3S0 34,016,666 41,971,190 41,103,516 29,888,161 

Bacon, hams and beef 11,912,349 22,997,418 37,469,618 36,330,584 32,809,886 

Butter and cheese 9,606,086 9.251,730 ii^soIom 12,^1,^76 TsXvS 

fc ar v. 10,^63,020 20,177,619 21,24^,815 19,308,019 22,900,480 

&{£« 4,302,320 4,122,308 5,007,035 5.808,712 5.671,495 

i, u ' l " w t • 3,025,035 6,973,189 7,068,471 8,i3:;,32o 5,692,203 

Tobacco, and manufactures of 21,995,9^ 26,659,92! 25.331,946 32,968,528 27,844.470 

r£& an n manQ f a ctures of. 12,942,281 15,240,872 19.u9.802 §1,353 721 17,740,194 

Litton, all manufactures pf 3,558,136 2,304,330 2,947.528 3095840 4071,786 

Iron and steel, and manufactures of.... 19,00^090 8,747,106 11,119,831 13180,654 I7,385,«;i6 

a C ^' "S, raac , b ! ne8 f and P arts of 1,898,861 2436,085 2150,720 1594296 1797929 

Agricultural implements iJotW 1,547413 2,58^914 3$&7S3 Jfrsw 

^ 10Ck "; if'-i 552,15=; 679,162 868,888 1,007,507 1,222,914 

ci^a Jol-^y* - Fo k BT ?. N ' Gooi) 3 * N » Specie RE-EXPORTED from the United States. 

Coin aud bnLn erchandlse $14,421,270 $15,690,455 $17,446483 $16,849,619 fi4.i57.6ix 

v-oiu auu Dumon 14,038,629 7,079,294 10,703,028 6,930,719 8,275,013 

ftnii^K£. x ? lu8lv *t? f , no ! i, £ r 3 r ' snlrt s. drawers, and manufactures not specified. This item embraces 
!ltK.i?rt i' th , c val » e ° f the imports of manufactured cotton. (*) This item includes 

less man half the value of manufactures of wool, (c) Exclusive of morocco and other fine. 



THB TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



11 



No. 6.— Foreign Trade of Great Britain and Ireland for Five Years. 

Table I.— IMPORTS and CONSUMPTION of the Principal Articles of Foreign 
and Colonial Merchandise.— (Years end December 31.) 



Articles. 1870. 

(a) Coffee cwts. 273,480 

(a) Tea cwts. 1,050,202 

Raw Sugar cwts. 12,798,631 

(a) Tobacco lbs. 41,717,715 

(a) Wine galls. 15,168,321 

Wheat cwts. 30,901,229 

Wheat flour cwts. 4,803,909 

Indian corn cwts. 16,756,783 

(Butter and cheese cwts. 2,200491 

Lard cwts. 217,696 

[Bacon and hams cwts. 567,164 

'Pork cwts. 217,014 

Tallow and stearine cwts. 1,530,893 

Petroleum galls. 6,859,385 

(c) Cotton, raw cwts. 11,958,635 

(e) Wool,sheep,alpaca,llama.cwts. 2,350,451 

(d) Hides cwts. ^302,232 

(e) Silk, raw lbs. 6,307.575 

Flax, hemp and jute cwts. 5,886,868 

(e) India rubber cwts. 152,118 



1871. 

276,881 

1,102,043 

12,126,508 

42,775.334 
10.237.7S6 
39,389,803 

3.977,939 
16,825,023 
2,511,183 

477,568 
1,093,838 

296,14^ 

',491,934 
8,080,126 
15,876,248 
2,884,213 
1447,898 

8,253,335 

7,360,104 

161 ,085 



1878. 

282,590 

1,141.003 

13.776,696 

44,oo4.799 
16,878,219 
42,127,726 

4,38^,136 
24.532,670 

2,195,964 
579,056 

2,001,815 
218,260 

1,328444 

6,399.719 
12,578,906 

2.735,533 
1,679,108 
7,302,083 
7*232,851 
I57,H4 



1878. 

288,669 

1,178,767 
14.243.328 
46,020,100 
18,027,308 
43,863,098 

6,214,479 
18,823,431 

2,636,294 
626,090 

2,987,229 
289,695 

1.527.321 
16,661,340 
13.639.252 

2,839,614 

1,621,676 

6445.213 

8,120,743 

157.436 



Table II.— IMPORTS.— Values of the Leading Classes of Articles. 



Aggregate value, exclus. specie.. £303,257493 

Specie and bullion 29451,668 

(6) Coffee 4,942,769 

(d) Tea 10,697,619 

Sugar, raw and refined 17,184,868 

(d) Tobacco 2,169,053 

Of) Wine 4,817,294 

Wheat 16,264,037 

Wheat flour 3,383,711 

Indian corn 5,790,110 

Butter and cheese 10,068,208 



Lard 

Bacon and hams 

Pork 

Tallow and stearine 

Petroleum 

(c) Cotton, raw 53477,71 

(<?) Wool— sheep ,lamb,alp.& llama £1,812,198 

id) Hides 4,601 ,617 

(e) Silk, raw 8,204,993 

Flax, hemp and jute 10,402,705 

(«) India rubber 1,197,628 

(j) Wood and timber 12,884,740 



727,192 
1,769,241 

799,508 
3,318,166 

535.272 



£331.015.480 
38,140,827 

5.394.5" 

11,635,^44 

18,186,297 

3,324,906 

7,072,000 

23,318,883 

i'468',863 

10,280,536 

1,310,012 

2,725,909 

693,096 

3,134,531 

604,017 

55,907,070 

17,926,639 

S.035,613 

8,921,589 
11,875,225 

1,684,281 
",785.317 



£354.693.624 

29,608,012 

5.257,403 

12,933,143 

21,187,601 

2,709,032 

7,718,848 

26,169,185 

4,087,639 

8,691,192 

9,060,451 

1,308,844 

4,188,981 

447.377 

2,848,164 

433.472 

53,380,670 

18.523,350 
6,701,186 
7,825,180 

11,161,870 
1,762,259 

13040,909 



£371.287,372 
33,599,231 
7,230,351 

11,372,595 

20,913,297 
3,902,337 
8,267,326 

28,138,746 
1,§49,8 5 2 
6,646,991 

11,016,720 

1,388,881 

6,245,230 

644,014 

3,152,413 

991,841 

54,704,847 

19,541,678 

6,700,661 

6,758,138 
11,313,011 

1,746,095 
18,134,082 



1874. 

1,226,988 

14,130,041 

47,126,303 

17,284,242 

41,527,638 

6,236,044 

17,693,621 

3,105,073 

374.328 

2,542,095 

322,574 

1,155,243 

21,463,361 

13,989,861 

3,075.633 

1.538,079 

5,911,831 

7,939.252 

129,163 

£370,082,701 

30,379,188 

7,064,788 

11.532,896 

20,009,730 

3,973,6i9 
6,863465 

25,236,932 
5,685,076 
7482,720 

13,533,952 

884,596 

5,902,429 

704^35 

2.331 .479 

993,418 

50,696406 

21,116,184 
6,831432 
4,966,325 

11,378,622 
1,326,605 

21,328,237 



Table III.— EXPORTS Quantities of Leading Articles op British Home Manufacture. 



Coal, cinders and fuel tons. 11,702,649 

Cotton goods thousand yds. 3,266,998 

Cotton yarn .lbs. 180,078,060 

Linen goods thousand yds. 226,471 

Linen yarn lbs. 37,239,314 

Woolen & worsted goods. 1000yds. 292,701 

Woolen and worsted yarn... lbs. 35,536,848 

(A) Iron and steel tons. 2,821,575 

Copper, wrought & unwr't..cwts. 767,958 

Salt tons. 764,707 



193 



12,747,989 

3,417406 

,695,116 

,338 

36,235,621 

367,869 

43,725,577 

3,169,219- 

791.364 
893,201 



13,198494 

3.537,905 

212,327,972 

245,019 

31,187,051 

412,141 

39,734,924 

3,382,762 

686,717 

753,581 



12,617,566 

3,483,736 

214,778,827 

208,123 

28,734,212 

345,887 

34,7 14, 507 

2,957.813 

699,397 

840,939 



13,927,205 

3,606,639 

220,682,919 

194,682 

37,154,906 

326,679 

34,981,008 

2487,522 

706,286 

828,109 



Table IV.— DOMESTIC EXPORTS.— Values of the Leading Classes of Articles. 



£223,066,162 
33,760,671 

1,853,733 

6,246,133 

72,821411 

9,721,945 
33,283,112 



£256,257,347 

30,335.861 

2,085430 

10442,321 



Aggregate value, excl. of specie.. £199,586,822 

Specie and bullion 18,919,690 

Beer and ale 1,881,673 

CoaL cinders and fuel 5,638,271 

CO Cotton manufactures 71416,345 

(i) Linen manufactures 9485,837 

(i) Woolen and worsted m'f's... 26,659,202 

(h) Iron and steel ., 24,038,090 

Hardwares and cutlery 3,812,385 

Machinery and mill work 5.293,273 

Copper, wrought and unwrought. 2,819,853 

Table V.— Re-Exjpobts of Foreign and Colonial Merchandise. 

Aggregate value £+4.493.755 £60,508,538 £58,331.487 £55.830,162 

(a) Quantities entered for home consumption only. (&) Value of total Imported, of which 
about 5-6 is re-exported, (c) Quantity and value of total imported, of which from 1-5 to 1-6 is re- 
exported, 
and value 
1-8 is re-exported. 

plates, and excluding hardware and cutlery, and machinery, the value of which is separately 
stated. (0 Including yarn. O) Exclusive of mahogany. 



26,124,134 
4,006,385 
1,966,041 
2,962,634 




£255,164,603 
28,899,285 

2422,020 
13,188,511 
77.363.612 

9,285,983 
30,743,371 
37.73i.239 

4.938.537 
10,019,929 

3,287473 



£239.558,121 
22,853,593 

2,449.035 

11,984,621 

74,247,625 

8,832,533 

28.359,512 

31,190,256 

4,403,399 

9.790,914 

3,134,061 



£58,092,343 



KB 



-, — ■-■—IT- 



SS* 



If 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



tained with great steadiness, both in the United 
Btatet and Great Britain. The greatest falling 
off in the imports of the United States and the ex- 
ports of Great Britain, is shown in iron and steel 
um' the manufactures of these articles. lhe 
quantities of the various manufactures of iron 
imported into the United States in 1874^5 are not 
! one-fifth those imported in 1871-2. Next come 
the manufactures of cotton, woolen, silk and 
linen. The Br! feh exports of cotton manufac- 
tures, however, though greatly diminished in 
value, still show an iucrease in quantity. As 

[Concluded 



misht be inferrei from the state of trade, the 
falling off in values of articles which show a de- 
cline Is usually greater than the decline in quan- 
tities. In 1S75, as compared with 1874, the ex- 
ports of the United States show a serious decrease 
in cotton, wheat and wheat flour, petroleum, ba- 
con and hams, tallow and leaf tobacco, the de- 
crease in these important articles showing itself 
in quantities as well as values. 

In The Tribune Almanac of last year, we made 
the following observations in regard to the ex- 
port trade of the United States, the truth of 
on page 14.] 



No 7 -Total Value of the Imports of Foreign Merchandise and of the Exports of 
the Produce and Manufactures of the United States to each Country, in the 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1874 AND l8 73 , DISTINGUISHING THE COUNTRIES IN THE ORDER OF 
THE TOTAL VALUE OF THEIR TRADE IN 1874. 



COUNTRIES. 



Great Britain and Ireland — 

Spanish West Indies 

Germany 

France 

British North America 

Brazil.. 

Belgium 

China, including Hon,' Kong. 

Italy . 
Spain. 



1S74. 



Holland 

British India 

New Grenada 

Russia 

British "West Indies and Honduras 

Mexico 

Japan 

Venezuela 

Argertine Republic 

Philippine Islands 

British Australasia 

Hayti 

Sweden and Norway 

Dutch East Indios 

Central American States 

Uruguay 

< hill 

British Africa 

Pern 

British Qniana. 

French V. est Indies and Guiana.. 

Dutch West Indies and Guiana 

Gibraltar 

Austria 

Portugal 

Turkey in Europe 

Sandwich Islands 

I »en mai k 

Danish West Indies 

Turkey in Asia 

African territories, not named 

San Domingo 

Turkey in Africa 

Greece 

French possessions, not named . . . 

British possessions, not named 

Algeria 

Azures. Madeira & C. Verde Isl'ds. 
Spanish possessions, not named.. . 

Mlquelon and St. Pierre 

South American States, not named 

Liberia 

Greenland and Iceland ..... 

AU other countries 

Aggregates 



Imports. Exports. 

180,042,813 341,024,049 
92.312,816: 17,534,776 
43,909,852! 61,008,381 
51,691,896} 42,326,187 
34,365,961; 38.883,931 
43,888,047 

^,727,441 
18,568,9401 
8,409,294! 
4,598,204 



7,560,502 
20,197,515 

2,078,565 
8.378,666 
11,643,715 



2,516,623! 13,712,846 
14,179,6641 482,998 



7.363,7571 
I,257,i7°l 
3,634,003) 
4,346,364 
6;408,46o| 
5,399,786) 
4,537,670 
0,200,171 1 
1,750,177 
1,367,5931 
2,037,914 
3,857,706 

2,855.093 
2015,563 
666,560 
1,828,643 
1,256,286 
1,279,805 

1,441,134 

1,580,736 

8,296 

488,642 

66,625 
1, ci 5,952 
159,811 
227,637 
449,621 
617,021 
282,188 
270,631 
484,168 
139,926 
172,544 
149.339 
32,492 

"$S 

147,927 
55.640 

28,118 
41,130 



5,043,146 
10,284,803 
7,467,897 

4,016,148 
1,023,285 
1,860,229 

2,478,513 

15,050 

3,785,008 

4,089,764 

2,385,088 

451,462 

787,056 

1,115,042 

2,730.617 

1,369,331 
1,811,369 
1,712,369 
1,172,143 
979,001 
2,519,883 
1,682,249 

1,553,042 

1,697,320 

588,280 

1,315,662 
905,629 
5'9,752 
264,161 
498,860 
332,421 
32,668 
234,700 
171,580 
135,560 
215,293 
116,313 

213,213 
33,627 
123,463 

115,340 



1S73. 



Total. 

$ 

521,066,862 

109,847,592 
105,578,233 
94,018,083 
73,249,892 
51,449,149 
25,924,956 
20,647,505 
16,877,960 
16,241,919 
16,229,469 
14,662,662 
12,406,903 
11,541,973 
11,101,900 
8,362,512 

7,49i,745 
7,200,015 
7,016,183 
6,215,221 
5,536,085 

5457,357 
4,423,002 
4,309,16s 
3,642,149 
3,630,605 
3,397,177 
3,197,974 
3,067,655 
2,992,174 
2,613,277 
2,559,737 
2,528,179 
2,170,891 
2,059,177 
1,763,945 
1,605,232 

1,475,473 
1,133,266 
969,373 
881,182 
781,048 
603,052 
516,836 
374,626 

344,124 
284,899 

247,7«5 
227,255 
217,019 
181,554 
179,112 
28,118 
156,470 



Imports. Exports. Total 



237,298,208 

85,056,756 

61,401,766 

33,077,200 

37,649,532 

38,540,376 

5,7n,o77 

27,191,759 

7,974,482 

4,962,431 

2,943,077 

16,855,747 

6,148,840 

2,212,293 

3,643,169 

4,276,165 

7,903,794 
5,512,910 
7,587,843 
6,171,635 
3,142,418 
1,640,598 
2,598,652 
7.556,954 
1,974,968 
3,57i,376 
1,070,007 
3,994,828 
1,186,161 

3,214,273 
1,194,740 
1,182,994 

13,345 
781,402 

579.075 
113.533 
275,061 
8,5^2 
444,719 
757,167 
703,267 
409,850 
263,318 
413,604 
274>°55 
219,811 

57,95' 
125,877 
36,705 
13,282 
79.634 
104,335 
85,126 
21,069 



* 

312,347,848 

17,031,100 

60, 1 24,410 

33,220,620 

30,361,368 

7,090,987 

15,280,437 

2,547,085 

7,241,097 

10,056,724 

10,842,840 

165,270 

5,106,703 

11,764,256 

7,457,823 

3,941,019 

1,167,972 

1,526,342 

2,985,661 

17,570 

3,917,477 

3,308,757 

2,542,330 

255» J 34 

899,570 

1,836,421 

2,273,957 

1,708,928 

2,671,534 

1,638,115 

1,134,795 

954,852 

2,430,938 

1,608,612 

1,180,187 

885,258 

631,163 

1,281,380 

1,022,126 

43L398 

221,437 

602,373 

225,406 

51,379 
246,646 
132,294 

133,847 

178,030 

92,389 

204,447 

23,850 

98,655 



36,260 



-i. 



567,406,342, 633,339,368 1,200,745,710! 642, 136,210! 575,227,017 



$ 

549,646,056 

102,087,856 

121,526,176 

67,197,820 

68,010,900 

45,631,363 

20,091,514 

29,738,844 

15,215,579 

15,019,155 

13,785,917 

17,021,017 

11,255, 543 

13,976,549 

11,100,992 

8,217,184 

9,071,766 

7,039,252 

10,573,504 
6,189,205 
7,059,805 

4,958,355 
5,140,382 
7,812,088 
2,874,538 
5,407,797 
3,343,964 
5,793.7-6 

3,857,695 
4,852,388 

2,329,535 
2,137,840 
2444,283 
2,39°>oi4 
1,759,262 
998,791 
1,906,164 
1,280,962 
1,460,845 
1,188,565 

924,704 

1,012,223 

488,724 

464,983 
520,701 

352,u"3 
191,803 
303,9<>7 
129,094 
217,729 
103,484 
202,990 
85,126 
57,329 



1,217,363,227 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



13 



no. 8.— total value of the imports of foreign and colonial merchandise, and of 
the Exports of Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom in the Years 
1874 and 1873, Distinguishing the Countries in the Order of the Total Value of 
their Trade in 1874. 



COUNTRIES. 



United States 

France 

British India 

Germany 

Australia 

Russia 

Holland 

British North America 

Belgium ". 

China, including Hong Kong 

Brazil 

Egypt.... 

Spain and Canaries 

Turkey 

Sweden 

Italy 

Biitish West Indies 

British Sonth Africa 

Portugal, Azores and Madeira. . . 

Chili 

Denmark 

Peru 

Spanish West Indies 

Straits Settlements 

Norway 

Ceylon 

Argentine Republic 

New Grenada 

West Africa (Foreign) , 

Uruguay , 

Dutch East Indies 

Greece 

Philippine Islands , 

Austrian Territories , 

Wallachia and Moldavia 

Japan., 

Mexico 

Mauritius 

Channel Islands 

British West Africa 

Central America , 

Gi bralt ar 

Morocco 

Malta 

Hayti 

Algeria '. 

Venezuela. .-. 

Aden 

Dutch West Indies 

Danish West Indies 

Bolivia 

Ecuador 

Tripoli and Tunis 

French West Indies 

Persia 

Whale Fisheries, Northern 

Islands in the Pacific 

East Africa; Native States 

Falkland Islands 

Native Territories in Indian Seas 

St. Helena 

Cochin China, &c 

Bourbon (Reunion) 

Siam .. 

Madagascar 

French Possessions in India 

Patagonia 

Heligoland 

Ascension 

Arabia (Muscat) 

Aggregates 



1874. 



Imports. I Exports.! Total. 



£ 

73,897,400 
46,518,571 
31,198,446 

19.947.195 
18,547,710 

20,933,39! 
14,401,158 
1 1 ,858,909 
15,048,865 
11,938,194 
7,003,131 

10,114,79? 
9.035.418 
1,842,846 
8,483,5« 
3,634,360 
6,389,918 
4,297,285 
4,683,291 
4, 700,1; 10 
3,890,492 
4,501,213 
3-764,587 
2,604,814 

2,909,995 
3,600,492 

i,27i.445 

995,600 

I,q65,i5i 

1,437,288 

i.3U,939 
1,536,805 

1,417.989 
799.544 
6n,745 
^73,136 
546,651 

1 044,233 
650,211 
598,489 

1,120,874 

S2, 3 6 4 

699,163 

28^,098 

344,46i 

5!7,i44 

5°' 54 5 
189,889 

l6i,375 

58,231 

342,637 

297,405 

238,257 

14^,894 

102.043 

130,807 

84,667 

42,071 

51,929 

57,820 

15,683 

29,538 

28,511 

11,0 t6 
12,131 
11,887 

~38 
1,378 



£ 

28,241,809 

16,370,274 
24,080,693 
24,799,846 
19,062,920 
8,776,468 
14,427,113 

9,332,n9 
5,828,092 
8,402,066 

7,678,453 
3,585,106 
4,261,967 

7,037,707 
3.390,850 
6,369,609 
3,429,348 
4,301,761 
3,056,745 
2,751,094 
2,519,522 
1,193,261 
1,857,768 
2,701,526 
2,010,089 
1,158,283 
3,128,142 

2,170,012 

936,891 

1, 224^038 

l,28o,57I 

1,010,313 

456,953 

1,063,649 

1,244,871 

1,282,899 

1,124,613 

54=;,767 

817,246 

8:3,088 

157,078 

1,135,179 

443,416 

821,981 

441,952 

47,953 

506,443 

336,565 

267,845 

340,789 

£4,38r 

65,153 

101,993 

63,358 

37,o94 




£ 

102,139,209 
62,888,845 
55,279,139 
44,747,041 
37,610,630 
29,709,859 
28,891,271 
21,191,028 
20,876,957 
20,340,260 
14,681,584 
14,099,904 

13,297.385 
12,880,553 
11,874,402 
10,003,969 
9,819,266 
8,599,046 
7,740.036 
7,451,604 
6,410,014 

6 ,o94,474 
5,622,311 
5,306,38b 
4,920,084 
4-758,775 
4,399,587 
3,566,552 
" 2,902,042 
2,661,326 
2,592,110 
2,147,118 
1,874,942 
• 1,863,193 
1,856,616 
1,816,035 
1,671,264 
1,590,000 
1,467,457 
1,451,577 
J , 277, 952 
J , 2 1 7, 543 
1,142,179 
1,107,079 
786,413 
565,007 
556,988 

526,454 
429,218 
399,020 
397,018 
362,558 
340,250 
209,212 

139,137 
130,807 
122,459 

85,329 
71,100 

58,073 
40,433 
29,879 
28,511 
27,541 
20,373 
12,131 
11,887 
4,408 
4,362 



1873. 



Imports. Exports. Total 



£ 

71,471,493 

43,339,234 
29,890,802 
19,926,451 
17,262,706 
21,189,331 

13,272,444 
11,727,851 
13,075,186 
13.303,917 

7,399.974 
14,155,913 
11,404,129 

6,068,925 

7,739,744 
3,831,091 
6,680,016 
4,120,915 
4,661,094 
4,764,195 
3,57i,i39 
5,219,572 
5,109,259 
3,464,279 

2.947,033 

4,331,006 

2,604,043 

1,077,233 

1,963,507 

1,270,723 

436,163 

1,736,643 

1,420,009 

869,433 

1,024,334 

161,390 

499,532 

1,273,910 

551,009 

473,405 

1,303,999 

92,905 

970,206 

301,668 

339.002 

438,784 

97,772 

25,876 

233,659 

io,454 

771,843 

318,161 

150,527 

17,684 

10,991 

14^98 

[7,492 

1,214 



56,566 

1,611 

17,000 

13,100 

3i,496 

2,037 

32,663 

9.325 



370,082,701 239,558,121 '6o9,640,822-"37i, 287,372 



£ 

33,574,664 
17,291,973 
21,3^4.205 
27,270,342 
17,610,112 

8,997,721 
16,745,850 

8,619,705 

7,200,949 
8,294,669 
7,544,669 
6,222,013 
3,921,355 
7,733,407 
3, '50,323 
7,444,195 
3,48i,597 
4,335,46i 
3,433,058 
3,161,104 
2,671,344 
2,524,622 

2,751,927 
2,101,223 
1,880,852 
1,052,072 
3,729,090 
3,074,972 
1,124,970 
1,762,042 
760,412 

993-571 

428,145 

1,484,320 

1,079,473 

1,680,017 

1,194,124 

581,893 

707,832 

701,186 

330,887 

1,197,693 

3i3,79i 

989,174 

548,023 

64,409 

527,601 

141,983 

428,686 

351,646 

75,120 

101,640 

64,604 

47,491 

46,85 3 

93,716 

64,161 

12,165 

405 

22,444 
6b 

30,891 
25,874 



55 
3,263 
1,535 

255,164,603 



£ 

[05,046,157 
60,631,207 

51,245,007 

47,190,793 
34,872,818 
30,187,012 
30,018,29.1 
20,347,516 
20,276,1^5 
21,598,186 

14,944,643 

20,377,926 

11,321,484 

13,802,412 

10,890,067 

11,275,286 

10,161,613 

8,456,376 

8,094, 1 ^2 

7,929,299 

6,242,483 

7,744,194 
7,861,186 
1,569,102 
4,827,881 
5,383,078 

6,333,133 

4,152,205 
3,088,477 
•3,032,765 
1,196,615 
2,730,214 
1,848,114 

2,353,753 

2,103,807 

2,241,407 

1,693,656 

1,851,803 

1,258,841 

1,174.091 

1,694,886 

1,290,198 

1,283,997 

1,290,842 

887,025 

503,193 

625,377 

167,859 

662,345 

362,100 

847,363 

419,801 

215,131 

65,175 

57,844 

I45,?98 

141,208 

133,375 
40,868 

5^,971 
24,o;i 
17,066 
13,100 
62,391 
27,911 
32,663 
9,325 

3,266 

1,535 



626,451^75 



14 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



which Is confirmed by the events of the twelve 
months which have passed since the tables for 
last year were compiled : " In examining the 
exports of the United States, the great fall in the 
Talue per cwt. of cotton and provisions, compar- 
ing 1866-70 with 1878-4, is to be noticed. Other 
striking features are the enormous quantities of 
breadstuffs and provisions exported in the last 
three years, the increase ranging from two to 
fivefold in four years. In the case of some of 
these articles, the capacity of the foreign mar- 
kets to absorb our productions appears to have 
been reached, and no further increase is to be 



expected, at least until trade in Great Britain 
becomes more active. Bacon, hams, beef and 
lard are examples of the products to which we 
refer. On the other hand, there is reason to ex- 
pect an increase in the exports of coal, leather, 
manufactu ee of iron and Bteel and cotton goods. 
The nation is under a necessity to export, both in 
payment for its imports and for the settlement of 
its large debts to foreigners. If cotton, bread- 
stuffs, provisions, petroleum, tobacco and the 
available coin and bullion prove inadequate for 
such payments, other articles will be taken — 
namely, manufactures." 



No. 9.— Foreign Trade of the Dominion of Canada. 

[The Dominion of Canada consists of the six Provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, 
Nova Scotia, British Columbia and Manitoba. The British North American Provinces, outside of 
the Dominion, are Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island. The population of the four princi- 
pal Provinces of the Dominion was 3,090,561 in 1861, and 3,485,761 in 1871.] 

Table I.— Value or Goods Entered fob Consumption. 

Ountri*. 1870-71. 1871-72. 1878-78. 1878-74. 

Great Britain $49,168,170 $61,900,702 * $58,s22,776 $63,076,437 

United States 29,022,387 34,217,969 47,735,6/8 54. 2 79,749 

France 1,265,183 1,809,244 2,023,288 2,302,500 

Germany 576,332 930,757 i,°99»9 2 5 9S6,9J7 

Spain 430.304 429,951 477*886 458,067 

Holland 173,210 193,658 216,628 256,138 

Belgium 171,584 204,344 346,702 293,619 

British North American Provinces 1,937,432 i,968,n87 1,808,997 1,088,468 

British West Indies 839,523 1,128,236 964,005 9i9,5 1 7 

Spanish " 2,010,930 1,276,739 1,143,241 1,340,235 

French " 25,922 35,906 43,412 30,502 

Other " 10,745 6,931 24,274 17,479 

South America 79,207 81,170 410,199 473,530 

China and Japan : 442401 386,612 1,663,390 1,224,506 

Other countries 499-755 345,061 1,028,193 683,142 

Total 4 Provinces ."$86,661,145 $104,921,876 ~< 

Manitoba 286,337 1,020,172 

British Columbia 1,767,068 

Grand total $86,947482 $107,709,116 $127,514,594 $127400,846 

It appears, from the foregoing statement, that nearly w per cent, of the aggregate importations 
into the Dominion during the last fiscal year, were from Great Britain, and 43 par cent, from the 
United States: the import trade with both these countries amounting together to nearly 93 per 
cent, of the whole importations. 

Table II.— Value op Expobts. 
„ ._*. Countriet. 1870-71. 1871-72. 1872-78. 1878-74. 

',"?, ?$}?}"' $24,173,224 $25,637,996 $31486,571 $35,898482 

unuea &iai.es 30,97^642 31,896,816 40,554,655 35,061,117 

rrance 76,376 102,242 '31,907 267,212 

Germany 16,235 36,232 76,553 65,<;ii 

,P a ' n "j ii7»079 2^,084 25,680 "960 

»°, lland 6,835 6,37? 13,142 14,905 

Belgium 57407 60,777 17,754 168,694 

n r lH R i! SortfcAraerican Provinces 1439,704 1,726,175 2,283,638 1411,278 

Jsrltipn westlnales 2,104,062 2,319,702 1,939,733 1,958,933 

Spanish ^ 1,498,854 1,632,681 1,614,312 1,246,371 

n,?, 1 !* .< J 94.596 273,547 299,060 372,000 

y ii, li . , 79,884 100,222 91,630 66,678 

South America 720681 671,031 1,259,266 1,212,615 

Other countries 380, 758 521,953 690,711 _ 993,067 

_ .. To . tal ;•:•••; $61,841,397 $65,010,834 

Estimated amount short returned at Inland Ports... 2.4j8,668 2,8871056 - 

Total the produce of Canada. . .$04,290,065 $67,897,890 $80,384,012 $78,737,832 

Goods not the produce of Canada exported to Great /«»«-? **~,wi» «v ,/./, ^ 

Britain, United States and other countries • 9,853,0 33 12,744,125 9405,910 10,614,096 

A^Vf T w°L 4 ^ J ,nC ^ S $74,143,098 $30,642,015 ^^ =^~ 

^^.^•""oba (to Gt. Brit, and United States only). 30, 520 K<ui 

British Columbia _° i^iljro? 

Grandtotal $74,173,618 $82,639,663 $89,789,922 $89,351,928 

Ofthegoodsnot the produce of Canada, exported in 1872-3. $7,2^7,277 went to Great Britai - , 

?•«.*!.' V.J- 8 . 7 ' to the Unlte d States. In 1873-4, $9,105,400 went to Great Britain, and $1,183,194 to the 
I nited States. *' J,: " 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



15 



STATISTICS of the IRON MANUFACTURES of the UNITED STATES. 

Compiled fkom the Report or JAMES M. SWANK, Sbcretart of the American 
Iron and Steel Association. 

Presented to the members, October 1, 1875. 



production of pig iron in thb united states in 
1874. 

The American Iron and Steel Association has 
received from the producers and from its cor- 
respondents full statistics of the production of 
pig iron in the United States in 1874. The total 
production was 2,689,413 not tons, against 
2,863,278 net tons in 1873, and 2,854,558 net tons 
in 1872, showing a decrease of 178,865 tons as 
compared with 1873, and 165,145 tons as com- 
pared with 1872. Notwithstanding this decrease, 
the production in 1874 was much larger than has 
been generally estimated — much lacker even 
than partial returns made to the Association at 
the close of 1874 indicated. 

In 1872 there was every inducement for fur- 
nace-owners to make all the iron that was pos- 
sible, for prices were high and the demand was 
constant; hence the hitherto unexampled yield 
of that year, 2,854,558 tons. In 1873 a number 
of large new furnaces, built in that year and in 
1872, were put in blast, and during the first half 
of the year greatly augmented the production of 
iron over that of the corresponding period of 
1872. Had the prices of 1872 been maintained 
during 1878, and the demand for iron experi- 
enced no abatement, there can be no doubt that 
the production of 1873 would have reached 
8,500,000 tons. But at the beginning of summer 
it became evident that production was outrun- 
ning consumption, and it will be remembered 
that on the 19th of June a convention of pig iron 
makers assembled at Cleveland, and adopted a 
resolution recommending a restriction of pro- 
duction. This recommendation was bo far fol- 
lowed or anticipated as to cause the blowing out 
during the summer of a number of furnaces, 
Others were blown out for repairs, at various 
periods during the year, and were not again put 
in blast. In September the panic came, and it 
was at once made evident, by the resultant 
shrinkage in prices and decrease in consumption, 
that production would have to be still further re- 
duced, and accordingly a number of additional 
furn.ices were blown out, so that, by the close of 
the year, of 665 furnaces then completed, 252 
were out of blast and 413 were in blast. The 
production of the year was 2,868,278 tons, or 
18,720 tons in excess of that of 1872. The year 
1874 opened with 413 furnaces in bla«t, in which 
nearly every one of the large new and improved 
furnaces built in 1872 and 1873 was included. 
The hopes of a revival of business that were en- 
tertained at the beginning of the year were soon 
found to be delusive, and then began the agita- 
tion of the policy of still further restricting pro- 
duction by means of a definite system which 
should aim at an equitable division of the trade. 
This agitation proved fruitless, but while it was 
pending very few furnaces were blown out, while 
fully as many others, some of which were new, 
were blown in. It was not until near the close 
of the year that a general determination to blow 
out furnaces was reached, and when the. year 
closed, of 701 furnaces then completed, 886 were 
out of blast and 365 were in blast. The produc- 



tion of the yrar was 2,689,413 tons, or 178,865 
tons less than the product of 1873. 

When we consider that the furnaces which 
made 2,S54,558 tons of iron in 1872 were mostly 
small ; that the lessened number of furnaces 
which made 2,868,278 tons in 1873 included all 
the large and improved new furnaces ; and that 
there were almost as many furnaces in blast in 
1874 as in s 1878, the best furnaces running, 
while the poorest stood idle, we need no long* 
wonder that the production of 1874 was 2,689.413 
tons, or only 178,865 tons less than the product 
of 1873. 

The quantity of pig iron of all kinds which was 
on hand and unsold at the close of 1874 in the 
hands of makers or their agents was 795,784 lut 
tons. The quantity which was held by specula- 
tive parties, or was in the hands of creditors, or 
in the hands of consumers, was undoubtedly 
large; so that, at the close of 1874, the total 
quantity of pig iron in the country, exclusive of 
the small stocks of foreign iron, may be safely 
estimated at 1,000,020 tons. Prices could not be 
expected to improve under such circumstances, 
and, although more furnaces have blown out 
since the 1st of January than have been blown 
in, the quantity of iron that has been made since 
then, joined to the 1,000,000 tons then on hand, 
has been entirely too large to exercise any other 
than a depressing effect on the market. On the 
1st of February, 1875, of 701 completed furnace 
stacks in the country, there were in blast 803 
stacks, and out of blast 893 stacks. Sixty-two 
furnaces had been blown out in January. Since 
February 1st the nnmber of furnaces out of blast 
has b.en slightly increased. The number of new 
furnaces completed in 1874 was 88, against 50 in 
1ST3 and 41 in 1872. The astonishing number of 
46 stacks is reported as being in course of erec- 
tion in 1875, while others are projected. 

Below we present a table showing the growth 
of the pig iron branch of the iron trade of the 
United States from 1854 to 1874, compiled from 
statistics procured by this Association. 



YEARS 



1854 

!$ 

1859 
i860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
186; 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 



Anthracite. 



339,435 
381,806 
443,U3 
390.385 
361,430 
471.745 
519,211 
409,229 
470-3I5 
577,638 
684,018 
479,558 
749.367 
798.638 
893,000 
971,150 
930,000 
956 608 
1,369,812 

1,312.754 
1,202,144 



Charcoal. 



342,298 
339,922 
37o,47 
330,321 
285,313 
284,041 
278,331 
195,278 
1 85, 660 
212,005 

241,8^3 
262,342 
332,580 
344,341 
370,000 
392,150 
365,060 
385,000 
^00,^87 
577,620 
576,557 



iXtumin 11 

Coal and 

foke. 



54,485 
62,390 

69,554 
77,451 
58,351 
84,841 
122,228 
127,037 
130,687 
157,961 

2io,125 

189,682 

268,396 

318,647 

340,000 

553,341 

570,000 
570,000 
984,1^9 

977,904 

910,712 



TOTAL. 



736,218 

784,178 

883,137 

798,157 

705,694 

840,627 

919,770 

731,544 

787,662 

947,604, 

1,135,999 

931,582 

i,35o,343 

1, .161,626 

1 ,603,000 

1,916,641 

1,865,000 

T, 91 2,6o8 

2,8^4,^8 
2,868,278 
2,689,413 



16 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



PRODUCTION OK ROLLED IRON IN TUB UNITED STATES 
IN 1S74. 

Below will be found a table showing the pro- 
duction in net tons by States of all forms of rolled 
in«n produced in the United States in 1874, includ- 
ing all kinds of rails, and nails and spikes. ^ As 
heretofore explained, our statistics of rolled iron 
embrace bar. band, hoop, plate, sheet, angle, 
girder, beam, boat, guide, rod, and bridge iron, 
and rolled axj.es. All forged iron, such as an- 
chors, anvils, hammered axles, cranks, ships 
knees, etc., is carefully excluded, because it is 
impossible to learn the whole amount of iron 
hammt red or forged in the vast number of ma- 
chine-shops, locomotive works, qferine engine 
works, anchor works, and similar establishments 
of the country. 



STATES. 



Maine 

N. Hampsh.. 

Vermont 

Massachus'ts 
Rbodelsland 
Connecticut. 
New York... 
New Jersey. 
Pennsylv'ia. 
Delaware... 
Maryland.... 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Alabama 

W. Virginia. 
Kentucky . . . 
Tennessee... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin... 

Missouri 

California . . . 
Kansas 



H 
o * J 

i— o 5 

Ota 



3.994 
300 



Total. 



4o.3 2 4 
7,170 
11,921 
76, coo 
24.645 
343.632 
6,860 

11,086 
1,406 
1,000 
1,609 

18,239 

1.573 
105.413 
7.376 
2,500 
4,207 

275 
1,500 
9,205 



e*3 



6,592 



4,000 
2,256 
120,098 
4,958 
",428 



5,120 



5.M3 



2,240 
1,553 



10,870 






28,8 1 ( 

3,44^ 



5.949 
27.643 
75.I5I 



5,602 



54,201 

5,121 

660 

27,253 

7,514 

4.2W 



689,280 175,258 245,609 



to- 
es 



£. o. 



hJ, 



14,650 



10,400 
24,/65 



46,979 

3,537 
259,288 



48,008 
'8J061 



522 
6,068 

13,693 
82,561 
20,617 
125,103 
2,448 
29,680 

24,017 
7,016 
2,000 



18,644 

300 

10,400 

100,500 
10,616 
11,921 

I33,5i8 
s8,o8i 

798,169 
11,818 
68,891 
16,688 
9,467 
1,000 
56,332 
34,548 
15,926 

226,370 

35,507 

134,093 

8,208 

29,955 

30,3=7 

16,221 

2,000 



729413 1,839,560 



The total production of all rolled iron in 181,4, 
Bessemer steel rails included, was 1,839,560 net 
tons, against 1,966,445 Ions in 1873, a decrease 
of only 126,885 tons. This decrease was all in 
rails. Of the total p^ oduct of the rolling mills in 
1874,1,110,147 tons were rolled iron other than 
rails, against 1,076,368 tons in 1873, an increase 
of 83,779 tons. The number of tonsof nail plate 
consumed in 1874 was 245,609 net tons, against 
201,235 tons in 1873, an increase of 44,874 tons. 
The increase of 38,779 tons in the aggregate pro- 
| duction of rolled iron other than rails in 1S74 was 
therefore wholly in the department of cut nails 
and spikes. The total number of kegs of cut 
nails and spikes produced in 1874 was 4,912,180, 
against 4,024,704 kegs in 1873. 

The following table will show the comparative 
production of rolled iron, excluding rails, and of 
cut nails and spikes, in all the States in 1873 and 
1874. 



STATES. 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 
Massachusetts . . . 

Rhodelsland 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Alabama 

West Virginia . . . 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Missouri 

California 



Bar.Angle,Bolt, 

Rod, Hoop, 

Plate and Sheet 

Iron. 

Net tone. 



1873. 1874. 



4.710 

300 

53,3" 

8,000 

I Moo 

90,796 

41,112 

447,282 

XI & 7 

Is. 669 
7,462 
1,840 

500 
3,863 
26,569 
2,588 
118,709 
4,5*0 
5,240 
4,109 



Cat Nai't and 
Spikes. 

Kega. 



1873. 1874. 



8,601 
6,945 



3,994' 

300 

46,916; 

7,170 
11,921 
80,590 
26,901 

463,730 
11,818 
20,883 
n,o86i 

M°6| 
1,000 
1,609 
23,359' 
i,573 
110,556 
7,376| 
4-740, 
5,760 

275 
12,370 
9,205 



626,465! 576,376 
73,249 j 68,920 

84U38J * V18J085 

456,537i 552,867 
1,195,609 1,503,019 



106,922; 112,034 ji 

10,183' j 

I J 

878,6531,084,027 

j 102,411 

[ 13,210 

460,618! 545,052 
98,530! 150,279 
33,500! 85,000 



Total 875,133 864,538 4,024,704 4,912,180 



In the following table is presented a summary, 
of the production of all forms of rolled iron in the 
United Str.tes from 1864 to 1S74. 



YEAR*. 



1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 

1873 
1874 



Ral's. 



335,369 
3^6,292 
430,778 
462,108 
506,714 
^93,586 
620,000 

775,733 

1,000,000 

890,077 

729.4I3 



Other Rolled 
Iron. 



536,958 
^00,048 

^,3" 
570,838 
598,286 
642,420 
70s, 000 
710,000 
941,992 
1,076,368 
1,110,147 



Total. 



872,327 
856,340 
1,026,089 
1,041,946 
1,10^,000 
1,236,006 
1 ,325,000 

1,485,733 
1,941,992 

I,?66,445 
I,839,f;6o 



PRODUCTION OF RAILS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1874. 

The total production of rails of all kinds in the 
United States in 1874, was 729.413 net tons, 
against 890,077 tons in 1873, 1,000.000 tons in 
1872, and 775,733 tons in 1871. The following 
table will show the States which produced rails 
in 1874, and the character of the product, in net 
tons. 

The whole number of rail rolling mills in the 
country in 1874 was 91, of which 57 make heavy 
rails mainly, and 84 make only light or street 
rails. Of the whole 91 mills, 22 made no rails 
in 1874. The prBduct of the year was therefore 
rolled by 69 mills, and many of these ran only a 
part of the time. The capacity of all the rail 
rolling mills of the country is at least double tht 
product of 1874, which was 729,413 net tons. Ol 
the 67 mills which made rails in 1874, 7 mad« 
both iron and Bessemer Bteel rails, 1 made Bes 
semer steel rails exclusively, 2 made steel-headec 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



IT 



STATES. 

lass 

few York 
r. Jersey. 

laryland 

f. Va.... 

Lentucky 
'ennessee 

>hio 

ndiana. .. 
llinois .. 
lichigan. 
Viscousin 
lissouri.. 
Salilornia 
Kansas.... 

Total.... 


>« «f 

y » E. 
: ?, 


i* 

©:? 

• *> 

if 

: d 




.3 

• — 

» p. 

3 

i 

T 


»»• 

If 8? 
w$ e 

£.- s o 

"g.f 

• m Z 

: a er 
. a> p 

• TB 

I,O0O 
14,007 

597 
1.377 

200 


a> 

w 

2. 


H 




22,982 
1,300 

179.774 

2,500 
1,200 

43.320 
314 

73,783 

8,288 
16,517 


19.732 

522 
1,150 

200 
7,384 

522 

630 

840 

1,500 

32,480 


14,650 
9,400 

24,76=; 
9,505 
1,123 

48,008 
8,061 

2,000 
12,293 
29,781 
19.781 

s \n 
20,552 
6,000 
6,576 

2,000 


'485 

517 

2,917 

418 

1,876 

86 

440 

6,739 


14,650 
10,400 

24,765 
46,979 

3,537 

259,288 

48,008 

8,061 
522 

6,068 

13,693 

82,^61 

20,617 

12^103 

2,448 
29,680 
24,017 

7,016 

2,000 


349.978 


323,035 


17,181 


729,4 r 3 



ails exclusively, 2 made steel-headed rails and 
ron rails, and one made solid cast steel rails and 
ron rails. 
The following summary v£U show the sources 
f rail supply during these three years, in net 
ons: 



Rails of nil Kinds. 


1872. - 

1,000,000 
530,850 


1878. 

890,077 
258,773 

1,148,850 


1874. 




729,413 
108,282 


1, =30,850 


_ 8 37.695. 



Our exports of rails during the past four years 
lave not been sufficiently large to affect appre- 
iably the above figures of home consumption. 
They were as follows in net tons: 1871, 333; 
1872. 1,212-, 1873, 375 ; 1874, 1,257. 

Below is a table which shows the production of 
sach of the rail-making States during the past 
"our years. The production of street, mine, and 
igbt rails in 1872 is given in the aggregate, but 
n the other years it is incorporated with the gen- 
eral rail product of the several States : 



STATES. 

Pennsylvania. . .c. 

[llinois 

Ohio 

New York 

Maryland 

Wisconsin 

Massachusetts 

Indiana 

Maine 

Missouri •.. 

Tennessee 

iNew Jersey 

Kentucky 

(Georgia 

Michigan 

West Virginia 

Vermont 

California 

Kansas 



Street, mine and 
light rails 

Total 



1871. 



335.604 
91,178 
75.782 
87,022 
44.941 
28,774 
28,864 
12,778 

13,383 
8,200 
9.667 
6,700 
6,00s- 
7,840 

14,000 
5,000 



775,733 



1878. 1878. 1874. 

419,529 
106,916 
121,923 

82,457 
26,472 
37,284 
29,242 

23,893 
14,058 
15,500 
14,620 

9,185 

4,000 

6,930 

9,883 
20,100 



941,992 
58,008 



775,733 1,000,000 



259,288 
125,103 
82,561 
46,979 
48,008 
29,680 

24.765 

20,617 

14,650 

24,017 

13,693 

3.^37 

6,668 

8,061 

2,448 

522 

10,400 

7,016 

2,000 

890,077 729,413 

I ' • 



328,522 
136,102 
130,326 
59,764 
42,3^6 
39,495 
34,034 
20,579 
16,500 
14,020 
13,973 
13,749 
11,386 

8,275 
4,433 



475 



0,077 729,413 



PRODUCTION OF BESSEMER STEEL IN THE UNITED 
STATES IN 1874. 

The eight completed Bessemer steel establish- 
ments in this country were not fully occupied in 
filling orders during 1874. Nevertheless, the pro- 
duct of the year was greater than that of 1873. 
The production of Bessemer steel rails in 1874 
was 144,944 net tons, against 129,015 net tons in 
1873 — a gain of 15,929 tons. The production of 
Bessemer steel rails in this country, since 1867, 
when they were first made upon orders, has been 
as follows in net tons : 



1871 38,250 

1872 94,070 

1873 129,015 

1874 144,944 




Below is a table of the annual production in 
this country of merchantable Bessemer steel for 
all purposes, from 1867 to 1874, in net tons : 



1867 3,000 

1868 8,500 

1869 , ..12,000 

187O , 40,000 



1871 45,000 

1872 110,500 

1873 1 =,7,000 

1874 176,579 



The total quantity of pig iron converted by the 
Bessemer or Pneumatic process was 140,404 net 
tons in 1S72, 183,534 tons in 1S73, and 204,352 
tons in 1874. 

The Edgar Thomson Steel Company Limited 
made their first blow on Thursday, August 26th 
last, started their blooming mill on Friday, Aug. 
27th, and rolled their first rail on Wednesday, 
Sept. let. The works at once went into full opera- 
tion. This company makes the ninth that is now 
engaged in making Bessemer steel rails in this 
country. The Lackawanna Iron and Coal Com- 
pany will follow before the close of this year. 
The foundations of the Bessemer plant of the Vul- 
can Iron Works at St. Louis have just been laid. 

The quantity of Bessemer ingots made in the 
United Kingdom during the last five years is 
stated as follows, by competent authority, in 
gross tons : In 1870, 215,000 tons ; 1871, 329,000 ; 
1872,410,000; 1873,496,000; 1874,540,000. 

The imports of steel rails from all countries 
into the United States in the calendar year 1874 
were 100,466 net tons, against 159,571 tons in 
1VT3, and 149,786 tons in 1872. Prior to 1S72 the 
imports of steel rails were not separately classi- 
fied, and there is consequently no record of the 
quantity imported. In the following table we 
give in net tons the production and importation 
of steel rails during the past three years, the 
combined figures indicating the consumption in 
those years : 



STEEL RAILS. 



Production of Bessemer 

steel rails 

Importation, ditto 

Consumption, ditto 



1872. 1878. 



94,070 129,015 



1874. 



144,944 



149,786 159,5711100486 
243,856 ; 288,58~6 ! 245,430 



The average price in currency at which Amer- 
ican steel rails have been sold at the works since 
the establishment of the industry, is shown in 
the following summary : 



1867., 
1868., 



.$160 1 1869, 
. 1 58^ 1 1870. 



.$I32M 1 187I. .$102>£ I 1873. .$I20}< 

. 106% 1 1872.. 112 '1874.. 94^ 



The prices obtained at the works thus far dur- 
ing 1875, have averaged about $75. 



18 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



Below is a table showing, in net tons, the total 
production of steel other than Bessemer in this 
country during the past ten years : 



i86^. 
1866. 



IS 



1869. 



15,262 

18,973 
19,000 
21,500 
23,000 



1870 35- 000 

1871 37.°°° 

1872 38,000 

1873 5o.o«> 

1874 4748i 



During the calendar year 1874 our imports of 
steel lnpots, bars, sheets and wire amounted to 
$2,678,611, against $3,863,316 in 1873, $4,106,0S7 
in 1872, and $8,460,735 in 1871. Our exports 
of these articles in 1874 amounted to 343 net 
tons of the value of $29,557, against 26 tons 
in 1S73 of the value of $5,4S1, 9 tons in 1872 of 
the value of $3,624, and 80 tons in 1871 of the 
value of $7,364. The increase in our exports 
and the decrease in our imports of these com- 
modities in 1874 are very marked, and the sta- 
tistics for 1874 are equally encouraging to the 
home manufacturer. 

SCMMARV OF IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTION IN 1874. 

From the foregoing statistics of the production 
of pig iron, rails, bar iron, steel, etc., in the 
United States in 1872, 187S and 1874, the follow- 
ing table of the aggregate production of iron 
and steel is compiled, embracing the different 
branches of the iron trade : 



PRODUCTS— NET TONS I 1872. 

Pig Iron 

All rolled iron, includ- 



187S. 



1874. 



ing nails 

All rolled iron, includ- 
ing nails and exclud- 
ing rails 

Rails of all kinds 

Bessemer steel rails.. . 

Iron and all other rails 

Street railB 

Kegs of cut nails and 
spikes 

Merchantable Besse- 
mer steel other than 
rails 

Total of merchantable 
Beasemer steel 

Crucible cast steel . . . 

Open-hearth steel 

All otber steel 

Blooms from ore and 
pig iron 



2,854,558 2,868,278 2,689,413 
1,941,992 1,966,445 1,839,560 

941,992 1,076,368 1,110,147 
1,000,000 j 890,0771 729,413 
94,070 

905,930 
i 15,000 



4,065,322 



16,430 

i 10,500 

27,260 

3,000 

7,740 

^8,000 



129,015 

761,062 

9,43o 



144,944 

584,469 

0.739 



4,024 704 4,912,180 



27,985 

1^7,000 

32.786 

3-Soo 

I3,7M 

62,^64 



31,635 

176,579 

34,128 

7,000 

6,353 

61,670 



The consumption of rails in any given year can 
be ascertained with a great degree of accuracy 
by assuming that the quantity carried over from 
year to year is always about the same, and that 
the total of imports and production is therefore 
consumed. The following table will show the 
probable consumption of rails in this country 
during 1872, 1873 and 1874 : 



RAILS. 



i 1878. 
I Net Tons 



905,930 



Production of iron rails 

Production of Besse- 
mer rails .... I 94,070 

Importation of Iron) 
rails 

Importation of Besse- 
mer rails 



381,064 
149,786 



Probable consumption 1,530,850 



761,062 
129,015 
99,202 
i59.57i 



1,148,850 



COTTON STATISTICS. 

Previously to 1790, the United States did not 
export a pound of cotton. A little had been 
raised for domestic use before the Revolution, 
but the quantity was of no importance. In 1791 
the trifling quantity of 189,316 lbs. was ex- 
ported, and in 1792, 138,328 lbs. — not enough in 
both years to load an average sized schooner. 
About this time Eli Whitney invented the cotton 
gin, by which the wool of the upland cotton is 
separated from the seed with facility, whereas be- 
fore the process was so difficult that the cotton was 
hardly worth the labor of preparing it. The ef- 
fect of this invention was immediately perceptible 
in the exports of cotton, which increased in 1794 
to 1,601,760 lbs., and in 1795 to 5,276,300 lbs. 
By 1821 they had increased to 124,893,405 lbs. of 
the value of $20,157,484, and at present the ex- 
ports upon an average exceed 1,100,000,000 lbs. 
of the average value in our paper currency of 
$200,000,000. The following table shows the an- 
nual production of cotton in bales in the United 
States for a period of 54 years. 
No. 1. — Total Crop of Cotton in the United 
States in each Year since 1820, stated in 
Bales of about 440 lb*, each Net Weight. 



1874. 

Net Tomb 



584,469 

^44,944 

7,796 

100,486 



837,695 



These figures indicate a reduced consumption 
of rails of all kinds in 1874 of 311,155 tons as 
compared with 1873, and of 698,155 tons as com- 
pared with 1872. 



Years. Bales. Years. Bales. Years. Bales 



1821-22 
1822-23 
1823-24 
1824-25 
1825-28 
1826-27 
1827-28 
1828-29 
1829-30 
1830-31 
1831-32 
1832-33 
1833-34 
1834-33 
1835-36 
1836-37 
1837-38 
1838-39 



455,000 
495,000 
509,158 
569,249 
720,027 
957,281 

727,593 

870,415 

976,845 

1,038,848 

987,477 
1,070438 
1,205,324 
1,254,328 

!, 300,725 
1422,930 
1,801,497 
1,360,532 



1 839-40 
1840-^ 
184I-42 
1842-43 
1843-44 
1844-45 
1845-46 
1846-47 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1850-tlI 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1854-5: 
1855-5I 
1856-57 



2,177,835 
1,034,945 
1,683,574 
2,378,875 
2,030,409 

2394,503 
2,IOO,537 
1,778,651 
2,347,634 
2,728,596 
2,096,706 
2,355,257 

3,01^,029 

3,262,882 
2,930,027 
2,847,339 
3,527.845 
2,939,519 



18^7-58 
1858-59 

18^9-00 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1863-64 
I864-6S 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1868-69 

1869-70 
1870-71 

1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1874-75 



3,113,962 
3,851.481 

4,609,770 
3,656,086 
* 4, 800,000. 
1,500,000 
500,000 
300,000 
2,193,987 
2,019,774 
2,59:-.993 
2,439.039 
3.154,946 
4,352,317 
2,974,35i 
3,930,^08 
4,170,388 
3,832,991 



The above statistics show an average for the 
last three years of nearly 4,000,000 bales. Of this 
aggregate, on an average of the last four years, 
1,200,000 bales a year have been consumed by 
the manufacturers of our own country. Ac- 
cording to the valuable statistics of The Com- 
mercial and Financial Chronicle, Northern 
manufacturers took from the crop 896 860 bales 
in 1S69-70; 1,008,956 bales in 1870-1; 977,540 
bales in 1S71-2; 1,063,465 bales in 1872-3; 
1,177,417 bales in 1873-4, and 1,062,522 bales in 
1874-5. Manufacturers in. the Southern States 
took 90,000 bales in 1869-70; 91,240 bales in 
1870-1 ; 120,000 bales in 1871-2 j 187,662 bales in 
1S72-3; 128,526 bales in 1873-4, and 130,483 
bales in 1874-5. 

The late J. R. McCullcch, an eminent author- 
ity in political economy among the inhabitants 
of the British Isles, expatiates in his Dictionary 
of Commerce on the immense obstacles to be 
overcme before the cotton manufacture could 
gain a secure footing in the United States. He 
regarded that species of industry as having been 
forced into a premature existence here by a pro- 
tective tariff, and expressed the opinion that 
such a misdirection of capital and industry could 

* EatimntprL r/~^.«i /,'ouosi /vn >,"/»/,» Oft 1 



Estimated. 



[Continued on page 20.] 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



19 



YEAR3. 



OOOOOOCOCOCOOOCO 



t I 



Total Exported. 



00 CO -i CitCjO CO 
COSliltlMMdlO 



02 P^O N ifi« COO O 

jS "t r ; c Q'C < "£'C' ov q. 

«- ■ « -t -too" cJ" co g"co* 
\o CO t vro ciom 
o r~,o cA-ro>fi m 



West Indies and 
South America. 



WO iflM-tS 

• p^oo pi mo pi 
on co q i- co rj c^ 
•2 -? po co" m m I 



British North 
America. 



o co cox co t-* pi p>% 



ft t^«M POO t t-l 

O O >-" "" POOO -t o 



HUN 



Mexico. 



WinoO 



ci oo t r^oo o* on m 

^•O^w O On O POO 
. cq in cn p*. -r ci_o m 

i O oo pT c? Q\ p". 6" On 

* CO PI O « CO on 
cooo cTo i-j 

on O r^t^pi no 

t co co o pi i-i 
^ ooo pi o m t < 



. hinn, Azores,, 

Denmark, a»d;,a^g"pfpo o"ci 

..,-,' i„ O OOO i-i PI 

rest of Europe. m rn.--.oo « 



Sweden and 
Norway. 



in . 



Italy. 



O ifiCi 

O ~T PO O m too o 

in r^o — On pi on-d 

. -r q> o_ m -t n q. co 

2 m cTco" -t p" cT cooo* 

"<tfiNMri10O O- 

•— >0 O "X PJ, t O; ci^ c* 

COO" t tC M m ir C* 
N MM 



H.lland. 



go p-. t t- m n o 

OO fllflN MOO m M 
M_ Cs. N H^OO O- "-^ CO 

p^ n in m cT to t 

•npto p* o oooo g 

N inO l^NNOO 
C* N 00* in PI C? O* 



Belgium. 



hoo t(i ptco O p-» 

M 1/MniT -tO TO 
, COCANh CO POO^ i-i 

* p*. cooo" coooo" co 



- M ir 



Russia. 



t OnPO too o pi 

00 -• U". CO P~ t CO CO 

( P^ O O cOi-ifi coO 
6*.tp*6*incocog" 
qo r-»o p-» cooo p^ on 

O00 Nmm^ mo 

lOl/ldl^H -f On t 
M CO N t m 



Spain. 



On co on m o oo to 

ON CO P^ ON P^ N PI 

*? o"oo -? in «T cT n 



MNMCItCONin 



Germany. 



■>to co o co T p^o 
qnm oir.N OM » 
qo^ co r-« pi no pi o 

oo oo" "TtC \r ono* pT co 

,0 onn n r^oo 



CM p^ t>J» O NtON' 



France. 



OiM t COO CO 
cooo 
O to 



JO O ooo cooo 



j;o>N u-,m\o m cjrj 
co co g* pT 6"ob* co p*. 
co on m moo i-i p^ 



Gre-'t Britain 

and Ireland. 



CO PIO00 POin t N 
t m CO P-* TTO >-i t>* 

mcjiriNciP.M px 
• OtCOinNtONM 

co n m -no n h tN 
_q co in in i-i co qo m 

r- 1 -t -tO* ON ft* COOO" CO 



YEARS. 



.£"°P. Ono m ci co-r 
Onoo t^r^r-^r^r^ 

cooooooocooooooo 



p~ 
o 

u 

p 

O 

5 

►l 

« 
o 

a 
f* 

o 

O t-i 

S° 

Pa 
CO 

Ki w 

2s 

p 

H 
r-i 

M 
O 



B 

s 

I 



YEAES. 



ON o M pi co -t NJ" t O r^co o- O i-l pi co -*■ 
1/ ,o OOOOOOOOnO p^p>.p^p^c^ 

cooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooo 



EXCESS OF 
IMPORTS. 



opiooopiOpiocooOcooopico 

CO i-i m O COOO P-O O OO 00 00 O POO 



05 -J- O- ON v/-> CO O ON CO "T TX Ch^D CO On O- 

!qoo w\o pi rs'fu-,ir»pi o^c^h q^oo^^po^ 

*"* O" o"o0 Onoo" On n^Oo" PIO p^i-"N6"^-iP^r^ 



ON CO tj-O O ON C- O On i-i "I- > 



TOTAL 
EXP0BTED. 



o o o oo o -roo oooo -too ono pi 

CO -T PI ^i O- O PI CO CO PI -1- -T m -f ""i CO 

w o o-""i-tcoo-o>onco cooqo^ q Pi. 1 ^ 

«N COONCslCI proo" •-* >^ CO ^ On ir, \T\ \r . O P^ 
S -T COX) i-i >no 000 CO~i00 P^l^O Ono 
.O J co ch p^ co Pj ^; 0-0 r^ pi - O O O o- 



u-, ooo i-i-i -fpioo o pi -too pi co o oo 
t^ir, oni-> tf OtXJ inn p^ coo r-~ pi >n 

HMCIMM CI CO CO CO CO PI PI CO CI CI PI 



TOTAL 
IMPORTED. 



d ClOOOO -tOO -tO CI O O P) rt <N 



1^ i O CO On Cl 00 



CO O O OnO PI 



CO pi P^ P^. PI CO 



°. '"; '1 p i 

. OnjO -t CO -r PI ci 
CO 00 COl 

,Q OjO; 

—> "-■ o"o" CO O T'ji P~ ci CO — ONOO c 



P^ On P^O *t 



cb i<od b O >- oo o p-.no co co c>o 
c-oMS-in v^oq^ p^ iQ co m oo ^oo 
" co o -tod" p^ c^co" uT ooo" co pfo 

M NON1-- P^O CI CI CO p-~ O CI NO 
l/,vO 00 ON pP| PI CO CI PO t^ *t vTi ir 



O O -t -t -r O -to -J- O O 
ci oo pi -r ci -tt^' 

»-i^O O COCO Pl^ P; 

"op 



OlNf fi' 



Other Counti ies. ,n o" o' cooo 1 \r. R. o 

| r- p; CO O NT.O P-. vr , -t00_ CO NT, 

" o" co o* cT pCoo" On 



r, co r^ CO CnOO "~>00 
■ - O p^ •-• ^ >o 



CI COCO CI 



_ ui ci ci u"N00 

m UTi CO CO CO "-I 



Japan. 



-t t -TO PI ~T 

Cl PI O On CO . O 

ci -t cooo^ q, **2 

m" -t C*^D w 

M OO0 •» 1 Cl 

N-JON 

<> cT 



China. 



ooo 

•- CO I 



o l*~ tri vr, co c 
t^oo >*f 

m'oV 
coio 



■*PI00 PI 

Tf "^-CO 

; .- i-^oo^oo^ 

cT N^OOO 

O NOM On 
MNOffl 



Br'tish Poses- 
Bions in the 

East Indies. 



g co oo oo two o co o o co 
ooo -tcioo ono to -*p^g 
co m -r ii-i p^ cOno pi^ qNO^ i-^no^ 

6"i-ro"-To"p^p^ci pCno o o 

CO-t-tNOPI PI tO I-" o -tco 
com OO -tN/^ONcOcOP^^ttrj 

cT -t On cT -to* Wi »roo P0 !-• M 

o>oo oncoo -tM on g^co -t 

S ci CO CO t U". T-O rt ft CO 



to to 

t PO t t 

p; i^-p^q 

On t On iA 

o co t ci 
ci^ ci^o q 
i-Tco pCpT 

CO tNO im 
t -tco t 



Egypt. 



o to tco oo to too ooo o pio a 

U-Y.O ONO o 1 1 o o pi oo too >-■ coo 

o o o t cono m,^ <i <J 1 i; * fj *i ' 

„C i-C -r cT cf cT cooo" O >fi pi O O no m P-» I 

So iri On -• vti On COnO CO O0 unmiOOO p^ > 

*2 o onoo o ti~i tcq^ pj,Pi. M ^tr^.M > voq i NC 

*"* I * 'NO 6" ON CO nto" co"o On o" POO 1^ t C 

cotttnONCi t^M pi pino tNNO < 



O t tNOOO CI00 Q t O Cl t to 

1 1 o mNH r^oo m o 'f h ci tm 
The Mediter- • o ir. m^k iq m ono^ t cono on t p^oci 

.noun »T(liiiivp Stf" P^ > "o" >n g, O S n\0 o" P^ m o* 

inean. ex*iu>ive ^ cooooo pi q vticomoo opw r^cot^ 
of Kgypt. K 



iriPioo r^.Pi in r^ p>. in ir, t^. qNq_ 
no co m" p^ «Vo po m cooo'oo" 



Brazil. 



Io tvi (ouoo tci u u^juu'ju y -ruw 
no o co g oomoccooooopioo 
. o-oo co O >-> "~ " t q i^ Onno co_oo oo t 
I co oo"o" d" 6\ co p^ co 1 6"o p^ too" p5o"h 
jo r^oo oNfio "On moi««imoso o 

pi t Cl^ Pl^ PQNO^ 0_tlf)NtNtNMiriNtlfl 
cT P^ P^ CO cToo" NTOo" o"co" On tNO" Cl Cl ON 

n m m««c<i mo t^ on p>-o co " p~ p~ 



New Granada 

and 

Venezue'a. 



ci gooo o too pi 
a on p^no cm m t pi co in 



d int^ci o onOm oooooon 



British West 
India Is'ands 
and Brtish 

Guana. 



o ■^■■^■e^o pi pi cioQooooo g ooo 

troo o Miioi" ltoo n to in cono oo 

• ci r^. co coco ONONCOCNioo^in, ci^inONM p> 

I cT o"o" co i-Tco"no" g"6"ininti-rb"opT 

' On u-|00 OOO COCOO m PI Oib MflsQ 

' in, o t ""> "i. P^ mo^oo t^.o coo^ t O Mri 
w? in ino"o" co t cT i-T cT ci" m" i-T 



PI M 



Mexico. 



o pi t g o-- 

Cl w NOO tNJ 

ir, m^ O^'OO^ ci - 

M00 On t Cl C 

po p> coo in 



to o oo t 

t m CO -to 

"l! q m 1 1 

6" cT m"oc?o" 



CI CO 



The 
United States. 



o 



oo tooo go go too o o o t 

CNl CICQCO00 cog M ttCNIOO mO 

ii"i ci ojo t i-^oo q onoo^ on o o oo 
p^ d" eg" t too" cl m no"co"oo"oo" pC g" cono" 

O On O PI On On COO O NiAtKO P^CNl 

i-^oo^ iniricOMOo o m tcociONO^in. on 
m in cf coo* t in o"oo t p-^o oo" in cT t 

Ommm m CON N M/|n CON COP- 

onmoo Minmu-itt^oooooo 



YEARS. 



on g m ci -o t mo p^.oo on o m ci co t 
itnoo oooo noooo p^i^p^r^i^ 

COOOOOOOOOCOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOCOCO 



20 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876, 



\Conlinu4d from pagt 18.] 
end in nothing but ruin to the parties involved 
in it While the people of the United States can 
agree with Mr. McCulloch that without the pro- 
tection of the tariff the cotton manufacture 
could never have reached its present develop- 
ment in our country, it may at the present time 
be seriously debated whether the manufacture 
might not continue to flourish with unabated 
vigor were the protective duties abolished and 
revenue duties alone collected, as is the case in 
Canada. The fact, however, is beyond doubt 
that the United States rank next to Great Britain 
and far in advance of all other countries in the 
manufacture of cotton goods, though the pro- 
ducts of our factories are almost exclusively for 
home consumption. 

The United States produce more cotton than 
all the rest of the world together. The annual 
consumption of cotton in Europe and North 
America is now estimated at 2,700,000,000 lbs., 
of which 1,250,000,000 are worked up in Great 
Britain, 925,000,000 lbs. on the Continent of 



Europe, and 525,000,000 lbs!, in the United States. 
Of this total of 2,700,000,000 lbs., over 1,700,000,- 
000 lbs. are grown in the United States, and less I 
than 1,000,000,000 in India, Egypt, Brazil, and 
other countries. By consulting Table No. 2, on 
the preceding page, it will be seen that Great \ 
Britain is the destination of from two-thirds to 
three-quarters of all our exports of cotton, the | 
greater portion of the remainder going to the < 
Continent of Europe. Table No. 8 shows that j 
previously to 1861 more than three-fourths of all I 
the cotton imported into Great Britain came ; 
from the United States, whereas upon an average • 
of the last four years but little more than one-'; 
half of the British imports came from this coun-'i 
try. It will be noticed that a large quantity of \ 
cotton, which is finally manufactured by the nt-^ 
tions of Continental Europe is first imported by [ 
Great Britain, and then re-exported to its final ! 
place of destination. The quantity for the last \ 
ten years has ranged from 220,000,000 to 389,- J 
000,000 lbs. 

II 



The following tibles exhibit, in the strongest 
light, the decadence in the foreign commerce of 
American shipping since 1860, and the great 
increase, during the same period, of British 
tonnage. Fifteen years ago two-thirds of the 
tonnage which entered and cleared at our 
ports, carried our own flag, and in British ports 



AMERICAN AND BRITISH SHIPPING. 

our flag was seen almost as often as British 
colors. The state of things is now reversed, 
British-built steamers and other vessels doing, 
we suppose, two-thirds of the foreign carrying 
trade of the world. The accompanying statistics, 
which have never before been placed in juxta- 
position, will be found an interesting study. 



No. i.— Total Tonnage of United States and Fobeign Vessels (sailing and steam) 
Entered and Cleared with Cargoes and in Ballast, at Ports in the UNITEp 

STATES, FROM AND TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 



Y«»rs. 



1857-8. 

1858-9. 
1859-0. 
1865-6. 
1865-7. 
1867-8. 
1868-9. 
1869-0., 
1870-1., 
1871-2., 
1872-3.. 
1873-4.. 
1874-5.. 



ENTERED. 



CLEARED. 



U. Stale*.; Foreign. 



Tons. 
4.395.642 
1,265,648 
5,921,285 
3,372,060 
3.435.052 
3,550.550 
3,402,668 
3486,038 
3,742,740 
3.71 I.846 
3,612,631 
3,893.725 
3.573.950 



Tom. 
2,209,403 
2,540,387 
2,353,9" 
4,4io.4 2 4 
4,318.673 

4.495.4°5 
5.347,694 
5,669,621 
6,266,444 

7.094,577 
8,083,086 
9,197,829 
8,118,860 



Total. |U. States.; Foreign. 



T..ns. 

6,605,045! 
7.806,0351 
0,275,1061 
7,782.484 
7,773.725 
8,046,015 
8,750,362 

9.155.659 
10,009,184 
10,806,423 
11,695,717 

13,091.554 
11,692,810) 



Tons, j 
4,49°.033 : 
5,297,367| 
6,165,924; 
3,383,1761 
3,419,502! 
3,717,9561 
3,38i,363| 
3,106,929! 

3,746,945 
3,682,309 
3,756,564 
3,982,052 
3,736,639! 



Tons. 

2,312,759 
2,618,388 
2,624,005 
4.438,384 
4,465,490 
4,561,060 
5.372,570 
5,662,474 
6,151,537 
7,051,425 
8,065,132 
9,207,396 
8,159,868 



Total. 



Tons. 
6,802,792 

7,915,755 
8,789,929 
7,821,560 
7,884,992 
8,279,016 

8,753,933 
9,160,403 
9,898,482 

10,733.734 
11,821,696 
13,180,448 
11,896,507 



TOTAL. 



U. States.) Foreign. 1 To'.al. 



Tons. 

8,885,675 
10,563,015 
12,087,209 

6,735,230 

7,268,506 
6,784,031 
6,992,067 
7,489,685 

7,394,155 
7,369,195 

7,875,777 
7,310,589 



Tons. I 

4,522,162! 

5.1 58,775 1 

4,977,910 

8,848,808 : 

8,78^,163! 

9,056,525! 

10,720,264! 

1 1, 332,005! 

12,417,981: 

14,146,102) 

16,148,218] 

18,405,225. 

16,278,728 



Tons. 
13.407,837 
15,721,790 
17,065,125 
15,604,044 

15,658,717 
16,325,031 
17,504,295 
18,325,062 
19,907,666 
21,540,157 

23,517,413 
26,281,002 

23.589.317 



Y.ari. 



.1857-8 

..1858-9 
.1859-0 

.1801-6 
.1866-7 
. 1867-8 
.1868-9 
,.1869-0 
,.1870-1 
.1871-2 
,.1872-3 
,.1873-4 
.1874-5 



No. 2.— Total Tonnage of British and Foreign Vessels (sailing and steam) Entered 

AND CLEARKD WITH CARGOES AND IN BALLAST, AT PORTS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 

from and to Foreign Countries and British Possessions. 



Years. 



1858... 
.859... 
1800... 
18'JI... 
1862... 
1853... 
1864... 
1865... 
1866... 
1867... 
iS63... 
1869... 
1870... 
1871... 
1872. . . 
1873... 
1874... 



ENTERED. 



British. Foreign. 



Tons. 
6,439,201' 
6,585,112 
6.889,009 



Tons. 
4.522,499 
4,636,810 
5,283,776 



7,721.035) 5,458,554 

7,856,639; 5,234,451 

8430,146 4,821,917 

9,028,100 4486,911 

9.623432 4,694.454 

10,692,102 4,920,068 

11,197,865 5,140,952 

11,225,017 5,396.758 

11.721,897; 5,476.427 

12.380,390 1,732,974 

13.857,638 6,622,250 

14.173.280 6,842,126 

14.541.028 7,323,929 

14.833.644 1 7.534.866 



Total. 



To:.s. 
10,961,700 
11,221,922 
12,172,785 

13,179,589 
13,091,090 
13,256,063 
13,115,011 
14,317,886 
15,612,170 
16,338,817 
16,622,675 
17,198,324 
18,113,364 
20479,897 
21,015,415 
21,864.957 
22,368,510 



CLEARED. 



British. I Foreign. 



Tons. 
6452,204 
6,726,731 
7,025,914 

7,699497 
8,000,221 
8,589,246 
9.173,575 
9.735.523 
10,563,624 
11,172,205 

11,434.507 
12,067,270 
12,691,790 
14,177,110 
i4,545,8oi 
15,106,316 
15,256,039 



Tons. 
4,896,077 
4,915,606 
5,490,593 
5,716,555 
5,354,128 
4,893424 
4,515,923 
4,843,683 
5,086,656 
5,245.090 
5.623,797 
5,644.687 
5,835,028 
6,890,871 
6,939,809 
7,468,713 
7,804.408 



Total. 



Tons. 
11,348,281 
11,682,337 
12,516,507 
13,416,052 

13444.349 
13,482,670 
13,689498 
I4,579.2o6 
1 5,650,280 
16,417,295 
17,018,304 

I7 / 71I '257 
18,526,818 
21,067,081 
21485,010 
22,575,029 
23,060,447 



TOTAL. 



Brit sh. I Foreign. I Total. 



Tons. I 
,12,891405] 
i 13,31 1, 843 
1 13.9 14,923 
i 15,420,132: 
15,946,860 
17,019,392; 
,18,201,675: 

19,358,955 
21,255,726 
22,370,070 

! 22,660,424 
23.789,167 
25,072,180 
28,034,748 
28,719,090 
29,647.344' 
30,089,683 



Tons 
9418,576 
9,592,416 

10,774,369 
11,175,109 
10,588,579 
9,719,341 
9,002,834 

9,538,137! 
10,006,724 
10,386,042 
11,020,555] 
11,121,114' 
11,568,002 
13,513,130! 
I3.78i,935 
14,792,642 

15.339.274 



I Tons. 
22,309,981 
22,904,259 
24,689,292 
26,595,641 
26,535,439 
26,738,733 
27,204,509 
28,897,092 
31,262450 
32,756,112 
33,680,979 
34,910,281 
30,640,182 
41,547,878 
42,501,021 
44,439,986 
45,428,957 



Years. 



...1858 
...1819 
...i860 
...1861 
...1862 
...1863 
...1864 
...1865 
...1866 
...1867 
...1868 
...1869 
...1870 
...1871 
...1872 

...1873 
...1874 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



21 



Tonnage Statistics of the Canals and Trunk Railroads. 



able I.— Tons of Freight of all kinds moved 
on the New York Canals and the New Y rk 
Central, Brie and Pennsylvani i Railroads. 



1 Year. 


N. Y. 


Central 


Erie 


Pennsvl'a 


Ciinals. 


Railroad. 

1,387,433 
1,449,604 


Railroad. 


R hi 1 road. 


(62 


5.598,785 


1.632,955 


1 ,980, 1 26 
2,256,347 


63 


5,557,692 
4,85,2,941 


1,815,090 


64 


I,557,M8 


2,170,798 


2,559,884 


65 


4,729,654 


1,275,299 


2,234,350 


2,555.705 


166 


5,775,220 


1,602,197 


3,242,792 


3,186,35,9 


67 


5,688,325 


1,667,926 
^846,599 
2,281,885 


3.484,546 


3,709,224 


68 


6,442,225 


3,908,243 


4,427,884 


!6 9 


5,859,080 
0,173,769 


4,312,209 


4,992,025 


'70 


4,122,000 


4,852,505 


5,427,400 


i/i 


6,107.888 
6,673,370 
6,364,782 
5,804,588 


4,532,056 


4,844.208 


6,575,843 


'72 


4.393.965 


5,564,274 


7,844.778 


'73 


5,522,724 
6,114,678 


6,312,702 


9,211,231 
8,626,946 


(74 


6 364,276 



Note.— In the above and following statistics 
the New York canals, 2,000 lbs. are called a 
)n. 

able II. — Tons of Agricultural Product* 
moved on the New York Canals and Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, and of Vegetable Food on the 
New York Central and Erie Railroads and 
Wetland Canal. 





N. Y. 


Welland 


Central 


Erie 


Pennsvl. 


ear. 

$61 


Canal*. 


Canal. 

586,583 


Railroad. 

441,562 
469,885 


Railroad 

243.959 
261,824 


Railroad. 


2,M4,373 


220,000 


K>2 


2,494.036 
2,236,075 


721,149 
558,489 


225,045 


863 


405,380 


228,632 
215,986 


280,2^9 


864 


1,572,836 


♦144,561 
350,608 


461,511 


338,646 


865 
866 


1,696,091 
1,786,060 


349. 103 


212,677 


344,827 


439.487 


453,663 


397,903 


353,'9» 


867 


1,438.517 


341,975 
495,873 


495,194 

568,680 


277432 


410,823 


868 


1.442,147 


302,4 c, I 


■,84,870 


86q 


1,314,071 


503,860 


764,831 


322,978 


483,105 


870 
871 


1,309,1 53 
1,863,868 


1,297,481 

1,459.919 
1,158,894 


468,976 
745,670 


873,423 
851.579 


872 


1,683,962 


623,448 


711,720 


1,134,517 


873 


1,750,418 


^40,050 


1, 4 £.2,962 
1,678,476 


584,030 


I.II9.734 


874 


1,772,583 622,558 


791,265 1,229.615 



599,553 tons in 1874, against 253,411 tons in 1862. 
For agricultural products and" total tonnage, see 
Tables I and II. 

Table IV.— Average Cargo of Boats, Time nec- 
essary to make a Passage, and Cost of bring- 
ing a Barrel of Flour from Buffalo to Al- 
bany ; Lockages at Alexander's Lock, and 
total Tons Delivered at Tide-water from the 
Erie Canal. , 



* Half year only. The years 1861-3 for the Wel- 
and Canal end with December 31 ; from 1865 to 
874 with June 30. 

Table III.— Tows of Lumber. Coal, Manufact- 
ures, Merchandise and Miscellaneous Ar- 
ticles moved on the New York C ina s. 





1 








Y.ar. 


Lumber. 


Coal. 


factu es. xhmdise 


laneous. 


1861... 


1,052,392 
1,569,674 


542,150 
636,720 


280,256 
364,887 


1 35,096 
167,927 
172,278 


353.368 


1862... 


35§'55' 


1863... 


1,528,688 


732,657 
855,063 


319432 


468,5,02 


1864... 


1,478,921 


282,354 


143.984 


519.783 
408,765 
600,434 


1865... 


1,407,315 


720,083 


281,832 


144,968 
179,878 


1866... 


1,769,994 


1,136,613 


302,241 


.867. . . 


1,744,252 


1,282,594 


320,844 


219,880 


682,238 


1868... 


1,958,309 
1,885,930 


1,611,689 


373,262 


324.064 


732,754 
7^3462 


1869... 


1,324,408 


345*239 


268,970 
271,856 


'1870... 
I1871... 
1872... 


1,916,511 


1,458.185 


342,497 
336,288 


875.567 


1,941.297 


1,194,037 
1,402,5,90 
1,025,859 
1,413,102 


288,428 


843.970 


1,950,798 

1 I,W2,072 


325,564 


298,758 


951,698 


1873... 


267,820 


172,990 
132,181 


965,623 


;l8 7 4... 


1 1,482,753 


246,697 


757,212 



Note.— The principal article embraced under 
the head of manufactures is the Syracuse salt. 
of which were carried 212,730 tons in 1873. » n <l 
167,801 tons in 1874. Under the head of merchan- 
dise is included railroad Iron, of which 161,667 
tons were carried in 1872, and 53,363 tons in 187.3. 
Under miscellaneous are classed iron ore, stone, 
lime and clay, which, together, amounted to 



YEAR. 


Average 
Cargo 


6 e*^ 


'Sfi'gg 

— .a pot. 


« ■ 

*> M "° 


T.ns de- 
livered at 
tide-water 
from Erie 






£*£< 


£<& eS 'S 


►J « - 


Canal. 


1841 


41 


9 


71c. 


30,320 


532,520 


1844.... 


g 


*% 


60 


28,219 


799,816 


1847.... 
1848.... 
1849.... 


10>4 


7 l 


43,957 


1 ,431 ,2 52 


3 


• g* 


56 


34,9" 
36,918 


1,184,337 
1,266,724 


1850 


76 


9 


58 


38,444 
40,396 


1,554,675 


1851.... 


78 


8K 


49 


1,508,677 


1852.... 
1853.... 


80 
84 


9 


§ 


41,572 
42,967 


1,644,690 
1,851,438 
1,702,693 


1854.... 


94 


52 


35.981 
30,873 


1855. . . . 
18^6.... 


• 92 


8.^ 


52 


1,420,715 


100 


8X 


60 


31,223 


1,587,130 


1857.... 


100 


8H 


46 


22,182 


1,117,199 
1,496,687 


1853.... 


126 


8K 


34 


23,473 


&.::: 


143 
140 




3i 
42 


20,274 
32,439 


1.451,333 
2,276,061 


1861 


167 


&X 


46 


3i,i79 


2,449.609 


1862 


*K 


48 


34,977 


2,017,094 
2,647,689 


1863 


177 


9 


45 


30,071 


1864 

1865.... 
1866.... 


1W 
160 
170 


10 
10 
10 


57K 
5i 

52 


28,742 
26,037 
29,882 
28,654 


2,146,634 
2,078,361 
2,523,664 


1867.... 


15.6 


10 


48 


2,226,112 


1868.... 


148 

183 


10 


48 


32,107 


2,378,572 


1869 


10 


51 


24,625 


2,257,68o 


1870 


181 


10 


33 


25.124 


2,290,698 


1871.... 


178 


11 


40 


29,725 
28,035 


! 2,648,877 


1872.... 


190 


11 


42 


2,670^05 
! 2,585,355 


1873.... 


213 


11 


46M 


24,960 


1874.... 


197 


11 


3i 


24,085 


2,370,297 



Table V.— Dates of the Opening and Closing of 
the Erie Canal for Thirty Years. 



YEAR. 

1846... 
1847... 
1848... 
1849... 
1850... 
1851... 
1852... 

1853... 
1854... 
1855... 
1856.., 
1857... 
1858.., 
1859... 
i860.., 
1861.., 
1862.., 
1863.., 
1864 . . 
1865.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 



1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 



OPENED. 

.April 16.. 
.May 1.. 
Mtfy 1. 
.May 1. 
.April 22. 
.April 15. 
.April 20. 
.April 20. 
.April 1. 
.April 1. 
.April 5. 
.April 6. 
.April ;8. 
.April 15. 
.April 25 
.May 1. 
.May 1. 
.May 10. 
..April 30. 
.May 1. 
. . May 1 . 
, .May 4. 
..April 23. 
..May 6. 
..May 10. 
..April 24. 
..May 13. 
.May 15. 
..May 1. 
..May 18. 



CLOSED. 

.November 25 
.November 30 
.December 9 
.December 5 
.December 11 
.December 5 
.December 16 
.December 20 
.December 3 
.December 10 
December 4 
.December 15 
.November 30 
.December 12 
.December 12 
.December 10 
.December 10 
.December 8 
.December 8 
.December 12 
..December 12 
.December 5 
.. December 8 
.December 10 
..December 8 
.November 29 
..December 4 
.November 20 
..December 5 



2-2 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



UNITED STATES REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 

It is sufficiently evident that, whilst one-third of the national revenue is necessarily ab- 
sorbed by the payment of interest, a persevering application of the resources afforded by 
"c.oL of peace and prosperity, to the discharge of the principal, in the manner directed 
lTthTl%fsTatu^ by which the United States can ulUmaUlyob. ■ 

tain the full command of their revenue, and the free disposal of all their resources. -Albert 
Gallatin, Report on the Finances, Dec. 9, 1805. 

No i —Statement of the Receipts of the United States Government for Twenty- 
one Years, from July i, 1854, to June 30, 1875. 



Yew- 
Ended. 



1811.. 
1856.. 
1857.. 
i8s8.. 
1819.. 
i860.. 
1861.. 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1864.. 
186;.. 
i865... 
1867.., 
1868.., 
1869.., 
1870.., 
1871... 
1872... 

1873. 

1874. 

1875. 



Customs. 



$ 

53.025,794 
, 64,022,863 
63,875,905 
41,789,621 
49,565,824 
, 53,187.512 
39,582,126 

: 49.056,398 
69.059,642 

'102,316,1^ 
84,928,261 



37,640,788 

109,741,134 

209,464,215 

179,046,652 309,226,813 

.1176,417,811 266,027.537 

.164,464,600 191,087,^89 

.180,048,427 158,356,461 

. 194038,374 184,899,756 

. 206,2-0,408 143,098,154 

.216,370,287 130,642,178 

.■188,089,^23 113,729,314 

.I163, 103', 834 102,409,785 

. 1 57, 167, 722 110,007,494 



Direct 
Tax. 



1,795,332 
1,485,104 

475,649 
1,200,173 

1. 974,254 

4,200,234 

1,788,146 

765,686 

229,103 

580,355 

315.255 



Public 
Lands. 



$ 

11,497,049 
8,017,645 
3,829,487 
3,513,71° 
1,756,687 

1, 77$558 
870,659 
152,204 
167,617 
588,333 
996,553 
665,031 

1,163,576 

1,348,715 
4,020,344 
3,310,482 



Mis- 
cellaneous. 



$ 

827,731 
1,116,191 
1,259,921 
1,352,029 
1,454.596 
1,088,530 
1,023,511 

915,328 

3,741,794 
30,291,702 
25,441,516 
29,036,314 
15,037,122 
17,745,404 
13,997,339 
12,942,11 



2,388,647^30,373,634 
2,575,7141 15,106,051 
2,882.312 17,161,270 
1,812,429 17,071,043 
1,413,640' 15,432,915 



Net Ordinary 
Receipts. 



65.350,575 

74,056,099 

68,905,313 

46,615,366 

52,777,108 

56,014,600 

41,476,299 

51,919,261 

112,094,946 

2^3,412,971 

322,031,118 

519,949,164 

462,846,680 

376,434,454 

357,188,216 

395,959,834 

t302,7ll,l98 

364,694,230 

322,177,674 

284,441,091 

284,021,771 



Premiums. 



Total net 
Rec-ipts. 

%~~ 

65»350,575 
74,056,699 
68,965,313 
46,611,366 
709,358 53,486,466 
10,008 56,064,608 
33,631 41,509,930 
68,400 51,987,661 
602,345 112,097,291 
21,174,101 264,587,072 
ti 1, 683,447 333,714,601 
t38,o83/D56 ; 558,032,620 
t27,787,330 490,634,010 
T29,203,63o 405,638,084 

+13,755,491 !37o,943,747 
ti5,291,644| 4 u,255,478 
§8,892,8401391,604,038 
§9,412,638 374,106,868 
§11,560,131 333,738,205 
§5,037,665 289,478,756 
§3,979,2881288,000,051 



Yer 

Hided. 



..1855 
..1856 
..1857 
..1858 
..1859 
..i860 
..1861 
..1862 
..1863 
. . 1864 
..1865 
..1866 
..1867 
..1868 
..1869 
..1870 
..1871 
..1872 

..11873 
..1874 

,..1875 



* Of which $[6,498,971 from premium on gales of gold coin, and 82,799,921 from premium on" 
goid shipped from San Francisco to London. See page 8 of Finance Report for 1864. 

t Chienv from Premiums on sales of gold coin for currency. 

X Includes $8,280,093 paid into the Treasury as proceeds of sales of ordnance. &c. See Finance 
Report for 1871, p. V, note. 

\ Premiums on sales of gold coin for currency. 

No. 2. — Statement of the Expenditures of the United States Government for 
Twenty-one Years, from July i, 1854, to June 30, 1875. 



Yenr 
Ended. 



1811. 
1816. 



1819.. 
i860.. 
1861.. 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1C64.. 
1861.. 
18SX . 
1867.. 
1863.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
18M.. 
1875.. 



War. 



Navy. 



$ 

14,648,074 13,327,091 
16,963,161 14,074,835 

19,IS9,I5I 
25,679.122 



Indians. Pensions. 



$ 

2,772,991' 
2,644,264 



12,611,695 4,354,419 
14,053,261 4,978,266 



23,154,721 14,690,928 
16,472,203 11,114,610 

23,007,131 12,387,157 
42,640,353 



3,490,535 

2,991,122 

2,861,481 
2,327,948 



$ 

1.477,612 
1,296,230 
1,310,381 
1,219,768 
1,222,223 
1,100,802 
1,034,600 
812,170 
1,078,113 

4,985,474 



Mis- 
cellaneous. 



Net Ordinary 
Expenditures. 



389,173,562 

603,314,412 63,261, 235 j 3,152 ,03: 

690,391,049 81,704,96412,629,971 

r. 030,690.400 122,617,4341^,059,361 1(3,347,621 

23 3,' 54,676 43,285,66213,29^,729 15,601.110 

91,224,416 31,034,011 4,642,132 20,0^6,112 

123,2)6,649 21,771,50314,100,682 23,782,^87 , 

78.501,991; 20,000,75817,042,92328,476,622 1116,474,062 

57,615,675 21,780,2303,407,93828,340,202 13,237,462 

tl44,o8o,o85 19,431,027:7,426,997 34,443,895 ! 60,481,916 

35»372,I57| 21,249,810(7,061,729 28,133,4031 60,984,757 

46,323,138 23.526,21717.911,70129,^19,427! 73,328,110 

.-2,313,027 3o,932,i87;6.6o2,4e2 29,038,415! 69,641,194 

41,120,646 21,497, 626 8,3 84,617 29,416,216 71,070,703 



$ 

24,090,421 
31,794,039 
28,561,499 
26,400,016 
23,797,544 
27,977,978 
23,327,288 
21,385,863 
23,198,382 
27,172,217 
42,989,383 
40,613,114 
51,110,224 
13,009,"" 



$ 

56,316,198 
*66, 772,528 
66,041,144 
72,330,437 
66.315,950 

62,616,056 

456,379,897 

694,004,576 

811,283,679 

1,217,704,199 



Interest on 
Debt. 



$ 

2,314,465 

1,953,822 

1,593,265 

1 ,652,056 

2,637,650 

3,114,121 

4,034,157 

13,190,345 

24,729,701 

53,685,422 

77,395,000 



385,954,731 ! 133,067,625 
202,947,734 1143,781,592 
220,91 1,088 j 140,424,046 
1190,496,355 130,694,24: 



164,421,507 
^165,863,921 
113,201,856 
180,488,637 
178,618,981 
171,529,841 



"9,235*4' 

125,576,51 

i I 7,357,84o 

104,750,688 

107,119,811 

103,093,145 



Premiums. 



t872,047 
t385,373 
t363,572 
T574,443 



1,717,000 

558*477 

£10,813,349 

§7,001,151 

Ti, 674,680 

" 15,996,556 

**9,oi6,795 

* "6,958,207 

* '5,105,920 
**i,395,074 



Yenr 
Endnd. 



851 
856 

857 
818 
819 
860 
861 
862 
863 
864 
S65 
866 
867 
868 
869 
870 
871 
872 
S73 
874 
875 



and Mex?c rt o, 8 oi a Dec en i* iy 3 '^' MOUnder the »5 th article of the treaty between the United States 

J j^ em i? ,m8 J>aid on purchase of United States stock, 
int'relt notM *'°i 6 'i. ,I?8paid on Purchase of 7-30 three year treasury notes, $194,132 on compound 
sp,;m° e ' a, - d ?5 '°?° on Purchase of Oregon war debt. 
« t 1 i nm » paid on P urc hase of treasury notes. 
ir i5- C ir S i,V 2GO,ccc for purchase of Alaska, 
bonds for current paid ° D P archase of 7"3o treasury notes and $1,374,680 on purchase of 5-20 

£ fS!w. pa i d on Purchases of 5-20 bonds for currency. 
See T Finance ■ E&ortlS ™ 7 Ti%, nofe. 6aleS ° f ordnance aQd expended by the War Department. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



THE FOREIGN MARKETS FOR OUR BREADSTIFFS. 



The first of the subjoined tables shows that 
while the exports of our wheat to foreign coun- 
tries are subject to great fluctuations, the move- 
n»ent for the last two fiscal years has been on a 
g/eater scale than during any former period. 
The total exported, exclusive of flour, rose from 
8 million bushels in 1859, to 87 millions in 1862 ; 
then fell to less than 6 millions in 1866, and in- 
creased again to 71 millions in 1874. The second 
table shows that the British imports of wheat 
from each country are subject to corresponding 
vicissitudes, the fluctuations in the aggregate 
imported being less violent, but still considerable. 
The average quantity imported into Great Britain 
for five years past, including 1875, which is not 
i embraced in our table, isabout4'2>£ millioncwts., 
or 80 million bushels. The United States, count- 
ing the exports directly from our own ports and 
indirectly through the ports of Canada, are by 
far the most important source of supply. For 



the annual value of the wheat exported from the 
United States to all countries, and imported into 
Great Britain from all countries, see the tables 
on pages 10 nd 11. 

In addition to the exports of wheat, there were 
exported from the United States, in the fiscal 
year 1874, 4,094,094 barrels of wheat flour, and in 
1875, 3,951,086 barrels. The principal countries 
to which flour is exported from the United States 
are Great Britain, the West Indies, Brazil, the 
British North American Provinces, New Grenada 
and Venezuela. 

For four years past the exports of Indian corn 
have been of great consequence, the quantity 
averaging more than 80,000,0u0 bushels a year, 
and the value exceeding $'25,000,000 in paper 
currency. Great Britain is the principal market 
for this product, the quantities sent to other 
countries being comparatively insignificant 



Table 1.— Bushels of Wheat Exported from the United States to Various Foreign Countries. 

(Years end June 30.) 



Year 

Ended. 



i8s9-... 
i860.... 
1861.... 
1862.... 
1863.... 
1864.... 
186s ... 
1866.... 
1867.... 
1868.... 
1869..., 
1870..., 
1871.... 
1872.... 
1873. •■ 
1874.... 
187=;.... 



All 
Ountries. 



Gt. Britain 
Direct. 



bUBh. 
3,002,016 

4,155.153 
31,238,057 
37,606,079 
36,160,414 
23,681,712 
9.937,1 S2 
5,179.103 
6,146,411 
15,940,890 
17.li7.S36 
36^84,1 15 
34,304,906 
26,423,080 
39,204.285 
71,039,928 
53.047,175 



Canada. 



bush. 
1,352,252 
1,120,975 



bush. 

1,322,718 

1,934,206 
24,510,961 
22,905,505 
27.3-^,739 
18,078,099 

5,823,25s 

1,970,716 

4,685,61s 

1 2,368,446 ' 3,0^6,271 
13.356,5^0 3.3S8, SQ7 
27.787,609; 6,232,357 
22,488,021 19,2^2,149 
19,017,411 13.709.065 
3t ,790,876 0,304 ,042 
Si.833.278S8.717.903 
42,057,004 5,032,981 



Gt. B. Mnd 
Canada. 



bush. 

2,674,970 

. 3.051.181 

4,148,029 28,6^8,990 

4.538,472 27,443,977 

33.909,434 



6^83,695 
4.ii6,543 
3,728,929 
i,8si,30o 
79 s . 15° 



France. 



22,195,542 

9, 1^2,184 

3,822,016 

<;,484,i65 

15,424.717 

16,715,1 

34.019 

31,740 170 

22,726,476 

38,094,918 

6o,ssi,i8i 

47,089,985 



^966 



bush. 

§.460; 

28,49s 

1,728,190 

7,6^.387 

381,970 

292,424; 

17.329 

4L436 1 
260,763 

36,839 

1,012,637, 

55^,263 

1,429,688 



2,223,366 

127,009 i,S95,oi4 



Portugal. 

bush 

59.952 

S.739 

25,089 

327.070 

563.125 

82,104 

00,282 

83.794 

4,800 

83.190 

120,880 

701,825 

475,856 

426,884 

131.129 

300,301 



Au«- 
trxlia. 

bush. 

909,6ss 
382,763 
44-I.040 
147.323 
188,227 

31,072 
976.714 
287,092 

42,162 
371.721 

78,898 

1,059 

153 

23.042! 

37.333 

40,474 



Be'gium. 


Holland. 


China. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


102 931 


22,218 





8,052 





9,961 
42,398j 


160,408 


32.849 


1.036,731 
622,986 


61.110 
1 10.348 


32,295 
228,714 


^S^s 


416,552 


214,078 
9,689 








379,76o 





— — 


237,339 


34,726 


7,000 


29,822 


5,016 





91,1461 


195,964 


71,068 
186,885 


01,805 


942,399 


1,330 


1,275,101 


244,117 


30 


ioo,os4 


583,w8 


18 


3,709.694 


3.160,431; 


« 


2,081,744' 1,572,0981 






Year 
Ended. 



...1859 
...i860 
...1861 
. . . 1862 
...1863 
...1864 
...1865 
...1866 
...1867 
. . . :868 
. . . 1869 
. . . 1870 
...1871 
...1872 
...r8 7 3 
...1874 
...1875 



Table II.— Hundred Weights (112 lbs.) of Wheat Imported into the United Kingdom from 
various Countries. (Years end December 31.) 



Year 
Ended 

1854.. 
1851.. 
i8s6. . 
i8s7-- 
1858.. 
1859. . 
i860.. 
1861.. 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1864.. 
1865.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1879.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 



All 
Countries. 



CWtB. 

14,868,650 
11,^60,042 
17,648,043 
14,897,814 
18,380,782 

17.337,329 
25,484,151 
29.95S.S32 
41,033,503 
24,364,171 
23,196,714 
20,962,963 
23,IS6,329 
34,64 5, S69 
32,639,768 
37,695,828 
30,901,229 
39,389,803 
42,127,726 
43.863,008 
41,527,638 



United 
States. 



cwts. 

1 ,809,630 
1,078,593 
5,542,983 
2,810,934 
2,576,791 
1 =,9,926 

6,497,335 
10,806,891 
16,140,670 
8,704,401 
7,895,015 
1,177,618 

635,239 
4,188,013 
s, 008, 1 49 
13,181,507 
12,371,922 
13,386,122 
8,719,940 
19,796,414 
23,090,091 



U. S. rla 
Canada. 



CWt8. 

78,650 

63,137 

484.549 

497,445 

436,891 

29,124 

704,829 

2,381,275 

3,732,959 

2,093,997 

1,225,523 

306,765 

8,789 

683,127 

557,443 

2,723.053 

2,838,361 

3,278,031 

1,734,982 

3,761,863 

3,8n.«;75 



Total I 
U. States. I 



Russia. 



cwts. 

1,888,280 
1,141.730 
6,027,^32 

3.317,379 

3,013,682 

188,050 

7,292,164 

13,248,160 

19,873,629 

10.798,398 

9,120,538 

M84.383 

644,028 

1,871,140 

6,465,592 

15,904,560 

15,200,283 

16,664,1 S3 

10.4s4.922 

23,558,277 

26,902,666 



CWt8. 

2,196,302 

war. 

3,290,989 
3,060,959 
2,6^2,940 

3.836.993 
5,638,299 
4,^02,998 
5,751,018 

4.534.305 
5,119,234 
8,093,879 
3,937.199 
14,025,236 
io,os3,6i7 
9,158,331 
10,269,198 
I5,6s4,ooo 
I7,8ss,6s8 
9,591.679 
5,725,661 



•Ger- 
many. 



CWt8. 

4.913,651 
4,162,123 
1,871,536 
5,388,188 
3,985,882 
4,256,248 
6,542,601 
6,270,468 
7,588^39 
^,296,81 1 
6,363,892 
6,817,292 
6,260,970 
7,103,005 
6,043,362 
6,149,030 
3,348,214 
3,050,108 
3,891,062 
2,1S5.173 
3.063,032 



France. 



CWt8. 

62O,0OS 

II3.356 
43.364 

161,105 
3.S4S.754 
4,752,241 
2,394,608 

783,913 

974,28s 

147,481 

587,10s 

2,252,873 

3,473,130 

597.40S 

16,414 

468,274 

253.644 

137.641 

2,844,811 

1,170,262 

300,297 



Egypt. 



cwts. 

1,312,588 
1,894,711 

2,316,613 
885.023 

2,013457 
I.634.S29 

854,815 
1,472,514 
3,289,156 
2,319,590 

366,868 

10,063 

33,831 

I.4S1.774 

3,2'9,S30 

1,004,479 

I04.9SO 

897,116 

2,340,227 

1,261,230 

293,880 



Turkey. 



cwts. 

707,607 

365,85s 
645,753 

70,841 

324.688 

191,291 
288, S96 

411,277 
1,284,439 
282,903 
311,086 
386,142 
387,252 

1,904,61s 

1,730,492 

1,392,497 

317.039 

827,265 

559,008 
295.207 
567.427 



f Austria 



cwts. 

316,195 
28s,o5i 

371,4M 

23,149 

85,371 

61,312 

317,070 

378,244 

78S.4SI 

72,722 

11,041 

579,280 

I,320,S29 

142,635 

1,004,701 

i,03o,s63 

60,472 

239W47 

S5.186 

11,530 

- 2,337 



Year 
Ended 

..1854 
..185S 
..1856 
..1857 
..1858 
..18S9 
..1860 
..1861 
..1862 
..1863 
. . 1864 
..1865 
..i860 
..1867 
..1868 
..1869 
..1870 
..1871 
..1872 
..1873 
..1874 



• Exclusive of the Duchies of Schleswig and Holstein, with Lauenburg from 1854 to I860, inclusive, 
t Including Venetia from 1864 to 1860, inclusive. 



21 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



THE PUBLIC DEBT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Statement of November 30, 18T5. 

Debt Bearing Interest In Coin.* 



Title of Loan. 



Authorizing Act. 



Loan of 1858 

Loan of February, 1861 ('81's)., 

Oregon War Debt 

Loan of July & Aug. 1861 ('81's) 

Loan of 1863 ('81's) 

Ten-forties of 1864 

Five-twenties of June, 1864 

Five-twenties of 1865 

Consols of 1865 

.Consols of 1867 

Consols of 1868 

Funded Loan of 1881 



[June 14, 1858 

'February 8, 1861 . . . 

'March 2,1861 

'July 17 & Aug. 5, '61 

.March 3, 1863 

March 3, 1864 

'June 30, 1864 

'March 3, 1865 

March 3, 1865 

|March 3, 1865 

; March 3, 1865 

J'yi4,'7o&Jan.2o.'7i. 



Rate 
of Int. 



When Kedecmab'e. 



sp.ct. 
6p.ct 
6p.ct 
6p.ct 
6p.ct 
5 p.ct 
6p.ct. 
6p.ct. 
6p.ct. 
6p.ct. 
6p.ct. 
5p.ct. 



After Jan. 1, 1874. 



After June 30, 1881. 
After June 30, 1881. 
After March 1, 1874 
After Nov. 1, 1869. . 
After Nov. 1, 1870. . 
After July 1, 1870.. 
After July 1, 1872.. 
After July 1, 1873.. 
After May 1, i88x.. 



When Pay'le. 



Dec. 31, 
July 1, : 



1904 



M'h. 
Nov. 

Nov. 1,1885 
July 1, 1885 
July 1, 1887 
July 1, 1888 



Title of Loan. Interest Payable. 

Loan of 1858 Jan. and July... 

Loan of February, 1861 ('81's). . . 'Jan. and July. . . 

Oregon War Debt Jan. and July. . . 

Loan of July&Aug. 1861 ('81's).. Jan. and July... 

Loan of 1863 ('81's) Jan. and July... 

Ten-forties of 1S64 March and Sept, 

Five-twenties of June, 1864 ;May and Nov.. 

Five-twenties of 1865 I May and Nov. . 

Consols of 1865 Jan. and July . . . 

Consols of 1867 Jan. and July . . , 

Consols of 1868 Jan. and July . . . 

Funded Loan of 1881 Feb., May, &c. . 

Total 



Amount 


Interest due and 


Outstanding. 


unpaid. 


$260,000 
18,415,000 




$19,170 OO 


945,000 


4,448 75 


189,321,350 


224,283 79 


75,000,000 


68,135 55 


194,566,300 


262,281 36 


46,891,100 


563,345 82 


152,534^50 


2,145,706 80 


202,663,100 


647,739 02 


310,622,750 


963,076 69 


37,474,000 


132,050 48 


465i558,450 


2,960,186 62 


$1,694,251,300 


$7,99o,424 88 



Accrued Interest 
to diite. 



$5,416 67 

460,375 00 

23,625 00 

4,733,033 75 

1,875,000 00 

2,432,078 75 

234,455 50 

762,671 25 

5,066,577 50 

7,765,568 75 

936,850 00 

1,939,826 88 



$26,235,479 05 



Debt on which Interest has Ceased since Tttatnrity. 



Title of Loan. 

Old Debt 



Mexican Indemnity Stock... 

Loan of 1847 

Loan of 1858 

Bounty Land Scrip 

Texan Indemnity Stock 

Loan of i860. 

Five-twenties, 1862 (called). 
Five-twenties, 1864 (called).. 
Five-twenties, 1864 (called).. 
Treasury Notes prior to 1846 

Treasury Notes of 1846 

Treasury Notes of 1847 

Treasury Notes of 1857 

Treasury Notes of 1861 

Seven-thirties of 1861 

One-year Notes of 1863 , 

Two-year Notes of 1863 

Compound-interest Notes. . . 
Seven-thirties of 1864 & 1865. 
Certificates of Indebtedness. 
Temporary Loan 



When Matured. 



i8 3 7- 



At various dates prior to Jan. i, 
At various dates in 1851 & 185* 

Dec. 31, 1867 

Jan. 1, 1874 , 

July 1, 1849 •• 

Dec. 31, 1864. ..; 

Jan. 1 , 1871 

Dec. 1, 1871, and at subsequent dates, 

November 13, 1875 

November 13, 1875 

At various dates from 1838 to 1844 

At various dates in 1847 and 1848 

At various dates in 1848 and 1849 

At various dates in 1858 and 1859 

March 1, 1863 

Aug. 19 and Oct. 1, 1864 

At various dates in 1865 

At various dates in 1866 

June 10, 1867, and May 15, 1868 

Aug. 15, '67, June 15 and July 15, 1868 

At various dates in 1866 

October 15, 1866 

February 28, 1873 



Three pr ct. certifi's (called). . 
Certif. of Indebtedness, i8 7 o.lSeptember 1, 1875 
Aggregate of Debt on which Interest has ceased 



Amt.Outstand'g. 


Interest Ac'd. 


$57,665 00 


$64,174 81 


, 1,104 91 


85 74 


1,250 00 


22 OO 


15,000 00 





3,400 00 


21655 


21,000 00 


3,045 00 


10,000 00 


625 OO 


17,083,10000 


3 6l ,977 54 


249,700 00 


2,049 44 


4,102,400 00 


8,891 30 


82,575 35 


2,670 76 


6,000 00 


206 00 


950 0C 


5700 


1,900 00 


105 00 


3,15000 


378 00 


17,05000 


1,198 43 


64,495 00 


3.236 85 


46,400 00 


2,883 18 


350,520 00 


70,508 81 


190,150 00 


13,882 49 


5,000 00 


3*3 48 


3,060 00 


256 06 


5,000 oq 


394 31 


110,000 00 


2,200 00 


$22,430,870 26 


$539,377 75 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



Debt Bearing no Interest. 



Title of Loan. 



[Old Demand Notes 

Legal Te'fkler Notes . . . 
Certificates of Deposit. 
Fractional Currency. . . 

Coin Certificates 

Unclaimed Interest 



Authorizing Acts. 



July 17, 1861 and Feb. 12, 1862 .' . 

Feb. 25, 1862, July 11, 1862, and March 3,1863 

June 8, 1872 (Clearing House Certificates) 

July 17, 1862, March 3, 1863, and June 30, 1864 

March 3, 1863 



25 



$69,707 50 

372,471,772 00 

42,610,000 00 

42,356,105 01 

IQ >79°\5°o 00 

20,234 84 

Aggregate of Debt bearing no Interest i$477, 3 24,3io 35 



Amount. 



Recapitulation. 



Description of Debt. 



Debt bearing interest in coin , 

Debt bearing currency interest 

Debt on which interest has ceased 
Debt bearing no interest 



Bonds at 6 per cent 

Bonds at 5 per cent 

Navy Pension Fund at 3 per cent. 



Old Demand and Legal-tender Notes. 

Certificates of Deposit 

Fractional currency 

Coin certificates 



Amount. 



$1,033,866,550 00 
660,384,750 00 
14,000,000 00 
22,430,870 26 
372,541,479 50 
42,610,000 00 
42,356,105 01 
i9,79 6 >5°° 00 



$2,207,986,254 77 
34.960,516 52 



Total Principal of Debt 

Add interest unpaid and accrued 

Total Debt ($2,242,946,771 29 

Cash in the Treasury — Coin $70,404,676 38 

Currency 12,014,962 34 

Special deposit for redemption of certificates of deposit 42,610,000 00 

Debt, less cash in the Treasury, December 1, 1S75 

Debt, less cash in the Treasury, November 1, 1875 ; 

Decrease of Debt during the past month 

Decrease of Debt since June 30, 1875 



125,029,638 72 



$2,117,917,132 57 
2,118 ,397,211 46 

$480,078 83 



$io,77i,593 75 



Currency Bonds Issued to the Pacific Railroads. 

(Not Included in the Public Debt as above stated.) 



Rate of Int. 



^ hen Payable. 

30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 
30 yrs. fm. date. 



Name of Railroad. 



Central Pacific 

Kansas Pacific 

Union Pacific 

Central Branch,U. Pacific. 

Western Pacific 

Sioux City and Pacific 



Authorizing Acts. 



July 1, '62 & July 2/64 
July 1, '62 & July 2/64 
July 1/62 & July 2/64 
July 1, '62 & July 2, '64 
|July 1, '62 & July 2/64 
July 1, '62 & July 2,'64 



6 per cent 
6 per cent 
6 per cent 
6 per cent 
6 per cent 
6 per cent 



Interest Payable. 

January & July 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 
January & July 



Name of Railroad. 



Central Pacific 

Kansas Pacific 

Union Pacific 

Central Branch, U. Pacific 

Western Pacific 

Sioux City and Pacific 

Totals 



Principal 
Outstanding. 



$25,885,120 
6,303,000 
27.236,512 
1 ,600,000 
1,970,560 
1,628,320 



$64,623,512 



Inter t accrued 1 Interest paid by I Int. repaid by 



& not yet paid. 



$647,128 00 

157,575 00 

680,912 80 

40,000 00 

49,264 00 

40,708 00 



United States, trans, mails &c. 



$11,027,697 67j$i,igi,765 86 
3,103,893 09 1,440,664 84 
" ,3 2 4 65 3,879,484 61 



781,808 26 
722,380 14. 
682,703 89 



44,408 05 

9,367 CO 

10,163 79 



$1,615,58780 $28,202,807 70,^6,575,854 15 



Hal. ol Int. paid 
by U. States. 



>9,835,93I 81 

1,663,228 25 

8,004,840 04 

737,40021 

713,013 14 

672,540 IO 



21,626,953 55 



The foregoing is a correct statement of the Public Debt, as appears from the books 
and Treasurer's Returns in the Department at the close of business, November 30, 1875. 

BENJAMIN H. BRISTOW, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



ssss 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



ABSTRACT OF PUBLIC 'LAWS, 

PARSED AT THE SECOND SESSION OF THE FORTY-THIRD CONGRESS, WITH A SUMMARY 

OF APPROPRIATIONS MADE 



redeem, in coin, the United States legal-tender 
notes then outstanding on their presentation for 
redemption, at the office of the assistant treas- 
urer of the United States in the city of New York, 
in sums of not less than fifty dollars. And to 
enable the Secretary of the Treasury to prepare 
and provide for the redemption in this act au- 
thorized or required, he is authorized to use any 
surplus revenues, from time to time, in the Treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, 
sell, and dispose of, at not less than par, in coin, 
either of the descriptions of bonds of the United 
States described in the act of Congress approved 
July fourteenth, eighteen hundred and seventy, 
entitled, "An act to authorize the refunding of 
the national debt," with like qualities, privileges 
and exemptions to the extent necessary to carry 
this act into full effect, and to use the proceeds 
thereof for the purposes aforesaid. And all pro- 
visions of law inconsistent with the provisions of 
this act are hereby repealed. 
Approved, January 14, 1875. 

Oil ar> . 19. — Removes the limit on the circu- 
lation of banks issuing notes payable in gold, 
which was formerly a maximum of $1,000,000 by 
any one bank. 

THE CIVIL RIGHTS BILL. 

Chap. .114. — An act to protect all citi- 
zens in their civil and legal rights. — Whereas, 
it is essential to just government we recognize 
the equality of all men before the law, and hold 
that it is the duty of government, in its dealings 
with the people, to mete out equal and exact 



TIIE CURRENCY. 

[The following is the Act of Jan. 14, 1S75, pro- 
viding for the resumption of specie payments on 
Jan. 1, 1879. This act was agreed upon by a 
caucus of Republican Senators, and made a 
party measure both in the Senate and House of 
Representatives, the Democrats, as a general 
thing, voting against it.] 

Chap. 15.— An act to provide for the 
resumption of specie payments — Be it en- 
acted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the United States of America in Con- 
gress assembled, That the Secretary of the 
Treasury is hereby authorized and required, as 
rapidly as practicable, to cause to be coined at 
the mints of the United States, silver cfins of the 
denominations of ten, twenty-five, and fifty 
cents, of standard value, and to issue them in re- 
demption of an equal number and amount of 
fractional currency of similar denominations, or, 
at his discretion, he may issue such silver coins 
through the mints, the subtreasuries. public de- 
positaries, and post-offices of the United States; 
and, upon such issue, he is hereby authorized and 
required to redeem an equal amount of such frac- 
tional currency, until the whole amount of such 
fractional currency outstanding shall be re- 
deemed. 

Sec. '2. That so much of section three thousand 
five hundred and twenty-four of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States as provides for a 
charge of one-fifth of one per centum for con- 
verting standard gold builion into coin is hereby 

repealed, and hereafter no charge shall be made justice to "all," of' whatever nativity, race, color, 
for that service. j or persuasion, religious or political, and it being 



Sec. 3. That section five thousand one hundred 
and seventy-seven of the Revised Statutes of the 
United States, limiting the aggregate amount of 
circulating notes of national banking associa- 
tions, be, and is hereby, repealed; and each ex- 
isting banking association may increase its cir- 
culating notes in accordance with existing law 
without respect to said aggregate limit ; and new 
banking associations may be organized in accord- 
ance with existing law without re-pect to said 



the appropriate object of legislation to enact 
great fundamental principles into law : Therefore, 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of 
Represent i tires of the United States of 
America in Congress assembled, That all per- 
sons within the jurisdiction of the United States 
shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment 
of the accommodations, advantages t facilities, 
and privileges of inns, public conveyances on 
land or water, theaters, and other places of public 



aggregate limit; and the provisions of law for j amusement; subject only to the conditions and 
the withdrawal and redistribution of national i limitations established by iaw, and applicable 
n mk currency among the several States and I alike to citizens of every race and color, regard- 



Territories are hereby repealed. And whenever, 
and so often, as circulating notes shall be issued 
to any such banking association, so increasing its 



less of any previous condition of servitude. 

Sec.2. That any person who shall violate the 
foregoing section by denying to any citizen, ex- 




issued to any such banking association as afore- 
said and to continue such redemption as such 
circulating notes are issued until there shall be 
outstanding the sum of three hundred million 
dollars of such legal-tender United States notes 



g such denial, shall, for every 
such offense, forfeit and pay the sum of five 
hundred dollars to the person aggrieved thereby, 
to be recovered in an action of debt, with full 
costs ; and shall also, for every such offense, be 
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon con- 



Januar n no ^ °? n f • £ ,er th f "H? day of viction thereof > sha11 b * fined not less than five 
seven^^nine tL w?/o ^T* J lund,ed and bundrad nor more than one thousand dollars, or 
seventy -nine, the Secretary of the Treasury shall shall be imprisoned not less than thirty days nor 



■*•■*"■■■•"■■» 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



27 



more than o*e year : Provided, That all per- 
sons may elect .to sue for the penalty aforesaid, 
or to proceed under their rights at common law 
and by State statutes ; and having so elected to 
proceed in the one mode or the other, their right 
to proceed in the other jurisdiction shall be 
barred. But this proviso shall not apply to 
criminal proceedings, either under this act or the 
criminal law of any State : And provided fur- 
ther, That a judgment for the penalty in favor of 
the party aggrieved, or a judgment upon an in- 
dictment, shall be a bar to either prosecution re- 
spectively. 

Sec. 3. That the district and circuit courts of 
the United States shall have, exclusively of the 
courts of the several States, cognizance of all 
crimes and offenses against, and violations of, 
the provisions of this act; and actions for the 
penalty given by the preceding section may be 
prosecuted in the territorial, district or circuit 
courts of the United States wherever the defend- 
ant may be found, without regard to the other 
party ; and the district attorneys, marshals, and 
deputy marshals of the United States, and com- 
missioners appointed by the circuit and territorial 
courts of the United States, with powers of ar- 
resting and imprisoning, or bailing, offenders 
against the laws of the United States, are hereby, 
specially authorized and required to institute 
proceedings against every person who shall vio- 
late the provisions of this act, and cause him to 
be arrested and imprisoned, or bailed, as the case 
may be, for trial before such court of the United 
States, or territorial court, as by law has cog- 
nizance of the offense, except in respect of the 
right of action accruing to the person ag- 
grieved; and such district attorneys shall cause 
such proceedings to be prosecuted to their ter- 
mination as in other cases : Provided , That 
nothing contained in this section shall be c«n- 
strued to deny or defeat any right of civil action 
accruing to any person, whether by reason of 
this act or otherwise ; and any district attorney 
who shall willfully fail to institute and prosecute 
the proceedings herein required, shall, for every 
such offense, forfeit and pay the sum of five 
hundred dollars to the person aggrieved thereby, 
to be recovered by an action of debt, with full 
costs, and shall, on conviction thereof, be 
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and be fined 
not less than one thousand nor more than five 
thousand dollars: And provided further, That 
a judgment for the penalty in favor of the party 
aggrieved against any such district attorney, or 
a judgment upon an indictment against any such 
district attorney, shall be a bar to either prosecu- 
tion respectively. 

Sec. 4. That no citizen posse 3 sing all other 
qualifications which are, or may be, prescribed 
by law shall be disqualified for service as grand 
or petit juror in any court of the United States, 
or of any State, on account of race, color, or pre- 
vious condition of servitude ; and any officer or 
other person charged with any duty in the selec- 
tion or summoning of jurors who shall exclude 
or fail to summon any citizen for the cause 
aforesaid shall, on conviction thereof, be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and be fined not more 
than five thousand dollars. 

Sec. 5. That all cases arising under the pro- 
visions of this act in the courts of the United 
States shall be reviewable by the Supreme Court 



of the United States, without regard to the sum 
in controversy, under the same provisions and 
regulations as are now provided by law for the 
review of other causes in said court. 
Approved, March 1, 1S75. 

TAXES ON LIQUORS AND TOBACCO; AND 
DUTIES ON SUGARS AND VARIOUS IM- 
PORTED COMMODITIES INCREASED. 

Ciiap. 127. — An act to further protect 
the sinking fund and provide for the exigen- 
cies of the Government. — Be it enacted &?/ the 
Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled, That from and after the passage of this act 
there shall be levied and collected on all distilled 
spirits thereafter produced in the United States, 
a tax of ninety cents on each proof gallon, or 
wine-gallon when below proof, to be paid by the 
distiller, owner or person having possession 
thereof, before removal from the distillery bonded 
warehouse; and so much of section three thou- 
sand two hundred and fifty-one of the Revised. 
Statutes of the United States as is inconsistent 
herewith is hereby repealed. 

Sec. 2. That section three thousand three hun- 
dred and sixty-eight of the Revised Statutes be, 
and the same is hereby, amended by striking out 
the words " twenty cents a pound " (on tobacco 
and snuff), and inserting in lieu thereof, the 
words "twenty-four cents a pound;" and that 
section three thousand three hundred and ninety- 
four of the Revised Statutes be, and the same is 
hereby, amended by striking out the word " five " 
wherever it occurs therein, and inserting instead 
thereof the word "six," and by striking out the 
word "fifty" and inserting instead thereof the 
words " seventy-five " (these two amendments 
apply to the tax on cigars) : Provide-}, That th« 
increase of tax herein provided for shall not ap- 
ply to tobacco on which the tax under existing 
law shall have been paid when this act takes 
eBect. And provided further, That whenever 
it shall be shown to the satisfaction of the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury by testimony under oath 
that any person liable to pay the increased tax 
by this section imposed had prior to the tenth 
day of February, eighteen hundred and seventy- 
five, made a contract fof the future delivery of 
such tobacco, cigars, and cigarettes at a fixed 
price, which contract was in writing prior to that 
date, such tobacco may be delivered to the con- 
tracting party entitled thereto under special per- 
mit from the Commissioner of Internal Revenue 
provided therefor, without previous payment of 
such additional tax ; but the said additional tax 
shall be a lien thereon, and shall be paid by and 
collected from the purchaser under such con- 
tract before the sale or removal thereof by him, 
and when demanded by the collector of internal 
revenue for the district to which the same shall 
be removed for delivery to the purchaser ; and 
any sale or removal by such purchaser, prior to 
the payment of such tax, shall subject him and 
such tobacco so sold or removed to all the pen- 
alties and processes of law provided in the case 
of manufacturers of tobacco so selling or remov- 
ing tobacco to avoid the payment of tax. 

Sec. 8. That on all molasses, concentrated 
molasses, tank-bottoms, syrup of sugar cane 
juice, melada, and on sugars according to the 
Dutch standard in color, imported from foreign 



<.. i i ii uhw ,u Mt,n » uawu ■ 1 1 



■jjwinii ii. i j . 



M 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



countries, there shall be levied, collected and 
paid, in addition to the duties now imposed in 
schedule G, section two thousand five hundred 
and four ®f the Revised Statutes, an amount 
equal to twenty-five per centum of said duties as 
levied upon the several articles and grades 
therein designated; Provided, That concen- 
trated melada, or concrete, shall hereafter be 
classed as sugar dutiable according to color by 
the Dutch standard : and melada shall be known 
and defined as an article made in the process of 
sugar-making, being the cane-juice boiled down 
to the sugar point, and containing all the sugar 
nnd molasses resulting from the boiling process 
and without any process of purging or clarifica- 
tion, and any and all products of the sugar-cane 
imported in bags, mats, baskets or other than 
tight packages shall be considered sugar and 
dutiable a3 such. And provided further, That 
of the drawback on refined sugars exported al- 
lowed by section three thousand and nineteen of 
the Revised Statutes of the United States, only 
one per centum of the amount so allowed shall 
be retained by the United States. 

Sec. 4 That so much of section two thousand 
five hundred and three of the Revised Statutes 
as provides that only ninety per centum of the 
several duties and rates of duty imposed on cer- 
tain articles therein enumerated by section two 
thousand five hundred and four shall be levied, 
collected, and paid be, and the same is hereby, 
repealed ; and the several duties and rates of 
duty prescribed in said section two thousand five 
hundred and four shall be and remain as by that 
section levied, without abatement of ten per cen- 
tum as provided in section two thousand five 
hundred and three. 

Sec. 5 That the increase of duties provided by 
this act shall not apply to any goods, wares, or 
merchandise actually on shipboard and bound 
to the United States, on or before the tenth day 
of February, eighteen hundred and seventy-five, 
nor on any such goods, wares, or merchandise on 
deposit in warehouses or public stores at the date 
of the passage of this act. 

Sec. (>. That nothing contained in the act en- 
titled " An act to amend existing customs and 
internal revenue laws, and for other purposes." 
approved February eighth, eighteen hundred and 
seventy-five, shall be construed to impose any 
duty on bolting-cloths theretofore admitted free 
of duty; nor to require the use of a stamp upon 
the receipt in the receipt-book of a savings bank 
vr institution for savingshaving no capital stock, 
and doing no other business than receiving de- 
posits to be loaned or invested for the sole benefit 
of the parties making such deposits without profit 
or compensation to the association or company, 
when money is paid to a depositor o a his pass- 
book. 

Approved, March 3, 1875. 

Chap. 139.— Enables the people of Col- 
orado to form a Constitution and State Govern- 
ment, and provides for the admission of the fctate 
of Colorado into the Union as soon as its Consti- 
tution is farmed and adopted by vote of the 
people. 

Chap. 143.— Authorizes the coinage of a 
twenty cent pi ecc of silver at the mints of the 
Lnited States. 



Appropriations^ 



Object. 



Le?islative 

Executive 

Judicial 

Foreign Intercourse. . 
Independent Treas — 
Mints & Assay Offices. 

Territorial Gov'ts 

Military Estab 

Naval Estab 

Indian Affairs 

Pensions 

Public Works 

Rivers and Harbors. . . 
Forts & Fortifications 

Public Lands 

Postal Service 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



Fiscal Year 

ending June 

30, 1876. 



$ 

5,224,275 
8,006,452 

3,417437 
1,420,2-72 

455,513 

1,407.433 

301,315 

3°>30I,332 

17,268,100 

5,874,558 

30,075,000 

8,025,542 

6,793,^7 

895,000 

1,855,409 

7,390,205 

18,103,574 



Fiscal Year 

ending June 

30, 1875. 



147,714,940 



5,797,234 88 

10,591,847 56 

3,709,984 13 

3,454,9 6 5 92 

490,547 34 

1,494,491 " 

298,655 86 

24,429,522 37 

20,813,946 70 

7,148,174 54 
30,355,000 00 
14,817,306 56 

5,463,000 00 
904,000 00 

2,014,457 70 

6,222,842 00 
16,9^1,781 53 



155,017,758 20 



Currency Contraction. 

The laws in force affecting the paper currency 
of the country have produced a contraction of 
the circulating medium during the 17 months 
ended Nov. 30, beyond the expectation of the 
general public, as may be demonstrated by the 
light cast upon the subject by the recent report 
of Controller Knox on the National banks, 
viz.: 

I. The legal-tender money, issued directly by 
the Government, was, 

On 1st of July, 1874 $382,000,000 

On 1st of December, 1875 372,471,772 

Decrease $9,528,228 

The above decrease is to compensate for the 
issue since Jan. 14. 1875, of $11,910,360 additional 
circulation to the National banks. 

II. The fractional currency outstanding was, 

On 1st of July, 1874 $45^881,296 

On 1st of December, 1875 42,356,105 

Decrease $^,52=;, 191 

III. The National bank circulation outstand- 
ing was, 

On June 20, 1874 $349,894,182 

On November i, 1875 345,586,902 

Decrease $4,307,280 

IV. Under the Act of June 20, 1874, for retiring 
bank circulation, the greenbacks remaining on 
deposit with the U. S. Treasurer, for the redemp- 
tion and retirement of bank notes was, 

On November 1, 1875 $20,238,642 

On June 30, 1874 3.813,675 

Increase . . $16,424,967 

V. The currency balance of the Treasury was, 

On June 30, 1874 $14,576,011 

On November 30, 1875 12,014,962 

Decrease $2,^61,049 

Finally, sum > arizing the above changes, we 
have the following as the net result : 

Decrease of legal tenders $9,528,228 

Decrease of postal currency 3,52^,191 

Decrease of bank notes 4,307,280 

Increase of legal tenders on de- 
posit for redemption of bank 

notes 16,424,967 

Total contraction $33,785,666 

Treasury balance reduced 2,561,04 9 

Net contraction $31,224,617 

As regards the banks, the contraction is $16,- 
! 233,192 greater than the above total, that being 
I the amount of permanent deposit with the U. S. 
1 Treasurer for the redemption and return of 
! their notes. 



»!""t<WWIW"WBP!"»l«> 



?^*" 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



20 



NEW YORK STATE GOVERNMENT, 1876. 

SAMUEL J. TILDEN, Governor. 

WILLIAM DORSHEIMER, Lieutenant Governor. 

LUCIUS ROBINSON, Controller. 

JOHN B1GELOW, Secretary of State. 

CHARLES N. ROSS, Treasurer. 

CHARLES S. FAIRCHILD, Attorney General. 

ADIN THAYER, CHRISTOPHER A. WALRATH, JAMES JACKSON, Jr., Canal Commissioners. 

JOHN D. VAN BUREN, Jr., Slate Engineer und Surveyor. 

NEIL GILMOUR, Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

FRANCIS S. THAYER, Auditor, Canal Department. 

ORLOW W. CHAPMAN, Superintendent, Insurance Department. 

DE WITT C. ELLIS, Superintendent, Dank Department. 

GEORGE WAGENER, RODNEY R. CROWLEY, MOSS K. PLATT, Inspectors of State Prisons. 

THADDEUS C. DAVIS, VIVUS W. SMITH. CHARLES G. MEYERS, Canal Appraisers. 

SANFORD E. CHURCH, Chief Judge, Court of Appeals. 

WILLIAM F. ALLEN, ROBERT EARL, CHARLES A. RAPALLO, CHARLES ANDREWS. 

CHARLES J. FOLGER, THEODORE MILLER, Associate Judges, Court of Appeals. 
EDWIN O. PERRIN, Clerk of Court of Ap_ eals. 

Sheriffs and County Clerks in the State of New York. 



County. County S-.at. Sheriff. Electid. 

Albany Albany Albert Gallup 1873 

Allegany Belmont *Stephen N. Rennet 1873 

Broome Binghamton . George W. Dunn 1875 

Cattaraugus . . Little Valley . . . William W. Henry 1873 

Cayuga Auburn Andrew J. Sanders 1874 

Chautauqua.. . May ville Corydon Hitchcock 1873 

Chemung Elmira Allen Coooer 1873 

Chenango Norwich William W . Brown 1873 

Clinton Plattsburg John H. Hopkins 1874 

Columbia Hudson William H. Van Tassel 1873 

Cortland Cortlandville . . Nicholas II. Haynes 1873 

Delaware Delhi Darius S. Jackson 1873 

Dutchess Poughkeepsie.. John G. Halstead 1873 

Eric Buffalo John B. Weber 1873 

E3sex Elizabethtown.. Samuel S. Olcott 1873 

Franklin Malone James A. Stockwell 1875 

FultOD Johnstown John Dunn 1874 

Genesee Batavia John H. Ward 1875 

Greene Catskill Piatt Coonley 1873 

Hamilton Sageville Caleb R. Carpenter 1874 

Herkimer Herkimer Volney Eaton 1873 

Jefferson Watertown AbnerW. Peck 1875 

Kings Brooklyn Albert Daggett 1875 

Lewis Lowvillc J. Mather House 1873 

Livingston Geneseo Elijah Youngs 1873 

Madison Morris ville Wilber M. Henderson 1875 

Monroe Rochester Henry E. Richmond 1875 

Montgomery.. Fonda James W. Kline 1873 

New York New York William C Conner 1873 

Niagara Lockport Joseph Batten 1873 

Oneida Utica George Benedict 1873 

Onondaga Syracuse Davis Cossitt 1873 

Ontario Canandaigua... Nathaniel R. Roswell 1873 

Orange Goshen James W. Hoyt 1873 

Orleans Albion Thomas Parker 1874 

Oswego Oswego Frank S. Low 1875 

Otsego Cooperstown... Peter Barton 1873 

Putnam Carmel. James O. Cole 1873 

Queens Jamaica Charles A. Sammis 1873 

Rensselaer Troy John A. Quackenbush 1873 

Richmond Richmond C. H . William C. Denyee 1873 

Rockland Clarkstown Charles B. Bensen 1873 

St. Lawrence. . Canton Edward J. Chapin 1873 

Saratoga Ballston Spa . . . Franklin Cai penter 1873 

Schenectady . . Schenectady . . . Hiram J. Ingersoll 1875 

Schoharie Schoharie Jehiel Brazee 1873 

Schuyler ...;.. Watkins John Wood 1874 

Seneca Waterloo Abram B. Slanson 1873 



County Clerk. ZLcUd. 

William E. Haswell 1874 

Win. H. H. Russell 1873 

Pliny A. Russell 1873 

Eugene A. Nash 1873 

Lyman C. Comstock 1873 

Herman Sixbey 1873 

John G. Copley 1873 

Andrew Shepardson 1875 

William J. McCaffrey 1873 

Henry B.Hall 1873 

Frank Place 1873 

Smith H. White 1873 

Andrew C. Warren 1873 

George L. Remington 1873 

Joseph A. Titus 1875 

Aimerin W. Merrick 1873 

William S. McKie 1874 

Carlos A. Hull 1873 

Omar V. Sage 1873 

William H. Fry 1874 

Edward Simms 1873 

Jacob Stears.jr 1873 

George G. Herman 1873 

Charles E. Mitchell 1873 

Hurlbert E. Brown 1874 

Lucius P. Clark 1873 

John H. Wilson 1873 

Abner H.Burtch 1873 

William Walsh 1873 

George L. Moote 1874 

James 3. Paddon 1873 

Charles E. Hubbell 1873 

Washington L. Hicks 1873 

William E. Mapes 1873 

Lucius R. Post 1874 

Broinard Nelson 1873 

Walter H. Bunn 1873 

Edwin B. Thompson 1873 

John H. Sutphin . 1873 

Eben C. Reynold , 1874 

Abraham V. Connor 1875 

Cyrus M.Crum 1874 

Tiras H. Ferris 1873 

James W. Horton 1875 

James G. Caw 1873 

Thomas W. Zeh, jr 1873 

Myron H. Weaver 1875 

tSamuel S. Gulick 1874 



Steuben Bath Holland B. Williams.. 1873 Archie E. Baxter 1874 



Suffolk Riverhead. Egbert G.Lewis 1873 

Sullivan Monticello Benjamin W. Winner 1873 

Tioga Owego William H. Rightmire 1873 

Tompkins Ithaca Barnard M. Hagin 1875 

Ulster Kingston Silas Saxton 1873 

Warren Caldwell Gideon Towsley 1873 

Washington. . Argyle \ John Larmon 1873 

Wayne Lyons Richard P. Groat 1873 

Westchester .. White Plains ... Ziba Carpenter 1873 

Wyoming Warsaw Albert Gaqe 1875 

Yates 



George C. Campbell 1873 

Lewis N. Stanton 1873 

John J. Van Kleeck 1873 

Doctor Tarbell 1873 

Peter D. Lefever 1873 

Albert F. Ransom 1873 

William H.Kiucaid 1873 

Volney H. Sweeting 1873 

J. Malcolm Smith 1873 

Charles J. Gardner 1873 



" «•»««•»» '"K" n uasi, *<-7 5 

Penn Yan Theodore Bogart 1873 Joseph F. Crosby.... ^ 1873 

P. O. address, Angelica ; + P. O. address, Ovid ; % P. O. address, Salem . 



80 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

January i, 1876. 



THE EXECUTIVE. 

Itt YS3ES S GU \NT, of Illinois, President of the United States ... Salary $50,000 

THOMAS W. FERRY, of Michigan, President pro temp, of the Senate 10,000 



THE CABINET. 

II AM ILTON FIS H . of Ne w York, Secretary of State. Salary $3,ooo 

BENJAMIN H. 11 RISTOW, of Kentucky. Secretary of the Treasury " 8,000 

WILLIAUW. BELKNAP, of Iowa, Secretary of War. .... 8,000 

GEORGE M. ROBESON, of New Jersey, Secretary of the Navy.. 8,000 

ZACHARIAH CHANDLER, of Michiean, Secretary of the Interior 8,000 

EDWARDS PIERUEPONT. of New York. Attorney- General 8,000 

MARSH VLL JEWELL, of Connecticut, Postmaster- General 8,000 



THE JUDICIARY; 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
MORRISON R. W AITE, of Ohio, Chief Justice Salary $10,500 



Nathan Clifford, of Maine, Associate Justice 
Noah H. Swaynb, of Ohio, 
Samuel F. Miller, of Iowa, 
David Davis, of Illinois, 
Salary of Associate Justices, $10,000. Court meets first Monday in December, at Washington 



Stephen J. Field, of Cat.. Associate Justice. 
William M. Strong, of Pa., 
Joseph P. Bradley, of X. J., 
Ward Hunt, of N.T., 



MINISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

ENVOYS EXTRAORDINARY AND MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 
Country. Capital. Miniwt. Salary . Appointed . 

AuBtria— Hungary Vienna „ . .Godlove S. Or th. Ind $12,000 1875 

Brazil Rio Janeiro James R. Partridge, Md 12,000 1871 

Chill Santiago... Cornelius A. Logan. Kansas 10,000 1873 

China Peking *George F. Seward 12,000 

France Paris Elihu B. Washburne, 111... 17000 ...i86q 

Great Britain London Robert C. Schenck, Ohio 17,500 1870 

Italy Rome George P. Marsh, Vt 12,000 1861 

Japan Yedo John A. Bineham, Ohio 12,000 1873 

Mexico Mexico John W. Foster, Indiana 12,000 — 1873 

Peru Lima Richard Gibbs, N. Y 10,000 1875 

Germany Berlin J. C. Bancroft Davis, Mass 17,5,00. ...1&74 

Russia St. Petersburg Geo. H. Boker, Pa 17.500 1871; 

Spain Madrid Caleb Cushing, Va 12,000. . . . 1874 

I 
MINISTERS RESIDENT. 

Argentine Republic Buenos Ayres Thomas O. Osborn, 111 7, =00 1874 

Belgium Brussels 7,500 

Bolivia La Paz Robert' M. Reynolds, Ala 7,^00.... 1874 

Central American States. Guatemala George Williamson, La 10,000 1873 

Columbia Bogota William L. Scruggs, Ga 7,500.. ..1873 

Denmark Copenhagen M. J. Cramer, Ky 7ooo 1870 

Ecuador Quito Christian Wullweber, Iowa 7,soo....i875 

Greece . . Athens J. Meredith Read, Jr., Pa 7,500. . , . 1873 

Hawaiian Islands Honolulu Henry A. Peirce Mass 7. wo 1869 

Netherlands Hague Mames Birnev 7.500.... 

Portugal Lisbon Benjamin Mofan, Pa 7,500. ...1874 

Sweden and Norway Stockholm C. C. Andrews, Minn 7,wo — l86 9 

Switzerland Berne Horace Rublee, Wis 7,500.. ..1869 

Turkey Constantinople.. . .Horace Mavnard. Tenn 7.5°°- . . . 1875 

I rugaay & Paraguay.... Montevideo John C. Caldwell, Me 10,000 — 1874 

V. S. of Colombia Bogota Wm. L. Scruggs, Ga 7, wo — 1873 

* enezuela Caracas Thomas Russell, Mass 7.300. . . . 1874 

MINISTERS RESIDENT AND CONSULS GENERAL. 

Hay 41 , Port-au-Prince.... E. D.Bassett.Pa '. 7,500 1869 

Liberia Monrovia J. Milton Turner, Mo 4,000 1871 

• Nominated, but not yet (January 1) confirmed. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



81 



XLIVTH CONGRESS. 

SENATE. 

THOMAS W. FERRY, of Michigan, President pro tern. 
George C. Gorham, of California, Secretary. 
The Senate is composed of Republicans (in Roman), 42 : Democrats (in Italics) , 29; Independents 
fin small capitals), 2 ; vacancy, i. The full Senate consists of 74 members. The figures before 
the name indicate the year in which (on the 3d of March) the term of the Senator expires. Those 
marked thus (*) were not members of the Senate during the term of the XLIIId Congress. 



ALABAMA. 
Terra ex^>. Senator. Home Post-Office. 

1877 George Goldthwaite Montgomery. 

1879 George E . Spencer Decatur. 

ARKANSAS. 

1877 Powell Clayton Little Rock. 

1^79 Stephen W. Dorsey Helena. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1879 Aaron A. Sargent Nevada. 

1881 *Newton Booth Sacramento. 

CONNECTICUT. 

879 * James E. English^ New Haven. 

P881 William W. Eaton Hartford. 

DELAWARE. 

1877 Eli Saulsbury Dover. 

11881 Thomas F. Bayard Wilmington. 

FLORIDA. 

1879 Simon B. Conover Tallahassee. 

1881 * Charles A. Jones Pensacola. 

GEORGIA. 

1877 Thomas M. Norwood Savannah. 

1879 John B. Gordon Atlanta. 

ILLINOIS. 

1877 John A. Logan Chicago. 

1879 Richard J. Oglesby Decatur. 

INDIANA. 

1879 Oliver P. Morton Indianapolis. 

1881 * Joseph E. McDo?ia.d Indianapolis. 

IOWA. 

1877 George G. Wright Des Moines. 

1879 William B. Allison Dubuque. 

KANSAS. 

1877 James M. Harvey Vinton. 

1879 John J. Ingalls Atchison. 

KENTUCKY. 

1877 John W. Stevenson Covington. 

1879 Thomas C. 31cCrcery...Ov?eTisboro'. 

LOUISIANA. 

1877 J. Rodman West New Orleans. 

1879 (Vacancy) 

MAINE. 

1877 Lot M. Morrill Augusta. 

1881 Hannibal Hamlin Bangor. 

MARYLAND. 

1879 George R. Dennis Kingston 

1881 * William Pinkney HTiyte.Balumore. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1877 George S.Boutwell Groton. 

1881 "Henry L. Dawes Pittsfield. 

MICHIGAN. 

1877 Thomas W. Ferry Grand Haven 

1881 *Isaac P. Christiancy Lansing. ' 

MINNESOTA. 

1877 William Windom Winona. 

1881 "Samuel J. R. McMillan. St. Paul. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1877 James L. Alcorn Friar's Point. 

1881 "Branch K. Bruce Floreyville. 



MISSOURI. 
Term exp. Senator. Home Post-Office. 

1879 Lewis V. Bogy St. Louis. 

1881 * Francis M. Cockre M. ..Warrensburg. 

NEBRASKA. 

1877 Phineas W. Hitchcock.. Omaha. 
1881 *Algernon S. Paddock. .Beatrice. 

NEVADA. 

1879 John P. Jones Gold Hill. 

1881 "William Sharon Virginia City. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1877 Aaron H. Cragin Lebanon. 

1879 Bainbridge Wadleigh...Milforl. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1877 Fred'k T.Frelinghuysen.Newark. 
1881 * Theodore F. Randolph .Morristown. 

NEW YORK. 

1879 Roscoe Conkling Utica, 

1881 *Francis Keman Utica. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1877 Matthew W. Ranson Weldon. 

1879 Augustus S.Merrimon.. Raleigh. 

OHIO. 

1879 John Sherman. Mansfield. 

1881 Allen G. Thurman Columbus. 

OREGON. 

1877 James K. Kelly Portland. 

1879 John H. Mitchell Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1879 Simon Cameron Harrisburg. 

1881 * William A . Wallace Clearfield. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1877 Henry B.Anthony Providence, 

1S81 "Ambrose E. Burnside ..Bristol. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1877 Thomas J. Robertson ...Columbia. 
1879 John J.Patterson Columbia. 

TENNESSEE 

1877 Henry Cooper Nashville. 

1881 * David M. Key\ Chattanooga 

TEXAS. 

1877 Morgan C. HAMiLTON..Walling's Ferry. 
1881 *S. B. Maxey Paris. 

VERMONT. 

1879 Justin S. Morrill Strafford. 

1881 George F.Edmunds Burlington. 

VIRGINIA. 

1877 John W. Johnston Abingdon. 

1881 * Robert E. Withers Wytheville. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1877 Henry G. Davis Piedmont. 

1881 *Alhn T. Coperton.. Union. 

WISCONSIN. 

1877 Timothy O. Howe Green Bay. 

1881 "Angus Cameron La Crosse. 



t Appointed by the Governor to fill vacancy. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES* 



Geobgb If. Adams, of Kentucky, Clerk. 



MICHAEL C. KERR of Indiana. Speaker: 



I Democrats, In Roman, 168; Republicans, in Italics, 108; Liberals and Independents, in Small ; 

Those marked thus (*) were members of the XLUId i 



Capitals, 14 ; Vacancies, 2.— Total, 292 
Congress.] 



ALABAMA. 

Jere. Haralson Selma, 

Jeremiah X. Williams Clavton. 

Taul Bradford Talladega. 

* Charles Hays Haysville. 

•John H. Caldwell Jacksonville. 

Goldsmith W. Hewitt Birmingham. 

Bnrwell B. Lewis Tuscaloosa. 

William H. Fornev Jacksonville. 

ARKANSAS. 

Luclen C Gause Jacksonport. 

"William F. Slenions Monticello. 

William W. Wilshlre Little Rock. 

"Thomas M. Gunter Fayetteville. 

CALIFORNIA. 

, William A. Piper San Francisco. 

Horace F. Page Placerville. 

•John K. Luttrell Santa Rosa. 

P. D. Wigginton Merced. 

CONNECTICUT. 

George M. Landers New Britain. 

James Phelps Essex. 

* Henry 11. starkweather. '.Norwich. 

* William H. Baruum Lime Rock. 

DELAWARE. 

James Williams Kenton. 

FLORIDA. 

*Josiah T. Walls Gainesville. 

* William J. lurman Tallahassee. 

GEORGIA. 

Julian Hartridge Savannah. 

William E. Smith Albany. 

•Philip Cook Americus. 

♦Henry R. Harris Greenville. 

Milton A. Candler Atlanta. 

•James H. Blount Macon. 

William H. Felton Cartersville. 

•Alexander H. Stephens.. Crawfordsville. 

Benjamin H. Hill Atlanta. 

_. ILLINOIS. 

Bernard G. Caulfleld Chicago. 

Carter H. Harrison Chicago. 

* Charles B. Farwell Chicago. 

* Stephen A . Hurlbut Belvidere. 

'Horatio C. Burchard. ...Frecport. • 

Thomas J. Henderson Princeton. 

Alexander Campbbll. La Salle. 

* Greenbury L. Fort Lacon. 

Richard H. Whiting Peoria 

c OH £' £;.? AOBT Rushville.i 

wnu W1 S e » Li Pittsfield. ' 

>\ illiam M. Springer Springfield. 

Adlai E. Stevenson. . . .Bloomington. 

•Joseph G. Camion Tuscola 

wu ,n H " ? d ?% ♦ • -Sullivan. 

. w V am 4' h S P ark8 • • • -Carlyle. 

w«ii m 5' Mon ieoa Waterloo. 

w illiam nartzell Chester. 

« illiam li. Anderson.. Mount Vernon 

■n . „ „ INDIANA. 

Benonl S. Fuller Boonville. 

fc e9 ft ^ llliams Wheatland. 

lln u*f A • £ err New Albany. 

•leptha D. New.. Vpmnn 

•William S.Holman.'.'.:r:.Au?ora' 
vri t ^H S '/ tob i nson Anderson. 

' Vort , V^ a J <le r 8 Indianapolis. 

•ThZZnJ-r B } mter tloomiugton. 

win »m a' S * " —j Lebanon. 

3SSa%Baff^:::*Of- 



13 



IOWA. 

1 * George W. McCrary Keokuk. 

2 John Q. Tufts "Wilton Junction. 

3 Lucien L. Ainsworth West Union. 

4 * Henry O. Pratt. Charles City. 

5 * James Wilson Buckingham 

6 Ezekiel S. Sampson Sigourney . 

7 *John A. Kasson Des Moines. 

8 * James W.McDil Afton. 

9 Addison Oliver Onawa. 

KANSAS. 

1 * William A . Phillips Salina . 

2 John R. Goodwin Humboldt. 

3 William R. Brown Hutchinson. 

KENTUCKY. 

1 Andrew R. Boone May field. 

2 * John Young Brown Henderson. 

3 *Charles W. Milliken Franklin. 

4 J . Proctor Knott Lebanon . 

15 Edward Y. Parsons Louisville. 

6 Thomas L. Jones Newport. 

7 Joseph C. S. Blackburn.. Versailles. 

8 *Milton J. Durham Danville. 

9 Joh?i D. White Manchester 

10 John B. Clarke Augusta." 

LOUISIANA. 

1 Randall L. Gibson New Orleans. 

2 E. John Ellis New Orleans. 

3 * Chester B. Darrall ..Brashear. 

4 William M. Levy Natchitoches. 

5 *Frank Morey Monroe. 

6 Charles E. JVash Washington . 

MAINE. 

1 * John H. Burligh South Berwick. 

2 * William P. Frye Lewiston. 

3 * James G. Plane Augusta. 

4 Harris M. Plaisted Bangor . 

5 * Eugene Hale Ellsworth. 

MARYLAND. 

i Philip F. Thomas Easton. 

2 Charles B. Roberts Westminster. 

3 * William J. O'Brien Baltimore. 

4 *Thornas Swann Baltimore. 

5 Eli J. Henkle Brooklyn. 

6 William Walsh Cumberland. 

MAS8ACHU SETTS. 

1 William W. Crapo New Bedford . 

2 * Benjamin W. Harris East Bridge water. 

3 *Henry L.Pierce '....Boston. 

4 Rufus S. Frost Chelsea. 

3 Nathaniel P. Banks.. .Waltham. 

6 Charles P. Thompson Gloucester. 

7 John K. Tarbox Lawrence. 

8 William Wirt Warren Boston. 

9 * George F. Hoar Worcester. 

to Julius H. Seelye Amherst. 

1 1 Chester W. Chapin Springfield. 

MICHIGAN. 

1 AlpheusS. Williams... Detroit. 

2 "'Henry Waldron Hillsdale. 

3 * George Willard Battle Creek. 

4 Allen Potter Kalamazoo . 

5 * William B. Williams Allegan. 

6 George H. Dur and Flint. 

7 * Omar D. Conger Port Huron. 

8 * Nathan B. Bradley Bay City. 

9 Jay A. Hubbell Houghton. 

» , r , ~ ~ MINNESOTA. 

1 *Sfark H. Bunnell Owatonna. 

2 * Horace B. Strait Shakopee. 

3 William S. King Minneapolis. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1 *LuciusQ. C. Lamar Oxford. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



88 



2 G. Wiley Wells _.. Hoi ry- Springs. 

3 Hernando D. Money Winona. % 

4 Otho R. Singleton Canton. 

5 Charles E. Hooker Jackson. 

6 *John R. Lynch Natchez. 

MISSOURI. 

i Edward C. Kehr St. Louis. 

2 *Erastus Wells St. Louis. 

3 *WilliamH. Stone St. Louis. 

4 *Robert A. Hatcher New Madrid 

5 *Richard P. Bland Lebanon. 

6 Charles H. Morgan Lamar. 

7 John F. Philips Sedalia. 

8 Benjamin J.Franklin Kansas City. 

9 David Rea Savannah. 

io Rezin A. De Bolt Trenton. 

ii *JohnB. Clark, Jr Fayette. 

12 *John M. Glover LaGrange. 

13 *Aylett H. Buckner St. Charles. 

NEBRASKA. 

i * Lorenzo Crounse Fort Calhoun. 

NEVADA. 

i William Woodbum Virginia City. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

i Frank Jones Portsmouth. 

2 Samuel N. Bell Manchester. 

3 Henry W.Blair Plymouth. 

NEW JERSEY. 

i Clement R. Sinnickson.. .Salem. 

2 * Samuel A . Dobbins Mount Holly. 

3 Miles Ross New Brunswick. 

4 *Robert Hamilton Newton. 

5 Augustus W. Cutler Morristown. 

6 Frederick H. Teese Newark. 

7 AugustusA.Hardenbergh.Jersey City. 

NEW YORK. 

i Henry B. Metcalfe Richmond. 

2 *John G. Schumaker Brooklyn. 

3 *Simeon B. Chittknden. Brooklyn. 

4 Archibald M Bliss .'...Brooklyn. 

t, Kdwin R. Meade New York. 

6 *SamueI S. Cox New York. 

7 Smith Ely, Jr New York. 

8 Elijah Ward New York. 

9 *Fernando Wood New York. 

io Abram S. Hewitt ....New York. 

ii Benjamin A. Willis New York. 

12 N. Holmes Odell White Plains. 

13 *John O. Whitehouse.. Poughkeepsie. 

14 George M. Beebe Monticello. 

15 John H. Bagley, Jr Catskill. 

16 Charles H. Adams Cohoes. 

17 Martin I. Townsend Troy. 

18 Andrew Williams Plattsburg. 

19 * William A . Wheeler Malone . 

20 * Henry H. Hathorne Saratoga Springs. 

21 Samuel E. Miller Franklin. 

22 George A . Bagley W atertown . 

23 Scott Lord Utica. 

24 William H. Baker Constantia. 

2s Elias W.Leavenworth Syracuse. 

26 * Clinton D. MacDougall.. Auburn. 

27 Elbridge G. Lapham Canandaigua. 

28 *Thomas C. Piatt Owego. 

29 CbarlesC.B. Walker Corning. 

30 John M. Davy Rochester. 

31 * George G.Hoskins Attica. 

32 * Lyman K: Bass Buffalo . 

33 (Vacancy.) 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1 Jesse J. Yeates Murfreesborough 

2 John A. Human Warre ton. 

3 * Alfred M . waddell Wilmington. 

4 Joseph J. Davis Louisbuigh. 

5 Alfred M. Scales Greeu'sborough. 

6 *Thomas S. A6he Wadesborough. 

7 *WilliamM. Robbins Statesville. 

8 *RobertB. Vance Ashville. 

OHIO. 

1 *Milton Sayler Cincinnati. 

2 *Hknry B. Banning... .Cincinnati. 

3 John S. Savage Wilmington. 

4 John A. McMahon Dayton. 





19 



AmericusV. Rice Ottawa. 

Frank H. Hurd Toledo. 

•Lawrence T. Neal Chillicothe. 

* William Lawrence Bellefontaine. 

Early F. Poppleton Delaware. 

* Charles Eosi r Fostoria. 

John L. Vance Gallipolis. 

Ansel T. Walling Circleville. 

*Milton I. Southard Zanesville. 

Jacob P. Cowan Ashland. 

Nelson II. Van 1 'or hes.... Athens. 

* Lorenzo Dan ford St. Clairville. 

*Laurin D. Woodicorth.. . . Youngstown. 

* James Monroe ( >berhn . 

* James A. Garfield ...Hiram. 

Henry B. Payne Cleveland. 

OREGON. / 

Lafayette Lane 

PENNSYLVANIA . 

Chapman Freeman Philadelphia. 

* Charles O'Neill Philadelphia. 

* Samuel J. Randall Philadelphia. 

* William D. Kel ey Philadelphia. 

John Robbins Philadelphia. 

* Washington Townsend. . .Westchester. 
Alan \\ood,Jr Conshohocken. 

*Heister Clymer Reading. 

*A. Herr Smith Lancaster. 

William Mutchler Easton. 

Francis D. Collins Scranton. 

Winthrop W. Ketchum ..Wilkesbarre. 

James B. Reilly Pottsville. 

*John B. Packer Sanburv. 

Joseph Powell Towanda. 

*Sobieski Ross Coudersport. 

John Reilly Altoona. 

William S. Stengcr Chambersburgh. 

Levi Maish York. 

Levi A. Mackey Lock Haven. 

Jacob Turney Greensburgh. 

James H. Hopins Pittsburgh. 

Alexander G. Cochrane.. Allegheny City. 

John W. Wallace Newcastle. 

George A. Jenks Brookville. 

James Sheakley West Greenville. 

Albert G. Egbert Franklin. 



27 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1 * Benjamin T. Eames Providence. 

2 Latimer W. Ballou Woonsocket. 

60UTH CAROLINA. 

i * Joseph H. Rainey Georgetown. 

2 Edward W. M. Mackey.. Charleston. 

3 Solomon L. Hoge Columbia. 

4 ' Alexander S. Wallace Yorkville. 

5 Robert Smalls Beaufort . 

TKNNES6EE. 

i William McFarland Morristown. 

2 ■'Jacob M. Thorn burgh ...Knox ville. 

3 George C. Dibrcll Sparta. 

4 (Vacancy.) 

c; *John M . Bright Favetteville. 

6 John F. House Clarksville. 

7 "Wash'ton C. Whitthorne.. Columbia. 

8 "John D. C. Atkins Paris. 

9 William P. Caldwell Gardner. 

io H. Casey Young Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

1 John H. Reagan Palestine. 

2 David B. Culberson Jefferson. 

3 James W.Throckmorton McKinney. 

4 *Roger Q. Mills Cor6icana. 

5 *John Hancock Austin. 

6 Gustave Schleicher Cicero. 

VERMONT. 

1 Charles H. Joyce Rutland. 

2 Dudley C. Denison Royalton. 

3 * George W. Hendee Morrisville. 

VIRGINIA. 

1 Beverly B . Dougl as Ayletts . 

2 John Goode.Jr Norfolk. 

3 Gilbert C. Walker Richmond. 

4 * William H. H. Stowell. . . .Burke ville. 

5 George C . Cobell Danville . 



34 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



6 John Randolph Tucker. .Lexington. 

7 "JohaT. Hams Harrisonburgh. 

8 'Eppa Hunton Warrenton. 

9 William Terry Wytheviile. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

i Benjamin "Wilson Wilsonburgh. 

1 < harles J. Faulkner Martinsburgh. 

3 'Frank Hereford Union. 

"WISCONSIN. 

i *Charles G. Williams Jan'sville. 

2 Laden B. Caswell Fort Atkinson. 

3 Henry S. Magoon Darlington. 

4 William Pitt Lvnde Milwaukee. 

5 Samuel D. Burchard Beaver Dam. 



6 Alamort M. Kimball Pine River. 

7 * Jeremiah M. Rusk Viroqua. 

8 George W. Cate Amherst. 



Delegates from the Territories. 

Abizona— Hiram S. Stevens Tucson. 

Colorado— Thomas M. Patterson Denver. 

Dakota— Jefferson P. Kidder Vermilion. 

Idaho— Thomas W. Bennett Boise City. 

Montana— Martin Maginnis Helena. 

New Mexico— Stephen B. Eikins Santa Fe. 

Utah— George Q. Cannon Salt Lake City. 

Washington— Orange Jac bs Seattle. 

Wyoming— William R. Steele Cheyenne. 



monthly Range of the Gold Premium for Fourteen Years. 

The following tables show the lowest and highest prices of gold at New York, for each 
month in the last fourteen years. The left-hand column of each year shows the lowest 
price, and the right-hand column the highest. 



DAT E. 

January.. . 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

A ugust . . . 
September 
October... 
November 
December 



1862 



' par 

| I02& 

IOli 
' 102^ 
IO3I 
IO9 
112^- 

n6f 

122 
129 
I3O 



I05 
IO4} 
I02| 
I02| 

i°4i 
109J- 

I2oJ- 

n6i 

124 

137 

i33i 

134 



1863 


J 34 


i6of 


J 53 


172I 


J 39 


171* 


146 


iS9 


143* 


155 


I4°£ 


14B5 


123* 


145 


122J- 


129} 


127 


14.H 


i 4 of 


i56i 


143 


*54 


147 


I52f 



18 



i5*4 
I57J- 
159 
x66* 



231a 

185 

189 

209 

211 



64 

160 
161 

169} 

187 

190 

251 

285 
262 

255 
229 
260 
244 



1865 



197^ 

196I 

148^ 

144 

128* 

TorS. 

138 
145* 
I42f 
144 

145^ 
I44f 



2344 

2l6f 

201 

160 

1454 

i47t 

146^ 

148^ 

145 
149 

148* 

146* 



1866 



136* 

i.35i 

125 

125 

**54 

137* 

*47 

146* 

!43i 
1454 
*374 
I3 1 * 



I3«* 

I2QJ 

1414 

167J 
1 55 I 

152^ 
M74 
J 54» 
148J 
141* 



1867 



132 
137* 

i33f 
i3 2 * 
134$ 
136! 
i36f 

139^ 

141 

140} 

J 37J 

133 



i37i 
140^ 
140$ 
14*4 
138J 
138* 
140! 

i42i 
146$ 

145* 
1414 

i37i 



1868 



*334 
139? 
137* 
'37* 
i39i 
139* 
I4°4 
1434 
M*4 
133* 
»32* 
134$ 



142J 
144 

141I 
i 4 o| 

M°* 
141* 

i45i 
150 
i45i 
140J 

*37 

136* 



DATE. 

January.. .. 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August — 
September 
October.. . 
November. 
December . 



1869 


18 


i34f 


136J 


119* 


i3°3 


138* 


"5 


i3°4 


*3?i 


no£ 


131I 


134J 


mi- 


134* 


i44i 


113! 


T 37 


139* 


110J 


*34 


137^- 


mi 


I3 1 * 


i37f 


"44 


130J 


162* 


112} 


I28i 


i3 T 4 


»«i 


121J 


I28| 


no 


"94 


124 


noj- 



:to 



123^ 

121^- 
1 16 } 

115! 
"5* 
114I 

122$ 

122 

Il6f 

"44 

"3a 1 

mi 



1871 


1872 


18 


iioj 


III} 


ioSi 


nof 


ml 


nof 


112} 


109 J- 


III 


112I 


IIO^ 


Illf 


109! 


IIO} 


"4* 


no£ 


111$ 


109 f 


"34 


ti6.f 


Til 


112} 


II2f 


"4f 


n6f 


Illf 


"3i 


"3 


"4i 


tt$ 


Illf- 


"3* 


"34 


"-4 


11- 


111S 


"34 


II2i 


"5f 


"4f 


II2f 


"5f 


U2f 


"54 


noi 


IIl| 


"5 


112* 


"^4 


107! 


nof 


"2f 


1 1 if 


"4* 


io6f 


I05| 


nof 


"if 


"34 


108 i 



173 



"4t 
115! 

n84 
"94 
nSf 
118* 
"6I 
n6± 
"6f 
i"4 
no}- 

II2f 



1874 


18' 


nof 


II2J 


"if 


Illf 


"3 


i^S* 


i"4 


"34 


"4I 


mi 


"4f 


114 


ml 


"3i 


"5 


1 10^ 


1121 


116} 


109 


"o* 


inf 


109} 


nei- 


112I 


iogf 


110} 


"3f 


109I 


"Of 


114} 


no 


II2f 


iHi 


nof 


112^ 


II2f 



"3t 
"5f 
117 

"5* 

ii6| 

"74 
"74 
"44 
"7f 
"7# 
"6f 

"54 



Population of the chief Cities and Towns of the State of New York: 

in 1875 and 1870. 

1875 1S7U! 



1S75 

New York* 1,046,037 

Brooklyn 484,616 

Buffalo !34<573 

Albany 86.013 

Rochester.... 81,673 

Troy 48,821 

Syracuse 48,315 

Utica 32,070 

Oswego 22,455 

Watervliet . . 20,734 

Elmira 20,^38 

Kingston t.. 20,474 
Poughkeepsie 19,859 

Auburn 18,359 

Cohoes 17,516 



1S70 

942,292 

396,099 

"7,714 
69,422 
62,386 
44,533 
43,°5i 
28,804 
20,910 
22,609 
15,863 

2i,943 
20,080 
17,225 
!5,357 



Newburgh.. . . 17,327 

YonkersJ 17,269 

Johnstown... 15,656 

L. Island City 15,609 

Binghamton.. 15,550 

Flushing 15,367 

Hempstead... 14,802 

Fishkill .'. 13,471 

Oswegatchie.. 13,204 

Schenectady. . 12,748 

Lockport 12,624 

Cortlandt ",970 

Rome 11,922 

Oyster Bay. . . 11,462 



17,014 

18,357 
12,273 

12,692 
14,650 

x 3,999 
",752 
I 3,<>94 
11,026 
i2,4»6 
11,694 
11,000 
io,595 



1875 

Brookhaven. ",451 

Deerpark i z ,"5 

Castleton 11,007 

Greenburgh. . 10,997 

Saugerties 10,951 

SaratogaSp'gs 10,775 

New Lots 10,765 

Newtown 1... 10,631 

Walkill 10,579 

Ithaca 10,058 

Watertown... 10,041 

Lenox 9,44° 

Hudson 8,828 

Plattsburg . . . 8,804 



1S70 

10,159 
9,387 
9,504 

10,790 

10,455 
8,537 
9,800 

20,274 

9,477 
10,107 

9,336 
9,816 
8,615 
8,414 



TR,o^h I ^nl U ( ?c : e n? 6 ; 2o6in r te J- itory ann f*ed from Westchester county in 1873. t Included in 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



35 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



TERMONT. 

Governor, '74. Got .,'72. Gov., '70. 
Counties. Dem. Rep. Lib. Adm. Bern. Rep. 

Bingham Peck Gardner Converse Heaton Stewart 

Addison.... 232 3763.. 712 3855.. 393 3176 
Beuningtoa 1123 2251.. 1 501 2519.. 1170 2660 

2476. . 

334f.. 
576.. 

3060 



Caledonia.. 1111 
Chittenden. 1616 

Essex 338 

Franklin.... 1299 
Grand Isle. 241 
Lamoille... . 707 

Orange 1437 

Orleans 586 

Rutland ... 1158 
Washingt'n 1837 
Windham . . 707 
Windsor.... 865 
Total 132 17 

Percent 28.30 



386.. 
I2os.. 



3433.. 
2362. . 
2651 . , 
3681., 




5293. . 



831 


1960 


1362 


3035. 


343 


793 


842 
203 


2243 
366 


500 


H14 


1384 


2831 


179 


1972 


1256 


3891 


1 172 


2701 


703 


2854 


920 


35/1 



33582.. I 661 3 

11.70.. 28.37 



Asahel Peck's maj., 20,325! 
aaj. in 1872, 21333; John W. 
1870, 21 ,309. TotaTvote in 1874, 4 6 »839 ; m l8 7 2 > 58,519; 



41946.. 12018 33367 

71.63.. £6.54 W6 

Julius Converse'^ 
Stewart's maj. in 



174 

5 8° 
4 

a 

no 



203 

5 8 
4 

* 

138 



in 1870,41,421. 

The following was the aggregate vote of can- 
didates for the other State offices : 

Lt.- Gov.... Lyman G. Hinckley, Rep 33718 

Henry Chase, Dem 13000 

Chase's maT . 20718 

Treasurer. John A. Page, Kep. 33790 

Otis Chamberlain, Dem 12736 

Page's maj 21014 

Legislature, 1874-5. Senate. House. Joint Bdl. 

lie publicans 29 

Democrats 1 

Liberal Reps — 

Independents — 

No politics — 

Rep. maj "28 

Representatives in Congress. 

18?4. 18?«. 18TO. 

Districts. Bern. Rep. Lib. Adm. Dem. Rep. 

I. Houton Joyce Heaton Willard Can Will*. d 

Addison 54 2808.. 213 3619.. 369 2470 

Bennington. 390 1754.. 858 2447.. 596 2272 

Rutland 056 3793- *33i 4749-. 1230 3017 

Washington .1491 1283.. 1176 3240.. 1480 270b 

Total 2597 9638.. 3618 14061..3675 10476 

Charles H. Joyce's maj., 7041; Charles W. 
Willard's maj. in 1872,10,443; in 1870, 6801. In 
t3;o, A. L. Miner, Iud. Rep., received 1110 votes, 
and in 1874, Charles W. Willard received 1635. 

II. Denison Polai/d Ste.le Poland Partridge Poland 

Caledonia. ..1 142 1222.. 535 2018.. 659 182S 

Orange 2650 1002.. 627 2100:. 1157 2484 

Windham ... 395 2042,.. 33 5508.. 653 2771 

Windsor 2851 1490.. 1734 3444-. 737 3356 

Total.... 70 
Dudley C. D 



038 5756.. 2929 1 1070.. 3206 10479 
>enison (Ind. Rep.) over Luke P. 
Poland, 1282 ; Poland's maj. in 1872, 8141 : in 1870, 
7273. In 1872, J. M. Pierce, Ind., received 2114- 
votes, and there were 389 scattering. In 187.1 . 
John B. Mead, the Gr nger candidate, received 
654, C. W. Davenport, Dem. , i960, and there weiv 
325 scattering. At this election there was no 
choice . At the 6econd election Luke P. Polan d 
received 4070, Alexander McLean 1124, and Dud- 
ley C. Denison 8295, with n scattering, giving 
Denison 2685 maj. over all. 

III. Edw.irds Hendeo Adam* Hendee GHlett Smith 

Chittenden.. 1294 2747.. 1206 3118.. 1248 3003 



Essex 313 

Franklin 713 

Grand Isle.. 216 

Lamoille 367 

Orleans 703 

Total — 3646 00^3.. 3182 X1473.. 3047 9116 
George W. Hendee's maj., 1397; in 1872, 8291; 
' Worthing ton C. Smith's maj. in 1 870, 6069. 



552.. 

2509.. 

267., 



268 
928 
176 
332 
272 



746.. 

2941- • 
382.. 
1720.. 
2563.. 



47 

Mo 
487 



647 
1993 

282 
1303 

1883 



MASSACHUSETTS, 

<T -Governor, 1075. — i Gov. '74. 
Counties. Dem.Rep.Temp.Ind.Ind. Dem. Rep. 

Gaston Ric-- liakerAdamsPhi . GastonTa but 

Barnstable. . 655 1439 181 
Berkshire.... 3S75 3757 72 

Bristol 5164 6590 951 

Dukes 119 iq6 4 

Essex 10733 in 18 1697 

Franklin — 19S3 1900 428 
Hampden... 4673 4648 241 
Hampshire.. 2244 2121 99 
Middlesex ..14005 15482 1499 
Kantucket.. 93 379 1 

Korfolk 4965 4699 791; 

Plymouth... 3566 4007 718 

Suffolk 13970 14391 1047 

Worcester... 12278 12512 1391 



40 4.. 

9 1.. 

none 2.. 

109 33-. 

88 1.. 

83 36.. 

312 6.. 

212 73- • 

1 none 

129 16.. 

52 62. . 

232 37-. 

189 44.. 



Total 78333 83639 9124 1497 316 

Percent.. 46.oU 4K.37 6. YS .67 18.. uj.os> io.ii 

Alexander H. Rice over William Gaston 5sc6. 
"illiam Gaston's maj. in 1874,703?. Total vote 



163 1607 

47&3 3878 

6371 6713 

190 3;, 5 

!22/4 I4373 
21l6 2539 
7466 3709 
3094 2Ql6 

1687O I75.J7 

107 353 

5120 4972 

3404 4Soo 
20039 12271 
* 3913 I3 54| 
96376 803.14 
5 1.*9 4S.11 
Cast; 
Will 

in 1871. 172,909; in 1074, 105,720. m addition to 
the vote included in the above tabic, the; e, were 
276 scattering in 1871, and 270 scattering in 1874. 

The aggregate vote iu 1871. of candidates tor 
the other State offices wa6 as follows: 

Lieut. Cror.. Horatio G. Knight, Rep 95,906 

John Qjiincy ^\ dams, Dem 71,192 

.. Knight's maj 26,404 

Secof State. Henry B. Feirce, Rep 96,477 

George H. Monroe, Dem 76,107 

Peirce's maj 20,280 

Auditor Julius L. Clarke, Rep 97,298 

John E. Fitzgerald, Dem 71,611 

Clarke's maj 21,687 

Treasurer... Charles Endicott, Rep 97,002 

Weston Rowland. Dem 74,766 

Endicott's inaj 23,n6 

Atty. Qen... Charles R. Train, Rep 9>,j68 

George F. Verry, Dem 74,608 

Train's maj. 22,80 

Scattering votes for Lieut. Gov. 1331 ,- Sec. of 
State, 259; Auditor.. 131 ; Treasurer, "190, and At- 
torney General, 447. 
Legislature, 1876. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Republicans 30 182 212 

Opposition 9 58 67 

Republican maj "21 "124 "145 

Representatives in Congress. ' 
The names of those elected are printed in Italic. 
Dtsts. Opposition. ls?4. Administration. 



4161 
6688 



1 Louis Lapham. 

2 Edward Avery.. 

3 Benjamin Dean. 4927 

4 Josiah G.Abbott 651 1 
1 Aof/VJ P. Banks 13438 

6 C. P. Thompson 8716 

7 John K. Tarbox 8079 

8 Wm. W.Warren 8181 

9 EHThaver 8961 

10 Julius ft. Seelye 7773 
Henry C. Hill... 3474 

1 1 Ches'r W. Chapin 1 1964 

Totals 94177 

Majority 6178, 

Diets. Liberal. '18T3. Administration 



9927 James Bujginton . 
9611 Benj. W. Harris. 
8c4K J enry L. Pierce. 
672T Ru/i/s S. Frost. 
7263 Daniel W. Gooch. 
7747 Beuj'n F. Butler. 
7415 James C. Aver. 
7861 J.M. S. Williams 
9423 George P. Hoar. 
7353 Chas. A. Stevens. 

6227 nenry Alexander. 
87599 



Jcs. M. D y 2609 

2 Edward A very.. 1090 

3 Saninel C Cobb. 1139 

4 Leopold Morse.. 6262 

5 KathTP. Banks. 8039 

6 C. P. Thompson. 1737 

7 John K. Tarbox. "1989 

8 Wm. W. Warren. 5829 

9 George F. Verry 5007 

10 D. W. Bond 4188 

11 John F. Arnol d. 6927 

Totals 61216 

Majority 



12441 James BvJJlnton . 
12752 Benj. W. Harris. 

8931 Wm. Whiting. 

8715 S muel Hooper. 
12472 DanH W. Gooch. 
11881 Benj. P. Butler. 
11742 Eben'r R. Hoar. 
1 1929 J. M.S. Williams. 
12691 George P. Hoar. 
14019 Alvah Crocker. 
12260 H enry L. Dawes. 



[30733 
69517 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



CONNECTICUT. 



'& 



PBE8. '72. 

Lib. Aam. 



Gov. *?2. 
Bern. 



Gov. 

Dem 



£>h 



° > '" li<- * JKm oSL SiJr^il \UrZa Inirr-oll H ,£. Gr-Wey Gran! Hubbard Jewell EnglUh Jewell 

6937.. 7067 6792.. 8516 

8367.. 9J07 9038- • 10I 98 

3886.. 40V 3893- • 4405 

2617 273O. . 2S99 

12336 7084. . 1 1 123 

4081 480c.. 4999 

1947 1945" • 1970 

1940 29^7.. 2004 



r»Jrfl< •' 

lUMford ....1198B 
1 eld .... S678 
- 1 I. 

■ 

TolUnd 216s 

Total 

• 

Majority. . 

The Prohir 
Smith 
sniltti 

H Illg'TH 



7003 


S22. 


8274 


at 


«6. 
168. 


1074 
5070 


9649 


MO- 


10672 




49'- 


. 4687 




2009 




189. 


. 2429 




2932. 


u n 




i.ii. 



24 S2.. 
9°S4- 
4739- • 
1828.. 
2710. ^ 

9WJ. 

4t. of. 



4J M 

53 45 



3Q24S- 
46 55.. 



43880 
47.54 



6m8 — — 6 /* 82 

:i.in vote wa« 2932 for Henry D. 

4960 for Smith In 1874. 24M for 

OiMiilh'ttein 18:2. Charles 

reenc in iS7=>. 94*o ; over 



5814 — — 



8401 
10623.. 

4565.. 

3448.. 
"349. • 

6108.. 

2335- 
3789- . 

50638. 

62.46.. 

4758 



77D7 
9399 
4804 
2857 
10991 
4783 

2068 



764 s. 
9820.. 
4428.. 
3°75- • 

'38:: 
2188. 

3295 



8499 
0728 

5134 
2924 
11701 

5' 74 
2001 
2209 



7890 
9712 
4820 

3'39 

10322 
5682 

22Q3 

3 6l 5 



44562 
48.90 



465^- 
51. 1C. 



47370 

49.95 



— 200J — 



47473 

50.05 

103 



\cr 1. reenc in is7=>. 94"o: over 
,e and Smith, o;4«: " v,, r Harrison in 1874, 
1 ;iii.l Smith, i8i.i •. over Haven 
1 , , '- 0:1 oyer Hsven sod Smith, 3363. Grant's 
Marshall Jewell over Hub- 
hard in : Huhbard and Gillette, 
.- i*h In 1871, io<. 

be iHni'.cralic and Republican 

98,024; in 1871. t<6,728; in 1873, 

fbr President in ib;.>, 96.518; tor Gover- 

B r ;n 1872,91,125; In 187I, 94-843- 

LaoULATVM, 1875. Semite Hmtie 

its 14 128 

KepoMlcans 6 106 

Lsdepeadenti 1 M 12 

!>• in'>cratlc maj. 7 u 18 

The aKR-njfiitc vote in 1875, of candidates for 
the nth- r state ..ftlccs, wa6 as follows: 

LUirt. 9ov....Q*orwt O. sill. Dem 53» 2 47 

Charles L. English, Rep.... 45,024 



Joint Bal. 
142 
112 



Jesse G. Baldwin, Pro 2,923 

Sill over all 5,300 

Sec. of State... Marvin H. Sanger, Dem ^3,2^8 

Augustus H. Kean, Rep 44,984 

Ruel P. Cowles, Pro 2,912 

Sanger over all 5,362 

Treasurer "William E. Raymond, Dem. 53,1*7 

Owen B. Arnold, Rep 4=.. 176 

John A. Rockwell, Pro 2.885 

Ravmond over all *,ooo 

Comptroller.. Alfred R. Goodrich. Dem.. 53,268 
Robert B. Crawford, Rep... 44,965 

Dabney Carr, Pro 2,875 

Goodrich over all ^,428 

By an amendment to the Constitution, ratified 
by the people at the October town elections, by 
a vote of 41,254 in favor of, to 2*25 against, elec- 
tions in Connecticut from and "after November, 
1676, will be held on the Tuesday after the first 
Monday in November, and State officers will be 
chosen biennially. The Legislature will meet 
on the Wednesday after the ist Monday in Jan- 
uary. 



East Haven... 234 

(iuilford 2*3 

Hamden 280 



By Town*. 

IV 1875 A>I> . 

HAl.Ti ORD < "I STY. 

ImT.'J (,ov. 1*74 

hsm.Rtp. Madison 157 

roll Qrrane infr.iUr i. Meriden 1298 

Hartford 4483 3226.. 4087 2880 Middlcbury... 45 

112.. 9s loo'.Milford 431 

232.. 2.16 2i7,Nancatucb.. . 353 
1.-.. 172 87 N. Bra:. ford. . 94 
42>.. 477 384 North Haven. 134 

59.. 150 61 Orange 215 

252.. iu 230' Oxford 134 

70.. 133 06 Prospect 45 

307.. 293 2^2 1 Seymour 171 

246.. 243 217 Southbury ... 157 
4oj.. 294 317 Wallingford.. .;oi 
266.. 204 131 Wster6ury...i5i9 

I/O.. 33< 2sl Wolcott 6d 

190., 177 197 Woodbridge.. 53 
rots] 



Ingersoll Gre«n« Ing.Harr»n| FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



\\>>:i 99 

Held ... 204 
<-m 

Burlington 

>n 187 

inby ... 130 

I Hartford 

idsor... 2 it 

Karmington.. ;j; 

tSa 



292.. 211 

308.. 224 

115.. 248 

213.. 150 
1069.. 1077 

84.. 37 

312.. $5 



2.75'Fairfield 355 2*2.. 3: 

251 Bridgeport ...2447 i860.. 1988 1718 






• ury. 



Hartland 103 

M .11: I* hi 



214.. 
I24.. 

260.. 
103.. 

73-. 

21s.. 
133-- 
311.. 
915-. 
so.. 

87.. 



76 
125 
148 
118 

41 

186 

130 
381 



43 



'• .tain.. 

rtOfl ... 
Plalnvllle. ... 
Rocky Hill... 

daor.. . 

Sum.-iil 

W. Hartford., 
W'tliersilcld. 

- >r , 

Wind'rLocka 
Total 



MS 


379- 


05 


B. 




9". 


106 


.& 


in 


"1. 


212 


191. 


4-> 


299. 


» 


289. 


103 


202. 


. U2 


220. 


323 


210. 


26l 


>*. 



Bethel 263 

i»9 Brookfield.... 130 

945'Danbary 812 

72 Darien 174 

282 Easton 1 50 

130 Greenwich ... 571 
117 Huntington .. 215 

128 Monroe 141 

244 New Canaan.. 279 
109 New Fairfield 133 

61 Newtown 411 

217 Norwalk 961 

123 Redding 165 

278 Ridgefleld.... 203 

842 Sherman 101 

43 Stamford 707 

84 Stratford 357 

7. Trumbull 163 



-*A -,.l "I'oiai 132109049.10672^54*.;""*""" * v 3 

** -71 NEW LONDON COUNT YVi U r e8 l on -; '5 1 

.!' Now London. 708 683.. 690 525i u .<Y; t P ort 3&5 



1043 

9» 
105 
114 

213 

:* 
-.1 

. 120 



- 683 

" I Norwich 1416 1787 

°i Bozrab 60 109. 

, : f'olchcstcr... 266 208. 

: list Lyme.... 1^3 13^. 

Franklin 73 76. 

■riswold 216 229. 

"ton 442 

'•billion 117 

;99;Ledysrd 135 

,0 » Lisbon U 



406., 
208., 



210.. 300 i92 Lvme .-...;:;;« Z" „? ^ 



■ 96^1.10714 8367 N.stonlngton 162 

NEW RA,VI \ < (»c\tv Old Lyme 109 

Havcn...5666 3404..4iii 3549 J, rcston 322 



.1089 

63 
191 

1 

139 
384 

i 

111 
89 
18s 



iS >WilttW 214 

Total 
217I > WINDHA 



209. 

75-. 
429.. 
142.. 
100., 
403., 
184., 

98.. 
194. 

35- 
202., 
840. 
151. 
203., 

73- 
690., 
346. 
141. 

58. 
149. 
163. 



246 

U7 
660 

146 
546 
176 
138 
282 
107 

& 

15s 
206 

5^4 
350 
170 
120 
284 
212 



104 Brooklyn 151 

79 Ashford 157 

235 Canterbury... 175 

3N9 Chaplin 60 

184 Eastford 108 

120 Hampton. ... 75 
53 Killlngly. 32 



164 
72 

80 



63 



• FnlU. -a 

< h'-hlrc .. 

809 



5S-. 

204., 
213., 
7S3- 



299 
>99 
7S7 



543' 



Plaintteld 2 

18=;.. 89 166 Pomfret 60 

247.. 18=; 204 Putnam 178 

111 . 135 107 Scotland 59 

180.. 283 147 Sterling 100 

77.. 61 81 Thompson ... . 123 
121 . 134 120 Voluutown... 92 

481 493-. 4^7 393 Windham 4S3 

198 191 •• 181 i76 ,W T oodstock .. 138 
Tox*\ 5427 5739. .4687 4739 ' 



S:ilem 
, Bpragoe 168 



^fc^NT^. 6937 
122.. 138 116 
124.. 161 117 
114.. 164 128 

80.. 
114.. 

96.. 

264.. 
144.. 
334.. 
92.. 
108.. 
3; 



stonlngton . 
Waterford 



St 

350. 
300. 



328 

221 

7t 

■s 

82 

95 
122 

459 
•43 



197 
74 
544 
142 
108 
438 
144 
114 
184 
39 
190 
828 
»5« 

r 7 
738' 



46 

1SI 

144 



»4 
360 
229 
116 
222 

89 

91 
279 

69 

354 
293 



Total 2539 3231. .2429 2710 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 137G. 



37 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



Litchfield.. . 
Barkhauistead i65 
Bethlehem ... 93 
Brirtgewater . 127 

Canaan 220 

Colebrook 129 

Cornwall 227 

Soshen 113 

Harwinton ... 74 

Kent 167 

Morris 91 

N. Hartford.. 184 
New Milford . 454 

Norfolk 123 

North Canaan 185 

Plymouth 409 

Roxbury 130 

Salisbury 586 

Sharon 359 

Torrington... 358 

Warren 78 

Washington.. 188 
Watertown .. 147 
Winchester... 512 
Woodbury.... 239 



Ingersol Givene In<; Harr'n)NeW Britain. 1264 



Landers Hawl. Kend. Hawl. 1873, ^83. Calvin S. Harrington, 



237. 

120. 

64., 

35. 

53- 



278 

'a 
121 

185 



96. . 124 

io6 



76.. 
no.. 
102.. 

60.. 
252.. 
278.. 
149.. 
101.. 

369- • 
80.. 

178.. 

148.. 

311.. 
56.. 

149.. 

197.. 

412.. 

215.. 



9< 

113 

74 

I5 2 
90 

148 

389 

166 
356 
127 

5»9 

325 

308 

70 

1? l 
120 

424 
217 



68 
34 

07 
10 J 
119 

85 
120 

99 
5« 
238 
277 
138 
103 
361 
83 
182 

133 

299 

6^ 

»55 

209 
380 
204 



Total 5678 3968. . 5078 3886 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Middletown.. . 1 145 

Haddara 296 

Chatham 180 

Chester 103 

Clinton 100 

Cromwell 189 

Durham 154 

E. Haddam... . 277 

Essex 17s 

Killiugworth 112 
Middleiield... 56 
Old Saybrook 167 

Portland 207 

Saybrook 121 

Westbrook ... 75 

Total 3297 2950.. 289: 

TOLLAND COUNTY 



Newington... 101 
Plain ville ... 130 
Rocky Hill.. 104 

Simsbury 202 

Southington. 422 
S. Windsor.. 186 

Suffleld 359 

W. Hartford. 98 
Wethersfield 143 

Windsor 314 

Wind. Locks 25$ 



996 
76. 
200. 
120. 
211. 

399- 
165. 

317- 
210. 
222. 
230. 
136. 



828 
66 

101 
78 

3$ 

270 
84 

108 

2S2 



998 Prohibitionist, received 631 
81 votes in 1875. 

192 Dist.III.— NEW LONDON CO. 

Il8 Foster Suirkw.Bill Stark. 

193 New London. 667 741.. 578 553 
349 Norwich 1476 1756.. 877 1342 



Total 113^6 10632..? 

TOLLAND CO. 



150 Bozrah 59 108. . 

283 Colchester ... 265 208.. 

191 East Lyme ... 156 132.. 

21 (Franklin 74 75.. 

203|Griswold 168 277.. 

J43 G-roton 439 420.. 

iLebanon 122 204.. 



Tolland 147 

Andover 61 

Bolton 76 

Columbia... 92 
Coventry... 140 
Ellington... 166 

Hebron 128 

Mansfield .. 180 

Somers 132 

Stafford 374 

Union 100 

Vernon 40s 

Willington.. 77 



13$.. 

63.. 

68.. 

69.. 
191.. 
140. . 

135" 
238.. 

1S2.. 

372.. 

8s.. 
523.. 
143- • 



l4 l 

58 

75 

97 

103 

160 

122 

163 

119 

330 

88 

2 % 



5 jLedyard 136 

m Lisbon 67 

,5! Lyme 101 

gjMontville 170 

65iN. Stonington 169 243 

2I0 I Old Lyme m 109. 

1 ' Preston 327 

,^' 1 Salem 74 

2 £ Q iSprague 172 

IQ 2i Stonington 
'g^lWaterford. 

871 Total 

505! WINDHAM CO 



495 
196 



68.. 
89.. 
191.. 



180.. 

74-. 
120.. 

49i •• 
194.. 



112 

I 

368 
118 
in 
62 
142 

146 

264 
57 
114 
319 
160 



79 
193 
125 

82 
218 
323 
222 
120 

167 
222 
113 
154 
73 
141 
410 
151 




134] Brooklyn 160 

Total 2078 2314. .1842 22is Asbford l8 ° 

Total Dist. 13434 12940.10704 12030 

George M. Landers 's maj. 488 ; 
Joseph li. Hawley's maj. in 1873, 
1266. In 187^, Edwin B. Lyon, 
Prohibitionist, received 223 
votes. 

Dist. II.— NEW HAVEN CO. 
PhelpB Kt-llcgsj tCngl.Kel ong 

New Haven. .4973 4097. .3397 3859 
Beacon Falls 50 59.. 49 5=; 
Bethany 81 26. 



14 5818. .4071 4822 
AM C " 



no.. 
62.. 

62.. 

6s.. 
174.. 
128., 
132.. 
22s., 
148. 
315- 

84. 
437- 
136. 



1.57 

59, 

78 

93 

i 

n6 
180 
129 
344 



79 



Branford 312 

Cheshire 218 

Derbv 813 

East "Haven.. 222 

Guilford 244 

Hamden 267 

Madison 1=4 

Meriden 1296 

Middk'bury . 42 

Milfo.d 399 

NaugaLuck.. 308 
X. Branford. 92 
North Haven 131 

6i Orange 201 

196 Oxford in 

Prospect 44 

Seymour 162 

Southbury... 152 
Wallingford. 304 
Waterbury ..1421 
Wolcol t 58 



233- • 
222.. 

743- • 
311.. 

315-. 
135.. 
217.. 
not.. 
86.. 
318.. 
283.. 
134.. 
120. . 
282.. 
124.. 
74-. 

22s.. 



88 

254 

204 

702 

210 
192 
229 
169 
990 
48 
313 
268 

126 
160 
n6 

47 
170 



148 
203 
672 
269 
276 
152 
205 
91c 
80 
366 
214 
130 

248 

JOB 



Tolland 160 

Andover 61 

Bolton 79 

Columbia 94 

Coventry 147 

Ellington 170 

Hebron 124 

Mansfield 18s 

Somers 132 

Stafford 38s 

Union 101 

Vernon 446 

willington ... Si 

Total > .««5 **8- • 2009 1828I %££&££ £ 

Congressmen. -il.«.«i 

Dist. I.-HARTFOED CO. I rot ^rmm tf&i? ^;? 628 98?9 
1'37'S 1873 ' MIDDLESEX CO. 
Towns. Dem.Rep/Dem.Xep\\*}\& A }* to v nio P 8 45--947 
Laude.sUaw . Ktmd. HawiJ;j£ a t c ' am 28 7 

Hartford..... 41 19 3649.. -3399 3375 fc£!£J* m "- !£ 
Avon 94 116.. 71 iii^" t! * tu I0 ° 

<s£ S yiSSSSiik: ill 

241 



176 
537.. 119 

317.. 345 3'8 

1051. .12^2 I032 

5I-. 49 47 
89.. 39 71 



Berlin 239 

Bloom field... 204 

Bristol 544 

Burlington.. 163 

Canton 175 

E.Hartforf'.. 300 
E. Windsor.. 236 
E. Granby... 12s 

Enfield 360 

Farmingtou.. 236 
Glastonbury. 336 

Granby 145 

Hartland 103 

Manchester.. 319 
|^ Marlborough 60 



274.. 
330.. 
261. , 

76., 
440. 
274. 
338. 
198. 

49- 
432. 

49. 



162 
242 
184 

i°5 
224 
182 
300 

M7 
81 
192 

52 



Essex 214 

t„i!Kiliingworthii3 
2 9 yiMiddlpfi*ld. ss 
fir,0. Saybrook 109 
°,i Portland.... 198 
^'l Saybrook .. 127 
2^ Westbrook.. 

iqo 

53 
357 

43 



199.. 
167.. 
116.. 
152.. 
158.. 
106. . 
287.. 

II:: 

109.. 
130-. 

160,. 
88.. 



251 
101 
73 
72 
135 
132 
163 

96 



629 
188 
146 

166 



Canterbury... 179 

Chaplin 65 

Eastford 107 

Hampton 73 

Killiugly .... 325 

Plain field 239 

Pomfrei> 70 

Putnam 196 

Scotland 62 

Sterling 100 

Thompson 129 

Voluntown... 92 

Windham 485 

Woodstock... 148 



112., 
104.. 
in.. 

84.. 
114.. 

95-. 
515.. 
270., 

139., 
328.. 

88., 



325.. 
136.. 
348.. 384 
305.. 130 



124 

133 

155 

46 

80 

5o 

207 

182 

73 

119 

37 

54 

84 

7i 



133 
105 
131 
74 
105 
100 

ill 
122 
253 
85 

269 
107 
332 
306 



223. 
80. 
145. 



364 
219 
113 

82 



121 
99 
57 



Total 2610 3182.. 1929 2942 

Total Dist 80=4 9000.. 6000 7764 

Henry H. Starkweather's maj. 
946; in 1874, 1764. Elisua H Fal- 
mer, Prohibitionist, received 559 
votes in 1875. 
Dist. IV.- FAIEFIELD CO. 

Burnum Hubb'd liarn. Miner 

Bridgeport ...2201 '2138.. 1978 1642 

Fairfield 339 271 

Bethel 239 

Brookfield.... 126 

Darien 169 

Danbury 757 

Easton 149 

Greenwich ... 533 

Huntington.. 207 

Monroe 140 

New Canaan.. 260 

New Fairfield 132 

Newtown 403 

Norwalk 882 

Redding 161 

Ridgefieid.... 184 

Sherman 101 

Stamford 654 

i56!Stratford 302 

107 Trumbull 152 

257 Weston 114 

233iWestport 359 

59 Wilton 20S 

T ?M Total.... .8792 7^73.. 7644 6977 
Il i\ LITCHFIELD CO. 

3 10 : Litchfield.. 280 
170 Barkhamstd 169 
IQ 3 Bethlehem . 92 



462 . . 629 
100.. 150 
411.. 491 
188.. 142 
124. 
234 
101 

385 
640 

l & 
183 

98 

443 

28s 

153 
M4 
3" 
214 



99- 
219. 

37-. 
210. 
916., 
153. 
222. 

74. 
707. 
387. 
154. 

58. 
152. 
167. 



Total 3237 30=51 . . 2543 2882 Bridgewater 124 

Total Dist. 15440 13831. 12173 w6i| Canaan 224 

James Phelps's maj. 1609 ; Colebrook.. 130 
Stephen W. Kellogg's maj. in Cornwall... 212 



129. 
64. 
31. 
48. 

97. 
124. 



265 
176 
92 
105 
175 
no 
235 



214 
212 
81 
132 
605 

446 

142 

96 

219 

186 
801 

154 

171 

52 

8-ii 

33o 
10 1 

47 
168 



231 
120 
72 
32 
73 
92 
108 



M 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



n it 

H»r\\ : 

Knit 

S. Il.tiif.nl. i;o 

117 



B»n>umlluf> Ml s-n.Vlner 



|06 



N. 1 tnun. 



I5O.. I76 



3»9 



»i Plymouth . . 40! 
in Koxbory — 119 
i-buiy... 617 

ir>>n 326 

: rlngton. 326 

2S6 Warren 68 

1 ;j Wa^liiiiKton 178 
97 Watertowu 137 



lUrnamHobo dBarn.M.ner Wlncb0(|ter ^ 4o6#> 3&6 



^oc" 10- 3 g? WoodbnT y . 236 217" 174 21 ^ 

149!! £,91 133 Total 5481 4075. .4917 3820 

171.. 324 127 Total Dist. 14273 11648. 12^61 10797 

334.. 287 286 WilliamH. Barnutu'8maj.262ti; 

"60.. 63 65 in 1873, 1764. In 187;, Dwigbt W. 

138.. 160 161 Hodge, Prohibitionist, received 

200.. 113 189 608 votes. 



NEW YORK. 

COKTROLLEB, *&. 1875— SKC. STATB— 1873. 1874— GOVEBNOB— 1872. 



PBE8.72. 



Count ■ <, 



Albunr 

Allegany 

< atlaraugiu 

» aynga -17 

4171 



l>.m. lip. Dem. Rep. D.dcL. Rep. Dem. 
Bob n»..D -pi n r Liifelow Siw.ird W"i en Th •>■ r T.ldcn 




KB ton 3450 

3902 

M >iiro • 

■in tv 

ok 

• » 

< » 1 ili i°^39 

lags 

() itarl'j 462; 

■ s 

Ifo 

<937 

I'm nam 1261 

Qveeaa O273 

'i. 1 303a 

and 

M. LftWTi Hi 

.. 4712 

• r 1 71 1 

\ 

60a 

4 

an 

1 I •-> 3261 

1' i - 3517 

7, 

IBOJ 

. 

"1116 

r . . 8136 

1Q0 

1 t 

1 



.3*9709 3761; 



„ 150..390211 
49 \i.. 50 9: 



375401 



• 'V* : , f ? r Jonn R i«elow, 14,810; for Diedrich Willers.in 73,9.8^ 
HSSL-rl' r" ,n ''- ;: V or,,ohn A - I)ixiu '^'^'-- for Grant in '72 ; 53.456. fn 1875, 
p., recelred 11,103 votca lor Sec. of State, and A. A. Hopkins, Temp., 9,9 

t For vote on other State Officers In 18*5, see page 58.] 



I 

to 



387282 440738 

46.77 53 'Ji 

893; for 

G. B. 

992 for 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



39 



NEW YORK BY TOWNS AND COUNTIES. 

ALBANY COUNTY. I Bigelow Sew' d Tilden Dix WillersThayer 
S*C. of Stats, '75. Gov. ^74. Seo.St. '73- I Maine.... 149 252.. 155 265.. 94 231 

IOI 



Towns, dkc. Bern. Rep''. Bern. Rep. Dem.Rep. ! Nanticoke 

Bigelow Sew d Tildeii Dix WillersThayer Sanford 295 



Albany,Wdr. 



12.. 
13.. 
14.. 
is.. 
16.. 



267 507. 

704 548.. 

868 200. . 

830 486. . 

473 472.. 



359 
281 
972 
540 

542 

tli 
435 
311 

545 
419 



043. , 

529., 
401., 
563.. 
546.. 
843., 
323.. 

691., 
336.. 
697.. 



398 385. 
703 408. 

871 
1043 
500 
408 
361 
954 
017 
690 
533 
817 
414 
307 
525 
433 



330 358 I Triangle 242 

218 Union 230 

259 | Vestal 200 

Windsor 286 



261.. 
290. , 
251.. 
164., 
337.. 



78 

335 
212 

234 
221 
260 



103.. 
292., 
228.. 
233.. 
182., 

319- < 



50 
251 
144 
226 
182 
208 



93 
224 
228 
235 
185 

317 



Total 4321 4799.. 4296 4881.. 3234 4109 

Majority — 478.. — 58s.. — 875 

CATTARAUGUS COUNTY. 



343 ; Allegany 305 



Total City.. 8831 8356.. 9574 7581. 

Berne 298 304.. 316 297. 

Bethlehem 342 445.. 352 424. 

Coeymans 417 251.. 432 267.. 

Cohoes 1342 1154.. 1350 1166. 

Guilderland . . . 324 483.. 363 516. 

Knox 103 276.. 128 273. 

New Scotland. 327 484.. 336 449. 

Rensselaer rille 413 231.. 439 229. 

Watervliet 1956 1842.. 1872 1738. 

Westerlo 299 2 5 4.. 304 294. 

Total 14652 14080. .15466 13234. 

Majority ^72 — .. 2232 — . 

ALLEGANY COUNTY. 



8550 6590 
319 307 



Alfred 25 

Allen 25 

Alma 61 

Almond 165 

Amity 121 

Andover 136 

Angelica 90 

Belfast 96 

Birdsall 73 

Boliver 77 

Burns 108 

Caneadea 114 

Centerville .... S3 

Clarksville 24 

Cuba 200 

Friendship 172 

Genesee 29 

Granger 36 

Grove 40 

Hume in 

Independence.. 61 
New Hudson . . 24 

Rushford 56 

Scio 151 

Ward 40 

Wells ville 398 

West Almond.. 42 

Willing 86 

Wirt 53 



234. 

80. 

58. 
150. 

255. 
202. 

199. 
192. 

47. 
130.. 84 
185.. 131 



32 
45 
88 

183 
I5S 
147 
124 
138 
87 



191.. 
112.. 

95- ■ 
280.. 
250.. 

xol:: 
70. 



To 
41 

255 
190 

42 
45 
70 



206.. 131 
I75-. 



121. 
243.. 

159.. 

59-. 
394.. 

75-. 
134- ■ 
203.. 



63 

166 

62 

4 i 

8 i 
58 



Total 2667 4807.. 3267 5187. 

Majority — 2140. . — 1920. 

BROOME COUNTY. 

Barker 132 144.. 120 141. 

Binghamton ... 228 219.. 244 244. 

r ' City, 1.. 418 350.. 452 401. 

" " 2.. 192 227.. 194 230. 

" " 3-. 333 3°o.. 300 316. 

" " 4.. 302 367.. 315 370. 

" " 5.. 175 150.. 120 142. 



Total City.. 1420 1394. 




Chenango 99 

Colesville 338 

Conklin 124 

Fenton 151 

Kirkwood 167 



Lisle. 



207. 

39°- 
117. 
196. 
130. 



176 346.. 



1387 1459. 

96 203. 

361 377- 

116 125. 

140 210. 

165 122. 

172 378. 



1020 1131 
67 165 



Ashfbrd' 153 

Carrolton 93 

Cold Spring 126 

Conewango 126 

Dayton 106 

East Otto 102 

Ellicottville.... 200 
Farmers ville... 76 
Franklinville... 212 

Freedom 73 

Great Valley... 162 

Hinsdale 197 

Humphrey 69 

Ischua 92 

Leon 82 

Little Valley... 96 

Lyndon 36 

Machias 106 

Mansfield 74 

Napoli 90 

New Albion 155 

Olean 290 

Otto 105 

Perry sburg.... 117 

Persia is7 

Portville 170 

Randolph, 265 2S0 

Red House 37 34. 

Salamanca 243 224. 

South Valley.. 81 48. 
Yorkshire 146 233. 



188. 
178. 

99- 
92. 

186. 

165 

155. 

139. 

147. 

183. 

217. 

145. 
125. 
123. 
83. 
207. 
153. 
112. 
174. 
137. 
172. 
198. 
200. 
166. 
173. 
132. 
230. 



Total 4342 5138. 

Majority — 796. 



316 
179 

"5 
114 
128 
132 
94 
253 

196 
80 

173 

184 
92 
98 
71 

100 
34 

103 

79 

91 

177 

256 

83 
124 

164 
265 

67 
274 

87 
151 



181.. 
187.. 

91.. 

94-. 
174.. 
126.. 

154.. 
is8.. 
161.. 
181.. 

174" 

169.. 

154.. 

126.. 
106. . 

179.. 

161.. 
136.. 
171.. 

144-1 

185.. 

199.. 
300.. 
161.. 
164.. 

135- • 
227.. 
248.. 

41.. 
257.. 

70.. 
241.. 



234 

124 

73 

8 J 

& 

80 
155 

& 
50 

95 
161 

I 4 
g 
95 
23 

l\ 

60 

123 

202 

£ 3 
89 

137 
85 

135 
51 

187 
41 

121 



133 
144 

59 
97 
174 
121 
138 
137 

I2S 

154 

r 3 3 
87 

113 
78 
82 

142 

142 
98 

116 
148 
192 
246 

136 

125 

168 

24 k 
36 

173 
46 



4517 5255-. 3^3 4316 
— 738 . — 1133 



CAYUGA COUNTY. 



Auburn, 1 320 

" " 2 223 

" 3- 
" 4- 

5. 

6. 
" 7- 



237 
303 
152 

83 



405.. 307 

448.. 203 

3S6.. 214 

247.. 253 



141. 

278. 

79- 



138 
174 
89 



384.. 
425.. 
329.. 
260.. 

151.. 

273.. 

75.. 



217 

161 
210 
124 
122 

77 



350 
387 
317 
255 
152 
278 
60 



Total City.. 1492 1954.. 1378 1897.. 1064 1799 



Aurelius 189 150.. 225 

Brutus 245 377.. 250 

Cato 133 277.. 154 

Conquest 179 177.. 174 

Fleming 120 153 . 115 

Genoa 147 308.. 160 

Ira 180 181.. 189 

Ledyard 123 2S3.. 140 

Locke 77 148.. 87 

Mentz 327 167.. 327 

Montezuma 196 101.. 188 

Moravia 238 265. . 

Niles..... 210 183.. 

Owasco 66 149.. 

Scipio 135 178.. 

Sempronius 112 121.. 

Sennett 106 180. . 

Springport 205 174.. 

Sterling 202 304 . . 

Summerhill 58 116., 

Throop 115 96.. 

Venice.... 119 240., 

Victory 158 202., 



142.. 161 

365 . . 200 

227.. in 

138. . 176 

165.. 99 



226 
220 
66 
114 
100 

97 
230 
160 

56 
121 
102 
139 



284. 

171.. 

281.. 

120.. 

129.. 

109.. 

212.. 

153.. 
115.. 
157.. 
IOO.. 

173- • 
204.. 
254.. 

95-. 
122.. 
224.. 
140.. 



ios 

144 

90 

52 

293 

168 

168 

145 

55 

100 

62 

83 

159 

159 

40 

10 7 i 
no 



146 
407 
276 

156 
253 
187 
243 
150 
210 
114 

244 
150 
150 
154 

167 
239 

3 29 

86 
109 
183 
170 



Total 5132 6454.. 5018 5977.. 3924 6150 

Majority — 1322.. — 959.. — 2226 



Bigel 

Arkwrigbt 45 

Bustl 77 

Carroll 53 

Charlotte i«4 

Chautauqua... 309 
( berry Creek.. 123 

Clvmer 77 

Dunkirk 634 

Kllery 100 

Klhcott 5°° 

EllniKton »7 

French Creek.. 63 

Gerry fJ 

Hanover 301 

Harmony 221 

Klantone 29 

Mlna 65 

Poland »o 

Pooifret 378 

Portland 133 

Kiplev 132 

Sheridan 116 

Sherman 106 

Stockton 150 

Vlllenova 108 

Wetftfleld 244 



CH i^^«TCtoiDffwni«.Tb.j r |c!ia^ 209 2go.. 1* 296.. 181 20 

166 



117.. 82 

172.. 122 

192.. 113 

146. . 241 

330- • 330 



283!! 03 

265- • 95 

167.. 183 

164.. 116 

225.. ,63 




82 Clinton 172 64. 

186 Dannemora.... 126 181.. 

155 Ellenburg 272 253.. 

143 I Mooers 214 392.. 

316 1 Peru 223 305.. 

142 1 Plattsburg 811 683.. 

146 Saranac 309 400. 

355 ' 

900 

703 

17* 



102 

84 
2J0 
101 
198 



67. 
212. 
25O. 
567. 
304. 



204 

228 
259 

254 
914 



209 
369 

?39 
641 



574 1062.. 

277 501.. 263 332 

13s 223.. 205 143 



Schuyler Falls. 181 187^ 

Total .., 3782 4172.. 3093 5°68-- 3726 3672 

Majority — 39°- • — *975- 54 

COLUMBIA COUNTY. 



Total 4426 6138., 5355 7825.. 4034 5653 



CHEMUNG COUNT! 



Ashland 117 

Baldwin in 

Big Flats 195 

tatlln in 

Chemung 152 



104.. 
85.. 
145- • 

164., 



106 
107 
201 

167 



Elmira 147 115.. 161 

Elmira City, 1.. 100 188.. 169 



2tf 

3-- 256 

4-- 4U 

5.. 241 

o.. 225 

7.. 185 



192. 
271. 

2 so. 
228. 
298. 
in. 



357 
271 

267 

259 
191 



108.. 
108.. 
181.. 
109.. 
191.. 
103.. 
212.. 
I94-. 
3U.. 
255.. 
250.. 
281.. 
93-. 



89 138 
129 no 



177 
113 
173 
161 

328 
289 
393 
253 
227 

177 



187 
154 
230 
119 
219 
201 
319 
259 
236 

275 
119 



Total City.. 1 745 1338.. 1939 1396.. 1 

Erin 204 65.. 1S9 83.. 

Horseheads 395 



Suutliport 401 

Van Ellen 219 

Veteran 212 



314.. 410 

195- • 403 

133.. 209 

236.. 215 



332.. 
215.. 
150.. 
277.. 



820 1628 
95 



Ancram 214 

Austerlitz 114 

Canaan no 

Chatham 383 

Claverack 371 

Clermont 137 

Copake 208 

Gallatin 96 

Germ ant own.. 117 

Ghent 236 

Greenport 109 

Hillsdale 280 

Hudson, 1 164 

" 2 297 

" 3 204 

" 4 305 

Total City.. 970 
Kinderhook ... 472 
Livingston. ... 174 
New Lebanon.. 200 

Stockport 120 

Stuyvesant .... 228 
Taghkanic 236 



154.. 


230 


148.. 


131 


189.. 


149 


545.. 


532 


327.. 


44b 


53.. 


157 


239.. 
156.. 


224 
130 


152.. 


134 


327.. 


298 


144.. 


£ 


190 . 


201.. 


242 



176.. 347 
208. . 225 
321.. 34C 




156.. 372 
209.. 218 
303. • 329 



906.. 1154 
372.. 507 
238 



156. . 
103.. 



23a 
332 
145 
292 
250 



812., 
389.. 
153 

130., 

X S:: 



1156 

533 
220 

i? i 
128 

252 

249 



900 
372 
198 

137 
127 

126 



Total 4781 4625.. ^780 4434.. 5502 4752 

Majority is&" — .. 1^46 — .. 750 — 

CORTLAND COUNTY. 
Clncinnatus ... 136 in, 

913 

180 



Cortlandville... 534 

Cuyler 72 

Freetown 58 

Harford 73 

Homer 294 

Lapeer 70 

~£\ I Marathon 164 

ib7 I Preble 151 

' Scott: 93 



E97 



323 g^""" y:J 

&&V.- 4 S°? 3187.. 4226 3453.. 401 1 3816 Taylor.';.";.'.*!! 115 



Majority 



Afton 210 169.. 

ltuliibridge 216 220.. 

Columbus 55 124.. 



822 — .. 773 
CHENANGO COUNTY. 
173- 
244. 
154- 
191. 



195 — 



Coventry 149 

German 53 

Greene 409 

Guilford 231 

Lincklaen 61 

McOonough.... 155 

New Herlln 200 

North Norwich 90 13*9 



Norwich 610 

89 

•'if'ird 309 

l'harsalia.. a... 137 

Pitcher 121 

Plymouth 97 

Preston 82 

Sherburne 230 



229 

64 

139 

59 

73 
144 
293 
101 
696 
150 

3«9 
169 

J39-- 134 
130 
in 

208 



I75-. 
93-. 
370.. 
244.. 
134.. 
133- • 
247.. 



617.. 
183.. 
372.. 

65.. 
139. 
i'J.<- 

83. 
393-. 



Smltlivllle 201 149!! Bu 

8 "»yrna 77 262.. 91 



389.. 
257.. 
138.. 
122.. 
322.. 
T38.. 

753- • 
222.. 

363.. 

146.. 
178.. 
86.. 

S: 

222.. 



187 

170 

45 

130 

M 
% 

118 

248 

79 



122 
203 
in 
163 
82 
316 

249 
104 
82 
223 
115 



623 640 
89 173 



283 

157 
112 
89 

,s 

187 
80 



332 

77 
148 
123 

368 

137 
203 



M*a^ity.:::^^-^J96..3595 4062 



CLINTON COUNTY 

Altona 15! 210.. in2 300 

Ausiible 267 302 

Beekmantown. 232 241 
Black Brook... 223 296 
Cbamplaln 392 319 



106 
215 
297 



28s.. 
294.. 
34i.. 
426., 



3 

233 
234 



217 
256 
230 
276 



Truxton 178 

Virgil 177 

Willett 102 



513.. 

78.. 
203.. 

85.. 
132.. 

8" 

100., 

126., 

205., 

77.. 



145 
501 

57 

73 

80 

231 

68 
172 

% 
129 
117 
142 

195 
no 



105.. 
8^2.. 
171.. 
in.. 
119.. 
472.. 

73-. 
193.. 

84.. 

134- • 
75-. 

121., 

119.. 

215., 
83. 



136 
434 

72 

1? 

165 

139 

7i 

J 2 5 
85 
179 
182 



119 

521 

69 

'8 
135 

74 
128 

139 
210 

7* 



Total 2356 3000.. 2268 2927.. 2063 3037 

Majority — 644. — 659.. — 974 

~NTY. 



Andes 216 

Bovina 78 

Colchester 270 

Davenport 312 

Delhi 259 

Franklin 252 

Hamden 69 

Hancock 329 

Har> ersfleld... 172 

Kortrigbt 193 

MaBonvllle 148 

Meredith 101 

Middletown.... 428 

Roxbury 338 

Sidney 295 

Stamford 184 

Tompkins 359 

AValton 241 



DELAWARE COUN' 



2 $ 
3i3 
305 
285 
249 
106 
348 



312. 
267. 

171. 

475. 

358. 

263. 
244. 
149. 
167. 

203. 

185.. 123 
284. . 448 

180.. 344 

181.. 311 

164.. 185 

405.. 459 

409.. 241 



188 
187 



155- • 
297.. 
160.. 
447.. 

269.. 
266.. 
147.. 
172.. 
181.. 
188.. 

2SL. 
183.. 
I98.. 

I75-. 

395- ■ 
428.. 



186 
73 
220 
263 
253 

X g 
223 

130 

177 
137 
76 

377 
291 
220 

153 
300 
229 



293 
146 
294 
142 

454 
354 
271 
187 
133 

186 
164 
268 
18) 
168 
174 
377 
427 



Total.. 4244 4573.. 4591 4607.. 3589 4378 



Majority — 329.. — " 16.. 

DUTCHESS COUNTY. 

Amenia 239 319.. 390 196. 

Beekman 97 245. . 227 



- 789 



297 264 1 Clinton 204 177.. 238 138.. 



305 
140 
210 



229 



I ■ 1 



mum 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



41 



Bigelow Sew'd Tilden Dix Wil'eraThayer 

Borer 221 300.. 305 151.. 228 209 

East Fishkill... 283 2=^2.. 4'° Iz8 - 

Fishkill 1103 1076. . 1164 1013. 

Hyde Park 307 291. 

156 168. 



Lagrange 

Milan 180 129. 

North East 148 265. 

Pawling 159 172. 

Pine Plains 157 193 • 

Pieasant Valley 203 187. 

Pougbkeepsie . 387 314. 

City, 1.. 434 205. 

" 2.. 297 402. 

'« 3.. 224 3-25. 

" 4.. 269 326. 

" 5.. 241 292. 

" 6.. 196 317. 



328 
201 
177 
277 
294 

255 
257 
478 
472 



211.. 

161.. 
n6.. 
107.. 
161.. 
236.. 
127. 



162 
901 
243 
16^ 221 



288 
9 



450 236.. 

252 288.. 

322 246.. 

296 226., 

226 248.. 

Total City... 1661 1867. . 2018 1371 



Red Hook 440 301. 

Rbinebeck 322 322. 

Stanford 260 233. 



Union Vale . 
Washington 



125 170., 
257 3I4-. 



33« 

281 

247 
369 



2&.. 
326.. 

188.. 



157 143 

170 203 

231 is8 

184 151 

248 212 

354 281 

410 235 

368 278 

218 327 

270 313 

264 238 

210 272 

1740 1663 

402 272 

314 34J 

279 200 

189 173 

301 302 



Total 6909 7205.. 8767 5354.. 7"6 6462 



Majority , 



— 386.. 3413 
ERIE COUNTY. 



546 



Alden 221 

Amherst 326 

Aurora 224 269.. 211 

Boston 178 

Brandt 109 

Buffalo, 1 1364 

2 574 805. 

" 3 799 947- 

4 643 



191.. 237 167.. 213 170 
390 177.. 304 i7< 
247 

90 
123 
534 



95-. 
144. 

795- 



180 

121 

141 1 



854- • 741 
1314 1986.. 1345 1349 



92 748. 

72 696. 

705. 



6 1035 i°33- 

7 885 1689. 

8 800 473. 

9 460 878. 

10 573 1190. 

11 481 1076. 

12 469 397- 

13 '93 212. 



1049 753- 
971 1140. 

839 45° • 



844. 
1091. 



534 890. 
450 377- 
210 187. 



184 


250 


171 


69 


9 5 

1098 


99 


717 


11 

690 


702 


089 
678 


1229 


123b 


n 


712 

1085 


643 


478 


421 


795 

1082 


503 


422 


811 


414 


343 


195 


154 



Bigelow Sew'd Tilden Dix WillersThayer 

St. Armand.... 32 71.. 27 71.. 18 59 

Schroon 127 139 . 146 130.. 

Ticonderoga .. 228 379.. 308 411.. 

Westport 127 228.. 220 224.. 

Will8DOro' „ 139 166.. 138 192., 

Wilmington . . . 35 *33- 22 hi., 



164 267 

73 153 

86 143 

25 106 



Total 2584 3386.. 3191 3395- • i9°° 2707 



in 
131 
29 



Majority — 802.. — 204. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Bangor n6 316.. 96 286.. 

Belmont 125 

Bombay 122 

Brandon 45 

Brighton 18 

Burke 154 

Chateaugueay. 276 

Constable 142 

Dickinson 40 

Duane 44 

Ft. Covington. 157 2 4°- 

Franklin in 95 

Harrletstown.. 35 

Malone 558 

Moira 106 

Westville 124 



— 807 



137- - 
no.. 

83.. 

17.. 
197.. 
234-. 
147- 
241.. 

23. 
240. 

S:: 

695.. 
167.. 
143.. 



no. 

in. 

73- 

20 19. 

160 173. 

302 229. 



T4 

100 

69 



127 

36 

150 210.. 



116. 
275. 



56 
114 

25 

14 

14 I42 

220 204 

IOO I24 

30 199 
20 



107 

44 



105. 
23. 



428 740.. 
148 130. . 



119. 



30 
131 



277 
121 

74 



229 
79 

62(1 

106 
101 



1442 2342 
900 



Total City... 9590 1 2335.. 101 27 9770.. 8703 9482 



Cheektowaga . 143 190. . 

Clarence 178 322.. 

Colden 188 113.. 

Collins 168 295.. 

Concord 264 413.. 

East Hamburg. 182 185.. 

Eden 210 201.. 

Elma 217 mi. 

Evans 227 266.. 

Grand Island . . 102 123. . 

Hamburg 349 178. . 

Holland 184 158.. 

Lancaster 378 208.. 

Marilla 183 199.. 

Newstead 202 415.. 

North Collins.. 133 207.. 

Sardinia i<;8 186.. 

Tonawanda 364 301 . , 

Wales K7 151.. 

West Seneca... 168 201., 



157 173- . 

190 300.. 

207 140. . 

161 307.. 

270 432.. 

185 225.. 

204 213. . 

214 153.. 

226 287.. 

101 -1215.. 

342 182.. 

194 166.. 

35i 239.. 

198 183.. 

264 363.. 

124 226.. 

180 203. , 

461 290. . 

168 149., 

223 136. , 



84 
J 35 



155 
307 



146 278 
187 357 
181 167 
192 193 

147 148 
189 243 

82 114 

2<;7 187 

128 153 

286 242 

149 152 

158 334 

106 183 

133 156 

334 208 

no in 

192 155 



Total 2233 2883.. 2029 2786 

Majority — 630.. — 757 

FULTON COUNTY. 

Bleecker 167 31.. 170 43.. 105 37 

Broadalbin 182 297.. 187 310.. 176 258 

Caroga 107 51.. 135 47-. 6 7 28 

Ephratah 177 206.. 216 225.. 137 148 

Johnstown 1350 1922.. 1366 1930.. 933 1443 

Mayfield 197 298.. 202 288.. 173 191 

Northampton.. 272 207.. 290 215.. 232 163 

Oppenheim 134 i57- 190 239- 165 137 

73 128.. 85 122.. 85 108 

68 81.. 



Perth. 
Stratford 



239- 
122., 
104.. 



92 83 



Total 2727 3378.. 2943 3523. . 2165 2596 

Majority — 651.. — 580.. 

GENESEE COUNTY. 



Alabama 96 246 

Alexander 136 246. . 

Batavia 702 633.. 

Bergen 215 226.. 

Bethany 106 193.. 

Byron 118 214.. 

Darien 186 175.. 

Elba 200 181.. 

LeRoy 353 468-- 

Oakfield 127 192.. 

Pavilion 116 184.. 

Pembroke 238 300.. 



Stafford. 

Total 

Majority. 



90 208. 



85 204. . 

122 250.. 

678 523.. 

194 178. . 

no 179.. 

00 1S3.. 

186 144.. 

197 155- • 

425 468.. 

117 173.. 

124 176., 

237 267., 

107 188., 



43i 

27 i« 
77 176 



401 

115 18b 

55 "8 

32 139 



98 

144 

310 

73 

So 



124 
168 
388 
144 
137 



133 215 
43 146 



3466.. 2672 3088.. 1558 2654 



— " "783.. — 416. 
GREENli COUNTY. 



Ashland 83 

Athens 3°2 



117. 
273. 



Cairo 267 187. 



85 113. 

320 330. 

320 23s. 

888 775- 



Total V14743 17765. .15686 15146. .13049 14196 

Majority — 3022.. 540 — .. — 1147 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Chesterfield 192 324.. 264 335.. iw 268 

Crown Point... 1*5 396.. 170 388.. 68 332 

Ellzabethtown. 70 199.. 78 182.. 41 177 

Essex 182 141.. 185 125.. 124 98 

Jay 253 2^,9.. 276 228.. 242 208 

Keene 46 12c;.. 37 101.. 16 74 

Lewis 124 129.. 124 143.. 88 149 

Minerva 82 w.. 122 46.. 70 47 

Moriah 661 508.. 941 570.. 

Newcomb 8 31.. 8 28.. 

North Elba. .. 32 43.. 33 33-. 

North Hudson. 91 59.. 86 6i., 



573 39° 

2 22 

28 27 

48 • 54 



Catakill 641 664.. 

Coxsackie 457 33* •• 475 344- 

Durham 230 208.. 234 264. 

Greenville 239 i9°.» 250 225. 

Halcott 66 9.. 79 

Hunter 170 129. 

Jewett 130 4 6 - 

Lexington 173 24 . 

XT,.*.. 1T.UI, 



New Baltimore 303 217. 



Prattsville 208 

Windham 165 



66.. 
I35-. 



163 

247 

330 255. . 

184 71.. 

206 134., 



44- 



1096 

120 

320 
220 
800 

263 

243 226 

70 10 

193 168 

127 104 

200 45 

311 224 



78 
281 

319 
803 

444 
251 



216 
231 



72 
142 



Total 3434 2596.. 3998 3043.. 3767 3058 

Majority 838 — .. 955 —..709 — 

HAMILTON COUNTY. 

Arietta .. 18 8. 

Benson ... 74 13- 

Hope ..88 59. 

Indian Lake... .. • 32 29. 

Lake Pleasant. .. 42 17. 

Long Lake .. 5 22. 



31 

73 
63 
30 
34 



42 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



Morrhonse 

Weill 

Total 



Billow Sewd Tilden Dbt WillersThayer 



24 
120 



30 
112 



39 



444 267.. 403 2 46. 

Majority 177 _ ■• *57 _ • 

HERKIMER COUNTY. 

Columbia 131 I95-- '55 J93- 

Danube 116 101.. 140 104. 

124 195- 

317 3o»- 



Danube 

Fairneld 133 2°° 

Frankfort 322 255 

German Flats.. 787 704. • 726 724- 

Herkimer 355 37L- 373 39i- 

Litchfield 134 152.. !«3 149 

Little Fall*.... 820 599 

Manhelm 24; 172 

Newport 152 237 

Norway 102 

Ohio 99 



92. 
102. 



89 

827 650. . 055 
262 201.. 211 
172 233 



364 171 

193 — 

113 206 

122 180 

107 180 

2S8 351 

535 6 53 
360 



Blgelow Sew'd TPden t>ix WilleraThayer 

Brooklyn, 24... 525 441.. 389 285.. 349 350 
25... 772 1053- - 619 754.. 652 749 
Total City.. 37437 3°977. -37660 25479.. 30162 26425 



Russia 127 3°5- 



148 

115 104. 

154 312. 



337 

162 
132 237 



Flatbush 516 219 

Flatlands 117 i°5. 

Gravesend 177 "5- 

New Lots 764 468. 

New Utrecnt.. 363 172. 



103 



293.. 501 280 

3 187.. 170 214 

205 108.1 194 124 

893 500.. 695 637 

347 244. . 365 222 



Total 39374 32116. .39809 26811^32087 27902 

Majority 7860 — ..12998 — .. 4185 — 

LEWIS COUNTY 



120 
67 



92 
101 



Salisbury 144 

Schuvler 80 

Starke 121 



214. 
179. 
223. 



153 221. 



Warren 166 181. 



Wilmnrt 14 

Wlnfleld "9 



27. 
230. 



151 224. 
191 167. 

26 

99 



139 337 

178 229 

76 179 

157 206 

162 174 

11 25 

194. . 76 202 



40. 
41. 
223. 



Total 4187 4659-- 4377 4728.. 35°8 4559 



Majority — 472.. — 3=i- 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

AdamB 230 418.. 232 428.. 

Alexandria.... 397 289.. 384 293.. 

Antwerp 240 394.. 215 409.. 

Brownvllle 212 340.. 226 340., 

Cape Vincent. . 361 

Champion 167 

(lay ton 433 

Fllisburgb 401 557.. 404 585. 

Henderson 150 263.. 133 210. 



253. 
303. 
557- 



353 201 

188 29; 
405 269 



Hounsfleld 223 237.. 

Le Roy 274 310.. 

Lorraine 93 121.. 

Lyme 201 231.. 

Orleans 269 283. . 

Famelia 84 127.. 

Philadelphia... 263 154.. 

Rodman 70 219.. 

Rutland 134 240.. 

Theresa 249 231.. 103 



Watertown 81 

" City, 1.. 193 



160. 
213- . 



222 24s., 
258 340. . 
121 129.. 
198 230.. 
216 269., 

83 127., 

223 151.. 
63 221., 

136 24s.. 
238., 

149- • 
192 225.. 



— 991 

176 337 

304 240 

155 256 

155 303 

232 183 

165 227 

299 204 

269 439 

82 170 

137 177 

207 309 

76 90 

202 217 

175 192 

69 106 

146 119 

58 148 

109 211 



Croghan 363 108 

Denmark 129 298 

Diana 168 171 

Greig 183 137 

Harnsburgh... 102 100 
High Market... 148 

Lewis 137 

Leyden 187 

Lowville 273 361 

Lyonsdale 138 133. 

Martinsburgb . 177 243. 

Montague 88 53. 

New Bremen . . 293 94. 

Osceola 41 

Piuckney 170 

Turin m 

Watson 155 

West Turin 189 

Total 



328 116.. 

149 300. . 

192 171.. 

194 151.. 

85 129., 

157 40., 

l l 
22c 



216. 



252 
117 

203 
80 
118 



282 
121 
192 
100 
35 
43 



255 381.. 230 371 
145 123.. new town 
190 286. . 170 276 



47-. 
112.. 



280 

64 

170 

237.. 121 215.. 

85.. 190 82.. 

224 221., 



51. 
92. 

53- 
95- 



227. 



287 74 

41 46 

138 88 

119 225 

143 100 

177 213 



3052 2710. . 3219 2764. . 2606 2493 



Majority 342 — .. 455 

LIVINGSTON COUN 



2.. 197 264.. 166 277.. 



■a 

114 



188 
130 
193 



3.. 244 100. 
4. . 287 256. 

Total City 



2 19 



210., 



140 2<tf 
184 179 



288 246. . 220 204 



921 


9 2 3-. 


863 


958.. 


638 


834 


471 


375- • 


364 


415.. 


307 


291 


73 


70.. 


77 


53-. 


60 


44 



Wilna 471 

Worth _73 

Total 6004 6716.. 5666 6837.. 4222 5421 

Majority — 712.. — 1171.. — 1199 

KINGS COUNTY. 

Brooklyn, 1.... 1 131 1372.. 1151 1324. 

2.... 1208 297 

3 1021 1421 

4 1027 1004 

" 5 2217 669 

" 2f 



Avon 247 

Caledonia 122 

Conesus 106 193 

Geneseo 210 386 

Groveland 137 

Leicester 115 

Lima 299 

Livo-ia 206 

Mount Morris. 456 
N. Dansville... 546 

Nunda 265 

Ossian 128 

Portage 96 

Spa ta 151 

Springwater. . . 142 37 
West Sparta... 138 118 
York 94 283 



340.. 
178., 



131.. 
192., 

368."! 

368.. 
305.. 

291.. 
126., 

120.. 



TY. 

272 333- 

133 185. 

102 187. 

256 381.. 194 352 

153 126. 

173 198. 



113 — 

186 270 

69 140 

44 129 



295 261 

231 412.. 

494 346. . 

563 383-. 

272 348. . 

147 109.. 

109 144.. 

167 128.. 

139 361.. 

141 129. 

106 315.. 



103 93 

167 106 

197 263 

100 296 

428 370 

373 297 



211 
114 

116 



340 
95 

"8 



100 233 
107 120 
103 249 



Total.. 3458 4122.. 3753 4346.. 2687 3633 



Majority — 664.. — 593. 

MADISON COUNTY. 



— 951 



920 1302 

857 348 

923 1199 

797 973 



158" 



1260 267 

Mil 1174 

998 875 

2077 621.. 2043 766 

I275.. 2842 II99.. 2213 1212 

2124.. 1894 1834.. i486 1894 

1531 820.. I350 652.. 827 68l 

153O 512.. I260 493.. 1421 499 

2|32 IOM.. I90O 1015 

I64O I328.. I415 I43I 

274I 286.. 2275 347 

1210 I534.. IO3I II06 

2682 703.. 2033 780 

1438 I278.. I06l I434 

I966 1531.. I462 I924 

17 1708 '495-. 1939 1102.. 1346 1322 

18 1086 1093.. 1128 811.. 775 710 

19.... 1058 1674.. 1 144 1296.. 779 1423 

20 1247 2129.. 1242 2048.. 979 2015 

21... .1450 n$(>.. 1466 1034.. 1306 1032 

22....1193 1522.. 1227 1210.. 888 1141 

23.... 576 999.. 514 809.. 422 257 



'/• 



10 2284 in 

11. ...1417 

12 2830 

13.... 1 123 1804 
14.... 2765 837 

13....1195 1707 

16.... 1776 2065 



Brookfleld 270 418. 

Cazenovia 379 584., 

De Ruyter no "249., 

Eaton 318 512., 

Feuner 97 n8., 

Georgetown... 83 198., 

Hamilton 276 548., 

Lebanon 114 213., 

Lenox 1035 1039.. 1014 1121 

Madison 213 291.. 197 318 

Nelson 136 169.. 152 211 

Smithfield 78 196. 

Stockbridge. .. 190 230. 

Sullivan 609 365. 



296 470.. 

365 568.. 

127 279.. 

310 493. . 

114 148.. 

90 205., 

271 611., 

117 218., 



228 


337 


253 


417 


M 


246 


444 


3 


130 
183 


199 


457 



207 

396 



240. 

379. 



Jk x ? 2 

818 763 

155 232 

137 190 

45 149 

151 165 

4i3 295 



Total... 3928 5130.. 3938 5450.. 2985 4200 

Majority — 1202.. — 1512.. — 1215 

MONROE COONTY. 

Brigbton 180 208.. 165 220.. 326 271 

Chili 163 135.. 159 154. • 120 142 

Clarkson 179 170.. 189 209.. 182 220 

Gates 123 157.. 151 103.. 243 144 

290 223 

74 300 

162 185 

315 163 

237 202 



Greece 309 316.. 324 284 

Hamlin 78 201.. 82 276.. 

Henrietta 191 

Irondequoit.... 99 

Mendon. .. 280 

Ogden 243 



198 

139 

228 
270 



197 204. 

129 117. 

288 247. 

234 279.. 246 264 



Parma 147 289.. 160 261.. 116 265 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



43 



Bigelow Sew'd T ilden DixWillrrsThayer 



Penfleld 139 365.. 141 

Perinton 247 483.. 314 

Pittsford 120 

Riga 183 



Rochester, 1 
2.. 
3-- 

4-. 



316 



235- 

241.. 

282.. 

238.. 

656.. 
296 351.. 
472 481.. 
265 369.. 
284 465.. 
601 
429 
250 
443 
335 
366 



278., 
437« 

*92. 

218. 
213. 



Bigelow Saw'd f ild«n DixWilleraTliayer 



405.. 
600.. 

360.. 

287.. 

432.. 

476.. 
265 488. . 
204 91 . , 
313 250. . 



197 

281 
3-l6 

428 541 

301 3SI 

592 347 

306 284 

309 437 

663 540 

463 436 

297 339 

525 206 

432 322 

483 238 

330 396 
198 

355 196 



129 242 Royalton 497 376.. 49 

290 421 Somerset 93 219.* 71 

207 175 i Wheatfield 301 166. * 304 



"5 
282 
382 
436 
310 
480 
272 
280 



193 I WilsOn. ........ 278 2 80. . 257 

157 



401 . . 290 345 

248. . 56 189 

196. . 168 135 

299.. 218 258 



195 
47i 



Total 4599 4296.. 4578 4625.. 33" 3962 



624 45 

455 



45 £ 
416 

302 
206 
333 
304 
377 
68. .new ward 



250 

I 5 
307 

363 

303 



I- 
8.. 

9-. 
" 10.. 

" 11.. 

" 12.. 

14 13.. 

« 14.. 

I5-. 
• 16.. 

Total City ...5384 6331.. 6309 5130.. 5349 4572 

Rush 115 141.. 132 128.. 132 121 

Sweden 349 462.. 355 446.. 379 491 

Webster 138 328.. 172 283.. 170 299 

Wheatland 218 278.. 232 235.. 202 215 

Total 8885 11175..1C094 9701.. 9278 9108 

Majority — 2290. . 393 — . . 170 — 

MONTGOMERY COCNTY. 

Amsterdam 903 790.. 867 1012.. 799 948 

444.. 461 401.. 385 39 1 

191.. 131 209.. 131 195 

251.. 393 284.. 337 285 

323.. 387 281.. 311 354 

640.. 562 e#0.. 452 570 

271.. 400 317.. 339 335 

261.. 355 283.. 298 224 

184 . 308 192.. 232 171 

212.. 275 214.. 225 171 



Majority 294 — . . — __ 47 

ONEIDA COUNTY. 

204 ; Annsville 241 197.. 305 zto.. 209 

37J J Augusta 196 236.. 219 276.. 173 

2 "l ! Ava 103 88.. 107 116.. 83 

Boonville 422 570.. 386 599.. 300 

Bridgewater^.. 114 129.. 130 165.. 70 

Camden 314 471.. 301 431.. 

Deerfleld 198 188.. 232 222.. 

Florence 262 123.. 343 "3.. 

Floyd 118 103.. 121 121.. 

Forestport 169 119.. 150 135.. 

Kirkland 525 430.. 497 459- • 

Lee 302 246.. 308 243.. 

Marcy 131 159.. 135 I 74«« 

Marshall 203 207.. 217 226.. 

New Hartford . 318 348. . 328 470. . 

Paris 269 345.. 284 407.. 

Remsen 47 207.. 54 241.. 

Rome, 1 292 174.. 271 194.. 

" 2 232 128.. 264 114.. 

" 3 369 181.. 388 158.. 

" 4 263 192.. 266 165.. 

" 5 231 312.. 262 327.. 



&50 

179 
231 
103 
540 
"5 



Cauajoharie ... 425 

Charleston 130 

Florida 340 

Glen 350 

Minden .... 473 

Mohawk 350 

Palatine 314 

Root 243 

St. Johnsville.. 274 



Total 3802 35 6 7.. 41' 

Majority.^23 W . -^^ 

Ass- Dist. 1 . . . .3942 1220. . 4341 1122 

" 2.... 3794 671.. 3926 691 

" 3- ..-3378 753-. 3601 597 

" 4.... 4883 1209.. 5104 989 

" 5.. ••3050 2433 

" 6.... 3164 1212 

•• 7.... 2010 2507 

" 8.... 3467 3179 

.2829 37: 



3773-. 3509 3644 
- 135 



184 


383 


157 


180 


215 


75 


106 


no 


132 


121 


447 


465 


"8 


247 
no 


189 


482 


254 


229 


365 


42 
222 


X 


223 


114 



290 

218 



151 
175 



236 319 



Total City.... 1387 987.. 1451 
Sangerneld ... 352 251. 373 

Steuben 48 

Trenton 182 

Utica, 1 153 

" 2 351 



206 
216 
i95 
437 
303 
410 
222 



Total City .. .2939 2344.. 3°39 2598.. 2388 2456 

ro . . 230 336 



3710 2144 

3537 957 

2279 2529.. 

4396 2421.. 3303 2531 

3302 3413. . 2729 3087 

2804 2165.. 3459 1964.. 2561 1530 

.2459 3249.. 2597 3345.. 2226 2449 

.3016 2183.. 3750 1554.. 3328 1400 

.2732 3066.. 3008 2832.. 2370 2392 

.2798 1263.. 3070 1059.. 2424 824 

.4450 2411.. 4678 2169.. 3801 1622 

.4298 2218.. 5000 1848.. 4310 1481 

.5077 3720.. 5334 3427.. 3018 2738 

.4034 2112.. 4377 2014.. 3861 1703 

.2833 1071.. 2752 1091.. 2608 801 

.5898 3833.. 6058 3506.. 4747 2592 

" 21 5861 3748.. 6136 3629.. 5143 2884 

Ward 23 1534 1096.. 1805 1047 . .with West- 

•» 24 931 357.. 987 565.. Chester. 



9.. 
10.. 
n.. 
12.. 
13.. 
14.. 



19.. 
20., 



3513 " 6 4 
3748 469 

4437 1079 Vernon....:.... 287 

£& 17^1 Verona 427 

Vienna 342 

Western 207 

Westmoreland. 205 
Whitestown ... 321 



140. 
520. 
no. 
223. 
493- 
35°- 
39- 

488'. 
194. 



60 
171 

151 

400 



958. 
271. 
186. 

547- 
117. 
219. 



1189 941 

372 237 

48 148 

148 470 

109 136 



409 484.. 321 



222 
233 

461 

$ 

212 



389 
44- 
104. 
301. 
208. 
330. 
202. 



104 
184 
171 

329 
263 
326 
193 



224 
460 
373 
52 
101 

268 
195 



3032 173 
2629 9 
1953 17 



Total 79274 49614.. 87436 44908- -69702 35710 

Majority... .29660 —..42328 —..33992 — 
NIAGARA COUNTY. 

Cambria 155 206.. 175 244 

Hartland 264 347.. 264 

Lewiston 244 256.. 227 

Lockport 216 261.. 235 

City, 1. 387 346.. 346 
*« "2. 322 181.. 281 

u "3. 356 472.. 363 

" " 4. 238 189. . 224 



327. 
480 
291. 



471- 



285 
424 
317 
288 
223 



330 
31? 569 



226 



385 526.. 318 



240 
202 
368 

484 



Total 10691 10607. .11137 11488.. 8830 10538 



322. 
273. 
291. 
373- 
i95. 
475- 
222. 



92 
190 
170 
191 

226 
331 
174 



Total City 1303 1188.. 1214 1-65.. 1026 1123 

Newfane 279 215.. 283 278.. 208 225 

Niagara 597 450. . 648 465.. 425 424 

Pendleton 168 102.. 197 133-. 122 120 

Porter 195 230.. 201 210.. 156 



292.. 
312., 
296., 
377- 
239- 
457- 
227. 
305. 
6^5. 
265. 
578. 
139- 

37£- 
328. 

327. 



593-. 
335-. 
804.. 
758.. 



334 
223 

373 
631 



533- 
235. 
54°- 
700. 



192 
no 
125 

232 278 
258 286 
77 206 
262 464 
166 210 



Majority 84 — . — 351 

ONONDAGA COUNTY. 

Camillas 267 2^7.. 264 240.. 

Cicero 121 292.. 119 408.. 

Clay 186 312.. 213 370-' 

De Witt 261 296.. 292 286.. 

Elbridge 460 377- • 469 346., 

Fabius 137 239.. 140 257., 

Geddes 277 

Lafayette 186 

Lysander 331 

Manlius 505 

Marcellus '204 

Onondaga 412 

Otisco 124 

Pompey 327 

Salina 226 

Skaneateles.... 369 

Spafford 105 214 

Syracuse, 1 381 364 

2.... 579 593-. 637 621.. 504 
*• 3.... 249 335.. 292 265.. 300 

. " 4.... 529 

531 



1708 



237 



197. 278. 
501 692. 



147 
33i 
345 

448 
637 
292 



3$- 
263. 
427. 
213. 
389. 
621. 
265. 



232 
497 

96 



404 
530 
204 
481 
97 



363 652. 
531 653. 
257 672. 



4 I 5 
563 

315 



84?. . 509 

746.. 472 

662.. 511 

622.. 434 

656. . 205 



230 275 
265 233 

231 305 
80 136 

236 342 . 
467 
168 
589 
474 
465 

449 
469 



Total City.... 3420 4831.. 3928 4803.. 3231 3423 
202 I Tully 130 215.. 96 189.. 120 163 



44 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



Bigelow Sew'dTilden DixWillorsThayer 

YanBuren ^83 331 •« 3Q3 289.. 27? 236 

Total ..8331 11216.. 9379 11610.. 7234 8677 

Majority — 288s.. — 2231.. — 1443 

^ y ONTARIO COUNTY. 

Bristol 133 '66.. 127 178.. 84 162 

Canadicc 66 115.. 48 121.. 21 86 

Canandaigua.. 774 762.. 622 744.. °86 686 

E. Bloonniuld.. 289 238.. 251 215.. 172 208 

Farmiugton. . . . 116 173.. 94 170.. 74 166 

Geneva 606 547.- 725 62a.. ™* 5 2 & 

Gorham 270 262.. 263 236.. 227 237 

Hopewell 186 182.. 156 162.. 137 *54 

Manchester.... 377 345- • 37' 334-. 262 373 

Naples 283 322.. 271 324.. 159 252 

Ph.-lps 582 343.. 613 328.. 547 403 

Richmond 115 230.. 121 227.. 72 166 

Seneca 250 306.. 25.2 ?£>.. 179 236 

South Bristol.. 116 121.. 106 135.. , 74 89 

Victor 310 234.. 295 257.. 195 206 

W. Bloomflcld. 126 2 28 .. 134 2 1 4.. 91 182 

Total 4599 4S74-- 4449 4536.. 3744 4152 

Majority 23 — .. — 87.. — 408 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

BloomingGrove 211 270.. 206 243.. 168 224 

Chester 227 218.. 189 206.. 183 182 

Cornwall 208 283.. 263 277.. 146 233 

Crawford 176 128.. 219 142.. 195 144 

Deerpark 1057 625.. 1237 738.. 1143 575 

Goshen 501 399.. 461 383.. 436 360 

Greenville 168 36.. 164 32.. 121 36 

Haniplonhurg . 134 80.. 141 92.. 127 70 

Highlands 200 159.. 190 194.. 129 172 

Mi.'iisink 242 70.. 223 69.. 175 67 

Monroe 329 549.. 340 491.. 233 400 

Montgomery... 376 484.. 375 490.. 356 417 

Mount Hope... 169 133.. 173 173.. 135 161 

Newburgh 2^3 323.. 261 32=;.. 205 310 

" City, 1. .460 264.. 506 343.. 37' 3'3 

2.. 445 461.. 501 507.. 420 455 

3-. '54 350- • '75 3^9-- '63 331 

" 4 ■ • 2 45 2 46. . 267 283.. 199 247 ■ 

Total City ...1304 1321.. 1449 1 94.. 11 53 1346 

New Windsor.. 239 179.. 233 200.. 200 154 

Wallkill 764 999.. 1012 1096.. 753 1209 

Warwick H40 431.. 344 488.. 313 494 

Wawayanda... 2 07 133.. 196 186.. 170 186 

Total 730s 6859.. 7878 73'9-. 6341 6740 

Majority 446 — .. 339 — .. — I99 

ORLEANS COUNTY. 

Alhion 416 522.. , withBarre > 

Banc 89 253.. 664 827.. 441 601 

carlton 159 284.. 191 318.. 101 230 

Clarendon 150 188.. 172 218.. 153 207 

Cainos 144 230.. 186 226.. no 166 

Kendall 126 175.. 136 224.. 84 141 

?J u l 1Ta >" 2 49 221.. 307 252.. 213 206 

Ridircway 427 470.. 488 481.. 310 456 

•™ilhy 22s 293.. 309 3 I0 .. 139 278 

» ates 75 218.. 94 2 91.. 42 21 5 

J, 01 .* 1 ,; 2060 2874.. 2,67 3147.. 1393 2500 

Majority - 8,4.. _ $„ ™ > 

OSWEGO COUNTY. 

A ,b ! on 190 221.. 167 232.. 113 164 

:V n, . ,, 7 '°7 '39-. 101 126.. 82 121 

Boylston. 43 „.. . 4, g ._ 26 8 . 

k°."?i R v Utla 2 ?2 2,1. 34S 327.. 3'2 239 

S* .£-, 3'o 3«5.. 422 368.. 318 233 

H»nni6al ,90 302.. ,86 288.. T23 291 

M^iVT 24 i 291 -- 307 324.. 23Y 291 

5 r ,,x, S° 248 521.. 221 487.. 161 431 

Or e weU ftVCn " "J T" 56 2 «" 2 ' 5 

X rWe " JO" 167.. 71 100 c 7 ,. 

08w . e go v ,- t '45 2-jI. xL 2 f 7 \: ,g li° 3 

m c»ty,i. 303 201.. 311 233.. 189 248 

„ 2 - '93 82.. 203 96.. 120 85 

.. '■ £3 344.. 305 356.. 205 34? 

M 4. 228 239.. 264 235.. 180 230 

.. 5- 2 4& 163.. 294 189.. 234 186 

« ,' 'jiV 25 •• I J X 2? 5-- I0 3 285 

7- 85 130.. 85 !4 3 .. 79 12 l 



Bi-elow Sew'd Tilden DiiWillergThayer 



OswegoCity, 8. 254 140.. 229 153 



Totality.... 1 769 1575.. 1862 1704 



Palermo 117 

Parrish 159 188., 

Redfleld 90 52.. 

Richland 372 444., 

Sandy Creek.,. 158 344.. 

Schrceppel 322 323. , 

■■$.. 



Scriba 192 

Volney . 513 

W©«t Monroe.. 100 
Williamstown . 225 



250 
687. 

87. 

78. 



187 251. 

168 219. 

103 88. 

288 432. 

] 64 392 . 

384 344. 

213 302. 

652 734. 

144 119. 

173 75- 



Total 5930 7095.. 6439 7580 

Majority — 1163.. — 1141 

OTSEGO COUNTY. 



Burlington 170 189. 

Butternuts 173 291. 

Cherry Valley . 289 215. 

Decatur 98 

Edmeston 182 

Exeter 136 

Hartwick 296 

Laurens 235 

Maryland 322 

Middlefield 363 220 

Milford 340 224 

Morris* 229 314 

New Lisbon.... 219 161.. 209 

Onconta 460 492 

Otego 202 ien 

Otsego 517 

Pittslield 148 

Plainfleld 98 

Richfield 240 

Roseboom 161 

Springfield 280 156 

Unadilla 362 215. 

Westford 159 131. 

Worcester 326 278. 



93- 

165. 
220. 

245- 
242. 



539-. 
169.. 



189. 



153 151. 

150 261. 

305 196. 

104 92. 

209 190. 

148 169. 

290 225. 

241 255. 

289 247. 

402 219. 

351 204. 

233 274. 
152. 

431 474- 

228 223. 

534 457- 

157 154. 

83 194. 

218 230. 

178 179. 



324 
362 
166 in. 



226. 



318 293, 



Total 6003 5378.. 6083 5330. 

Majority 427 — .. 733 "— . 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Carmel 236 275.. 300 282. 

Kent 97 219.. 162 152. 

Patterson 102 200.. 137 174. 

Phillipstown... 373 521.. 621 456. 

Putnam Valley 167 155.. 253 102. 

South East 230 378.. 233 312. 



Total 1225 1748 . 1706 1478. 

Majority — 523.. 228 — . 

QUEENS COUNTY. 

Flushing 1266 1021.. 1295 1072. 

Hempstead .... 993 1071.. 847 1123. 

Jamaica 70s 352.. 710 396. 

Long Isl. City.. 1257 496.. 1483 417. 

Newtown 690 497.. 666 517. 

N. Hempstead. 492 602.. 369 643. 

Oyster Bav 908 678.. 881 791. 



277.. 208 313. 

312.. 311 329. 

215 187. 

"3 253. 

544.. 723 5'3. 

629.. 710 678. 



Total 6314 4717.. 6257 4961. 

Majority 1397 — .. 1296 — . 

RENSSELAER COUNTY 

Berlin 188 

Brunswick ;66 

E. Greenbush... 204 203 

Grafton 69 288. 

Greenbush 631 

Hoosick 735 

Lansingburgb... 523 873'.'. 622 848*. 

Nassau 203 332.. 300 392. 

N. Greenbush.. 330 365 

Petersburgh.... 212 183 

Pittstown 199 446 

Pcestenkill 245 ic8 

Sand Lake 246 309. . 

Schaghticoke.. 282 316.. 338 353 

Schodack 456 323. . 532 420 

Stephentown . . 195 260. . 230 272 

Tr °y.- * 396 348.. 430 336 

„ 2 284 576.. 344 568 

3 137 289.. 145 284 



367 
228 



399. 
185. 



255 5'0. 
167. 
272. 



225 
306 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



45 



Troy, 4. 



Big*low Sew'd Tilden DixWiHersThayer 
...269 «;58.. 286 523.. 256 586 
499.. 244 440. 



8. 

9- 
10. 
11. 



225 

379 251.. 406 
647 
488 
477 
527 



7 505 394- 



" 12 

" 13 

Total City. 



599 
456 
485 
438 
395 



ip:: 

381.. 
104.. 

58. 



253. 
310. 

162. 

336. 
45b 106. 
388 tf. 



204 267.. 187 282. 



.4862 4022.. 5019 3790 



Total 9846 9842. .10702 9881. 

Majority 4, — .. 821 — . 

RICHMOND COUNTY. 

Castleton 90=; 867.. 899 790. 

Middletown.... 772 399.. 813 313. 

Northfteld 604 506.. m3 3^9. 

Southfield 391 291.. 431 260. 

Westfleld 365 451.. 365 38 8. 

Total 3037 2514. . 3021 2150. 

Majority 523 — . . 871 — . 

ROCKLAND COUNTY. 

Clarkstown 497 185.. 543 264 

Haverstraw 534 

Orangetown... 636 

Ramapo 437 

atony Point.... 225 



296., 
661.. 
374-. 
109.. 



601 318. 
709 689. 
527 393- 



252 153. 



Total 2329 1625.. 2632 1817.. 24=19 1792 

Majority 704 — .. 8m — . 667 — 

ST. LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



$ 



163. 

681. 

12. 

65 201 . 

67 362. 

32 167. 



65 
33 
?7 



133 

96, 
207, 



Brasher 242 229.. 

Canton 356 638.. 

Clifton a 14.. 

Colton 62 214.. 

De Kalb 66 349.. 

De Peyster 30 184.. 

Edwards 53 122.. 

Fine 31 83.. 

Fowler 74 189.. 

Gouverneur 187 445.. 

Hammond 65 109.. 

Hermon 131 191.. 

Hopkinton 51 246.. 

Lawrence 103 299.. 

Lisbon 128 597.. 

Louisville 134 187.. 

Macomb 85 140.. 

Madrid 108 253.. 95 266. 

Massena 1^1 231.. n5 246. 

Morristown.... 81 287.. 80 307. 

Norfolk 141 2o<;.. 131 231. 

Oswegatcbio... 711 1065.. 678 1027. 

Parish ville 55 310.. 43 305. 

Pierpont 69 289.. 89 109. 

Pitcairn 29 97.. 26 310. 

Potsdam 281 936.. 296 901. 

Rossie 93 150.. 99 141. 

Russell 152 141.. 149 175. 

Stockholm 106 436.. 119 456. 

Waddington... 125 2 44.. 151 283. 

Total 390a 8940.. 3866 9106. 

Majority — 5038.. — K240. 

SARATOGA COUNTY. 



18b 471. 
65 175. 
205. 
290. 
302. 
597- 
178. 
US 



120 

S 3 
89 

i34 

149 

88 



Ballston 229 

Charlton . ..... 171 



168., 
152 



207 
189 



174. 



Clifton Park... 214 351.. 227 361. 

j Corinth 120 171.. 72 270 

! Day 143 104.. 132 110 

j Edinburgh 163 182.. 127 

Galway 177 203.. 192 

j Greenfield 176 335.. 185 

Hadley 57 160.. 43 

! Halfmoon 263 401. 

Malta 123 154.. 116 

Milton 438 625.. 480 

Moreau 140 221. 

Northumberl'd 129 188. 

Providence 109 116. 

Saratoga 3^9 45 1 -. 



239. 
362. 
no. 

305 357. 

at 

231. 
172. 
147. 



145 
103 



Springs 889 1139- • 



414 512. 
940 1100, 



218 475 

364 219 

573 366 

408 234 
417 181 
399 325 

409 128 
352 56 
14 9 3 02 

4348 4149 



9157 10054 

- 897 

719 689 

691 415 

412 333 

316 286 

333 4io 



2471 2133 

338 - 

518 253 

534 347 

637 (k8 

478 412 

272 122 



109 
211 
2 
42 
35 
25 
44 
12 

91 n» 
134 284 
91 
133 
199 
202 



467 

211 
90 
in 
75 



a 

3 ? 
38 

27 331 
75 106 

74 
41 

100 



162 
20^ 
149 



345 659 
34 181 

151 

58 



40 
21 



184 178 

60 54 

103 128 

62 255 

54 101 

2215 5726 

— 35i 1 



179 
147 



173 359 

89 296 

122 

108 



102 
174 



184 241 

206 423 

44 135 

280 344 

118 153 

333 693 

133 192 

1 =,6 190 

87 129 

360 490 



Bigelo-w Sew'd Tilden Dix'.V 

Stillwater 360 284.. 343 305 

Waterford 399 472.. 470 479 

Wilton 72 156.. 75 159 

Total 4731 6033.. 4953 6264 

Majority. ... — 1302.. — 1311 
SCHENECTADY COUNTY 

Duanesburg ... 289 388. . 279 359. 

Glenville 334 359.. 4 u 291. 

Niskayuna 83 120.. 82 123. 

Princeton 75 130.. 82 127. 

Rotterdam 270 321.. 269 292. 

Schenectady ,1. 180 114.. 190 102. 

" 2. 184 184.. 187 182. 

3. 312 216.. 364 192. 

4- 358 393-. 4i5 323. 

5- 311 35 6. . 369 272^. 

Total City . . . 1 38s 1263.. 15 2 5 10 71 . 

Total 2436 2581.. 2648 2263T 

Majority — 145. 385 — . 

SCHOHARIE COUNTY. 



Blenheim 150 94, 

Broome 209 244 

Carlisle 208 124, 

Cobleskill ^48 243, 

Conesville 137 83, 

Esperance 108 176. 

Fulton 391 160. 

Gilboa 214 249. 

Jefferson 132 198, 

Middleburgh .. 122 217, 

Richmondville 269 187. 

Schoharie 463 270. 

Seward 224 100. 

Sharon 264 144. 

Summit . 



Wright 226 129. 



Total 4276 2730. 

Majority 1146 — . 

SCHUYLER 

Catherine 96 177. 

Cayuta 97 50. 

Dix 388 428. 

Hector 483 629. 

Montour 131 261. 

Orange 170 167. 

Reading 154 185. 

Tyrone 192 193. 

Total 1711 2090. 

Majority .._— 379 



4544 2712. 
. 1832 — . 
COUNTY. 
115 182. 



Covert 210 

Fayette 463 

Junius 91 

Lodi 



SENECA COUNTY. 



Ovid 219 

Romulus 196 

Seneca Falls... 800 
Tyre 



182, 

301. 

103. 

223 213. 



Varick 178 

Waterloo 400 



255. 
104. 

559- 
123 109. 



149. 
344. 



Total 2883 2379 

Majority soj — 



STEUBEN COUNTY 



Addison 344 

Avoca 202 211. 

Bath 738 667. 

Bradford 120 89. 

Cameron 128 102. 

Campbell 165 201. 

Canisteo 279 278. 

Caton 78 158. 

Cohocton 305 275. 

Corning 686 474. 

Dansville 202 100. 

Erwin 174 185. 

Fremont 126 72. 

Greenwood 108 93. 

Hartsville ...•. 63 54. 

Hornby 91 130 



824 959 Hornellsville . . 886 629. 



H 7 
189 

244 



97. 
193^ 
162, 



533 223. 

171 80. 

126 181. 

436 135. 

255 213- 

153 183. 



509 
292 
459 
2c;6 
321 
236 



262, 

2=;6. 
112, 



217 137. 



12=; 
608 
545 



190 230. 
224 177. 
204 153- 
249 240. 

2260 2110, 
ist> — . 



260 188. 
470 321. 



124 

203 



145 

223 

506 



144. 

240. 
260. 

601. 
132. 
182. 

337. 



3202 2569. 

633 



314 216. 

225 218. 

752 617. 

124 76 



J 55 
178 



162. 
199. 



279 320. 
100 186. 



299 
890 
231 



302. 
558. 
104. 



204 215. 
133 122. 

69. 

92. 

137. 

7 6 3- 



135 
967 



ille-sThayer 

328 309 

3 8 2 439 

83 177 



4336 6087 
— 1751 



236 
375 



221 

165 
170 



320 
383 
no 
117 
297 
"5 
212 



279 2S4 

324 375 
253 ^6o 

1191 1316 
2195 2549 
— 354 



146 
132 
201 
414 

'iif 

360 
171 
119 

377 
265 
407 
194 
308 
'187 
204 



100 
175 
143 

65 
139 

J £ 3 
183 
149 
161 

154 
221 

92 
174 

94 
113 



3713 2271 
1442 — 



97 

462 

166 
200 
185 
174 



183 
43 
392 
<$2 
"228 
184 
184 
222 



1728 2018 
— 290 



236 
404 
103 
174 
242 

185 
877 
144 

193 

457 



166 

193 
119 
182 
211 

139 
412 
132 

129 
273 



3015 1956 
1059 — 



379 
201 
710 

113 
140 
142 
231 

77 

291 
861 

J § 5 
189 

109 

123 

62 

141 

815 



177 

22 3 

758 

74 



28s 
179 
288 

537 
9i 

212 
98 



586 



48 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1876. 



Blgdow S^w'd Tflden DixWIllenThsyer 

Howard 156 161.. 248 332-. »5 *°A 

58 200 



Jasper 

Liudley 136 

Prattsburgh ... 263 261. 

Pultney 143 146 

Rathbone 109 100 

Thurston 70 140 

Troopsburgh.. 153 198 

Tuscarora 105 108 

Urbana 237 

Wavland 243 

Wayne 88 

West Union ... 131 

Wheeler 183 

Woodhull 135 



248 

69 249. 
153 "5- 



220.. 
182.. 

89.. 

61.. 



301 234.. 

145 172.. 

122 130.. 

122 131.. 

176 215.. 

103 127- • 

226 227.. 

278 197.. 

99 105.. 

121 61.. 



62 199 
125 113 

246 



339 

160 172 

117 135 

107 148 

175 183 

73 133 

239 225 

271 174 

82 115 

92 46 



188 III.. 171 133 
158 294.. 129 254 



Total 6920 6264.. 7688 7072.. 7076 6655 

Majority 6*6 — .. 616 — .. 421 — 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Pabylon 423 304-. 356 261.. 225 334 

Brookhavcn.... 908 650.. 682 604.. 632 617 

Easthampton.. 240 245.. 179 263.. 112 187 

Huntington.... 598 608.. 539 554-. 422 397 

Isllp 438 372.. 282 330. 

Riverhead 328 294 



31 
122 
389 
670 



43- 



Shelter Island. 35 42.. 

Sinithtown 130 126.. 

Southampton.. m8 643.. 

Southold 689 459.. 679 486 



231 335 
270 284.. 248 348 



20 40 

99 120 

312 668 

58 482 

Total 4313 3743.. 3529 3601.. 2881 3528 

— 647 

204 206 

320 74 

no 

52 

122 

47-. 47 29 

92.. 256 123 

53- • 55 

313 262.. 371 

160 41.. 83 



Majority 57° — •• - 72 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Bet v el 236 207.. 251 212 

Callieoon 304 76.. 392 80 

Cochecton 147 84.. 10 69.. 137 

Delaware 274 51.. 318 57.. 28 

Falleburgh .... 220 256.. 257 253 9I 



ForeBtburgh... 135 

Fremont 299 

Highland 92 

Liberty 338 

Lumberland ... 159 
Mamakating... 342 

Neversiuk 238 

Rockland 175 

Thompson 387 

Tusten 120 



82. 

2<3. 

39- 
379- 

a 

381. 
39. 



130 
306 
77 



340 349. 

264 205. 

197 165. 

392 370. 



132 



39- 



296 

278 396 
217 174 
184 163 

350 347 
103 41 



ToUl 3526 2288.. 3681 2294.. 2996 2216 

Majority 1238 — .. 1387 — .. 780 — 

TIOGA COUNTY. 

Barton 497 577. 

Berkshire n8 169. 

Candor 494 459. 

Newark Valley 178 340. 

Nichols 143 244. 

Owego 1087 116s. 

Rlchford no 188. 

Spencer 232 231. 

Tioga 408 276. 



496 565.. 398 474 

101 180. . 91 139 

471 378.. 394 382 

157 320.. 128 30 



139 242. 

1117 1158. 

118 155. 

229 226. 

409 278. 



T .°^ al A 3267 3649.. 3237 3W2.. 2<i44 

Majority — ^82.. — 26s.. ' 

TOMPKINS COUNTY. 

Tarollne 244 232.. 2^3 213 

Danby 167 28c 

Drvdcn 472 cp 

Enfield 194 18? 

(iroton 287 426. 

Ithaca 1135 j 169. 

Lansing 358 321. 



96 206 

825 1080 

78 138 

222 187 

312 218 

3127 
583 



I3 I. 

X 

273 
1 106 



282. 



461.. 32 

196. 

401. 



211 194 
131 215 



324 
156 



427 
177 



214 357 

1019.. 1037 ios7 

265 216 

268 189 

203 286 



NewflcYd 332 T2Y.'. 326 230 

L' lyases 342 348.. 290 292 

_ ULSTEK COUNTY. 
Denning 101 65. 

406. 



F.popns 343 

Gardiner 200 

Harden burgh.. 65 

Jlurlev 184 

Kin : 



«.. 



96 



109.. 214 
39.. 66 
287.. 246 



379 478. • 2<a 



131.. 

48.. 

220., 



gston .... 592 J39.. .70 209 
City.. 1733 1247.. 1687 1211 



80 

444 
198 140 
68 65 
236 326 
522 283 
J 372 X374 



Bigelow Sew'd Tilden DixWillersThayer 

Lloyd 244 171.. 244 194.. 228 294 

Marbletown... 295 284.. 333 337-. 321 435 

Marlborough . . 246 219. . 264 238. . 213 234 

New Pal tz 277 185.. 286 188.. 240 223 

Olive 351 140.. 357 189.. 349 238 

Plattekill 130 126.. 146 182.. 118 223 

Rochester 355 2°9-- 402 207.. 376 237 

Rosendale 533 230.. 401 221.. 394 333 

Saugerties 875 635.. 982 740.. 715 873 

Shandaken 315 156.. 302 150.. 268 182 

Shawangunk... 277 136. .342 163.. 283 132 

Wawarsmg... 720 532.. 796 569.. 534 583 

Woodstock . . . . 134 i35- • 184 142.. 186 2 49 

Total 7970 555°-- 8303 5884.. 6969 6968 

Majority 2420 — .. 2419 — .. 1 — 

WARREN COUNTY. 

Bolton 88 136.. 112 146.. 80 132 

Caldwell 150 79.. 155 102.. 141 100 

Chester 180 262.. 236 2^4.. 188 241 

Hague 83 168.. 91 47.. 67 44 

Horicon 93 54-. 106 169.. 78 148 

Johnsburgh.... 218 288.. 254 227.. 209 182 

Luzerne 68 206.. 76 214.. 50 197 

Queensbury.. . . 636 817.. 826 800.. 646 694 

Stony Creek... 122 131.. 146 116.. 95 120 

Thurman 133 120.. 148 114.. 12s 113 

Warrensburgh . 231 138.. 250 145.. 190 159 

Total 2002 2399.. 2400 2334.. 1869 2130 

Majority — 397- • 66 — .. — 281 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Argyle in 381.. 154 394.. 144 35 8 

Cambridge 145 277.. 188 305.. 166 340 

Dresden 53 86.. 72 77.. 54 74 

Easton 101 299.. 163 3S2.. 118 348 

Fort Ann 346 381.. 373 354.. 362 334 

Fort Edward... 483 446.. 521 519.. 528 454 

Granville 337 487-. 342 399.. 259 415 

Greenwich 243 498.. 308 541.. 196 469 

Hampton 46 76.. 68 167.. 54 77 

Hartford 115 288.. 127 272.. 99 2J9 

Hebron 85 296.. 154 272.. 93 268 

Jackson 56 157.. 93 172. 86 169 

Kingsbury 290 476.. 443 427.. 360 401 

Putnam 18 129.. 10 116.. 13 101 

Salem 277 411.. 331 305.. 317 381 

Whitecreek. . . . 220 325. . 268 314. . 232 375 

Whitehall 635 546.. 725 424.. 633 3 40 

Total 3561 5^59-. 4346 5410.. 3714 51^3 

Majority — 1998.. — 1064.. — 1439 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

Arcadia 496 489.. 532 497.. 456 507 

Butler 123 271.. 160 295.. 109 308 

Galen 570 545.. 509 584.. 450 527 

Huron 168 204.. 151 178.. 125 165 

Lyons 556 504. . 506 510. . 476 560 

Macedon 144 298.. 143 262.. 184 242 

Marion 70 309.. 76 286.. 47 182 

Ontario 117 262.. 164 306.. 126 307 

Palmyra 366 499.. 388 474.. 333 391 

Rose 209 267.. 191 277.. 180 216 

Savannah 180 228.. 161 236.. 147 228 

Sodus 466 512. . 448 468 . 403 413 

Walworth 97 211.. 82 222.. 85 202 

Williamson.... 156 275.. 144 220.. no 235 

Wolcott 404 340.. 362 288.. 261 260 

Total 4137 5 2I 4.. 4017 5103.. 3492 4743 

Majority — 1077.. — 1086.. — 1251 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY. 

Bedford 261 421.. 274 3m.. 245 479 

Cortlaudt 940 1109.. 1246 962.. 742 974 

EastcheBter 7^51 464.. 799 480.. 537 503 

Greenburg boi 692.. 993 679.. "733 661 

Harrison 90 89.. 136 81.. 101 99 

Kingsbridge... with New York 208 106 

Lewisboro 112 208.. 116 203.. 87 225 

Mamaroneck.. 122 03.. 167 107.. 89 113 

Morrisanla with New York i8«;7 923 

MountPleasant ^26 359.. 576 361.. 467 394 

1 Newcastle 17c; 178.. 194 177.. 152 194 

New Rochelle.. 469 2^1.. 400 304.. 3^5 200 

Northcastle.... 141 166.. 154 166.. 134 229 



a 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1ST6. 



47 



North Salem... 88 148., 
Ossining 803 505. 



88 166. 
761 665. 
136 59. 



Pelham 116 

Poundiidge.... 135 82.. 123 79.. 

Rye 412 357.. 548 497., 

pears dale 26 33.. 24 32., 

pomers 172 129.. 144 126.. 

iWeBtch ester ... 385 220.. 452 240., 

West F arms with New York 

White Plains... 338 223.. 367 177., 

Tonkers 1063 1101.. 121 1 988.. 

Yorktown 247 207.. 257 245., 

Total 8173 7154.. 9166 7145.. 

Majority 1019 — . . 2021 — . , 

WYOMING COUNTY. 



A 54 f 8 

617 025 

95 65 

120 108 

493 442 



29 
120 

266 
723 
37? 



156 
255 
451 

211 



916 IOOO 
I76 237 



9688 892I 
767 — 



Arcade 239 157. 

Attica 276 314. 

Bennington 176 112. 



218 188. 
292 327. 



I Castile 95 

Covington 25 

57 



281 



252 . 
136-. 
158.. 



123. 
281. 



Eagle 

Gainesville ... 
Genesee Falls. 

Java 194 127 

Middlebury.... 77 
Orangeville.... 47 

Perry 92 

Pike 94 

Sheldon 103 

Warsaw 222 

Wethersfleld... 97 



100 219 
63 



30 
72 
123 233 



170. , 



120 

241 

129 

91 

40 

55 
9i 



106.. 


87 


113.. 


12 5 8 7 


127.. 


206 


143.. 


227.. 


7» 


248.. 


5i 


134.. 


70 


13°-. 


51 


28Q.. 


125 


34°.- 


*J 


250.. 


73 


313- • 


bq 


119.. 


203 


128.. 


120 


460 . 

76.. 


299 
144 


%: 


■a 



91 

217 

108 
no 
173 

100 
102 
225 

133 
370 
214 
Il8 
431 



: £ 4 

02 



Total 2017 3136.. 2416 3433. 

Majority — 1119.. — 1017. 

YATES COUNTY. 

Barrington .... 151 136.. 136 139. 

Benson ... 174 331. 

Italy 78 133. 

Jerusalem 244 286. 

Mi ddlesex 87 1 72 . 

Milo 563 56c . 

Potter 172 256. 

Star key 224 305.. 216 

Torrey 159 129.. 139 



327. 
141. 



237 267. 
64 153., 



554 
145 



561.. 
272. 
332. 
142. 



1613 2882 

— 1269 

160 141 

194 3i9 

103 106 

259 276 



188 244 
195 256 
157 in 



Total 1852 2313.. 1721 2334., 

Majority — 461.. — 613., 



1935 2095 
— 160 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN- 

18?4. 18t2. 18*0. 

Districts. Bern. Hep. Lib. Adm, Bern. Hep. 

I. MetcalfeFrench CovertStudder Towns Norvell 

gueens 5904 5116.. 5922 6094.. 6175 4896 
ichmond . .3083 2032.. 2543 2756.. 2590 2132 

Suffolk .3197 3854.. 3332 5027- • 3»6i 443 8 

Total 12184 11002. .11797 13877.. 1 2632 1 1 466 

Henry B. Metcalfe's niaj. 1,182 ; Henry J. Scud- 
der's maj.in 1872, 2,080 ; Dwight Townsend's maj. 
in 1870, 1,166. William J. Spence, Temp., received 
281 votes. 

18T4. 18?2. 

Bern. Hep. Lib. Adm. 

II Kings CO. ScbumekerWoodSchumakerPerry 



Brooklyn, ward 1, pt. 



595 
1245 
1084 
2057 
2673 

1354 
2307 
2570 
1238 



35I-. 572 



564 



230.. 1119 330 

1098.. new ward. 

578.. 1985 861 

1238.. 2449 

885 

2855 

2437 

1043 



624 
1002. 

427. 
1 104. 



1504 

I 73 
2673 

39« 
1275 



Total 15123 6652. .13345 8378 

John G. Schumaker's maj. 8,471 ; in 1872, 4,967. 
In 1872, Wm. E. Robinson, Ind., received 1,031 

III." Kings Co. ChittendenOstranderGoodr. Wo df. 
Brooklyn, Ward i,pt.. 1036 406.. new ward. 



3- 
4- 
7- 

11. 

13- 



1241 

2562 

1931 
1419 



665 
632. . 1062 



985.. 
1249. . 



1227 

1200 

1140.. 2007 2119 

1595 1803 

1394 1972 



ChhtendenOstranderGoodr.Wo' df 

Brooklyn,Ward 19 1418 973.. 104' 1654 

" " 20 1870 1387.. 13^0 231 1 

" "21 1678 953.. 2386 28c 1 

" " 23 783 518.. new ward. 

*• "25 592 753.. new ward. 



Total 14539 8996.. 115- 15177 

Simeon B. Chittenden's maj. 5,543 ; Stewart L. 
Woodford's maj.in 1872, 3,671. Mr. Chittenden. 



who ran as an Independent Republican, was 
also elected by about the same majority to rep- 
resent the district for the unexpired term of Mr. 
Woodford. 

IV. Kings Co. BHsb 

Brooklyn, Ward 9 1253 



2488 
1392 
1703 
17 2071 

24. 



Bennett ColahanCrooto 

489.. 1343 

841.. 2198 

1303.. 1315 

1783 

1491 



984 
3/2 

FTatbush 525 

Flatlands 177 

Gravesend 205 

New Lots 919 

New Utrecht 3S0 



1789.. 
960., 
951.. 
283., 
280.. 
164., 
102.. 
461., 
239.. 



912 



1207 
962 

1730 
2292 

16&8 
896 



new ward. 



176 
66 
92 

554 

272 



C85 

277 
204 

802 
289 



Total. -i 12439 7862. .10202 11012 

Archibald M. Bliss's maj. 4,577; Philip S'. 
Crookc's maj. in 1872, 810. 

By chap. 798, Laws of 1873, the city of New 
York is divided into seven districts for the elec- 
tion of Members of Congress, as follows : 

V. Wards 1,2,3, 4' S» 6 t 8 and 14, Bedloe's, Ellis 
and Governor's islands. 

VI. Wards 7, 11 and 13. 

VII. Wards 10 and 17. 

VIII. Wards q, 15 and 16, and that part of the 
18th lying within 14th St., 26th St., and 4th aud 
6th aves. 

IX. That part of the 20th ward lying within 
26th 6t., 40th st., 7th ave. and Hudson river, and 
those parts of the 12th and 22d lying within 40th 
6t., Spuyten Duyvil creek, fcth ave. and Hudsoa 
river. 

X. The 18th ward, east of 4th ave.,Blackwell's 
island, and the 19th and 21st wards, east of 3d av. 

XI. That part of the 20th ward lying within 
26th st., 40th et., 6th and 7th aves., the 12th and 
22d wards, east of fcth ave., the 19th and 21st 
wards, west of 3d ave., Ward's and Randall's 
islands. 



1874. 

Bern. Ind. 

"V. N. Y. Mca«le Hogai 

Ass.Dist. 1 . . . 2496 281 7 

" 2... 2472 208c 

" 3...2141 i860 

" 5,pt209o 2258 

Total 9199 9024 

Edwin R.Meade'B maj . 
175, 

Bern. Hep 

VI. N. Y. CoxCampbeli 
Ass.Dist. 4... 51 16 773 

" 6... 3563 765 

" 8,pti37i 

" 12... 3712 1401 

Total 13762 3428 

SamuelS. Cox's maj. 
i°>334. 

VII. N.Y. Ely Spencer 
Ass.Dist. 8pt.2367 2508 

10...2735 2475 
" 14... 2 587 143; 

Total 7689 6418 

Smith Ely, jr.'s maj. 
1,271. 

VIII. N.Y. WardLawson 
Ass.Dist. 5,pt 704 386 

" 7...22II 2469 
" 9... 3384 2980 



1878. 



V. Hew York City, 
Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
14. Wm. R. Roberts, 
Lib., 20,281 ; Matthew 
Stewart, Adm., 5,356; 
Roberts's maj. 14,925. 



VI. New York City, 
Wards 11 and 13, and 
those parts of the 18th 
and 21st lying east of 
3d ave. James Brooks, 
Lib., 16,6.45 ; Adolph G. 
Dunn, Admin., 5,005 ; 
Brooks's maj. 11,640. 

VII. New York City, 
Wards 9, 15 and 10, ana 
18th, west of 3d ave. 
Thos. J. Creamer, Lib., 
10,012 ; Conrad Geib, 
Adm., 8,279; Creamer's 
maj- 1.733- 

VIII. NewYorkCitv, 
Wards 9, is, 16 and 21st, 
west of 36. ave. John 
D . Lawson.Adm., 13,305 ; 



48 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



•\v»rdL»«ion Charles P. Shaw, Lib., 
Aa»t .Dle.ii.pt 606 8629,39:,; LawBon'B maj. 
13. . .3208 2535 3,910. 

Total ... .10113 wH it TCow York Cltv 
ElljaW Ward's maj W..| ^ £°* d ™^g3i 

-^- v t- w^ H«raV B. Melliflh, Adm., 7,811 ; 
l^vK; *£? "■£■ Michael Connolly, Lib., 
AM.DUI. 11.pt 847 7" 8 j h Hard f Apoi. 

'f,'^ ^MoHall, 7,068; Mellish 
, 7 .pt3049 2 «" over Hardy, 773; over 



19,ptJQ72 mi 



Total 8763 6428 

Fernando Wood over 
John Hardy. 2,33*. 

Robert B. Newton re- 
ceived 1,131 votes. 

.V. N.Y. H«wittO'Br1en 
AM.Dlst. 16...3603 2754 

J8.pti963 

2o.pt2777 

2i,ptn6o 



Total 9503 



23^9 
2192 
_7j8 

8083 



A bniuj S.Ile witt'B maj 
1.420. 

XI. N.Y. WiUUB.rer 

Ass. Dibt. n.pt 948 1344 

n.pt 413 

" I7,pti3«;i 

i8.pt 879 

19.pt 241 

2O,pt202O 
" 2I,pl4S02 



Connolly, 1,094. 

In November,i874,R'd 
Schcll,Dem.,waselected 
to fill the vacancy from 
the I Xth Dlst.,cau8ed by 
the death of Mr.Mellish, 
receiving 12,^62 votes, 
and having a maj. of 
6,61; over John Hardy, 
Ind. Dem. 

X. New York City, 
"Wards 12 and 19. Fer- 
nando Wood.Llb., 10,^26 ; 
Wra.A. Darling, Adm., 
9,641 ; Wood's maj. 883. 



9^8 
860 

» 

1680 
2916 



Total I0 35L. *°? 6 



Benjamin A. 
roaj. 2,318. 



lllis's 



Dem. Rep. 

XII. Odell Wg.l 
W 1 Mcho8ter.i2o82 8391 

N.IIolnienOdell'smaJ. 
3.691. W. H. Van (ott 
(Temp.) received 285. 

XIII. WhUhonitB^al. 

< oliimbla ...-711 450; 

Dutchess 8759 541" 

l'utnam 1711 1422 



148W 13932 

John O. Whitehousc's 
maj. 927. 



Total 16181 11344 

John O. Whitehoustrs 
maj. 4,837. W.Farrington 
(Temp. j ree'd 768. 

X I V. Beebe Everett 

Orange. .7872 7373; Orange 7935 "8527 

Rockland... 2641 1831 Sullivan 3383 33,^ 



Ltb.Adm. 

XI. Pctter FUeu 

Putnam 1422 1667 

Rockland . . . 2405 2267 
Westchester 11287 10245 

Total 15204 14179 

Clarkson N. Pottjr'B 
maj. 1,025. 

XIII. 'WhiUh.Ketchum 

Columbia 5863 ^788 

Dutchess 8990 £144 

Total . 



XII. 



HortonSt.John 



Sullivan 4005 202: 



Total 14H18 1 1229 

Ocorgo M. Bcebc's 
mat. 3,289. 
X V . BoRleySttbblm 

Oroenc 4010 3051 

Ulster 7730 6769 

Schoharie . . .4465 2880 

Total 16205 12700 

John H. Baglcy, jr.'s 

xtr 3 ' 50 *' 



Total 11318 11842 

Charles St. John'B maj. 

XIV. DewttMajrwell 
£r e . ene 3t»9 3529 

L Ister tea 8485 

Total 12031 12014 

David M.Dcwftt's maj. 

17. 



Qainn Adannj XV. 



Perrv Adams 



Ell Perry. Dcm., ree'd Total l86 7o 17538 

6,108 votes. Eli Perry's inaj. 1,138. 

1S?4. 1878. 1870. 

tvit u'u-J b ^:J Ub - Adm ' Dem. Hep. 

l-.M.IJ'i^. H«K»>«T»wni»dTb»yer Sm:.rtWarr- n I>avU 
K. nss-Uor.. 10403 10197.. 9378 11475.. 12460 7361 
W a^hlngton 45jl_52J &.. 3974 636 0.. £%J£s 

uMo^^ w ^ 4 -r^:^ 1 ^ 



WaldoWillismsHeatonHaleRogeraWilliama 

Essex 3380 3216.. 1967 3707.. 2551 3058 

Warren ......2442 2284.. 1986 2852.. 2418 2491 

Total 8336 11251.. 8174 1 1025.. 9444 0272 

Andrew Williams '8 maj. 2,915 ; Robert S. Hale's 
maj. in 1872, 2,851 ; John Rogers's maj. in 1870, 172. 

XIX. SawyerWb.eelerCantwellWhee!erMoUWh ■ 1 

Franklin 1861 303*.. 2102 3443.. 2209 2994 

St.Lawrence.3692 9288.. 4463 11282.. 3490 10020 

Total W3 12323.. 6565 14725.. 5699 13020 

William A. Wheelers maj. 0,770; in 1872, 8,160; 
in 1870,7,321. 

XX. SanderoHathornJudsinHatliomCarrol! Marvin 

Fultn 2926 3498.. 3171 3384.. 2749 2859 

Hamilton .... 385 264.. 507 362.. 487 158 
Montgomery. 4218 3708.. 3989 4043.. 4222 3337 

Saratoga 4660 6548. .4738 7185. . 4955 5141 

Schenectady . 2994 1915. . 2351 2788.. 2415 "1895 

Total 15183 I5933--I475 6 1 7762.. 14828 13390 

Henry H. Hathonrs maj. 750; in 1872, 3.006; 
John M. Carroll's maj. in 1870, 1,438. Samuel 
McKean, Ind. Rep., had 2,286 votes in 1870. 

XXI. AllibenAlillerStuigei»WilburJuiu.ndPrindle 

Chenango.... 4173 5069.. 4378 5610.. 4081 5453 

Delaware 4345 4912.. 4523 5380.. 4472 5354 

Otsego .5913 .15 93 -. 6270 6378.. 5836 5945 

Total 14431 

Samuel F. Miller's" maj. 



15171 17368. .14380 167^2 
.c^,. 1,143; David Wilbur's 
maj. in 1872, 2,197 ; Elizur H.Prindle'B maj. in 
1870, 2,363. 

XXII. GravesBag!ey3'kw«y MerriamCorn w . Mer'm 

Herkimer ....4407 4774.. 4163 5480.. 4076 4953 
Jefferson ....5608 6873.. 5985 0451.. 5979 6862 
Lewis 3240 2744.. 3072 3406.. 2844 3048 



1 7337-- 12809 14863 
. L. Mcr- 



Total 1325=; 14391.. 13220 

George A. Bagley's maj. 1,136 ; 'CTihton 
riam'sniaj.in 1872,4,117; in 1870, 1,964. 

XX III. i.ordJiobeits^BermauRobertsW'paTe'- Roberts 

Oneida 11922 10496.. 10481 13284.. 10606 12322 

Scott Lord's maj. 1,426 ; Ellis H. Roberts's maj. 
in 1872,2.803; in 1870, 1,7:6. In 1874, Richard E. 
Sutton (Temp.) received 380 votes. 

XXIV. Wswnet i:akt-r FosterLansiiig'hoec'ftLariFing [ 

Madison 3944 ^323.. 4047 6060.. 3763 5464 

Oswego 7105 6800.. 0794 9350.. 6017 7980 

Total moo 12123.. 10841 15410.. 9780 13450 

William H. Baker's maj. 1,014 ; William E. 
Lansing's maj. in 1872. 4,^69; in 1870, 3,670. In 
1S70, Caleb Calkins (Temp.) received 593 votes. 

XXV. Cemst ckLeav'thHiscockDucll Mc n "thyDuell 

Cortland.... 2224 2951.. 2360 3658.. 1830 3^20 
Onondaga . .8934 11998. .10929 11799.. 8710 9434 

Total 1 1 158 14949.. 13289 15457. .10540 ]2Q=u 

Eilas W.Leavenworth's maj 3,791 ; R. Holland 
Duell's maj. in. 1872, 2,168 ; in 1870, 2,414. 

XXVI. WilsonMcD'gall r .TesMcD'gailDan'lBSeel'y 

Cayuga 4723 5897.. 5293 7510.. 481 1 7187 

Seneca 3m 2561.. 3010 2899.. 3086 2637 

Wayno .4023 4975-. 4016 6077.. 4237 54 52 

Total 11857 13433. .12325 16486. .12134 i^ 2 / 6 

Clinton D. MacDougalls maj. 1,576; in 1872, 
4,161 • John E. Seeley's maj. in 1870, 3,142. 

XX VII. I'ierpontu.pham Whit Lamp t . omst'kLamp't 
Livingston.. 3759 4229.. 3640 4579.. 3258 4347 

Ontario 4417 4465.. 41 7i 5562.-4234 5042 

iatca 1594 2120.. 1919 2745.. 1875 2726 

Total 97-0 10814.. 9730 12886.. 9367 121 15 

Elbridge G. Lapham's maj. 1,044; William H. 
Lamport's maj. in 1872, 3,156; in 1870, 2,748. In 
1874, S. B. Ayres (Temp.) received 1,163. 

X XVIII. J .nes Plata GoodrU hi'latt Apg rGoodrich 

Broome 4415 4681.. 4502 5719.. 3876 5114 

Sch yler — 2187 2048.. 2131 2451.. 2107 2511 

Tioga 3061 3651.. 3205 4153. • 3096 3902 

Tompkins... 3320 3386.. 3568 4280.. 2950 3944 

Total 13513 13766.. 13406 16603.. 12029 'M7 1 

Thomas C. Piatt's maj. 753; 101872,3.197; Milo 

Goodrich's maj. in 1870, 3,442. In 1874, Elbert W. 

Cook (Temp.) received 957. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18T6. 



49 



XXIX. Walker Hakes H«yt SmUnRobinsonSmith 

Allegany.... 3838 4582., 3158 5997-. 2744 5423 

Jhemung ,..4549 3313.. 395* 4270-. 4 n 7 35i8 

Steuben. . •. . .8633 6253.. 71=3 8471.. 6491 7335 



Total.. >.k 17020 14148.. 14262 18738. .13352 16276 
Charles C. B-. Walker's maj., 2,872 ; Horace B. 

Smith's maj., in 1872, 4,476; in 1870, 2,924. 

XXX. Angle Davy Gordon CI .rke White Clarke 

tf onroe .... 10004 9733.. 9913 12539.. 8805 10252 
Drleans .... 2518 3037. . 2557 3803. . 2382 3592 



Total 12522 12770. .12470 16342.. 11187 13844 

John M. Davy's maj., 248; Freeman Clarke *g 

naj. in 1872, 3,8-2 : in 1870, 2,657 ; Alphonso A. 

tfopkins (Temp.) received 675 votes '.n 1874. 

X X XI. BuekHoskinsSouth w. HoskiusShep d Wake . 

Genesee 2628 3155.. 2678 3995-. 2386 3766 

STiagara 4475 4760.. 4631 5271.. 4295 4818 

Wyoming... 2295 3408.. 2290 3967.. 2358 3550 



Total 9398 

George B. Hoskins'sma'jf. ,'1,925 ; in 1872', 3,634; 



11323.. 9599 13233^ . 9039 12134 



Beth Wakeman'smaj.in 1870,3,095, 

XXXII. Nicholls Bass Williams bass Williams Bass 
Erie I 497° 15968. .12813 17929. .15018 14415 

Lyman K. Bass's maj., 998 ; in 1872, 5,116 ; Wil- 
liam Williams's maj. in 1870, 603. 

XXXIII. AlienSessio^a.YlurraySessionsMurraySessions 

Cattaraugus 4990 4717.. 4006 5447.. 4089 4461 
Chautauqu a 7312 5742.. 5567 7475. . 5704 5709 

Total., ...12302 104S9.. 0573 12922.. 9793 10170 
Augustus F. Allen's maj., 1,843 ; Walter L. Ses- 
61008*8 maj. in 1872, 3,349 ; in 1870, 377. 

Vote for Senators. 
Wistrict. 1875. 1873. 1871. 

I. Bern. Rep. Bern. Rep. Bern. Rep. 

Counties. StephensPiinceThompson King Cock L'eane 

Queens 5259 5808.. 4259 5098.. 5728 3965 

Richmond. .2654 2893.. 2220 2302.. 2488 2092 

Suffolk 3920 4036.. 2760 3546.. 2674 3965 

Total 11833 J 2737.. 9239 10946.. 10890 10022 

L. Bradford Prince's maj. in 1775, 904 ; John A. 
iKing'smaj. in 1873, 1,707; Townsend D. Cock's 
maj. in 1871, 868. Barnabas F. Reeye received 594 
votes in 1875. 

II. Kings. Ken'dyRichards'n Coe Perry Pierce Perry 

Brooklyn,!. . . 1335 1107.. 1004 1199.. 629 574 

2.. 1269 289.. 870 334.. 2226 189 

" 3-- votes with III. Dist. 519 1350 

4..1143 862.. 865 895.. 890 1262 

5.. 2259 611.. 1992 817.. 3374 714 

7.. 2044 1842.. 1685 1758.. 1543 2252 

" 11. .1602 1458.. 1507 1304.. 1494 1802 

'* 13. 1245 105°.. 1400 1320.. 803 2224 

15..1159 1693.. 1470 1055.. 896 1697 

19.. 1204 1447.. 1127 1071.. 753 1458 

" 20.. 1452 1886.. 1121 1874.. 902 2420 



Total 14712 12845.. 13041 11627.. 14035 16002 

John R. Kennedy's maj. in 1875, 1,867; John 

W. Coe's maj. in 1873, 1,414 ; John C. Perry's maj. 

In 1871, 1,967. 

III. King*. JacobsCavanaghJacobsHenry Murphy V.Sicl. 



Brooklyn,*.. 861 

6. .1615 

8.. 1242 

" 9.. 1067 

' 10. .1792 

" 12.. 1690 

" 14.. 2071 

" 16.. 1840 

" 17.. 1778 

18..1013 

" 21.. 1294 

" 22.. 950 



Flatbush... 
Flatlands . . 
Gravesend . . 
New Utrecht 501 
New Lots. . . 309 



486 
774 

182 
142 



1334. . 
2435-. 

97°- • 

946.. 
I573-. 
1523.. 
1477. • 
1877.. 
1283.. 
1116.. 
1519.. 
1534.. 

896.. 

468.. 



;6 
1964 
801 
1384 
1760 
1906 
2042 
1509 
1311 

745 
1288 

835 
422 

345 
608 

533 
220 



1204.. with II. D. 

}i6.. 3444 1449 

1305 

1536 

3068 

3074 
1784 
1310 
1476 

552 



503. 
1144. 

674. 

776. 
1784. 
1348. 

718. 

1039.. 1812 
1162.. 957 

7^9.. new ward. 

360.. new ward. 

767.. new ward. 



558 

779 

2420 

307 
685 

1773 
1521 
824 
2321 
1062 



John C. Jacob's mal. In 1875, 39 ; in 1873, 3,c 
Henry C. Murphy's maj. in 1871, 6,565. 
IV. JV. Yrk. FoxMorrissey Fox Jones Tweed Rossa 



i Ass. Dist. 



,2504 
,1902 
,1808 
.2652 
,1612 



2674. 
2581., 
2325., 
3W9. 

2666. 



2856 

^397 
2470 

3735 
2238 



1840. 
1061. 
1674. 
1295. 



returned 
by Wards. 



Total 10478 13755. .13696 7633. .18706 6927 

John Morrissey's (Ahti-Tam.DemO maj. in 1875, 

3,277 ; John Fox's maj. in 1873, 6,063 : William M. 

Tweed's maj. in 1871, 11,779. 

V. pi. York. Nichoh Booth King Booth Norton Bened. 
5 Ass.Dist.,2949 2209.. 2211 2607.. 

7 " ..1570 2661.. 1737 i960., returned 
9 " ..2424 3772.. 2287 3646. .by Wards. 

13 " ..2501 3026.. # 2ii8 2577.. 

Total 9444 11668.. 83*,$ 10790. .10370 '1 5212 

James W. Booth's maj. in 1875, 2,224; in 1873, 
2,437 ; Erastus C. Benedict's maj.in 1871, 4,842. 

VI. K.York. Daly Baaden Gross Henck. Wolt. Weiss. 

8 Ass. Dist.. 2641 3896.. 3127 2645.. ; 

10 " ..1970 2938.. 2381 1676.. returned 
12 " ..2590 2572.. 2882 1693. .by Wards. 

14 " ..2273 1739.. 2061 1125.. 

Total 9474 11145. .10451 7139.. 7801 10226 

Casper A. Baaden's maj. in 1875, 1,671; Jacob 
A. Gross's maj. in 1873, 3,312; Augustus Weis- 
mann's maj. in 1871, 2,425. In 1871. Martin Nacht- 
man, Ind. Dem., received 4029 votes. 

VII. JVForfc.Ger'rdLaimb.Ledw. Ever»d Brad.O'Brie"n 

11 Ass.Dist..2i75 2890.. 1604 2863.. 

15 " ..2995 2002.. 3182 2204.. returned 

16 " ..3365 1546... 3603 2034.. by Wards. 

18 " -.3145 1220... 2408 3016.. 

Total 11680 7658.. 10707 10117.. 69^6 20292 

Joseph A. Monheimer, Dem., received 5,526 
votes. James W. Gerard's maj. over Laimbeer 
in 1875, 4,022 ; Thomas A. Ledwith's maj.in 1873, 
63o ; James O'Brien's maj. in 1871, 13,336. 

VIII. N.Y. Whee!erBixby Moore Pinck. Genet Tlem'n 

17 ASS. Dist. .3181 5422.. 3020 2909.. 

19 " ..1958 1921.. 1614 872.. returned 

20 " ..4325 5143.. 2638 3006.. by Wards. 

21 " . .4359 5i73- -2971 3202.. 

Total 13823 17659. .10243 9989. .12607 172.70 

Francis M. Bixby's" (Anti-Tam. Dem.) maj. in 

l8 75, 3,836 ; Hugh H. Moore's maj. in 1873, 254 ; 
Daniel F. Tiemann's maj. in 1871, 4,663. 

IX. MarshallRobt'nMarshallRobt'nCauldw.Robf'n 

Putnam 1231 1735.. 1207 1611.. 1224 1685 

Rockland. ...2146 1779.. 2295 1919.. 1943 2076 
Westchestei'934 9 10142.. 8255 10407.. 7184 1 :441 

Total 12726 13656.. 11757 13937.. 10351 16202 

Wm. H. Robertson's maj. in 1875, 930; in 1873, 
2,180 ; in 1871, 5,851.- 

X. Shuit St. John AbbottMadden Beebe Madd. 

Orange 7264 7024.. 6269 6531.. 5591 8299 

Sullivan 2229 3465.. 2702. 2382.. 3085 2462 



Total 9493 

Dan'l B. St. Jol 
bott's maj. in 1873, 58 ; Edward M.Ma'dden's maj. 




Total 20973 20934. .19710 15726. .21579 



10489.. 8971 8913.. 8676 10761 

ohn'smaj. in 1875, 996 ; Frank Ab- 

rdM. 

in 1871, 2,085. 

XI. MackinCarpenter Ray Hogeb.NekonPa'mer 
Columbia ...4287 5 I0 7«. 549° 4716.. 4292 "5367 
Dutchess.... 5725 8515.. 7296 6125.. 267 7764 

Total 10012 13622. .12786 10841 .4559 13131 

George N. Perry received 562 votes; B. Plait 
Carpenter's maj. in 1875, 3,610; Benjamin Pay's 
maj. in 1873, 1,945; Abiah W. Palmer's maj. in 
1871,8,572. 

XII. GibsonColemanParroent'rBnker RussellPaker 
Rensselaer. .9700 9898.. 9454 9552.. 9273 10060 
Washingto n.3612 .5469.. 4669 37 43.. 2975 6646 

Total 13312 1^367. .14123 13295.. 12248 16706 

Thomas Coleman s maj. in 1875, 2 <o=;5 ; Roswell 

A. Parmenter's maj. in 1873, 828 ; Isaac C. Baker, 

jr.'s maj. in 1871, 4,458. 



60- 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S7G. 



XIII Daylon Ha-rls Dayton F-aston Tracy Adams 

Albany... .14223 I447»..I34«« o ,, 3 r0 -'"Vi„i 3 $ 7 
Hamilton Harris's niaj. in 187 *. 249 : Jesse t . 
Darton'a ma). In 1873. 2.152 ; Charles H. Adams s 
maj. 101871, ot,6. ., 

\ IV s<hooinakerCooD<jllyVeechConn'yHardenb.Sand n 

C.reene 3486 2573.-3643 3'o>-- 3324 2822 

Ulster 7596 W24-. 047b 7285.- 7Q4» 75 ' 5 



Total 1 1082 8407. 



.iii6s 10337 



0407..10110 10385.. u »«»/ 

AuKastos SchoomakcrJr.'smaJ. in 1875, 2,58s; 
Henry c. Connelly's maj. in 1873, 266; Jacob 
Hardenb«rg , smaJ.lni87i,828 
ST. ItenedictWagner \\ agnetTullerW agn 

V,. It. ^r. on/1 > • 3I&V - 2o66 ■»!( 



Fulton and ( , 
Hamilton . P 183 
Montgoun'y .3302 

Saratoga 248: 

Bchencctady qooo 



3627. 

4088.. 
2530. 
6034.. 



2580.. 2966 3190 

190. 549 225 

3716.. 3293 4025 

5613.. 4008 6410 

2427.. 2221 2469 



Total 11656 16279.. 14526.. 13097 16319 

Webster Wagner's maj. in i«75. 2,623 ; in 1873, 
1 i.t,-'*5 ; in 1871,3,222. 

XVI. Wartwelt Tobey Gay Tobey Havens Ames 

( llnton 4083 3883.. 3652 3550.. 3^75 3872 

Kasex 2730 3183.. 898 3344.. 1 499 3° 2 2 

Warren 1927 24^5.. 1333 2103.. 2031 2443 




Total 6241 11466.. 3464 8090.. 4665 11590 

Darius A. Moore's maj. in 1875, 5,225; wells S. 
Dickinson's maj. in 1873,4,626; in 1871,6925. 

MarbuckHtrder.Middle'u Wmsl.l'onervVinsl 



XV11I. 

Jeflorson... .6164 
Lewis 3192 



6485. 
2563., 



4862 
2913 



4757.. 5684 
2115.. 2690 



7i37 
3008 



Total 0356 9048.. 7775 6872.. 8374 10145 

James F. Starbnck's maj. in 1871;, 308 ; Andrew 
C. Mlddlcton's maj. in 1873, 903; Norria Wins- 
low's maj. in 1871, 1,771. 

XIX. Brown ba%reArmst'g Lowr.Sandi'd Lowr. 

Oneida 10510 10865.. 8222 11051.. 9837 11428 

Theodore b. Sayre's maj. In 1875, 355 ; Samuel 
8. Lowery's maj. In 1873, 2,829; in 1871, 1,591. 
( h axles Avery received 386 votes in 1875. 

X X, L oniis Oiib»r: Avery McG wanScottMcGow. 

li'-rkimer.. .4196 4608.. 3496 4612.. 3671 4994 

Otsego .... ..6015 5589.. 499 4725.. 6 142 _5462 

Total 10211 10197 . 8486 9337.. 9813 10456 

David P. Loomis'smaj.in 1875, 14: Archibald 

C. MacGowan'smaJ.in 1873,851 ; in 1771, 643. 

X X I. JenkinsDodlttle Shoecraft Ke l'g Lewis Foster 
Madison ....3908 5002.. 3336 3585.-3235 5209 
Oswego . . . ..0050 6882.. 4 867_6o6i .^5685 7841 
Total .99^ 1 ,974. . 8203 9646. . 892o~liow 

ltcnjamin Doollttle's maj. In 1875, 2,016 ; Charles 
Kellogg s maj. In 1873, 1,443; William Foster's 
m*J. In 1871, 4,130. 

II. • ookstuvtr.McCarthy Mills Wood Porter Wood 



Cortland. .. .2502 2572 
Onondaga. ..7758 1108 



17 2971.. 1629 3180 
734 10450-. 6985 9425 

Total IQ 26o 13657.. 7w 13421.. 8614 1260; 

Dennis McCarthy a Win ,87? 3 39Y; Mantel 
P. Wood s maj In ,873, over NlillV.Vemp.,^ 671 • 

laVvo'teYft -i87? arlC8 °- Mm * T0mp ..**« 
AX I II. Lamont EngM'oum'.nkThomD.Yenm'nGra'ra 
f hcnango...3836 4478.. 3661 4268".. 3902 5565 
?M«r ar , e -" 4 "f ?3o..3589 4287.. 3917 5b65 
Schoharie.. ^26_^ 7 ^ Lj 6^_j3s^JS27 3021 

L^n^Z^C ** «! ^ames'H^a! 

Broome i>ch "^ rs « 1 ^^^»ylerSe sregMcVeilChafd 

TI^I" 8 lift #°"3*» 4046.. 33.6 4649 

Tomnkin.'"^ 3613..2499 30 5 0. . 2472 3906 
IM...3629 3709.. 2991 W 6.. 2226 36-3 



l0U1 "399 i»992.. B690 ,0132..' 8oITT^ 



John H. Sclkreg's maj. in 1875, 503; in 1873, 
M42j Thomas J. Cbatfield's maj. in 1871, 4,169. 

XXV. .DnrstonWoodin Cuyier VV'oodiuW yckolf >\ 'din 
'...5631 5637. . 4018 5303. . 4234 6883 
...4405 4793. . 3931 3Q34-. 3828 5299 



Cavurra. 

Wayne. 

Total 10036 10430.. 7949 8337.. 8062 12182 

William B. Woodin's raaj. in 1875, 394 ; in 1873, 

388 ; in 1871, 4,120. William P. Sisson received 577 

votes in 1875. 

XXVI. HammondHicks Johnson Woodw.Johns.Cleve'd 



Ontario 4753 

Seneca 2919 

Yates. .1851 

Total 9523 



4544- 
2341. 
2320. 



3858 
2600 
2008 



3988. . 3728 4456 
23°5-- 33ii 2418 
1999.. 25 27 1 728 

~86o2 



lumi yp-rj 920 <i. . 8466 8292.. 9566 

Stephen H. Hammond's maj. In 1875, 318; Wit 
iiam Johnson's maj. in 1873, 174; in 1871, 964. 
Stowell Powell received 520 votes in 1875. 

XXVII. Bradley Averlll BradleyFrisbieBradleyHarrow. 
Chemung ...4172 2908.. 4161 3595- • 3974 35^7 
Schuyl' r. .. 1811 1991.. 2023 1728.. 2160 2216 
Steuben — .7383 5807.. 7851 5853.. 6735 7193 

Total 13366 10796. .14035 11176. .12869 12976 

George B. Bradley's maj. in 1875, 2,570 ; in 1S73, 
2.8vj j Gabriel T. Harrower's maj. in 1871, 107. 

XXVlII.LambertonEmer--OnLord Decker Lord Kelly 

Monroe 9247 10801.. 10733 7349. .10225 83X3 

William N. Emerson's maj. in 1875, 1554; Jarvis 
Lord's maj. in 1873, 3*3 8 4 ; in 1871, 1,872. Scatter- 
ing in 1875,221. 

XXIX. Graves Cole Copelnnd Cole Bissell Bowen 

Genesee 2642 3411.. 1540 2626.. 2234 3238 

Niagara 4508 4306.. 3264 3992.. 3913 4509 

Orleans . . . . .1783 2943.. 1569 2506.. 2255 3347 

Total 8033 10660.. 6373 9124.. 8402 11094 

Dan H. Cole^s maj. in 1875, 1,727 ; in 1873, 2,7^1 ; 

George Bowen's maj. in 1871, 2,692. Albert F. 

Brown rece.ved 536 votes in 1875. 

XXX. Kneelsnd v\ ellmanFar urn viTellm.HardingWood 
Allegany — 2^69 4934.. 2784 4223.. 2417 5238 
Livingston.. 3519 4031.. 2609 3644.. 3398 4317 
Wyoming.. ..1903 3178.. 1777 26 00.. 1910 3427 

Total 7991 12143.. 7170 10467.. 7725 12982 

Abijah J. Wellman's maj. in 187^, 4,152 ; in 1873, 
3.297; James Wood's maj. in 1871,5,257. 

XXXI. Torrance Rogers Ganson Lewis Fa<-go Lewis 
Erie 14477 18031.. 13873 13165.. 12999 14844 

Sherman S. Roger's maj. in 1875, 3,554 : John 
Ganson's maj. in 1873, 708 ; Loren L. Lewis's maj. 
in 1871. 1,845. 

XXXII. Breed Vedder Brown Dow Stowell Allen 
Cattaraugus4375 5°57-. 3087 4282.. 3155 4596 
Chautauqua 48 97 5 5 08.. 4000 5 263.. 3270 0105 

Total 9272 ios6s;.. 7087 9545.. 6425 10701 

Commodore P. Vedder's maj. in 187c;, 1,293 ; Al- 
bert G. Dow's maj. In 1873, 2458 ; Norman M. Al- 
len's maj. in 1871, 4,276. 



ASSEMBLYJIEN; 
1875. Republican. 



VOTE FOR 

Deynocratic. 
ALBANY CO. 

1 Jurian Winne ...2844'3i35 Peter Slingerland* 

2 Thos.D.Colemanny) 3642 W.M.V an Antwerp. 

3 Wm. J. Maker. ..4<x)7 3666 Chas. D. Kathbone. 

4 Edward Curran.,3643 3724 Alfred LeRoy. 
ALLEGANY. | 

M. J. Titus 2046 4899 Sumner Baldwin. 

BROOME. 553 

Rodney A. .Ford. 4931 '4101 Marvin Canniff. 

_ . I 100 David Hoag.t 

CATTARAUGUS. | 

1 S. N. Wood 2202 2300 Harrison Cheney. 

2 A. F. Bennett... 2160 2771 Edgar Shannon. 
CAYUGA. I 

1 C.S.Beardsleyjr*2766 3026 George T. Post. 

I 211 IIowcllB.Couverset 

2 S. Edwin Day. ...2691 2763 ,ohn S. Broicn. 
\ 493 Edwin B. Marvin.f 



CHAUTAUQUA. 
Wm. 7f.m,itne?/ 



21 16 1978 Otis D. Hinklcy. 



2 Franklin Burritt. 3067 3337 Theodore A. Case* 



m rTiii nil ■■ r 



raf ii num. r»wr»wi ■■».,. r^<i» 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S76. 



61 



CHEMUNG, f 

Edmutid Miller. , ,4091 323:1 Alex. S. Diven. 
CHENANGO. I 

Dan'l M. Holmes*3823 4514 Isaac Plumb. 

I 264 .<Eneas L. Ensign. f 
pLINTON. 

Pat. H. Myers... 367a 4271 Shepard P.Bowen* 
COLUMBIA. I 

|i Gros.B.Rossman. 2326:2709 Geo.IT. Power. 
b John C.llubbard.2070 2305 John T.Kogeboom. 
PORTLAND. I 

I JudsonC. Nelson. 2759 2646 George L. "Waters. 
DELAWARE. I 

1 GabrielS. Mead. 1998 2322 Geo. D.Wheeler. 
|2 /. //. Ifayn.rd. .2SS3 2004 Geo. G. Decker.* 
SUTCHESS. 

John A. Fitch 



2 John Hackett. 



3035 '3839 Thomas Hammond. 
I 319 George K. Tabor.f 
3326 3845 Dewilt Webb. 

292 Henry D. My ers.t 
pRIE. 

1 Corn. Donohue..3568|365i Daniel Cruice. 
i2A.A.Vandenburgh27io;3904 Wm.W. Lawson.* 

3 Henry R. Jones.. 3095 4963 Edio. Gallagher.* 

4 Chas. F. 7'a6o/ , ..2475 ! 2i66Chas. A. Clark. 

k Bsrtr'd Chaffee.. 2^,2817 Wm. A. Johnson.* 

ESSEX. 

L Edw.'F.Edgerly. 2604 3357 Fm. E. Calk ins.* 

RRANKLIN. 



F. D. Flanders... 2245 

i"ULTON & HAMIL'N. 

John J. Hanson. .3345 

ienesee: 

A. B. Rathbonc.2732 

JREENE. 
Burton G. Morss 3352 

IERKIMER. 
Chann.Matthews432i 



2853 John J. Gilbert. 

3256 Demmon S.Decker. 
295 John McLaren.t 

3332 Newton 77. Green.* 
23 Harry Lathrop.f 

2632 Martin S. Miller. 
216 Edw'd D. Warner.f 

4473 Myron A. McKee. 
457 William Gates. t 



TCFFERSON. 

1 Andrew Smith. . .2563 3118 Lotus Ingalls. 

2 Lansing Becker.. 3698: 3312 George E. Yost.* 
QNGS. 

1 Daniel Bradley* .4320] No opposition. 

2 B E. Valentine.. 29701 3645 Jonathan Ogden. 

3 Michae: Coffey* . 4265:217s Jas. M. B. Cnilds. 

4 T. V.P. Talmadge* 594414583 Tunis. G.Bergen, jr. 

5 J. W. Ridgeway.32i5i405i^lMfo;i P. Jliggins. 

6 John Maerz 2986J3074 Jacob Worth.* 

7 Chan. L. Lyon... 3746(2734 Joseph R. Thomas. 

8 Ber'dSilverman*3762|4^56^1dr an M.Suydam. 
6078 William J.Cropscy. 



9 JohnMcGroartyoido 
.EWIS. 
Alex. H. Crosby.. 2891 

.IVINGSTON. 

Jas.Faulkner,jr*3&s,6 
UADISON. 

1 Russell Hazzard.1473 

2 George Berry*.. .Z451 



2879 Henry J.Botchford. 
55 Rosw. F. Murrayf. 

3737 Hugh W. McNair. 

2599 Morris N. Campbell 
15 Orl. Woodward.! 

2501 Fred'k C. Fiske. 
42 Chas. O. Chester .t 



MONROE. 

1 Homer C.Ely.... 1905! 2 W4 Willard Hodges, 

"52 Lyman Wall, t 

2 R. H. Schooley ..4142 6474 James S. Graham. 

I 52 Lyman C. Hough. t 

3 Alex. P. Butts... 22331 2 5"9 Heman Glass. 

107 George B. Spcrry.t 
MONTGOMERY. 
Geo. M. Voorhee8.279S 

NEW YORK. 

1 Nich. Muller*.... 3696 
Mich'l Madiganj.1338 

2 Wm. P. Kirk*... 2021 
Felix MurphyX.. 2426 

3 Jas. J. Slevin ....2144 
Jas. W. Graves*.. 1947 

4 John Galvin 3299 

John Sullivan*... 1890 



153 
696 



3547 Harmon Wendell. 
191 Ebenezer Howard.! 

No opposition. 

No opposition. 

No opposition. 

794 E. W. Thompson. 



5 Jas. F. Cavafragh.2208 '2299 
DavidS. Page*.. 675 

6 Matthew Patten.. 2258 
Mich'l Healey* . .1401 

7 C. A. H. Bartlett. 1359 2734 
Thos-. J. Gibbons* 225I 

8 Chas. Gaussman..2523 3074 
A. Etterich* 982; 

9 Benj.F.Vosburg. 2729 3373 
Petr. Mortimer*. 395; 

10 John Guth 21212669 

11 Alfred Pell 17263433 

Mich'l Jacobs*... 461 j 

12 J. E.Newburger. 2116,2290 
John Monks* 787; 

13 James Daly* 213V3157 

M. Gallagher*.... 3161 

14 John A. Foley... 17^9 
P. J. CartyX 2213 

15 M.P. Killi an 28372292 

Thos. Costigan*J.i579 

16 F. H. Churchill.. 2778 
Geo. Y. Whitso-nX. 3582 

17 Pat'k J.Kennedy. 2 =.94 '3439 
Geo. W.Plunkett*266i 

2301 



iS Steph.J. O'Jlare.2494 
Mich'l. J.Murphy* 197 

19 Jas. T. King 1898 

AnthonyFeeh:m*i853 

20 Orlan. L.Stewart 39^3 4336 
Geo. R. Phillips. 1061 

21 Jos. P. Fallon... 40& 4011 
Elias J.Pattison*i432 

NIAGARA. 

1 Amos A. Bissell.. 2709 2167 

162 

2 Henry F. Pierce. 1835 21 19 

92 
ONEIDA. 

1 R. U. Sherman* . 328312918 

195 

2 Silas T. Ives 1984 1 3049 

73 

3 J. H. Flanagan. 2575J2452 

I 71 

4 Walter Bdlou.... 2505 2284 

127 
ONONDAGA. 

1 Wm.Kirkpatr.CK 2660:3599 

188 

2 Horace K. King.. 307413510 

! 85 

3 Marshall R.Dyer 3153 



Geo. W. Belts. 
John J. Tobin.* 

A.Lahr. . 

Isaac I. Hayes. 

Fred'k Gugeljr. 

Andr. J. Campbell. 

Jos. Hoffman, jr. 
Chas.A.PeabodyJr. 

Archibald Watts. 

Robt.H.Strahan. 

No opposition. 

C. F. Tietjen. 

No opposition. 

William T. Graff. 

Bernard Biglin. 

No opposition. 

I. A. Englehardt. 

Rufus B. Cowing. 



ONTARIO. 

1 Seth Stanley 2534 

2 Hiram Maxfleld .2496 

ORANGE. 

1 T.N. Hulse 3*44 

2 John H. Reeve . . .4010 

ORLEANS. 

John Pratt 2115 

OSWEGO. 

1 David H.j udson 2179 

2 Wm.B. Howard.. 1981 

3 G.F.Woodbury. 1974 

OTSEGO. 

1 Jas. S.Davenport 3133 

2 Geo. Scramling . .3098 

PUTNAM. 

E. C.Howes 1105 

QUEENS. 

1 Tow ns'dD. Cock. 2725 

2 Alvan T. Payne..^^ 



3364 
126 

2142 

137 

2124 

in 

3568 

3375 
178 

2781 
291 

2519 
2696 
2257 

2486 
100 

2619 
368 



42 

2192 

24 

2513 

U5 



James F. Fitts. 
Jos . W.Grosvenor.f 
Jonas W. Brown. ' 
Benj. S. Laughlin.t 

Arthur B. Johnson. 
Timothy Parker.t 
Syiv. Gridley. 
Silas Purdy.t 
Curtis J. Wright. 
Jas. C. Longland.f 
Geo. B. Anderson. 
Otis P. White. t 

Allen Munroe. 
S. H. Hinsdale.! 
Carroll E. S rith. 
Calv. McCarthy.! 
C. Fredrick Herbst. 
Mathias Smith.! 

Volney Edgerton. 
A. B. Smith.! 
John Raines, jr. 
Stepb.A.Codding.T 

Thos. W. Bradley * 
F. M. Cummings. 
Wisner.! 

J. Drake Billings. 
Tunis H. Coe.!. 

Geo. B. Sloan. 
Thos.W. Green. 
John Freston. 

Wm. L. Brown. 
John Judd.! 
Meigs Case. 
Henry Wheeler.! 

Hamilton Fishjr. 
Samuel K. Ferris.! 

John M. Clark. 
S. W. Albertson.! 
John McAloney. 
D.K. Elmendorf.! 



M 

HEN8SELAKR. 

i Wm. y- ciftrv*. 3890 3528 Samuel W. Perry. 
John J. Grace*. .1398 „, „ „, ., 

2 LacliK K. Green. 2241 2969 Wm. F. Taylor,* 

3 Joseph "Lord 2508 28^3 Thou. B, Simmons. 

RICHMOND. „ „ _ 

John Dicker 2620 2875 An. 5. Townsend. 

RO* K.LAND. . w „ m 

r,Vo. U*. HVfan*.. 2375 1619 John W. Ferdon. 
SARATOGA. ^ 

1 Geo. A. Ensign. .240s 3006 Oeorge West* 

2 Anson M. Hovce.2372 2949 Isaac Noyes, jr. 
SCHENECTADY. 

Jacob I).Wemple2396 2597 Emmelt O'Aeill. 
BCH0HABD3. 

John M. Rosce*.y^i 2995 Jas. Harroway. 
BCHUYL8B. 

William II. Fish* 1671 216=; William Gulick. 
1 323 Charles Prince. t 
SENECA. 

Lewis Pott 2764 2461 Geo. H. McClellan. 

STEIBEN.